XII
.5. L
OST THE KEYS
?U
SE lablst.tex
141
XII
.5. L
OST THE KEYS
?U
SE lablst.tex
One of the conveniences of using keys for cross references is that you need not keep track
of the actual numbers, but then you’ll have to remember the keys. You can produce the
list of keys used in a document by running LAT
E
Xon the file
lablst.tex
. In our system,
we do this by first typing
latex lablst
L
A
T
E
Xresponds as follows:
*********************************
* Enter input file name
*
without the .tex extension:
*********************************
\lablstfile=
We type in the file name as
cref
which is the source of this document and is presented
with another query.
**********************************************
* Enter document class used in file cref.tex
*
with no options or extension:
**********************************************
\lablstclass=
So we type
article
.And is asked
********************************************
* Enter packages used in file cref.tex
*
with no options or extensions:
********************************************
\lablstpackages=
Here only those packages used in the article which define commands used in section
titles etc. need be given. So we type
amsmath,array,enumerate
This produces a file
lablst.dvi
which can be viewed to see a list of keys used in the
document.
Finally if your text editor is
GNU Emacs
,then you can use its
RefTeX
package to auto-
mate generation, insertion and location of keys at the editing stage.
Conversion pdf to html - control SDK system:C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
How to Convert PDF to HTML Webpage with C# PDF Conversion SDK
www.rasteredge.com
Conversion pdf to html - control SDK system:VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
PDF to HTML Webpage Converter SDK for VB.NET PDF to HTML Conversion
www.rasteredge.com
142
control SDK system:Online Convert PDF to HTML5 files. Best free online PDF html
area. Then just wait until the conversion from PDF to HTML is complete and download the file. The perfect conversion tool. Your HTML
www.rasteredge.com
control SDK system:C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
C#.NET PDF to HTML Conversion. Using provided C# code example, fast conversion from PDF to HTML can be achieved. C#.NET PDF to SVG Conversion.
www.rasteredge.com
TUTORIAL XIII
FOOTNOTES
,
MARGINPARS
,
AND ENDNOTES
LAT
E
Xhas facilities to typeset “inserted” text, such as footnotes, marginal notes, figures
and tables. This chapter looks more closely at different kinds of notes.
XIII
.1. F
OOTNOTES
Footnotes are generated with the command
\footnote{
footnote
text
}
which comes immediately after the word requiring an explanation in a footnote. The
text footnote
text appears as a footnote in a smaller typeface at the bottom of the page.
The first line of the footnote is indented and is given the same footnote marker as that
inserted in the main text. The first footnote on a page is separated from the rest of the
page text by means of a short horizontal line.
The standard footnote marker is a small, raised number
1
,which is sequentially num-
bered.
Footnotes produced with the
\footnote
command inside a minipage environment
use the mpfootnote counter and are typeset at the bottom of the parbox produced by the
minipage2.
However, if you use the
\footnotemark
command in a
minipage
it will produce a
footnote mark in the same style and sequence as the main text footnotes—i.e., stepping
the
mpfootnote
counter and using the
\thefootnote
command for the representation.
This behavior allows you to produce a footnote inside your
minipage
that is typeset in se-
quence with the main text footnotes at the bottom of the page: you place a
\footnotemark
inside the
minipage
and the corresponding
\footnotetext
after it. See below:
Footnotes in a minipage are num-
bered using lowercase letters.
a
This text references a footnote at
the bottom of the page.
3
a
Inside minipage
\begin{minipage}{5cm}
Footnotes in a minipage are numbered
using lowercase letters.\footnote{%
Inside minipage} \par This text
references a footnote at the bottom
of the page.\footnotemark
\end{minipage}
\footnotetext{At bottom of page}
The footnote numbering is incremented throughout the document for the article
class, where it is reset to 1 for each new chapter in the report and book classes.
1
See how the footnote is produced: “ ... raised number
\footnote
{
See how the footnote is produced:
...
}.
2
With nested minipages, the footnote comes after the next
\endminipage
command, which could be at the
wrong place.
3Atbottomofpage.
143
control SDK system:.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
XDoc.PDF SDK for .NET. RasterEdge XDoc.PDF for .NET is a professional .NET PDF solution that provides complete and advanced PDF document processing features.
www.rasteredge.com
control SDK system:VB.NET PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file
Conversion of PDF to Html5. For how to convert PDF to HTML document in VB.NET application, a simple and easy VB.NET sample code is given on this page for you
www.rasteredge.com
144
XIII
. F
OOTNOTES
,M
ARGINPARS
,
AND
E
NDNOTES
XIII
.1.1. Footnotes in tabular material
Footnotes appearing inside tabular material are not typeset by standard LAT
E
X. Only
tabularx
and
longtable
environments will treat footnotes correctly. But footnotes used
in these tables won’t appear just following the tables, but would appear at the bottom
of the page just like the footnotes used in the text. But in
longtable
you can place the
footnotes as table notes by placing the longtable in a minipage. See below:
Table
XIII
.1: PostScript type 1 fonts
Courier
a
cour, courb, courbi, couri
Nimbus
b
unmr, unmrs
URW Antiquab
uaqrrc
URW Grotesk
b
ugqp
Utopia
c
putb, putbi, putr, putri
aDonatedbyIBM.
b
Donated by URW GmbH.
c
Donated by Adobe.
\begin{minipage}{.47\textwidth}
\renewcommand{\thefootnote}{\thempfootnote}
\begin{longtable}{ll}
\caption{PostScript type 1 fonts}\\
Courier\footnote{Donated by IBM.} & cour,courb,courbi,couri \\
Nimbus\footnote{Donated by URW GmbH.} & unmr, unmrs \\
URW Antiqua\footnotemark[\value{mpfootnote}] & uaqrrc\\
URW Grotesk\footnotemark[\value{mpfootnote}] & ugqp\\
Utopia\footnote{Donated by Adobe.} & putb, putbi, putr, putri
\end{longtable}
\end{minipage}
You can also put your
tabular
or
array
environment inside a
minipage
environ-
ment, since in that case footnotes are typeset just following that environment. Note the
redefinition of
\thefootnote
that allows us to make use of the
\footnotemark
command
inside the
minipage
environment. Without this redefinition
\footnotemark
would have
generated a footnote mark in the style of the footnotes for the main page.
\begin{minipage}{.5\linewidth}
\renewcommand{\thefootnote}{\thempfootnote}
\begin{tabular}{ll}
\multicolumn{2}{c}{\bfseries PostScript type 1 fonts} \\
Courier\footnote{Donated by IBM.} & cour,courb,courbi,couri \\
Charter\footnote{Donated by Bitstream.} & bchb,bchbi,bchr,bchri\\
Nimbus\footnote{Donated by URW GmbH.} & unmr, unmrs \\
URW Antiqua\footnotemark[\value{mpfootnote}] & uaqrrc\\
URW Grotesk\footnotemark[\value{mpfootnote}] & ugqp\\
Utopia\footnote{Donated by Adobe.} & putb, putbi, putr, putri
\end{tabular}
\end{minipage}
control SDK system:C# Windows Viewer - Image and Document Conversion & Rendering in
CSV Document Conversion. RasterEdge Windows Viewer SDK provides how to convert TIFF: Convert to PDF. Convert to Various Images. PDF Document Conversion.
www.rasteredge.com
control SDK system:C# WinForms Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
PDF Conversion. • Convert PDF to Microsoft Office Word (.docx). • Convert PDF to Tiff image (.tif, .tiff). • Convert PDF to HTML (.htm, .html).
www.rasteredge.com
XIII
.1. F
OOTNOTES
145
PostScript type 1 fonts
Courier
a
cour, courb, courbi, couri
Charter
b
bchb, bchbi, bchr, bchri
Nimbus
c
unmr, unmrs
URW Antiqua
c
uaqrrc
URW Grotesk
c
ugqp
Utopia
d
putb, putbi, putr, putri
a
Donated by IBM.
b
Donated by Bitstream.
c
Donated by URW GmbH.
d
Donated by Adobe.
Of course this approach does not automatically limit the width of the footnotes to
the width of the table, so a little iteration with the
minipage
width argument might be
necessary.
Another way to typeset table notes is with the package
threeparttable
by Donald
Arseneau. This package has the advantage that it indicates unambiguously that you are
dealing with notes inside tables and, moreover, it gives you full control of the actual refer-
ence marks and offers the possibility of having a caption for our tabular material. In this
sense, the
threeparttable
environment is similar to the nonfloating
table
environment.
\begin{threeparttable}
\caption{\textbf{PostScript type 1 fonts}}
\begin{tabular}{ll}
Courier\tnote{a} & cour, courb, courbi, couri\\
Charter\tnote{b} & bchb, bchbi, bchr, bchri \\
Nimbus\tnote{c} & unmr, unmrs \\
URW Antiqua\tnote{c} & uaqrrc\\
URW Grotesk\tnote{c} & ugqp\\
Utopia\tnote{d} & putb, putbi, putr, putri
\end{tabular}
\begin{tablenotes}
\item[a] Donated by IBM.
\item[b] Donated by Bitstream.
\item[c] Donated by URW GmbH.
\item[d] Donated by Adobe.
\end{tablenotes}
\end{threeparttable}
Table 14.2: PostScript type 1 fonts
Courier
a
cour, courb, courbi, couri
Charterb
bchb, bchbi, bchr, bchri
Nimbus
c
unmr, unmrs
URW Antiqua
c
uaqrrc
URW Grotesk
c
ugqp
Utopia
d
putb, putbi, putr, putri
a
Donated by IBM.
b
Donated by Bitstream.
DonatedbyURWGmbH.
d
Donated by Adobe.
control SDK system:C# Word - Word Conversion in C#.NET
And detailed C# demo codes for these conversions are offered below. C# Demo Codes for Word Conversions. Word to PDF Conversion. PDF to Word Conversion.
www.rasteredge.com
control SDK system:C# powerpoint - PowerPoint Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
And detailed C# demo codes for these conversions are offered below. C# Demo Codes for PowerPoint Conversions. PowerPoint to PDF Conversion.
www.rasteredge.com
146
XIII
. F
OOTNOTES
,M
ARGINPARS
,
AND
E
NDNOTES
XIII
.1.2. Customizing footnotes
If the user wishes the footnote numbering to be reset to
1
for each
\section
command
with the article class, this may be achieved by putting
\setcounter{footnote}{0}
before every section or using the following command at preamble
4
\@addtoreset{footnote}{section}
The internal footnote counter has the name
footnote
.Each call to
\footnote
increments
this counter by one and prints the new value in Arabic numbering as the footnote marker.
Adifferent style of marker can be implemented with the command
\renewcommand{\thefootnote}{
number
style
}{footnote}
where number
style is one of the counter print commands;
\arabic
,
\roman
,
\Roman
,
\alph
,or
\Alph
.However, for the counter
footnote
,there is an additional counter print
command available,
\fnsymbol
,which prints the counter values 1–9 as one of nine sym-
bols:
§

††
‡‡
It is up to the user to see that the footnote counter is reset to zero sometime before
the tenth
\footnote
call is made. If the user wants to add values above nine, then he
has to edit the definition of
\fnsymbol
.See an example, which allows up to 12 footnotes
without resetting the counter:
\makeatletter
\def\@fnsymbol#1{\ensuremath{\ifcase#1\or *\or \dagger\or \ddagger\or
\mathsection\or \mathparagraph\or \|\or **\or \dagger\dagger
\or \ddagger\ddagger\or \mathsection\mathsection
\or \mathparagraph\mathparagraph \or \|\|\else\@ctrerr\fi}}
\renewcommand{\thefootnote}{\fnsymbol{footnote}}
\makeatother
An optional argument may be added to the
\footnote
command:
\footnote[
num
]{
footnote
text
}
where num is a positive integer that is used instead of the value of the footnote counter
for the marker. In this case, the footnote counter is not incremented. For example
∗∗
,
\renewcommand{\thefootnote}{\fnsymbol{footnote}}
For example\footnote[7]{The 7$ˆ{\rm th}$ symbol .... marker.},
\renewcommand{\thefootnote}{\arabic{footnote}}
where the last line is necessary to restore the footnote marker style to its standard form.
Otherwise, all future footnotes would be marked with symbols and not with numbers.
XIII
.1.3. Footnote style parameters
The appearance of the standard footnote can be changed by customizing the parameters
listed below:
\footnotesize
The font size used inside footnotes.
4
This command will only work within
\makeatletter
and
\makeatother
.
∗∗The7th symbolappearsasthefootnotemarker.
XIII
.2. M
ARGINAL NOTES
147
\footnotesep
The height of a strut placed at the beginning of every footnote. If it is
greater than the
\baselineskip
used for
\footnotesize
,then additional
vertical space will be inserted above each footnote.
\skip\footins
Alow-level T
E
Xcommand that defines the space between the main text
and the start of the footnotes. You can change its value with the
\setlength
or
\addtolength
commands by putting
\skip\footins
into the first argu-
ment, e.g.,
\addtolength{\skip\footins}{3mm}
\footnoterule
Amacro to draw the rule separating footnotes from the main text. It is
executed right after the vertical space of
\skip\footins
. It should take
zero vertical space, i.e., it should use a negative skip to compensate for
any positive space it occupies, for example:
\renewcommand{\footnoterule{\vspace*{-3pt}%
\rule{.4\columnwidth}{0.4pt}\vspace*{2.6pt}
You can also construct a fancier “rule” e.g., one consisting of a series of dots:
\renewcommand{\footnoterule}{\vspace*{-3pt}%
\qquad\dotfill\qquad\vspace*{2.6pt}}
XIII
.2. M
ARGINAL NOTES
\marginpar{
left-text
}{
right-text
}
The
\marginpar
command generates a marginal note. This command typesets the text
given as an argument in the margin, the first line at the same height as the line in the
main text where the
\marginpar
command occurs. The marginal note appearing here
This
is a
margi-
nal
note
was generated with
... command occurs\marginpar{This is a marginal note}. The ...
When only the mandatory argument right-text is specified, then the text goes to the right
margin for one-sided printing; to the outside margin for two-sided printing; and to the
nearest margin for two-column formatting. When you specify an optional argument, it
is used for the left margin, while the second (mandatory) argument is used for the right.
There are a few important things to understand when using marginal notes. First,
\marginpar
command does not start a paragraph, that is, if it is used before the first
word of a paragraph, the vertical alignment may not match the beginning of the para-
graph. Secondly, if the margin is narrow, and the words are long (as in German), you
may have to precede the first word by a
\hspace{0pt}
command to allow hyphenation
of the first word. These two potential problems can be eased by defining a command
\marginlabel{
text
}
,which starts with an empty box
\mbox{}
,typesets a marginal note
ragged left, and adds a
\hspace{0pt}
in front of the argument.
\newcommand{\marginlabel}[1]
{\mbox{}\marginpar{\raggedleft\hspace{0pt}#1}}
By default, in one-sided printing the marginal notes go on the outside margin. These
defaults can be changed by the following declarations:
\reversemarginpar
Marginal notes go into the opposite margin with respect to the de-
fault one.
\normalmarginpar
Marginal notes go into the default margin.
148
XIII
. F
OOTNOTES
,M
ARGINPARS
,
AND
E
NDNOTES
XIII
.2.1. Uses of marginal notes
\marginpar{}
can be used to draw attention to certain text passages by marking them
with a vertical bar in the margin. The example marking this paragraph was made by
including
\marginpar{\rule[-10.5mm]{1mm}{10mm}}
in the first line. By defining a macro
\query
as shown below
\def\query#1#2{\underline{#1}\marginpar{#2}}
we can produce queries. For example LAT
E
X
.This query is produced with the following
Hey!
Look
command.
For example \query{\LaTeX}{Hey!\\ Look}{}. This ...
XIII
.2.2. Style parameters for marginal notes
The following style parameters may be changed to redefine how marginal notes appear:
\marginparwidth
Determines the width of the margin box.
\marginparsep
Sets the separation between the margin box and the edge of the main
text.
\marginparpush
Is the smallest vertical distance between two marginal notes.
These parameters are all lengths and are assigned new values as usual with the
\setlength
command.
XIII
.3. E
NDNOTES
Scholarly works usually group notes at the end of each chapter or at the end of the
document. These are called endnotes. Endnotes are not supported in standard LAT
E
X, but
they can be created in several ways.
The package
endnotes
(by John Lavagnino) typesets endnotes in a way similar to
footnotes. It uses an extra external file, with extension
.ent
, to hold the text of the
endnotes. This file can be deleted after the run since a new version is generated each
time.
With this package you can output your footnotes as endnotes by simply giving the
command:
\renewcommand{\footnote}{\endnote}
The user interface for endnotes is very similar to the one for footnotes after sub-
stituting the word “foot” for “end”. The following example shows the principle of the
use of endnotes, where you save text in memory with the
\endnote
command, and then
typeset all accumulated text material at a point in the document controlled by the user.
This is simple text.
1
This is simple
text.
2
This is simple text.
3
Notes
1
The first endnote.
2
The second endnote.
3
The third endnote.
This is some more simple text
This is simple text.\endnote{The first
endnote.} This is simple text.\endnote{%
The second endnote.} This is simple
text.\endnote{The third endnote.}
\theendnotes\bigskip
This is some more simple text
GNU FREE DOCUMENTATION LICENSE
Version 1.2, November 2002
Copyright
c
 2000,2001,2002 Free Software Foundation, Inc. 59 Temple
Place, Suite 330, Boston, MA 02111-1307, USA
Everyone is permitted to copy and distribute verbatim copies of this license
document, but changing it is not allowed.
0 PREAMBLE
The purpose of this License is to make a manual, textbook, or other functional and
useful document free in the sense of freedom: to assure everyone the effective freedom
to copy and redistribute it, with or without modifying it, either commercially or non-
commercially. Secondarily, this License preserves for the author and publisher a way
to get credit for their work, while not being considered responsible for modifications
made by others.
This License is a kind of “copyleft”, which means that derivative works of the doc-
ument must themselves be free in the same sense. It complements the GNU General
Public License, which is a copyleft license designed for free software.
We have designed this License in order to use it for manuals for free software, because
free software needs free documentation: a free program should come with manuals
providing the same freedoms that the software does. But this License is not limited to
software manuals; it can be used for any textual work, regardless of subject matter or
whether it is published as a printed book. We recommend this License principally for
works whose purpose is instruction or reference.
(1) APPLICABILITY AND DEFINITIONS
This License applies to any manual or other work, in any medium, that contains a
notice placed by the copyright holder saying it can be distributed under the terms
of this License. Such a notice grants a world-wide, royalty-free license, unlimited
in duration, to use that work under the conditions stated herein. The “Document”,
below, refers to any such manual or work. Any member of the public is a licensee,
and is addressed as “you”. You accept the license if you copy, modify or distribute
the work in a way requiring permission under copyright law.
A“Modified Version” of the Document means any work containing the Document or
aportion of it, either copied verbatim, or with modifications and/or translated into
another language.
149
150
XIII
. F
OOTNOTES
,M
ARGINPARS
,
AND
E
NDNOTES
A“Secondary Section” is a named appendix or a front-matter section of the Doc-
ument that deals exclusively with the relationship of the publishers or authors of
the Document to the Document’s overall subject (or to related matters) and contains
nothing that could fall directly within that overall subject. (Thus, if the Document is
in part a textbook of mathematics, a Secondary Section may not explain any mathe-
matics.) The relationship could be a matter of historical connection with the subject
or with related matters, or of legal, commercial, philosophical, ethical or political
position regarding them.
The “Invariant Sections” are certain Secondary Sections whose titles are designated,
as being those of Invariant Sections, in the notice that says that the Document is
released under this License. If a section does not fit the above definition of Secondary
then it is not allowed to be designated as Invariant. The Document may contain zero
Invariant Sections. If the Document does not identify any Invariant Sections then
there are none.
The “Cover Texts” are certain short passages of text that are listed, as Front-Cover
Texts or Back-Cover Texts, in the notice that says that the Document is released under
this License. A Front-Cover Text may be at most 5 words, and a Back-Cover Text
may be at most 25 words.
A“Transparent” copy of the Document means a machine-readable copy, represented
in a format whose specification is available to the general public, that is suitable
for revising the document straightforwardly with generic text editors or (for images
composed of pixels) generic paint programs or (for drawings) some widely available
drawing editor, and that is suitable for input to text formatters or for automatic trans-
lation to a variety of formats suitable for input to text formatters. A copy made in
an otherwise Transparent file format whose markup, or absence of markup, has been
arranged to thwart or discourage subsequent modification by readers is not Transpar-
ent. An image format is not Transparent if used for any substantial amount of text.
Acopy that is not “Transparent” is called “Opaque”.
Examples of suitable formats for Transparent copies include plain
ASCII
without
markup, Texinfo input format, LAT
E
Xinput format,
SGML
or
XML
using a publicly
available
DTD
,and standard-conforming simple
HTML
,PostScript or
PDF
designed
for human modification. Examples of transparent image formats include
PNG
,
XCF
and
JPG
. Opaque formats include proprietary formats that can be read and edited
only by proprietary word processors,
SGML
or
XML
for which the
DTD
and/or pro-
cessing tools are not generally available, and the machine-generated
HTML
,PostScript
or
PDF
produced by some word processors for output purposes only.
The “Title Page” means, for a printed book, the title page itself, plus such following
pages as are needed to hold, legibly, the material this License requires to appear in the
title page. For works in formats which do not have any title page as such, “Title Page”
means the text near the most prominent appearance of the work’s title, preceding the
beginning of the body of the text.
Asection “Entitled XYZ” means a named subunit of the Document whose title either
is precisely XYZ or contains XYZ in parentheses following text that translates XYZ
in another language. (Here XYZ stands for a specific section name mentioned below,
such as “Acknowledgements”, “Dedications”, “Endorsements”, or “History”.) To
“Preserve the Title” of such a section when you modify the Document means that it
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested