V
.2. I
NDEX
41
Additionally, the command
\@dottedtocline
uses the following formatting parame-
ters, which specify the visual appearance of all entries:
\@pnumwidth
The width of the box in which the page number is set.
\@tocmarg
The indentation of the right margin for all but the last line of multiple
line entries. Dimension, but changed with
\renewcommand
.
\@dotsep
The separation between dots, in
mu
(math units). It is a pure number
(like 1.7 or 2). By making this number large enough you can get rid of
the dots altogether. Changed with
\renewcommand
as well.
V
.1.3. Multiple tables of contents
The minitoc package, initially written by Nigel Ward and Dan Jurafsky and completely
redesigned by Jean-Pierre Drucbert, creates a mini-table of contents (a “minitoc”) at the
beginning of each chapter when you use the book or report classes.
The mini-table of contents will appear at the beginning of a chapter, after the
\chapter
command. The parameters that govern the use of this package are discussed below:
Table
V
.1: Summary of the
minitoc
parameters
\dominitoc
Must be put just in front of
\tableofcontents
,to initialize
the minitoc system (Mandatory).
\faketableofcontents
This command replaces
\tableofcontents
when you want
minitocs but not table of contents.
\minitoc
This command must be put right after each
\chapter
com-
mand where a minitoc is desired.
\minitocdepth
AL
A
T
E
Xcounter that indicates how many levels of head-
ings will be displayed in the minitoc (default value is
2
).
\mtcindent
The length of the left/right indentation of the minitoc (de-
fault value is
24pt
).
\mtcfont
Command defining the font that is used for the minitoc
entries (The default definition is a small roman font).
For each mini-table, an auxiliary file with extension
.mtc
<
N
>where <
N
>is the chap-
ter number, will be created.
By default, these mini-tables contain only references to sections and subsections. The
minitocdepth
counter, similar to
tocdepth
,allows the user to modify this behaviour.
As the minitoc takes up room on the first page(s) of a chapter, it will alter the page
numbering. Therefore, three runs normally are needed to get correct information in the
mini-table of contents.
To turn off the
\minitoc
commands, merely replace the package
minitoc
with
mini-
tocoff
on your
\usepackage
command. This assures that all
\minitoc
commands will be
ignored.
V
.2. I
NDEX
To find a topic of interest in a large document, book, or reference work, you usually
turn to the table of contents or, more often, to the index. Therefore, an index is a very
important part of a document, and most users’ entry point to a source of information
is precisely through a pointer in the index. The most generally used index preparation
program is MakeIndex.
Online pdf to html converter - Library software component:C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
How to Convert PDF to HTML Webpage with C# PDF Conversion SDK
www.rasteredge.com
Online pdf to html converter - Library software component:VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
PDF to HTML Webpage Converter SDK for VB.NET PDF to HTML Conversion
www.rasteredge.com
42
V
. T
ABLE OF CONTENTS
,I
NDEX AND
G
LOSSARY
Page vi: \index{animal}
Page 5: \index{animal}
Page 6: \index{animal}
Page 7: \index{animal}
Page 11: \index{animalism|see{animal}}
Page 17: \index{animal@
\emph
{animal}}
\index{mammal|textbf}
Page 26: \index{animal!mammal!cat}
Page 32: \index{animal!insect}
(a) The input file
\indexentry{animal}{vi}
\indexentry{animal}{5}
\indexentry{animal}{6}
\indexentry{animal}{7}
\indexentry{animalism|seeanimal}{11}
\indexentry{animal@
\emph
{animal}}{17}
\indexentry{mammal|textbf}{17}
\indexentry{animal!mammal!cat}{26}
\indexentry{animal!insect}{32}
(b) The
.idx
file
\begin
{theindex}
\item animal, vi, 5–7
\subitem insect, 32
\subitem mammal
\subsubitem cat, 26
\item
\emph
{animal}, 17
\item animalism, \see{animal}{11}
\indexspace
\item mammal,
\textbf
{17}
\end
{theindex}
(c) The
.ind
file
animal, vi 5–7
insect, 32
mammal
cat, 26
animal, 17
animalism, see animal
mammal, 17
(d) The typeset output
Figure
V
.1: Stepwise development of index processing
Each
\index
command causes LAT
E
Xto write an entry in the
.idx
file. This command
writes the text given as an argument, in the
.idx
file. This
.idx
will be generated only if
we give
\makeindex
command in the preamble otherwise it will produce nothing.
\index{
index
entry
}
To generate index follow the procedure given below:
1. Tag the words inside the document, which needs to come as index, as an argument of
\index
command.
2. Include the makeidx package with an
\usepackage
command and put
\makeindex
com-
mand at the preamble.
3. Put a
\printindex
command where the index is to appear, normally before
\end{document}
command.
4. LAT
E
Xfile. Then a raw index (
file.idx
)will be generated.
5. Then run
makeindex
.(makeindex file.idx or makeindex file). Then two more files will
be generated, file.ind which contains the index entries and file.ilg, a transcript file.
6. Then run LAT
E
Xagain. Now you can see in the dvi that the index has been generated
in a new page.
V
.2.1. Simple index entries
Each
\index
command causes L
A
T
E
Xto write an entry in the
.idx
file. For example
\index{
index
entry
}
Library software component:Online Convert PDF to HTML5 files. Best free online PDF html
Online PDF to HTML5 Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF file to HTML. Just upload your file by clicking on the blue button
www.rasteredge.com
Library software component:XDoc.Converter for .NET, Support Documents and Images Conversion
Convert Word, Excel and PDF to image. Next Steps. Download Free Trial Download and try Converter for .NET with online support. See Pricing Check out the prices.
www.rasteredge.com
V
.2. I
NDEX
43
fonts
Computer Modern, 13–25
math, see math, fonts
PostScript, 5
table, ii–xi, 14
Page ii: \index{table|(}
Page xi: \index{table|)}
Page 5: \index{fonts!PostScript|(}
\index{fonts!PostScript|)}
Page 13 \index{fonts!Computer Modern |(}
Page 14: \index{table}
Page 17: \index{fonts!math|see{math, fonts}}
Page 21: \index{fonts!Computer Modern}
Page 25: \index{fonts!Computer Modern|)}
Figure
V
.2: Page range and cross-referencing
V
.2.2. Sub entries
Up to three levels of index entries (main, sub, and subsub entries) are available with
LAT
E
X-
MakeIndex
.To produce such entries, the argument of the
\index
command should
contain both the main and subentries, separated by ! character.
Page 5:
\index{
dimensions!rule!width
}
This will come out as
dimensions
rule
width, 5
V
.2.3. Page ranges and cross-references
You can specify a page range by putting the command
\index{...|(}
at the beginning of
the range and
\index{...|)}
at the end of the range. Page ranges should span a homoge-
neous numbering scheme (e.g., Roman and Arabic page numbers cannot fall within the
same range).
You can also generate cross-reference index entries without page numbers by using
the
see
encapsulator. Since “see” entry does not print any page number, the commands
\index{...|
see
{...}}
can be placed anywhere in the input file after the
\begin{document}
command. For practical reasons, it is convenient to group all such cross-referencing
commands in one place.
V
.2.4. Controlling the presentation form
Sometimes you may want to sort an entry according to a key, while using a different
visual representation for the typesetting, such as Greek letters, mathematical symbols, or
specific typographic forms. This function is available with the syntax: key@visual, where
key determines the alphabetical position and the string value produces the typeset text of
the entry.
For some indexes certain page numbers should be formatted specially, with an italic
page number (for example) indicating a primary reference, and an n after a page number
denoting that the item appears in a footnote on that page. MakeIndex allows you to
format an individual page number in any way you want by using the encapsulator syntax
specified | character. What follows the | sign will “encapsulate” or enclose the page num-
ber associated with the index entry. For instance, the command
\index
{keyword|xxx}
will produce a page number of the form
\xxx
{n}, where n is the page number in question.
Library software component:C#: How to Use SDK to Convert Document and Image Using XDoc.
This online C# tutorial will tell you how to implement conversion to Tiff file from PDF, Word, Excel You may use our converter SDK to easily convert
www.rasteredge.com
Library software component:VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
RasterEdge. PRODUCTS: ONLINE DEMOS: Online HTML5 Document Viewer; Online XDoc.PDF Demo▶: C#: Convert PDF to HTML; C#: Convert PDF to Jpeg; C# File: Compress
www.rasteredge.com
44
V
. T
ABLE OF CONTENTS
,I
NDEX AND
G
LOSSARY
delta, 14
δ, 23
delta wing, 16
flower, 19
ninety, 26
xc, 28
ninety-five, 5
tabbing, 7, 34–37
tabular, ii, 21, 22n
tabular
environment, 23
Page ii:
\index{tabular|textbf}
Page 5:
\index{ninety-five}
Page 7:
\index{tabbing}
Page 14: \index{delta}
Page 16: \index{delta wing}
Page 19: \index{flower@
\textbf
{flower}}
Page 21: \index{tabular|textit}
Page 22: \index{tabular|nn}
Page 23: \index{delta@
δ
}
\index{tabular@
\texttt
{tabular}
environment}
Page 26: \index{ninety}
Page 28: \index{ninety@xc}
Page 34: \index{tabbing|(textit}
Page 36: \index{tabbing|)}
Figure
V
.3: Controlling the presentation form
@sign, 2
|, see vertical bar
exclamation (!), 4
Ah!, 5
M¨adchen, 3
quote (
"
), 1
"
sign, 1
\index{
bar@
\texttt
{"|}|
see
{
vertical bar
}}
Page 1:
\index{
quote (
\verb
+
""
+)
}
\index{
quote@
\texttt
{""}
sign
}
Page 2:
\index{
atsign@
\texttt
{"@}
sign
}
Page 3:
\index{
maedchen@M\
"{
a
}
dchen
}
Page 4:
\index{
exclamation (
"
!)
}
Page 5:
\index{
exclamation (
"
!)!Ah
"
!
}
Figure
V
.4: Printing those special characters
Similarly, the command
\index
{keyword|(xxx)} will generate a page range of the form
\xxx
{n-m}
\newcommand{\nn}[1]{#1n}
V
.2.5. Printing those special characters
To typeset one of the characters having a special meaning to MakeIndex (
!, ", @, or |
)
in the index, precede it with a
"
character. More precisely, any character is said to be
quoted if it follows an unquoted
"
that is not part of a
\"
command. The latter case is for
allowing umlaut characters. Quoted
!, @, ", or |
characters are treated like ordinary
characters, losing their special meaning. The
"
preceding a quoted character is deleted
before the entries are alphabetised.
V
.3. G
LOSSARY
A‘glossary’ is a special index of terms and phrases alphabetically ordered together with
their explanations. To help set up a glossary, LAT
E
Xoffers the commands
\makeglossary
in the preamble and
\glossary{
glossary-entry
}
in the text part
Library software component:VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
RasterEdge. PRODUCTS: ONLINE DEMOS: Online HTML5 Document Viewer; Online XDoc.PDF Demo▶: C#: Convert PDF to HTML; C#: Convert PDF to Jpeg; C# File: Compress
www.rasteredge.com
Library software component:C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to
RasterEdge. PRODUCTS: ONLINE DEMOS: Online HTML5 Document Viewer; Online XDoc.PDF Demo▶: C#: Convert PDF to HTML; C#: Convert PDF to Jpeg; C# File: Compress
www.rasteredge.com
V
.3. G
LOSSARY
45
which function just like the commands for making up an index register. The entries are
written to a file with extension
.glo
after the command
\makeglossary
has been given in
the preamble. The form of these file entries from each
\glossary
command is
\glossaryentry\textit{glossary-entry}{
pagenumber
}
The information in the
.glo
file can be used to establish a glossary. However, there is no
equivalent to the
theindex
environment for a glossary, but a recommended structure is
the
description
environment or a special list environment.
Library software component:VB.NET PDF- HTML5 PDF Viewer for VB.NET Project
Convert PDF Online in HTML5 PDF Viewer. With RasterEdge VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer, users can directly convert and export PDF to Tiff, HTML file, DOCX and image
www.rasteredge.com
Library software component:RasterEdge for .NET Online Demo
Online PDF Editor (beta); Online Document Viewer; Online Convert PDF to Word; Online Convert PDF to Tiff; Online Convert PDF to Html. SUPPORT:
www.rasteredge.com
46
TUTORIAL VI
DISPLAYED TEXT
There are many instances in a document when we want to visually separate a portion
of text from its surrounding material. One method of doing this is to typeset the distin-
guished text with added indentation. It is called displaying. LAT
E
Xhas various constructs
for displaying text depending the nature of the displayed text.
VI
.1. B
ORROWED WORDS
Quotations are often used in a document, either to add weight to our arguments by
referring to a higher authority or because we find that we cannot improve on the way
an idea has been expressed by someone else. If the quote is a one-liner, we can simply
include it within double-quotes and be done with it (remember how to use quotes in
T
E
X?) But if the quotation is several lines long, it is better to display it. Look at the
following example:
Some mathematicians elevate the spirit of Mathematics to a kind of intellectual aesthetics. It
is best voiced by Bertrand Russell in the following lines.
The true spirit of delight, the exaltation, the sense of being more than man, which
is the touchstone of the highest excellence, is to be found in Mathematics as surely
as in poetry....Real life is, to most men, a long second best, a perpetual compro-
mise between the ideal and the possible; but the world of pure reason knows no
compromise, no practical limitations, no barriers to the creative activity embody-
ing in splendid edifices the passionate aspiration after the perfect, from which all
great work springs.
Yes, to men like Russell, Mathematics is more of an art than science.
This was type set as shown below
Some mathematicians elevate the spirit of Mathematics
to a kind of
intellectual aesthetics. It is best voiced
by Bertrand Russell in the
following lines.
\begin{quote}
The true spirit of ................................from which
all great work springs.
\end{quote}
Note that here we give instructions to T
E
Xto typeset some material in a separate
paragraph with additional indentation on either side and indicate the start and end of
material requiring special treatment, by means of the commands
\begin{quote} ... \end{quote}
47
48
VI
. D
ISPLAYED
T
EXT
This is an example of what is known in LAT
E
Xparlance as an environment. Environ-
ments are used to delimit passages requiring special typographic treatments and to give
instructions to LAT
E
Xon how to typeset it. The general form of an environment is of the
form
\begin{
name
} ... \end{
name
}
where name is the name of the environment and signifies to LAT
E
Xthe type of typographic
treatment required (deliberate attempt at a pun, that).
The quoted part in this example is a single paragraph. If the quotation runs into
several paragraphs, we must use the
quotation
environment, by enclosing the quotation
within
\begin{quotation}
and
\end{quotation}
.As usual, paragraphs are separated by
blank lines while typing the source file.
VI
.2. P
OETRY IN TYPESETTING
LAT
E
Xcan write poetry...well almost; if you write poems, T
E
X can nicely typeset it for
you. (I have also heard some T
E
Xwizards saying Knuth’s code is sheer poetry!) Look at
the passage below:
Contrary to popular belief, limericks are not always ribald. Some of them contain mathemati-
cal concepts:
Amathematician once confided
That a M ¨obius band is one sided
You’ll get quite a laugh
If you cut it in half
For it stays in one piece when divided
There is an extension of this to Klein’s bottle also.
This was typeset as follows:
Contrary to popular belief, ...
tried their hands at it:
\begin{verse}
A mathematician confided\\
A M\"obius band is one sided\\
You’ll get quite a laugh\\
If you cut it in half\\
For it stays in one piece when divided
\end{verse}
There is an extension of this to Klein’s bottle also.
Note that line breaks are forced by the symbol
\\
. Different stanzas are separated
in the input by one (or more) blank lines. If you do not want T
E
Xto start a new page at
aparticular line break (if you want to keep rhyming couplets together in one page, for
example), then use
\\*
instead of plain
\\
.Again, if you want more space between lines
than what LAT
E
Xdeems fit, then use
\\
with an optional length as in
\\[5pt]
which adds
an extra vertical space of 5 points between the lines. You can also type
\\*[5pt]
,whose
intention should be obvious by now.
VI
.3. M
AKING LISTS
Lists are needed to keep some semblance of order in a chaotic world and L
A
T
E
Xhelps us
to typeset them nicely. Also, there are different kinds of lists available by default and if
VI
.3. M
AKING LISTS
49
none of them suits your need, there are facilities to tweak these or even design your own.
Let us first have a look at the types of lists LAT
E
Xprovides.
VI
.3.1. Saying it with bullets
The
itemize
environment gives us a bullet-list. For example it produces something like
this:
One should keep the following in mind when using T
E
X
• T
E
Xis a typesetting language and not a word processor
• T
E
Xis a program and and not an application
• Theres is no meaning in comparing T
E
Xto a word processor, since the design purposes
are different
Being a program, T
E
Xoffers a high degree of flexibility.
The input which produces this is given below:
One should keep the following in mind when using \TeX
\begin{itemize}
\item \TeX\ is a typesetting language and not a word processor
\item \TeX\ is a program and and not an application
\item Theres is no meaning in comparing \teX\ to a word processor, since the design
purposes are different
\end{itemize}
Being a program, \TeX\ offers a high degree of flexibility.
The
\begin{itemize}
...
\end{itemize}
pair signifies we want a bullet-list of the
enclosed material. Each item of the list is specified by (what else?) an
\item
command.
We can have lists within lists. For example:
One should keep the following in mind when using T
E
X
• T
E
Xis a typesetting language and not a word processor
• T
E
Xis a program and and not an application
• Theres is no meaning in comparing T
E
Xto a word processor, since the design purposes
are different
• T
E
Xis the natural choice in one of these situations
– If we want to typeset a document containing lot of Mathematics
– If we want our typed document to look beautiful
Being a program, T
E
Xoffers a high degree of flexibility.
It is produced by the input below:
One should keep the following in mind when using \TeX
\begin{itemize}
\item \TeX\ is a typesetting language and not a
word processor
\item \TeX\ is a program and and not an application
\item Theres is no meaning in comparing \TeX\ to a word processor, since the design
purposes are different
\item \TeX\ is the natural choice in one of these situations
\begin{itemize}
\item If we want to typeset a document containing lot of Mathematics
50
VI
. D
ISPLAYED
T
EXT
\item If we want our typed document to look beautiful
\end{itemize}
\end{itemize}
Being a program, \TeX\ offers a high degree of flexibility.
The
itemize
environment supports four levels of nesting. The full list of labels for the
items (‘bullets’ for the first level, ‘dashes’ for the second and so on) is as shown below
• The first item in the first level
• the second item in the first level
– The first item in the second level
– the second item in the second level
∗ The first item in the third level
∗ the second item in the third level
· The first item in the fourth level
· the second item in the fourth level
Not satisfied with these default labels? How about this one?
 First item of a new list
 Second item
It was produced by the following input:
{\renewcommand{\labelitemi}{$\triangleright$}
\begin{itemize}
\item First item of a new list
\item Second item
\end{itemize}}
Several things need explanation here. First note that the first level labels of the
itemize
environment are produced by the (internal and so invisible to the user) command
\labelitemi
and by default, this is set as
\textbullet
to produce the default ‘bullets’.
What we do here by issuing the
\renewcommand
is to override this by a choice of our own
namely
$\triangleright$
which produces the little triangles in the above list. Why the
braces
{
and
}
(did you notice them?) enclosing the whole input? They make the effect
of the
\renewcommand
local in the sense that this change of labels is only for this specific
list. Which means the next time we use an
itemize
environment, the labels revert back
to the original ‘bullets’. If we want the labels to be changed in the entire document, then
remove the braces.
What if we want to change the second level labels? No problem, just change the
\labelitemii
command, using a symbol of our choice. The third and fourth level labels
are set by the commands (can you guess?)
\labelitemiii
and
\labelitemiv
.Look at the
following example.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested