embed pdf in mvc view : Converting pdf to html software application cloud windows html .net class ltxprimer-1.012-part1297

X
.2. P
ARAGRAPH BOXES
121
As with
\makebox
and
\framebox
the LAT
E
Ximplementation of
\raisebox
offers you
the use of the lengths
\height
,
\depth
,
\totalheight
and
\width
in the first three argu-
ments. Thus, to pretend that a box extends only 90% of its actual height above the
baseline you could write:
\raisebox{0pt}{0.9\height}{text}
or to rotate a box around its lower left corner (instead of its reference point lying on the
baseline), you could raise it by its
\depth
first, e.g.:
x
1
Badthing
x
2
Badthing
x
3
Badthing
x
4
$x_1$ \doturn{\fbox{Bad thing}}\\
$x_2$ \doturn{\raisebox{\depth}\\
{\fbox{Bad thing}}}\\
$x_3$ \doturn{\raisebox{-\height}\\
{\fbox{Bad thing}}} $x_4$
X
.2. P
ARAGRAPH BOXES
Paragraph boxes are constructed using the
\parbox
command or
minipage
environment.
The text material is typeset in paragraph mode inside a box of width width. The vertical
positioning of the box with respect to the text baseline is controlled by the one-letter
optional parameter pos (
[c]
,
[t]
,and
[b]
).
The usage for
\parbox
command is,
\parbox{
pos
}{
width
}{
text
}
whereas that of the minipage environment will be:
\begin{minipage}{
pos
}{
width
}
.. .here goes the text matter ...
\end{minipage}
The center position is the default as shown by the next example. You can also observe
that LAT
E
Xmight produce wide inter-word spaces if the measure is incredibly small.
This is the contents of the left-
most parbox.
CURRENT LINE
This is the right-most parbox.
Note that the typeset text looks
sloppy because LAT
E
X cannot
nicely balance the material in
these narrow columns.
The code for generating these three
\parbox
’s in a row is given below:
\parbox{.3\bs linewidth}
{This is the contents of the left-most parbox.} \hfill CURRENT LINE \hfill
\parbox{.3\bs linewidth}{This is the right-most parbox. Note that the typeset
text looks sloppy because \LaTeX{} cannot nicely balance the material in
these narrow columns.}
Converting pdf to html - software application cloud:C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
How to Convert PDF to HTML Webpage with C# PDF Conversion SDK
www.rasteredge.com
Converting pdf to html - software application cloud:VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
PDF to HTML Webpage Converter SDK for VB.NET PDF to HTML Conversion
www.rasteredge.com
122
X
. S
EVERAL
K
INDS OF
B
OXES
The minipage environment is very useful for the placement of material on the page.
In effect, it is a complete mini-version of a page and can contain its own footnotes, para-
graphs, and array, tabular and multicols (we will learn about these later) environments.
Asimple example of minipage environment at work is given below. The baseline is indi-
cated with a small line.
\begin{minipage}{b}{.3\linewidth}
The minipage environment creates a vertical box like the parbox command.
The bottom line of this minipage is aligned with the
\end{minipage}\hrulefill
\begin{minipage}{c}{.3\linewidth}
middle of this narrow parbox, which in turn is
\end{minipage}\hrulefill
\begin{minipage}{t}{.3\linewidth}
the top line of the right hand minipage. It is recommended that the user
experiment with the positioning arguments to get used to their effects.
\end{minipage}
The minipage environment
creates a vertical box like
the parbox command. The
bottom line of this minipage is
aligned with the
middle of this narrow parbox,
which in turn is
the top line of the right hand
minipage. It is recommended
that the user experiment with
the positioning arguments to
get used to their effects.
X
.3. P
ARAGRAPH BOXES WITH SPECIFIC HEIGHT
In LAT
E
X, the syntax of the
\parbox
and minipage has been extended to include two more
optional arguments.
\parbox{
pos
}{
height
}{
inner pos
}{
width
}{
text
}
is the usage for
\parbox
command, whereas that of the minipage environment will be:
\begin{minipage}{
pos
}{
height
}{
inner pos
}{
width
}
.. .here goes the text matter ...
\end{minipage}
In both cases, height is a length specifying the height of the box; the parameters
\height
,
\width
,
\depth
,and
\totalheight
may be employed within the emph argument in the
same way as in the width argument of
\makebox
and
\framebox
.
The optional argument inner pos states how the text is to be positioned internally,
something that is only meaningful if height has been given. Its possible values are:
t
To push the text to the top of the box.
b
To shove it to the bottom.
c
To center it vertically.
s
To stretch it to fill up the whole box.
In the last case, we must specify the interline space we wish to have and the deviations
allowed from this value as in the example below.
Note the difference between the external positioning argument pos and the internal
one inner pos: the former states how the box is to be aligned with the surrounding text,
software application cloud:Online Convert PDF to HTML5 files. Best free online PDF html
Creating a HTML from PDF has never been so easy! Easy converting! We try to make it as easy as possible to convert your doc files to PDF.
www.rasteredge.com
software application cloud:C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
Free C#.NET SDK library and components for converting PDF file in .NET Windows applications, ASP.NET web Able to export PDF document to HTML file.
www.rasteredge.com
X
.4. N
ESTED BOXES
123
while the latter determines how the contents are placed within the box itself. See an
example below. We frame the minipages to make it more comprehensible.
This is a mini-
page
with
a
height of 3 cm
with the text
aligned at the
top.
In this minipage
of same height,
the text is verti-
cally centered.
In this third box
of same height,
text is aligned at
the bottom.
In this fourth
box
of same
height, the text
is stretched to
fill in the entire
vertical space.
See the code that generated the above boxed material:
\begin{minipage}[b][3cm][t]{2cm}
This is a minipage with a height of 3˜cm
with the text aligned
at the top.
\end{minipage}\hfill
\begin{minipage}[b][3cm][c]{2cm}
In this minipage of same height, the text is vertically centered.
\end{minipage}}\hfill
\begin{minipage}[b][3cm][b]{2cm}
In this third box of same height, text is aligned at the bottom.
\end{minipage}\hfill
\begin{minipage}{b}{3cm}{s}{2cm}
\baselineskip 10pt plus 2pt minus 2pt
In this fourth box of same height, the
text is stretched to fill in the entire
vertical space.
\end{minipage}
In the last minipage environment the command
\baselineskip
gets the interline
space to be 10 points text allows it to be as low as 8 points or as high as 12 points.
X
.4. N
ESTED BOXES
The box commands described above may be nested to any desired level. Including an
LR
box within a parbox or a minipage causes no obvious conceptual difficulties. The
opposite, a parbox within an
LR
box, is also possible, and is easy to visualize if one keeps
in mind that every box is a unit, treated by T
E
Xas a single character of the corresponding
size.
A parbox inside an
\fbox
command has the effect that the entire parbox is
framed. The present structure was made with
\fbox
{
\fbox
{
\parbox
{
.75\linewidth
} {
A parbox ...
}}}
This is a parbox of width .75
\linewidth
inside an fbox inside a second fbox,
which thus produces the double framing effect.
software application cloud:VB.NET PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file
For how to convert PDF to HTML document in VB a series of demo code directly for converting MicroSoft Office Word, Excel and PowerPoint document to PDF file in
www.rasteredge.com
software application cloud:C# PDF Convert to SVG SDK: Convert PDF to SVG files in C#.net, ASP
Support converting PDF document to SVG image within C# PDFDocument(@"C:\input.pdf"); pdf.ConvertToVectorImages(ContextType Description: Convert to html/svg files
www.rasteredge.com
124
X
. S
EVERAL
K
INDS OF
B
OXES
X
.5. R
ULE BOXES
Arule box is basically a filled-in black rectangle. The syntax for the general command is:
\rule{
lift
}{
width
}{
height
}
which produces a solid rectangle of width width and height height, raised above the
baseline by an amount lift. Thus
\rule{8mm}{3mm}
generates
and
\rule{3in}{.2pt}
generates
.
Without an optional argument lift, the rectangle is set on the baseline of the current
line of the text. The parameters lift, width and height are all lengths. If lift has a negative
value, the rectangle is set below the baseline.
It is also possible to have a rule box of zero width. This creates an invisible line with
the given height. Such a construction is called a strut and is used to force a horizontal
box to have a desired height or depth that is different from that of its contents.
software application cloud:C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
Word in C#.NET. Online C#.NET Tutorial for Converting PDF to Word (.doc/ .docx) Document with .NET XDoc.PDF Library in C#.NET Class.
www.rasteredge.com
software application cloud:C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net
Best C#.NET PDF converter SDK for converting PDF to Tiff in Visual Studio .NET project. C# programming sample for PDF to Tiff image converting.
www.rasteredge.com
TUTORIAL XI
FLOATS
XI
.1. T
HE figure ENVIRONMENT
Figures are really problematical to present in a document because they never split between
pages. This leads to bad page breaks which in turn leave blank space at the bottom
of pages. For fine-tuning that document, the typesetter has to adjust the page breaks
manually.
But LAT
E
Xprovides floating figures which automatically move to suitable locations.
So the positioning of figures is the duty of LAT
E
X.
XI
.1.1. Creating floating figures
Floating figures are created by putting commands in a
figure
environment. The con-
tents of the figure environment always remains in one chunk, floating to produce good
page breaks. The following commands put the graphic from
figure.eps
inside a floating
figure:
\begin{figure}
\centering
\includegraphics{figure.eps}
\caption{This is an inserted EPS graphic}
\label{fig1}
\end{figure}
Features
• The optional
\label
command can be used with the
\ref
,and
\pageref
commands
to reference the caption. The
\label
command must be placed immediately after
the
\caption
• If the figure environment contains no
\caption
commands, it produces an unnum-
bered floating figure.
• If the figure environment contains multiple
\caption
commands, it produces multi-
ple figures which float together. This is useful in constructing side-by-side graphics
or complex arrangements.
• A list of figures is generated by the
\listoffigures
command.
• By default, the caption text is used as the caption and also in the list of figures.
The caption has an optional argument which specifies the list-of-figure entry. For
example,
\caption[
List Text
]{
Caption Text
}
125
software application cloud:VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
VB.NET PDF Converting DLLs for PDF-to-Word. This is an example for converting PDF to Word (.docx) file in VB.NET program. ' Load a PDF document.
www.rasteredge.com
software application cloud:VB.NET PDF- HTML5 PDF Viewer for VB.NET Project
PDF in VB.NET, VB.NET convert PDF to HTML, VB.NET convert PDF to Word Online Guide for Viewing, Annotating And Converting PDF Document with HTML5 PDF Viewer in VB
www.rasteredge.com
XI
.1. T
HE figure ENVIRONMENT
127
\clearpage
This command places unprocessed floats and starts a new page.
\FloatBarrier
This command causes all unprocessed floats to be processed. This is
provided by the
placeins
package. It does not start a new page, unlike
\clearpage
.
Since it is often desirable to keep floats in the section in which they were issued, the
section
option
\usepackage[section]{placeins}
redefines the
\section
command, inserting a
\FloatBarrier
command before each sec-
tion. Note that this option is very strict. This option does not allow a float from the
previous section to appear at the bottom of the page, since that is after the start of a new
section.
The
below
option
\usepackage[below]{placeins}
is a less-restrictive version of the
section
option. It allows floats to be placed after the
beginning of a new section, provided that some of the previous section appears on the
page.
\afterpage/\clearpage
The
afterpage
package provides the
\afterpage
command which
executes a command at the next naturally-ocurring page break.
Therefore, using
\afterpage{\clearpage}
causes all unprocessed floats to be cleared
at the next page break.
\afterpage{\clearpage}
is especially useful when producing
small floatpage figures.
XI
.1.3. Customizing float placement
The following style parameters are used by LAT
E
X to prevent awkward-looking pages
which contain too many floats or badly-placed floats.
Float placement counters
\topnumber
The maximum number of floats allowed at the top of a text page (the
default is 2).
\bottomnumber
The maximum number of floats allowed at the bottom of a text page
(the default is 1).
\totalnumber
The maximum number of floats allowed on any one text page (the de-
fault is 3).
These counters prevent LAT
E
Xfrom placing too many floats on a text page. These
counters do not affect float pages. Specifying a
!
in the float placement options causes
LAT
E
Xto ignore these parameters. The values of these counters are set with the
\setcounter
command. For example,
\setcounter{totalnumber}{2}
prevents more than two floats from being placed on any text page.
Figure fractions
The commands given below control what fraction of a page can be covered by floats
(where “fraction” refers to the height of the floats divided by
\textheight
). The first
128
XI
. F
LOATS
three commands pertain only to text pages, while the last command pertains only to float
pages. Specifying a
!
in the float placement options causes LAT
E
Xto ignore the first three
parameters, but
\floatpagefraction
is always used. The value of these fractions are set
by
\renewcommand
.For example,
\renewcommand{\textfraction}{0.3}
\textfraction
The minimum fraction of a text page which must be occupied by
text. The default is 0.2, which prevents floats from covering more
than 80% of a text page.
\topfraction
The maximum fraction of a text page which can be occupied by
floats at the top of the page. The default is 0.7, which prevents any
float whose height is greater than 70% of
\textheight
from being
placed at the top of a page.
\bottomfraction
The maximum fraction of a text page which can be occupied by
floats at the bottom of the page. The default is 0.3, which prevents
any float whose height is greater than 40% of
\textheight
from
being placed at the bottom of a text page.
\floatpagefraction
The minimum fraction of a float page that must be occupied by
floats. Thus the fraction of blank space on a float page cannot be
more than
1-\floatpagefraction
.The default is 0.5.
XI
.1.4. Using graphics in LAT
E
X
This section shows how graphics can be handled in LAT
E
Xdocuments. While LAT
E
Xcan
import virtually any graphics format, Encapsulated PostScript (EPS) isthe easiest graphics
format to import into L
A
T
E
X. The ‘eps’ files are inserted into the file using command
\includegraphics
file.eps
The \
includegraphics
command
\includegraphics[
options
]{
filename
}
The following options are available in
\includegraphics
command:
width
The width of the graphics (in any of the accepted T
E
Xunits).
height
The height of the graphics (in any of the accepted T
E
Xunits).
totalheight
The totalheight of the graphics (in any of the accepted T
E
Xunits).
scale
Scale factor for the graphic. Specifying
scale = 2
makes the graphic twice
as large as its natural size.
angle
Specifies the angle of rotation, in degrees, with a counter-clockwise (anti-
clockwise) rotation being positive.
Graphics search path
By default, LAT
E
Xlooks for graphics files in any directory on the T
E
Xsearch path. In addi-
tion to these directories, LAT
E
Xalso looks in any directories specified in the
\graphicspath
command. For example,
\graphicspath{{dir1/}{dir2/}}
XI
.1. T
HE figure ENVIRONMENT
129
\includegraphics[
width=1in
]{
tex.png
}
\includegraphics[
height=1.5in
]{
tex.png
}
\includegraphics[
scale=.25,angle=45
]{
tex.png
}
\includegraphics[
scale=.25,angle=90
]{
tex.png
}
tells LAT
E
Xto look for graphics files also in
dir1/
and
dir2/
.For Macintosh, this becomes
\graphicspath{{dir1:}{dir2:}}
Graphics extensions
The
\DeclareGraphicsExtensions
command tells LAT
E
Xwhich extensions to try if a file
with no extension is specified in the
\includegraphics
command. For convenience, a
default set of extensions is pre-defined depending on which graphics driver is selected.
For example if
dvips
is used, the following graphics extensions (defined in
dvips.def
)are
used by default
\DeclareGraphicsExtensions{
.eps,.ps,.eps.gz,.ps.gz,.eps.Z
}
With the above graphics extensions specified,
\includegraphics
file first looks for
file.eps
,
then
file.ps
,then file
file.eps.gz
,etc. until a file is found. This allows the graphics to
be specified with
\includegraphics{
file
}
instead of
130
XI
. F
LOATS
\includegraphics{
file.eps
}
XI
.1.5. Rotating and scaling objects
In addition to the
\includegraphics
command, the
graphicx
package includes four other
commands which rotate and scale any LAT
E
Xobject: text, EPS graphic, etc.
\scalebox{2}{\includegraphics{file.eps}}
\resizebox{4in}{!}{\includegraphics{file.eps}}
\rotatebox{45}{\includegraphics{file.eps}}
produces the same three graphics as
\includegraphics[scale=2]{file.eps}
\includegraphics[width=4in]{file.eps}
\includegraphics[angle=45]{file.eps}
For example, the following are produced with
LATEX
\rotatebox{45}{\fbox{\LARGE{\LaTeX}}}
XETAL
\rotatebox{180}{\fbox{\LARGE{\LaTeX}}}
However, the
\includegraphics
is preferred because it is faster and produces more
efficient PostScript.
XI
.2. T
HE table ENVIRONMENT
With the box elements already explained in the previous chapter, it would be possible to
produce all sorts of framed and unframed tables. However, LAT
E
Xoffers the user far more
convenient ways to build such complicated structures.
XI
.2.1. Constructing tables
The environments
tabular
and
tabular*
are the basic tools with which tables can be
constructed. The syntax for these environments is:
\begin{
tabular
}[
pos
]{
cols
}
rows
\end{
tabular
}
\begin{
tabular*
}{
width
}[
pos
]{
cols
}
rows
\end{
tabular*
}
Both the above environments actually create a minipage. The meaning of the above
arguments is as follows:
pos
Vertical positioning arguments (see also the explanation of this argument for
parboxes). It can take on the values:
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested