embed pdf in mvc view : Convert pdf to html code for email control SDK platform web page wpf html web browser ltxprimer-1.01-part1289

I
.2. S
IMPLE TYPESETTING
11
I
.2.4. Accents
Sometimes, especially when typing foreign words in English, we need to put different
types of accents over the letters. The table below shows the accents available in LAT
E
X.
Each column shows some of the accents and the inputs to generate them.
`o
\‘o
´o
\’o
ˆo
\ˆo
˜o
\˜o
¯o
\=o
˙o
\.o
¨o
\"o
\c c
˘o
\u o
ˇo
\v o
˝o
\H o
o
\d o
o
¯
\b o
oo
\t oo
The letters i and j need special treatment with regard to accents, since they should not
have their customary dots when accented. The commands
\i
and
\j
produce dot-less i
and j as ı and j. Thus to get
´
El est ´a aqu´ı
you must type
\’{E}l est\’{a} aqu\’{\i}
Some symbols from non-English languages are also available in LAT
E
X, as shown in
the table below:
œ
\oe
Œ
\OE
æ
\ae
Æ
\AE
\aa
\AA
ø
\o
Ø
\O
ł
\l
Ł
\L
ß
\ss
¡
!‘
¿
?‘
I
.2.5. Special symbols
We have see that the input
\LaTeX
produces LAT
E
Xin the output and
\
produces a space.
Thus T
E
Xuses the symbol
\
for a special purpose—to indicate the program that what
follows is not text to be typeset but an instruction to be carried out. So what if you
want to get \ in your output (improbable as it may be)? The command
\textbackslash
produces \ in the output.
Thus
\
is a symbol which has a special meaning for T
E
Xand cannot be produced by
direct input. As another example of such a special symbol, see what is obtained from the
input below
Maybe I have now learnt about 1% of \LaTeX.
You only get
Maybe I have now learnt about 1
What happened to the rest of the line? You see, T
E
Xuses the per cent symbol
%
as the
comment character; that is a symbol which tells T
E
Xto consider the text following as
‘comments’ and not as text to be typeset. This is especially useful for a T
E
Xprogrammer
to explain a particularly sticky bit of code to others (and perhaps to himself). Even for
ordinary users, this comes in handy, to keep a ‘to do’ list within the document itself for
example.
But then, how do you get a percent sign in the output? Just type
\%
as in
Convert pdf to html code for email - control SDK platform:C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
How to Convert PDF to HTML Webpage with C# PDF Conversion SDK
www.rasteredge.com
Convert pdf to html code for email - control SDK platform:VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
PDF to HTML Webpage Converter SDK for VB.NET PDF to HTML Conversion
www.rasteredge.com
12
I
. T
HE
B
ASICS
Maybe I have now learnt about 1\% of \LaTeX.
The symbols
\
and
%
are just two of the ten charcaters T
E
Xreserves for its internal
use. The complete list is
˜ # $ % ˆ & _ \ { }
We have seen how T
E
Xuses two of these symbols (or is it four? Did not we use
{ }
in
one of our examples?) The use of others we will see as we proceed.
Also, we have noted that
\
is produced in the output by the command
\textbackslash
and
%
is produced by
\%
.What about the other symbols? The table below gives the inputs
to produce these symbols.
˜
\textasciitilde
&
\&
#
\#
\_
$
\$
\
\textbackslash
%
\%
{
\{
ˆ
\textasciicircum
}
\}
You can see that except for three, all special symbols are produced by preceding them
with a
\
. Of the exceptional three, we have seen that
and
are used for producing
accents. So what does
\\
do? It is used to break lines. For example,
This is the first line.\\ This is the second line
produces
This is the first line.
This is the second line
We can also give an optional argument to
\\
to increase the vertical distance between the
lines. For example,
This is the first line.\\[10pt]
This is the second line
gives
This is the first line.
This is the second line
Now there is an extra 10 points of space between the lines (1 point is about 1/72
nd
of an
inch).
I
.2.6. Text positioning
We have seen that T
E
Xaligns text in its own way, regardless of the way text is formatted
in the input file. Now suppose you want to typeset something like this
The T
E
Xnical Institute
Certificate
This is to certify that Mr. N. O. Vice has undergone a course at this institute
and is qualified to be a T
E
Xnician.
The Director
The T
E
Xnical Institute
This is produced by
control SDK platform:VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
VB.NET class source code for .NET framework. This VB.NET PDF to Word converter control is a and mature .NET solution which aims to convert PDF document to Word
www.rasteredge.com
control SDK platform:C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
Convert PDF to multiple MS Word formats such as .doc and Password protected PDF file can be printed to Word C# source code is available for copying and using
www.rasteredge.com
I
.3. F
ONTS
13
\begin{center}
The \TeX nical Institute\\[.75cm]
Certificate
\end{center}
\noindent This is to certify that Mr. N. O. Vice has undergone a
course at this institute and is qualified to be a \TeX nician.
\begin{flushright}
The Director\\
The \TeX nical Institute
\end{flushright}
Here, the commands
\begin{center} ... \end{center}
typesets the text between them exactly at the center of the page and the commands
\begin{flushright} ... \end{flushright}
typesets text flush with the right margin. The corresponding commands
\begin{flushleft} ... \end{flushleft}
places the enclosed text flush with the left margin. (Change the
flushright
to
flushleft
and see what happens to the output.)
These examples are an illustration of a LAT
E
Xconstruct called an environment, which
is of the form
\begin{
name
} ... \end{
name
}
where name is the name of the environment. We have seen an example of an environment
at the very beginning of this chapter (though not identified as such), namely the
document
environment.
I
.3. F
ONTS
The actual letters and symbols (collectively called type) that LAT
E
X(or any other typeset-
ting system) produces are characterized by their style and size. For example, in this book
emphasized text is given in italic style and the example inputs are given in
typewriter
style. We can also produce
smaller
and
bigger
type. A set of types of a particular style
and size is called a font.
I
.3.1. Type style
In LAT
E
X, a type style is specified by family, series and shape. They are shown in the table
I
.1.
Any type style in the output is a combination of these three characteristics. For exam-
ple, by default we get roman family, medium series, upright shape type style in a LAT
E
X
output. The
\textit
command produces roman family, medium series, italic shape type.
Again, the command
\textbf
produces roman family, boldface series, upright shape type.
We can combine these commands to produce a wide variety of type styles. For exam-
ple, the input
\textsf{\textbf{sans serif family, boldface series, upright shape}}
\textrm{\textsl{roman family, medium series, slanted shape}}
control SDK platform:C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
Free online Word to PDF converter without email. C#.NET Sample Code: Convert Word to PDF in C#.NET Project. Add necessary references:
www.rasteredge.com
control SDK platform:VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to
NET, VB.NET convert PDF to HTML, VB.NET Convert multiple pages PowerPoint to fillable and editable PDF Create PDF file from PowerPoint free online without email.
www.rasteredge.com
14
I
. T
HE
B
ASICS
Table
I
.1:
STYLE
C
OMMAND
FAMILY
roman
\textrm{roman}
sans serif
\textsf{sans serif}
typewriter
\texttt{typewriter}
SERIES
medium
\textmd{medium}
boldface
\textbf{boldface}
SHAPE
upright
\textup{upright}
italic
\textit{italic}
slanted
\textsl{slanted}
SMALL CAP
\textsc{small cap}
produces the output shown below:
sans serif family, boldface series, upright shape
roman family, medium series, slanted shape
Some of these type styles may not be available in your computer. In that case, LAT
E
X
gives a warning message on compilation and substitutes another available type style
which it thinks is a close approximation to what you had requested.
We can now tell the whole story of the
\emph
command. We have seen that it usually,
that is when we are in the middle of normal (upright) text, it produces italic shape. But if
the current type shape is slanted or italic, then it switches to upright shape. Also, it uses
the family and series of the current font. Thus
\textit{A polygon of three sides is called a \emph{triangle} and a
polygon of four sides is called a \emph{quadrilateral}}
gives
Apolygon of three sides is called a triangle and a polygon of four sides is called a quadrilateral
while the input
\textbf{A polygon of three sides is called a
\emph{triangle} and a polygon of four sides is called a
\emph{quadrilateral}}
produces
Apolygon of three sides is called a triangle and a polygon of four sides is called a quadrilateral
Each of these type style changing commands has an alternate form as a declaration.
For example, instead of
\textbf{boldface}
you can also type
{\bfseries boldface}
to
get boldface. Note that that not only the name of the command, but its usage also is
different. For example, to typeset
control SDK platform:VB.NET Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF
Jpeg images Viewer, C# HTML Document Viewer for Sharepoint, C# HTML Document Viewer for Azure, C# HTML Document Viewer Convert Excel to PDF document free
www.rasteredge.com
control SDK platform:VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
in VB.NET, VB.NET convert PDF to HTML, VB.NET Convert Word to PDF file with embedded fonts or without original Free online Word to PDF converter without email.
www.rasteredge.com
I
.4. T
YPE SIZE
15
By a triangle, we mean a polygon of three sides.
if you type
By a \bfseries{triangle}, we mean a polygon of three sides.
you will end up with
By a triangle, we mean a polygon of three sides.
Thus to make the declaration act upon a specific piece of text (and no more), the decla-
ration and the text should be enclosed in braces.
The table below completes the one given earlier, by giving also the declarations to
produce type style changes.
STYLE
C
OMMAND
D
ECLARATION
SHAPE
upright
\textup{upright}
{\upshape upright}
italic
\textit{italic}
{\itshape italic}
slanted
\textsl{slanted}
{\slshape slanted}
SMALL CAP
\textsc{small cap}
{\scshape small cap}
SERIES
medium
\textmd{medium}
{\mdseries medium}
boldface
\textbf{boldface}
{\bfseries boldface}
FAMILY
roman
\textrm{roman}
{\rmfamily roman}
sans serif
\textsf{sans serif}
{\sffamily sans serif}
typewriter
\texttt{typewriter}
{\ttfamily typewriter}
These declaration names can also be used as environment names. Thus to type-
set a long passage in, say, sans serif, just enclose the passage within the commands
\begin{sffmily} ... \end{sffamily}
.
I
.4. T
YPE SIZE
Traditionally, type size is measured in (printer) points. The default type that T
E
Xpro-
duces is of 10 pt size. There are some declarations (ten, to be precise) provided in LAT
E
X
for changing the type size. They are given in the following table:
size
{\tiny size}
size
{\large size}
size
{\scriptsize size}
size
{\Large size}
size
{\footnotesize size}
size
{\LARGE size}
size
{\small size}
size
{\huge size}
size
{\normalsize size}
size
{\Huge size}
Note that the
\normalsize
corresponds to the size we get by default and the sizes form
an ordered sequence with
\tiny
producing the smallest and
\Huge
producing the largest.
Unlike the style changing commands, there are no command-with-one-argument forms
for these declarations.
We can combine style changes with size changes. For example, the “certificate” we
typed earlier can now be ‘improved’ as follows
\begin{center}
{\bfseries\huge The \TeX nical Institute}\\[1cm]
{\scshape\LARGE Certificate}
control SDK platform:C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF
email. C# source code is provided for .NET WinForms class. Evaluation PDF library and components for .NET framework. C#.NET Demo Code: Convert PowerPoint to PDF
www.rasteredge.com
control SDK platform:.NET RasterEdge XImage.Barcode Generator Purchase Details
QR Code. Micro QR Code. PDF 417. Online Convert PDF to Html. SUPPORT: Customer Support; Comprehensive Online Demos; SDK Class API Reference; PURCHASE; COMPANY.
www.rasteredge.com
16
I
. T
HE
B
ASICS
\end{center}
\noindent This is to certify that Mr. N. O. Vice has undergone a
course at this institute and is qualified to be a \TeX nical Expert.
\begin{flushright}
{\sffamily The Director\\
The \TeX nical Institute}
\end{flushright}
and this produces
The T
E
Xnical Institute
C
ERTIFICATE
This is to certify that Mr. N. O. Vice has undergone a course at this institute and is
qualified to be a T
E
Xnical Expert.
The Director
The T
E
Xnical Institute
control SDK platform:C# Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF in C#
Free online Excel to PDF converter without email. Quick integrate online C# source code into .NET class. C# Demo Code: Convert Excel to PDF in Visual C# .NET
www.rasteredge.com
control SDK platform:Purchase RasterEdge Product License Online
PDF, Microsoft Word, Excel, PowerPoint, HTML, Open Office NET imaging SDK to view, convert, process, transform from raster images, like jpeg, tiff, scanned pdf.
www.rasteredge.com
TUTORIAL II
THE DOCUMENT
II
.1. D
OCUMENT CLASS
We now describe how an entire document with chapters and sections and other embellish-
ments can be produced with LAT
E
X. We have seen that all LAT
E
Xfiles should begin by spec-
ifying the kind of document to be produced, using the command
\documentclass{... }
.
We’ve also noted that for a short article (which can actually turn out to be quite long!) we
write
\documentclass{article}
and for books, we write
\documentclass{book}
. There
are other document classes available in LAT
E
X such as
report
and
letter
. All of them
share some common features and there are features specific to each.
In addition to specifying the type of document (which we must do, since LAT
E
X has
no default document class), we can also specify some options which modify the default
format.Thus the actual syntax of the
\documentclass
command is
\documentclass[
options
]{
class
}
Note that options are given in square brackets and not braces. (This is often the
case with LAT
E
X commands—options are specified within square brackets, after which
mandatory arguments are given within braces.)
II
.1.1. Font size
We can select the size of the font for the normal text in the entire document with one of
the options
10pt
11pt
12pt
Thus we can say
\documentclass[11pt]{article}
to set the normal text in our document in 11 pt size. The default is
10pt
and so this is the
size we get, if we do not specify any font-size option.
II
.1.2. Paper size
We know that LAT
E
Xhas its own method of breaking lines to make paragraphs. It also has
methods to make vertical breaks to produce different pages of output. For these breaks
to work properly, it must know the width and height of the paper used. The various
options for selecting the paper size are given below:
letterpaper
11×8.5 in
a4paper
20.7×21in
legalpaper
14×8.5 in
a5paper
21×14.8 in
executivepaper
10.5×7.25 in
b5paper
25×17.6 in
Normally, the longer dimension is the vertical one—that is, the height of the page. The
default is
letterpaper
.
17
18
II
. T
HE
D
OCUMENT
II
.1.3. Page formats
There are options for setting the contents of each page in a single column (as is usual) or
in two columns (as in most dictionaries). This is set by the options
onecolumn
twocolumn
and the default is
onecolumn
.
There is also an option to specify whether the document will be finally printed on just
one side of each paper or on both sides. The names of the options are
oneside
twoside
One of the differences is that with the
twoside
option, page numbers are printed on
the right on odd-numbered pages and on the left on even numbered pages, so that when
these printed back to back, the numbers are always on the outside, for better visibility.
(Note that LAT
E
Xhas no control over the actual printing. It only makes the formats for
different types of printing.) The default is
oneside
for
article
,
report
and
letter
and
twoside
for
book
.
In the
report
and
book
class there is a provision to specify the different chapters (we
will soon see how). Chapters always begin on a new page, leaving blank space in the
previous page, if necessary. With the
book
class there is the additional restriction that
chapters begin only on odd-numbered pages, leaving an entire page blank, if need be.
Such behavior is controlled by the options,
openany
openright
The default is
openany
for
reportclass
(so that chapters begin on “any” new page)
and
openright
for the
book
class (so that chapters begin only on new
right
,that is, odd
numbered, page).
There is also a provision in LAT
E
Xfor formatting the “title” (the name of the docu-
ment, author(s) and so on) of a document with special typographic consideration. In the
article
class, this part of the document is printed along with the text following on the
first page, while for
report
and
book
,a separate title page is printed. These are set by the
options
notitlepage
titlepage
As noted above, the default is
notitlepage
for
article
and
titlepage
for
report
and
book
. As with the other options, the default behavior can be overruled by explicitly
specifying an option with the
documentclass
command.
There are some other options to the
documentclass
which we will discuss in the rele-
vant context.
II
.2. P
AGE STYLE
Having decided on the overall appearance of the document through the
\documentclass
command with its various options, we next see how we can set the style for the individual
pages. In LAT
E
Xparlance, each page has a “head” and “foot” usually containing such
information as the current page number or the current chapter or section. Just what goes
where is set by the command
\pagestyle{...}
where the mandatory argument can be any one of the following styles
plain
empty
headings
myheadings
The behavior pertaining to each of these is given below:
II
.3. P
AGE NUMBERING
19
plain The page head is empty and the foot contains just the page number, cen-
tered with respect to the width of the text. This is the default for the
article
class if no
\pagestyle
is specified in the preamble.
empty Both the head and foot are empty. In particular, no page numbers are
printed.
headings This is the default for the
book
class. The foot is empty and the head
contains the page number and names of the chapter section or subsection,
depending on the document class and its options as given below:
CLASS
OPTION
LEFT PAGE
RIGHT PAGE
book, report
one-sided
chapter
two-sided
chapter
section
article
one-sided
section
two-sided
section
subsection
myheadings The same as
headings
, except that the ‘section’ information in the head
are not predetermined, but to be given explicitly using the commands
\markright
or
\markboth
as described below.
Moreover, we can customize the style for the current page only using the command
\thispagestyle{
style
}
where style is the name of one of the styles above. For example, the page number may
be suppressed for the current page alone by the command
\thispagestyle{empty}
.Note
that only the printing of the page number is suppressed. The next page will be numbered
with the next number and so on.
II
.2.1. Heading declarations
As we mentioned above, in the page style
myheadings
, we have to specify the text to
appear on the head of every page. It is done with one of the commands
\markboth{
left head
{
right head
}
\markright{
right head
}
where left head is the text to appear in the head on left-hand pages and right head is the
text to appear on the right-hand pages.
The
\markboth
command is used with the
twoside
option with even numbered pages
considered to be on the left and odd numbered pages on the right. With
oneside
option,
all pages are considered to be right-handed and so in this case, the command
\markright
can be used. These commands can also be used to override the default head set by the
headings
style.
Note that these give only a limited control over the head and foot. since the general
format, including the font used and the placement of the page number, is fixed by LAT
E
X.
Better customization of the head and foot are offered by the package fancyhdr, which is
included in most L
A
T
E
Xdistributions.
II
.3. P
AGE NUMBERING
The style of page numbers can be specified by the command
\pagenumbering{...}
The possible arguments to this command and the resulting style of the numbers are given
below:
20
II
. T
HE
D
OCUMENT
arabic
Indo-Arabic numerals
roman
lowercase Roman numerals
Roman
upper case Roman numerals
alph
lowercase English letters
Alph
uppercase English letters
The default value is
arabic
.This command resets the page counter. Thus for example, to
number all the pages in the ‘Preface’ with lowercase Roman numerals and the rest of the
document with Indo-Arabic numerals, declare
\pagenumbering{roman}
at the beginning
of the Preface and issue the command
\pagestyle{arabic}
immediately after the first
\chapter
command. (The
\chapter{...}
command starts a new chapter. We will come
to it soon.)
We can make the pages start with any number we want by the command
\setcounter{page}{
number
}
where number is the page number we wish the current page to have.
II
.4. F
ORMATTING LENGTHS
Each page that LAT
E
Xproduces consists not only of a head and foot as discussed above
but also a body (surprise!) containing the actual text. In formatting a page, LAT
E
Xuses
the width and heights of these parts of the page and various other lengths such as the
left and right margins. The values of these lengths are set by the paper size options and
the page format and style commands. For example, the page layout with values of these
lengths for an odd page and even in this book are separately shown below.
These lengths can all be changed with the command
\setlength
.For example,
\setlength{\textwidth}{15cm}
makes the width of text 15cm. The package geometry gives easier interfaces to customize
page format.
II
.5. P
ARTS OF A DOCUMENT
We now turn our attention to the contents of the document itself. Documents (especially
longer ones) are divided into chapters, sections and so on. There may be a title part
(sometimes even a separate title page) and an abstract. All these require special typo-
graphic considerations and LAT
E
Xhas a number of features which automate this task.
II
.5.1. Title
The “title” part of a document usually consists of the name of the document, the name
of author(s) and sometimes a date. To produce a title, we make use of the commands
\title{
document name
}
\author{
author names
}
\date{
date text
}
\maketitle
Note that after specifying the arguments of
\title
,
\author
and
\date
,we must issue the
command
\maketitle
for this part to be typeset.
By default, all entries produced by these commands are centered on the lines in which
they appear. If a title text is too long to fit in one line, it will be broken automatically.
However, we can choose the break points with the
\\
command.
If there are several authors and their names are separated by the
\and
command, then
the names appear side by side. Thus
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested