VIII
.2. C
USTOM COMMANDS
81
x\circ y = x+y-xy
$$
This operation is associative.
Note the spaces surrounding the ◦ symbol in the output. On the other hand suppose you
want
For real numbers x and y, define an operation  by
x y = x
2
+y
2
The list of symbols show that the symbol  is produced by
\Box
but that it is avail-
able only in the package latexsym or amssymb. So if we load one of these using the
\usepackage
command and then type
For real numbers $x$ and $y$, define an operation $\Box$ by
$$
x\Box y = xˆ2+yˆ2
$$
you will only get
For real numbers x and y, define an operation  by
xy = x
2
+y
2
Notice the difference? There are no spaces around ; this is because, this symbol is
not by default defined as a binary operator. (Note that it is classified under “Miscel-
laneous”.) But we can ask T
E
X to consider this symbol as a binary operator by the
command
\mathbin
before
\Box
as in
For real numbers $x$ and $y$, define an operation $\Box$ by
$$
x\mathbin\Box y=xˆ2+yˆ2
$$
and this will produce the output shown first.
This holds for “Relations” also. T
E
Xleaves some space around “Relation” symbols
and we can instruct T
E
Xto consider any symbol as a relation by the command
\mathrel
.
Thus we can produce
Define the relation ρ on the set of real numbers by x ρ y iff x − y is a rational number.
by typing
Define the relation $\rho$ on the set of real numbers by
$x\mathrel\rho y$ iff $x-y$ is a rational number.
(See what happens if you remove the
\mathrel
command.)
VIII
.2. C
USTOM COMMANDS
We have seen that LAT
E
Xproduces mathematics (and many other things as well) by means
of “commands”. The interesting thing is that we can build our own commands using
the ones available. For example, suppose that t the expression (x
1
,x
2
,. .. ,x
n
)occurs
frequently in a document. If we now write
Convert pdf to web page - control SDK platform:C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
How to Convert PDF to HTML Webpage with C# PDF Conversion SDK
www.rasteredge.com
Convert pdf to web page - control SDK platform:VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
PDF to HTML Webpage Converter SDK for VB.NET PDF to HTML Conversion
www.rasteredge.com
82
VIII
. T
YPESETTING
M
ATHEMATICS
\newcommand{\vect}{(x_1,x_2,\dots,x_n)}
Then we can type
$\vect$
anywhere after wards to produce (x
1
,x
2
,. .. ,x
n
)as in
We often write $x$ to denote the vector $\vect$.
to get
We often write x to denote the vector (x
1
,x
2
,. . . , x
n
).
(By the way, the best place to keep such “newcommands” is the preamble, so that you
can use them anywhere in the document. Also, it will be easier to change the commands,
if the need arises).
OK, we can now produce (x
1
,x
2
,.. ., x
n
)with
$\vect$
,but how about (y
1
,y
2
,. .. , y
n
)
or (z
1
,z
2
,. .. ,z
n
)? Do we have to define newcommands for each of these? Not at all. We
can also define commands with variable arguments also. Thus if we change our definition
of
\vect
to
\newcommand{\vect}[1]{(#1_1,#1_2,\dots,#1_n)}
Then we can use
$\vect{x}$
to produce (x
1
,x
2
,.. ., x
n
)and
$\vect{a}$
to produce
(a
1
,a
2
,.. . ,a
n
)and so on.
The form of this definition calls for some comments. The
[1]
in the
\newcommand
above indicates that the command is to have one (variable) argument. What about the
#1
? Before producing the output, each occurrence of
#1
will be replaced by the (single)
argument we supply to
\vect
in the input. For example, the input
$\vect{a}$
will be
changed to
$(a_1,a_2,\dots,a_n)$
at some stage of the compilation.
We can also define commands with more than one argument (the maximum number
is 9). Thus for example, if the document contains not only (x
1
,x
2
,.. ., x
n
), (y
1
,y
2
,. .. , y
n
)
and so on, but (x
1
,x
2
,. .. ,x
m
), (y
1
,y
2
,. .. , y
p
)also, then we can change our definition of
\vect
to
\newcommand{\vect}[2]{(#1_1,#1_2,\dotsc,#1_#2)}
so that we can use
$\vect{x}{n}$
to produce (x
1
,x
2
,.. ., x
n
)and
$\vect{a}{p}$
to pro-
duce (a
1
,a
2
,. .. ,a
p
).
VIII
.3. M
ORE ON MATHEMATICS
There are some many other features of typesetting math in LAT
E
X, but these have better
implementations in the package amsmath which has some additional features as well. So,
for the rest of the chapter the discussion will be with reference to this package and some
allied ones. Thus all discussion below is under the assumption that the package amsmath
has been loaded with the command
\usepackage{amsmath}
.
VIII
.3.1. Single equations
In addition to the LAT
E
Xcommands for displaying math as discussed earlier, the ams-
math also provides the
\begin{equation*} ... \end{equation*}
construct. Thus with
this package loaded, the output
The equation representing a straight line in the Cartesian plane is of the form
ax + by + c = 0
where a, b, c are constants.
can also be produced by
control SDK platform:C# PDF Convert to SVG SDK: Convert PDF to SVG files in C#.net, ASP
Instantly convert all PDF document pages to SVG image files in C#.NET class Perform high-fidelity PDF to SVG conversion in both ASP.NET web and WinForms
www.rasteredge.com
control SDK platform:C# PDF: How to Create PDF Document Viewer in C#.NET with
image and outline preview for quick PDF document page navigation; Support rendering web viewer PDF document to images or svg file; Free to convert viewing PDF
www.rasteredge.com
VIII
.3. M
ORE ON MATHEMATICS
83
The equation representing a straight line in the Cartesian plane is
of the form
\begin{equation*}
ax+by+c=0
\end{equation*}
where $a$, $b$, $c$ are constants.
Why the * after
equation
?Suppose we try it without the * as
The equation representing a straight line in the Cartesian plane is
of the form
\begin{equation}
ax+by+c=0
\end{equation}
where $a$, $b$, $c$ are constants.
we get
The equation representing a straight line in the Cartesian plane is of the form
(
VIII
.1)
ax + by + c = 0
where a, b, c are constants.
This provides the equation with a number. We will discuss equation numbering in some
more detail later on. For the time being, we just note that for any environment name
with a star we discuss here, the unstarred version provides the output with numbers.
Ordinary text can be inserted inside an equation using the
\text
command. Thus
we can get
Thus for all real numbers x we have
x≤ |x| and x ≥ |x|
and so
x≤ |x| for all x in R.
from
Thus for all real numbers $x$ we have
\begin{equation*}
x\le|x|\quad\text{and}\quad x\ge|x|
\end{equation*}
and so
\begin{equation*}
x\le|x|\quad\text{for all $x$ in $R$}.
\end{equation*}
Note the use of dollar signs in the second
\text
above to produce mathematical
symbols within
\text
.
Sometimes a single equation maybe too long to fit into one line (or sometimes even
two lines). Look at the one below:
(a + b + c + d + e)
2
=a
2
+b
2
+c
2
+d
2
+e
2
+2ab + 2ac + 2ad + 2ae + 2bc + 2bd + 2be + 2cd + 2ce + 2de
control SDK platform:C# HTML5 Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
When viewing PDF document on web viewer, users can C# users can perform various PDF conversion actions, such as convert PDF to Microsoft Office Word
www.rasteredge.com
control SDK platform:C#: How to Add HTML5 Document Viewer Control to Your Web Page
the necessary resources for creating web document viewer addCommand(new RECommand("convert")); _tabFile.addCommand new UserCommand("pdf"); _userCmdDemoPdf.
www.rasteredge.com
84
VIII
. T
YPESETTING
M
ATHEMATICS
This is produced by the environment
multline*
(note the spelling carefully—it is not
mult
i
line
), as shown below.
\begin{multline*}
(a+b+c+d+e)ˆ2=aˆ2+bˆ2+cˆ2+dˆ2+eˆ2\\
+2ab+2ac+2ad+2ae+2bc+2bd+2be+2cd+2ce+2de
\end{multline*}
multline
can be used for equations requiring more than two lines, but without tweaking,
the results are not very satisfactory. For example, the input
\begin{multline*}
(a+b+c+d+e+f)ˆ2=aˆ2+bˆ2+cˆ2+dˆ2+eˆ2+fˆ2\\
+2ab+2ac+2ad+2ae+2af\\
+2bc+2bd+2be+2bf\\
+2cd+2ce+2cf\\
+2de+2df\\
+2ef
\end{multline*}
produces
(a + b + c + d + e + f)
2
=a
2
+b
2
+c
2
+d
2
+e
2
+f
2
+2ab + 2ac + 2ad + 2ae + 2af
+2bc + 2bd + 2be + 2bf
+2cd + 2ce + 2cf
+2de + 2df
+2e f
By default, the
multline
environment places the first line flush left, the last line flush right
(except for some indentation) and the lines in between, centered within the display.
Abetter way to typeset the above multiline (not multline) equation is as follows.
(a + b + c + d + e + f)
2
=a
2
+b
2
+c
2
+d
2
+e
2
+f
2
+2ab + 2ac + 2ad + 2ae + 2af
+2bc + 2bd + 2be + 2b f
+2cd + 2ce + 2c f
+2de + 2d f
+2e f
This is done using the
split
environment as shown below.
\begin{equation*}
\begin{split}
(a+b+c+d+e+f)ˆ2 & = aˆ2+bˆ2+cˆ2+dˆ2+eˆ2+fˆ2\\
&\quad +2ab+2ac+2ad+2ae+2af\\
&\quad +2bc+2bd+2be+2bf\\
&\quad +2cd+2ce+2cf\\
&\quad +2de+2df\\
&\quad +2ef
\end{split}
\end{equation*}
control SDK platform:C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
Support to create new page to PDF document in both web server-side application and Windows Forms. Ability to add PDF page number in preview.
www.rasteredge.com
control SDK platform:C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
and quickly convert a large-size multi-page PDF document to a group of high-quality separate JPEG image files within .NET projects, including ASP.NET web and
www.rasteredge.com
VIII
.3. M
ORE ON MATHEMATICS
85
Some comments seems to be in order. First note that the
split
environment cannot
be used independently, but only inside some equation structure such as
equation
(and
others we will soon see). Unlike
multline
,the
split
environment provides for alignment
among the “split” lines (using the & character, as in
tabular
). Thus in the above example,
all the + signs are aligned and these in turn are aligned with a point a
\quad
to the right
of the = sign. It is also useful when the equation contains multiple equalities as in
(a + b)
2
=(a + b)(a + b)
=a
2
+ab + ba + b
2
=a
2
+2ab + b
2
which is produced by
\begin{equation*}
\begin{split}
(a+b)ˆ2 & = (a+b)(a+b)\\
& = aˆ2+ab+ba+bˆ2\\
& = aˆ2+2ab+bˆ2
\end{split}
\end{equation*}
VIII
.3.2. Groups of equations
Agroup of displayed equations can be typeset in a single go using the
gather
environ-
ment. For example,
(a, b) + (c, d) = (a + c, b + d)
(a, b)(c, d) = (ac − bd, ad + bc)
can be produced by
\begin{gather*}
(a,b)+(c,d)=(a+c,b+d)\\
(a,b)(c,d)=(ac-bd,ad+bc)
\end{gather*}
Now when several equations are to be considered one unit, the logically correct way
of typesetting them is with some alignment (and it is perhaps easier on the eye too). For
example,
Thus x, y and z satisfy the equations
x+ y − z = 1
x− y + z = 1
This is obtained by using the
align*
environment as shown below
Thus $x$, $y$ and $z$ satisfy the equations
\begin{align*}
x+y-z & = 1\\
x-y+z & = 1
\end{align*}
control SDK platform:XDoc.HTML5 Viewer for .NET, Zero Footprint AJAX Document Image
View, Convert, Edit, Sign Documents and Images. Wide range of web browsers support including IE9+ powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image to
www.rasteredge.com
control SDK platform:DocImage SDK for .NET: Web Document Image Viewer Online Demo
Document Viewer Demo to View, Annotate, Convert and Print upload a file to display in web viewer Suppported files are Word, Excel, PowerPoint, PDF, Tiff, Dicom
www.rasteredge.com
86
VIII
. T
YPESETTING
M
ATHEMATICS
We can add a short piece of text between the equations, without disturbing the alignment,
using the
\intertext
command. For example, the output
Thus x, y and z satisfy the equations
x+ y − z = 1
x− y + z = 1
and by hypothesis
x+ y + z = 1
is produced by
Thus $x$, $y$ and $z$ satisfy the equations
\begin{align*}
x+y-z & = 1\\
x-y+z & = 1\\
\intertext{and by hypothesis}
x+y+z & =1
\end{align*}
We can also set multiple ‘columns’ of aligned equations side by side as in
Compare the following sets of equations
cos
2
x+ sin
2
x= 1
cosh
2
x− sinh
2
x= 1
cos
2
x− sin
2
x= cos2x
cosh
2
x+ sinh
2
x= cosh 2x
All that it needs are extra
&
’s to separate the columns as can be sen from the input
Compare the following sets of equations
\begin{align*}
\cosˆ2x+\sinˆ2x & = 1
& \coshˆ2x-\sinhˆ2x & = 1\\
\cosˆ2x-\sinˆ2x & = \cos 2x & \coshˆ2x+\sinhˆ2x & = \cosh 2x
\end{align*}
We can also adjust the horizontal space between the equation columns. For example,
Compare the sets of equations
\begin{align*}
\cosˆ2x+\sinˆ2x & = 1
&\qquad \coshˆ2x-\sinhˆ2x & = 1\\
\cosˆ2x-\sinˆ2x & = \cos 2x &\qquad \coshˆ2x+\sinhˆ2x & = \cosh 2x
\end{align*}
gives
Compare the sets of equations
cos2 x + sin
2
x= 1
cosh
2
x− sinh
2
x= 1
cos
2
x− sin
2
x= cos2x
cosh
2
x+ sinh
2
x= cosh 2x
Perhaps a nicer way of typesetting the above is
control SDK platform:C# Image: Quick to Navigate Document in .NET Web Viewer
API can be called from any document page object for navigate to the target part of web viewer document well-formed documents, like Word and PDF, will contain
www.rasteredge.com
VIII
.3. M
ORE ON MATHEMATICS
87
Compare the following sets of equations
cos
2
x+ sin
2
x= 1
cos
2
x− sin
2
x= cos2x
and
cosh
2
x− sinh
2
x= 1
cosh
2
x+ sinh
2
x= cosh 2x
This cannot be produced by the equation structures discussed so far, because any of these
environments takes up the entire width of the text for its display, so that we cannot put
anything else on the same line. So amsmath provides variants
gathered
,
aligned
and
alignedat
which take up only the actual width of the contents for their display. Thus the
above example is produced by the input
Compare the following sets of equations
\begin{equation*}
\begin{aligned}
\cosˆ2x+sinˆ2x
& = 1\\
\cosˆ2x-\sinˆ2x & = \cos 2x
\end{aligned}
\qquad\text{and}\qquad
\begin{aligned}
\coshˆ2x-\sinhˆ2x & = 1\\
\coshˆ2x+\sinhˆ2x & = \cosh 2x
\end{aligned}
\end{equation*}
Another often recurring structure in mathematics is a display like this
|x| =
x
if x ≥ 0
−x if x ≤ 0
There is a special environment
cases
in amsmath to take care of these. The above exam-
ple is in fact produced by
\begin{equation*}
|x| =
\begin{cases}
x & \text{if $x\ge 0$}\\
-x & \text{if $x\le 0$}
\end{cases}
\end{equation*}
VIII
.3.3. Numbered equations
We have mentioned that each of the the ‘starred’ equation environments has a corre-
sponding unstarred version, which also produces numbers for their displays. Thus our
very first example of displayed equations with
equation
instead of
equation*
as in
The equation representing a straight line in the Cartesian plane is
of the form
\begin{equation}
ax+by+c=0
\end{equation}
where $a$, $b$, $c$ are constants.
88
VIII
. T
YPESETTING
M
ATHEMATICS
produces
The equation representing a straight line in the Cartesian plane is of the form
(
VIII
.2)
ax + by + c = 0
where a, b, c are constants.
Why
VIII
.2for theequationnumber? ? Well, , this is Equationnumber2ofChap-
ter
VIII
,isn’t it? If you want the section number also in the equation number, just give
the command
\numberwithin{equation}{section}
We can also override the number LAT
E
Xproduces with one of our own design with the
\tag
command as in
The equation representing a straight line in the Cartesian plane is
of the form
\begin{equation}
ax+by+c=0\tag{L}
\end{equation}
where $a$, $b$, $c$ are constants.
which gives
The equation representing a straight line in the Cartesian plane is of the form
(L)
ax + by + c = 0
where a, b, c are constants.
There is also a
\tag*
command which typesets the equation label without parentheses.
What about numbering alignment structures? Except for
split
and
aligned
, all
other alignment structures have unstarred forms which attach numbers to each aligned
equation. For example,
\begin{align}
x+y-z & = 1\\
x-y+z & = 1
\end{align}
gives
x+ y − z = 1
(
VIII
.3)
x− y + z = 1
(
VIII
.4)
Here is also, you can give a label of your own to any of the equations with the
\tag
command. Be careful to give the
\tag
before the end of line character
\\
though. (See
what happens if you give a
\tag
command after a
\\
.) You can also suppress the label for
any equation with the
\notag
command. These are illustrated in the sample input below:
Thus $x$, $y$ and $z$ satisfy the equations
\begin{align*}
VIII
.4. M
ATHEMATICS MISCELLANY
89
x+y-z & = 1\ntag\\
x-y+z & = 1\notag\\
\intertext{and by hypothesis}
x+y+z & =1\tag{H}
\end{align*}
which gives the following output
Thus x, y and z satisfy the equations
x+ y − z = 1
x− y + z = 1
and by hypothesis
x+ y + z = 1
(H)
What about
split
and
aligned
? As we have seen, these can be used only within
some other equation structure. The numbering or the lack of it is determined by this
parent structure. Thus
\begin{equation}
\begin{split}
(a+b)ˆ2 & = (a+b)(a+b)\\
& = aˆ2+ab+ba+bˆ2\\
& = aˆ2+2ab+bˆ2
\end{split}
\end{equation}
gives
(a + b)
2
=(a + b)(a + b)
=a
2
+ab + ba + b
2
=a
2
+2ab + b
2
(
VIII
.5)
VIII
.4. M
ATHEMATICS MISCELLANY
There are more things Mathematics than just equations. Let us look at how LAT
E
Xand in
particular, the amsmath package deals with them.
VIII
.4.1. Matrices
Matrices are by definition numbers or mathematical expressions arranged in rows and
columns. The amsmath has several environments for producing such arrays. For example
90
VIII
. T
YPESETTING
M
ATHEMATICS
The system of equations
x+ y − z = 1
x− y + z = 1
x+ y + z = 1
can be written in matrix terms as
1
1
−1
1 −1
1
1
1
1
x
y
z
=
1
1
1
.
Here, the matrix
1
1
−1
1 −1
1
1
1
1
is invertible.
is produced by
The system of equations
\begin{align*}
x+y-z & = 1\\
x-y+z & = 1\\
x+y+z & = 1
\end{align*}
can be written in matrix terms as
\begin{equation*}
\begin{pmatrix}
1 &
1 & -1\\
1 & -1 &
1\\
1 &
1 &
1
\end{pmatrix}
\begin{pmatrix}
x\\
y\\
z
\end{pmatrix}
=
\begin{pmatrix}
1\\
1\\
1
\end{pmatrix}.
\end{equation*}
Here, the matrix
$\begin{pmatrix}
1 &
1 & -1\\
1 & -1 &
1\\
1 &
1 &
1
\end{pmatrix}$
is invertible.
Note that the environment
pmatrix
can be used within in-text mathematics or in
displayed math. Why the
p
?There is indeed an environment
matrix
(without a
p
)but it
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested