display pdf in iframe mvc : Convert pdf to webpage software application dll winforms windows azure web forms kowalski0-part137

IMPROVED COSMOLOGICAL CONSTRAINTS FROM NEW, OLD,
AND COMBINED SUPERNOVA DATA SETS
M. Kowalski,
1
D. Rubin,
2,3
G. Aldering,
2
R. J. Agostinho,
4
A. Amadon,
5
R. Amanullah,
6
C. Balland,
7
K. Barbary,
2,3
G. Blanc,
8
P. J. Challis,
9
A. Conley,
10
N. V. Connolly,
11
R. Covarrubias,
12
K. S. Dawson,
2
S. E. Deustua,
13
R. Ellis,
14
S. Fabbro,
15
V. Fadeyev,
16
X. Fan,
17
B. Farris,
18
G. Folatelli,
12
B. L. Frye,
19
G. Garavini,
20
E. L. Gates,
21
L. Germany,
22
G. Goldhaber,
2,3
B. Goldman,
23
A. Goobar,
20
D. E. Groom,
2
J. Haissinski,
24
D. Hardin,
7
I. Hook,
25
S. Kent,
26
A. G. Kim,
2
R. A. Knop,
27
C. Lidman,
28
E. V. Linder,
6
J. Mendez,
29,30
J. Meyers,
2,3
G. J. Miller,
31
M. Moniez,
24
A. M. Moura˜o,
15
H. Newberg,
32
S. Nobili,
20
P. E. Nugent,
2
R. Pain,
7
O. Perdereau,
24
S. Perlmutter,
2,3
M. M. Phillips,
33
V. Prasad,
2
R. Quimby,
14
N. Regnault,
7
J. Rich,
5
E. P. Rubenstein,
34
P. Ruiz-Lapuente,
30
F. D. Santos,
35
B. E. Schaefer,
36
R. A. Schommer,
37
R. C. Smith,
38
A. M. Soderberg,
14
A. L. Spadafora,
2
L.-G. Strolger,
39
M. Strovink,
2,3
N. B. Suntzeff,
40
N. Suzuki,
2
R. C. Thomas,
2
N. A. Walton,
41
L. Wang,
40
W. M. Wood-Vasey,
9
and J. L. Yun
4
(The Supernova Cosmology Project)
Received 2007October25; accepted 2008 April 2
ABSTRACT
We presenta new compilationof TypeIasupernovae(SNe Ia),a new dataset oflow-redshiftnearby-Hubble-flow
SNe,andnewanalysisprocedurestoworkwiththeseheterogeneouscompilations.This‘‘Union’’compilation of 414
SNeIa,whichreducesto307SNeafterselection cuts,includestherecentlargesamplesofSNeIafromthe Supernova
LegacySurvey and ESSENCE Survey, the olderdata sets,aswell asthe recently extendeddata set ofdistantsuper-
novae observed with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST).A single,consistent,and blind analysisprocedure isused
forallthevariousSNIasubsamples,andanewprocedureisimplementedthatconsistentlyweightstheheterogeneous
datasetsandrejectsoutliers.We presentthe latest resultsfrom this Union compilation and discussthe cosmological
constraintsfromthisnew compilationanditscombination with othercosmologicalmeasurements(CMB and BAO).
The constraintwe obtainfromsupernovae on the darkenergy density is
¼0:713
þ0:027
0:029
(stat)þ0:036
0:039
(sys),fora flat,
CDMuniverse.Assumingaconstantequationofstate parameter,w,thecombinedconstraintsfromSNe,BAO,and
A
1
Institut fu¨r Physik, Humboldt-Universita¨t zu Berlin, Newtonstrasse 15,
Berlin 12489, Germany.
2
E.O.LawrenceBerkeleyNationalLaboratory,1CyclotronRoad,Berkeley,
CA94720.
3
Department of Physics, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, CA
94720-7300.
4
Centro de Astronomia e Astrofı´sica da Universidade de Lisboa, Ob-
servato´rioAstrono´micodeLisboa,TapadadaAjuda,1349-018Lisbon,Portugal.
5
DSM/DAPNIA, CEA/Saclay,91191Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex,France.
6
Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley,
CA94720.
7
LPNHE, CNRS-IN2P3, UniversityofParisVI&VII,Paris,France.
8
APC, Universite
´
Paris 7, 10 rue Alice Domon et Le
´
onie Duquet, 75205
ParisCedex13,France.
9
CenterforAstrophysics,HarvardUniversity,60GardenStreet,Cambridge,
MA 02138.
10
DepartmentofAstronomyandAstrophysics,UniversityofToronto,60St.
GeorgeStreet,Toronto, ON M5S3H8,Canada.
11
DepartmentofPhysics, HamiltonCollege,Clinton,NY 13323.
12
Observatories of the CarnegieInstitution of Washington,813 Santa Bar-
baraStreet,Pasadena, CA9110.
13
American Astronomical Society, 2000 Florida Avenue, NW, Suite 400,
Washington,DC20009.
14
California InstituteofTechnology, East California Boulevard, Pasadena,
CA91125.
15
CENTRAeDep.deFisica,IST,AvenidaRoviscoPais,1049Lisbon,Portugal.
16
Department ofPhysics,University ofCalifornia Santa Cruz, SantaCruz,
CA95064.
17
StewardObservatory,UniversityofArizona,Tucson, AZ85721.
18
DepartmentofPhysics,UniversityofIllinoisatUrbana-Champaign,1110
WestGreen,Urbana, IL61801-3080.
19
Department of Physical Sciences, Dublin City University, Glasnevin,
Dublin9, Ireland.
20
Department of Physics, Stockholm University, Albanova University
Center, S-10691Stockholm,Sweden.
21
LickObservatory, P.O.Box85, Mount Hamilton,CA 95140.
22
Centre for Astrophysicsand Supercomputing, Swinburne University of
Technology, JohnStreet,Hawthorn,VIC3122, Australia.
23
M.P.I.A.,Ko¨nigstuhl 17,69117Heidelberg,Germany.
24
Laboratoire de l’Acce´lerateur Line´aire, IN2P3-CNRS, Universite´ Paris
Sud,B.P.34,91898Orsay Cedex,France.
25
Sub-Department ofAstrophysics,UniversityofOxford,DenysWilkinson
Building,KebleRoad,OxfordOX13RH,UK.
26
FermiNationalAcceleratorLaboratory,P.O.Box500,Batavia, IL60510.
27
DepartmentofPhysicsandAstronomy,Vanderbilt University,Nashville,
TN37240.
28
European Southern Observatory, Alonso de Cordova 3107, Vitacura,
Casilla19001,Santiago19, Chile.
29
IsaacNewtonGroup, Apartadode Correos321,38780Santa Cruzde La
Palma, IslasCanarias,Spain.
30
DepartmentofAstronomy,UniversityofBarcelona, Barcelona, Spain.
31
SouthwesternCollege,DepartmentofAstronomy, 900OtayLakesRoad,
ChulaVista,CA 91910.
32
Physics Department, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, SC1C25, Troy,
NY 12180.
33
LasCampanasObservatory,CarnegieObservatories,Casilla601,LaSerena,
Chile.
34
Advanced Fuel Research, Inc., 87 Church Street, East Hartford, CT
06108.
35
DepartmentofPhysics,FacultyofSciences,UniversityofLisbon,Ed.C8,
Campo Grande,1749-016Lisbon,Portugal.
36 LouisianaStateUniversity,DepartmentofPhysicsandAstronomy,Baton
Rouge,LA70803.
37 Deceased.
38
Cerro TololoInter-AmericanObservatory, Casilla 603,LaSerena, Chile.
39
Department of Physics and Astronomy, Western KentuckyUniversity,
BowlingGreen,KY.
40
Department of Physics, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX
77843.
41
Instituteof Astronomy, MadingleyRoad,Cambridge CB30HA,UK.
749
The Astrophysical Journal, 686:749–778, 2008October 20
#2008.TheAmericanAstronomicalSociety.Allrightsreserved.PrintedinU.S.A.
Convert pdf to webpage - Library control component:C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
How to Convert PDF to HTML Webpage with C# PDF Conversion SDK
www.rasteredge.com
Convert pdf to webpage - Library control component:VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
PDF to HTML Webpage Converter SDK for VB.NET PDF to HTML Conversion
www.rasteredge.com
CMB give w ¼ 0:969þ0:059
0:063
(stat)
þ0:063
0:066
(sys).While ourresultsare consistent witha cosmologicalconstant, we ob-
tainonly relatively weak constraintson a wthat varieswithredshift. Inparticular,thecurrentSNdata donot yet sig-
nificantlyconstrainw atz > 1.WiththeadditionofournewnearbyHubble-flowSNeIa,theseresultingcosmological
constraints are currently the tightest available.
Subject headinggs: cosmological parameters — cosmology: observations — supernovae: general
Online material: color figures, machine-readable tables
<![%ONLINE; [toctitlegrptitleOnline Material/title/
titlegrplabelColor figures/labelentrytitlegrptitlefigref rid="fg2" place="NO"Figure 2/figref/title/
titlegrp/entryentrytitlegrptitlefigref rid="fg3" place="NO"Figure 3/figref/title/titlegrp/
entryentrytitlegrptitlefigref rid="fg8" place="NO"Figure 8/figref/title/titlegrp/
entryentrytitlegrptitlefigref rid="fg9" place="NO"Figure 9/figref/title/titlegrp/
entryentrytitlegrptitlefigref rid="fg10" place="NO"Figure 10/figref/title/titlegrp/
entryentrytitlegrptitlefigref rid="fg14" place="NO"Figure 14/figref/title/titlegrp/
entryentrytitlegrptitlefigref rid="fg15" place="NO"Figure 15/figref/title/titlegrp/
entryentrytitlegrptitlefigref rid="fg16" place="NO"Figure 16/figref/title/titlegrp/
entrylabelMachine-readable tables/labelentrytitlegrptitletableref rid="tb9" place="NO"Table 9/
tableref/title/titlegrp/entryentrytitlegrptitletableref rid="tb10" place="NO"Table 10/tableref/title/
titlegrp/entryentrytitlegrptitletableref rid="tb11" place="NO"Table 11/tableref/title/titlegrp/
entryentrytitlegrptitletableref rid="tb12" place="NO"Table 12/tableref/title/titlegrp/entry/toc]]>
1. INTRODUCTION
The evidence for dark energy hasevolved fromthefirst hints,
forthe case ofa flatuniverse (Perlmutteret al.1998; Garnavich
et al. 1998; Schmidt et al. 1998), through the more definite ev-
idence for the general case of unconstrained curvature (Riess
et al. 1998; Perlmutter et al. 1999), to the current work, which
aimsto explore the properties of dark energy (for a review, see
Perlmutter&Schmidt2003).Severalnewcosmologicalmeasure-
ment techniquesandseveral new Type Ia supernova (SN Ia)data
sets have helped begin the laborious process of narrowing in on
the parametersthat describe the cosmological model. The SN Ia
measurements remain a key ingredient in all current determina-
tions of cosmological parameters (see, e.g., the recent CMB re-
sults[Dunkleyetal.2008]).Itisthereforenecessarytounderstand
how the current world data set of SN Ia measurements is con-
structed and how it canbe used coherently,particularlysinceno
one SN Ia sample by itself provides an accurate cosmological
measurement.
Untilrecently,the SNIa compilations (e.g., Riesset al. 1998;
Perlmutteretal.1999;Tonryetal.2003;Knopetal.2003;Astier
et al. 2006; Wood-Vasey et al. 2007) primarily consisted of a
relatively uniform high-redshift (z 0:5)data set from a single
studyputtogetherwitha low-redshift(z 0:05)samplecollected
in a different study or studies.However, once there were several
independent data sets at high redshift, it became more important
and interesting to see the cosmological constraintsobtainable by
combining several groups’ work. Riess et al. (2004, 2007) pro-
vided a first compilation analysis of this kind, drawing on data
chosenfromPerlmutteretal.(1999),Riessetal.(1998),Schmidt
et al. (1998), Knop et al. (2003), Tonry et al.(2003), and Barris
et al. (2004). Many of the subsequent cosmology studies have
usedthis compilation asthe representation ofthe SN Ia sample,
in particular the selection of supernovae that Riess et al. (2004,
2007)nicknamedthe ‘‘Gold’’sample.Otherrecentcompilations
that have been used are those of Wood-Vasey et al. (2007) and
Daviset al. (2007).
At present a number of updatesshould be made to the SN Ia
data sets, and a numberof analysis issues should be addressed,
including several that will recur with every future generation of
SN compilations. These include the following major goals:
1. It is important to add a new low-redshift SN Ia sample to
complementthelargeandrapidlygrowingnumberofdistantSNe.
Especially valuable are the SNe in the smooth, nearby Hubble
flow (z above 0.02). Since this part of the Hubble diagram is
currentlynotwellconstrained,newnearbySNeleadtoarelatively
large incremental improvement (Linder 2006). It isinteresting to
note that the largest contributionin thisredshift range still comes
from the landmark Calan/Tololo survey (Hamuy et al. 1996).
2. Theanalysisshouldreflect the heterogeneousnatureofthe
data set. In particular, it is important that a sample of poorer
quality will not degrade the impact of the higher quality data,
such as the Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS) and ESSENCE
high-redshift data sets, which have recently been published.
3. The different supernova data setsshould be analyzed with
the sameanalysisprocedure.Thepreviouscompilationscombined
measurementsand peak-magnitude fitsthat were obtained with
disparate light curve fitting functions and analysis procedures,
particularly for handling the colorcorrection forboth extinction
and any intrinsic color-luminosity relation.
4. A reproducible, well-characterized approach to selecting
the good SNe Ia and rejecting the questionable and outlier SNe
should be used.Previouscompilationsrelied to alargeextenton
theheterogeneousclassificationinformationprovidedbytheorig-
inal authors.Theselectionprocesswassomewhatsubjective:The
Gold compilation ofRiess etal.(2004,2007) excluded SNe that
Knopetal.(2003)consideredcomparablywell-confirmedSNeIa.
5. To the extent possible, the analysis should not introduce
biases into the fit, including some that have only recently been
recognizedasbeingpresentinmethodsofdetermining extinction
propertiesof SNe Ia.
Toreachthegoalofcarryingouttheseimprovements,wepresent
in this papera new SN compilation, a new nearby-Hubble-flow
SN Ia data set,and new analysisprocedures. Several additional
smaller enhancements are also presented.
With respect togoal 1,itisimportant tonote that bothnearby
and distant supernovae are needed to measure cosmological pa-
rameters.Thebrightnessofnearbysupernovaeinthe Hubbleflow
iscomparedtothatof high-redshiftsupernovae,which—following
the dynamics of the universe—might appear dimmer or brighter
than expected for a reference cosmology. Nearby SN light curves
typically have better observational coverage andsignal-to-noise
ratio (S/N) than their high-redshift counterparts.However, they
are significantly more difficult to discover since vast amounts
of sky have to be searched to obtain a sizable number of super-
novae, due to the smallvolume ofthe low-redshift universe.We
presentlightcurvesfromtheSupernovaCosmologyProject(SCP)
Spring1999NearbySupernovaCampaign(Aldering2000),which
consisted primarily of wide-field magnitude-limited searches and
extensive photometric andspectroscopicfollow-upobservations
using a large number of ground-based telescopes. We provide
BVRI lightcurvesforeightnearbysupernovaeintheHubbleflow.
We thenaddressgoal2bycombiningthenewdatasamplewith
published data of nearby and distant supernovae to construct the
largest Hubble diagramto date (but presumablynotfor long). In
thiscombinationwe adjustthe weightofSNe belongingtoasam-
pletoreflectthedispersionwedetermine forthe sample.Withour
prescription, SN samples with significant unaccounted-for sta-
tistical orsystematic uncertainties are effectively deweighted.
AllSN lightcurvesare fittedconsistentlyintheobserverframe
systemusingthe spectral-template–based fitmethodofGuyetal.
(2005)(alsoknown asSALT).Where possible,theoriginalband-
pass functionsare used (goal 3).
To addressgoal4,weadopt arobustanalysistechniquebased
on outlier rejection that we show is resilient against contamina-
tion. The analysis strategy wasdeveloped to limit the influence
ofhumansubjectivity.Spectroscopicclassificationisarguablythe
most subjective component ofSN cosmology (primarilybecause
KOWALSKI ET AL.
750
Vol. 686
Library control component:Online Convert PDF to HTML5 files. Best free online PDF html
HTML converter library control is a 100% clean .NET document image solution, which is designed to help .NET developers convert PDF to HTML webpage using simple
www.rasteredge.com
Library control component:VB.NET PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in vb.
Able to convert PDF to Tiff in .NET WinForms application and ASP.NET webpage. Convert PDF file to Tiff and jpeg in ASPX webpage online.
www.rasteredge.com
oftheobservationalchallengesassociatedwithhigh-redshiftsuper-
nova spectroscopy),and we avoiddecisionsofwhetherto include
aspecific SN that are based on spectroscopic features that go
beyond that of the authors’ classification.
Following Conley et al. (2006), the full analysis chain was
developed in a blind fashion—that is, hiding the best-fitting
cosmological parameters until the analysis was finalized. This
helps resist the impulse to stop searching for systematic effects
oncethe‘‘right’’answerisobtained.We derive constraintsonthe
cosmologicalparameters,takingcare totestandremovepossible
sources of bias introduced in the fitting procedure (goal 5).
The paper is organized as follows. In x 2 we methodically
present thedata reductionand photometric calibration ofthe light
curves from the SCP Nearby 1999 Supernova Campaign: the
reader more interested in goals 2–5 and the subsequent cosmo-
logical analysis might want to only skim this section. In x 3 we
combine thenewsupernovaewitha largesetofnearbyand high-
redshift supernovae fromthe literature and fit the full setoflight
curves in a consistent manner. We then proceed to determine
stringent constraintson the dynamics of the universe. Section 4
explains the methods employed for cosmological parameter es-
timation, which includesblinding the analysis and using robust
statistics. We evaluate the systematic errorsof themeasurements
inx 5andsummarizethe resultingconstraintson 
M
,
,w,and
other parameters in x 6.
2. A NEW SAMPLE OF NEARBY SUPERNOVAE
TheSNlightcurvedata presentedin thispaperwere obtained
aspart oftheSCP Nearby1999 Supernova Campaign(Aldering
2000). The search portion of this campaign was designed to
discover Type Ia supernovae in the smooth nearby Hubble flow
and wasperformed incollaboration with a numberofwide-field
CCDimagingteams:EROS-II(Blancetal.2004),NGSS(Strolger
2003), QUEST-I (Rengstorf et al. 2004), NEAT (Pravdo et al.
1999),and Spacewatch(Nugent etal.1999b).In some casesthe
wide-field searcheswerefocusedentirelyonsupernovadiscovery
(EROS-II and NGSS), while in other casesthe primary data had
different scientific goals,such asdiscovery ofnear-Earth objects
(NEAT, Spacewatch), quasars, or microlenses (QUEST-I). The
wide-field cameras operated in either point and track (NGSS,
NEAT, EROS-II) or driftscan (QUEST-I, Spacewatch) modes,
andintotalcoveredhundredsofsquaredegreespernight.Overa
2month periodbeginning in1999 February,a totalofmore than
1300deg2wasmonitoredforSNe.Sincethesearchwasmagnitude
limited—nospecificgalaxiesweretargeted—itresemblestypical
searchesforhigh-redshiftsupernovae.Thisisimportant because
commonsystematicseffects,such asMalmquistbias,are thenex-
pected to more nearly cancel when comparing low-redshift with
high-redshift supernovae.
Atotalof32spectroscopicallyconfirmedSNewerediscovered
by the search component of thiscampaign. Of these, 22 were of
Type Ia, and 14 (ofthese) were discovered nearmaximum light,
making themuseful for cosmological studies. In addition, early
alertsof potentialSNe byLOTOSS(Filippenko et al.2001)and
similar galaxy-targeted searches, and the WOOTS-I (Gal-Yam
et al. 2008) and MSACS(Germany et al. 2004)cluster-targeted
searches, provided a supplement to the primary sample as the
wide-area searches ramped up. Extensive spectroscopic screen-
ingandfollow-up wasobtained usingguest observertimeonthe
CTIO4 m,KPNO4m,APO3.5 m,Lick 3m,NOT,INT,MDM
2.4 m, ESO 3.6 m, and WHT4.2 m telescopes. The results of
theseobservationshavebeenreportedelsewhere(Kimetal.1999a
1999b; Aldering et al. 1999; Strolger et al. 1999a, 1999b, 2002;
Gal-Yametal.1999;Nugentetal.1999a,1999c;Blancetal.2004;
Garavini et al. 2004, 2005, 2007; Folatelli 2004). Photometric
follow-up observationswere obtainedwiththe LICK1 m,YALO
1m,CTIO0.9m,CTIO1.5m,MARLY,Danish1.5m,ESO3.6m,
KPNO2.1m,JKT1m,CFHT3.6m,KECK-I10m,WIYN3.5m,
and MLO 1 m telescopes. These consist of UBVRI photometry
with a nominal cadence of3–7 days. The follow-up observations
were performed between February and 1999 June, and additional
reference imagestodeterminethecontributionof hostgalaxylight
contamination were obtained in spring 2000.
Fromthiscampaignwe presentBVRIlight curvesforthe eight
TypeIa SNethatfallintotheredshift range0:015PzP0:15and
forwhich we wereable toobtainenoughphotometric follow-up
data:SN1999aa (Armstrong &Schwartz1999;Qiaoetal.1999),
SN 1999ao (Reiss et al. 1999), SN 1999ar (Strolger et al.
1999b), SN 1999aw (Gal-Yam et al. 1999), and SN 1999bi,
SN 1999bm, SN 1999bn, and SN 1999bp (Kim et al. 1999a).
Further information on these SNe is summarized in Table 1.
Photometric data on SN 1999aw have already been published
by Strolger et al. (2002); here we present a self-consistent re-
analysisof that photometry.
2.1. Data Reduction and Photometric Calibration
Thedata werepreprocessed usingstandardalgorithmsforbias
and flat field correction. In addition, images that showed sig-
nificantfringingwerecorrectedbysubtractingthe structured sky
residualsobtained from the median offringing-affected images.
Reflecting an original goal of this program—to obtain data for
nearbySNeIamatchingthatofthehigh-redshiftdataof Perlmutter
etal.(1999)—wehaveemployedaperturephotometrytomeasure
the SN light curves.For measurement of moderately bright point
sourcesprojected ontocomplexhost galaxy backgroundsinfields
sparsely covered by foreground stars, aperture photometry has
highersystematicaccuracy,butslightlylowerstatisticalprecision,
than PSF fitting. We usedan aperture radiusequal tothe FWHM
ofa point source, asdetermined fromthe fieldstarsinthe image.
The aperture correction, which isdefined as the fraction of total
light that isoutside the FWHM radius, is determined by approx-
imatinganinfiniteaperture bya 4 ;FWHM radiusaperture. The
aperturecorrectionforagivenimageisthenobtainedbyaweighted
average forall the stars in the field.
Inall, photometric observationsemployed atotal of12 differ-
ent telescopes and 14different detector/filtersystems.Thispre-
sented the opportunity to obtain a more accurate estimate of
systematicerrorsinducedbydifferentinstrumentalsetups—which
might otherwise be masked by apparent internal consistency—
and thereby come closer to achieving calibration on a system
TABLE 1
Summary of Supernova Coordinates and Redshifts
Name
R.A. (J2000.0) Decl. (J2000.0) Redshift
IAUC
SN1999aa.........
08 27 42.03
+2129 14.8
0.0142
7180,7109
SN1999ao.........
06 27 26.37
3550 24.2
0.0539
7124
SN1999aw........
11 01 36.37
0606 31.6
0.038
7130
SN1999ar.........
09 20 16.00
+0033 39.6
0.1548
7125
SN1999bi .........
11 01 15.76
1145 15.2
0.1227
7136
SN1999bm.......
12 45 00.84
0627 30.2
0.1428
7136
SN1999bn........
11 57 00.40
1126 38.4
0.1285
7136
SN1999bp........
11 39 46.42
0851 34.8
0.0770
7136
Notes.—Unitsofrightascensionarehours,minutes,andseconds,andunitsof
declinationaredegrees,arcminutes,andarcseconds.Theheliocentricredshiftwas
determinedusingnarrowhost-galaxyfeaturesforall but one SN. In thecaseof
SN1999aw: duetothefaintnessofitshost,theredshiftwasdeterminedfromthe
SN spectra.
IMPROVED COSMOLOGICAL CONSTRAINTS
751
No. 2, 2008
Library control component:C# Word - Convert Word to HTML in C#.NET
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel, VB.NET PowerPoint, VB.NET Tiff, VB.NET Imaging, VB.NET OCR How to Convert Word to HTML Webpage with C#
www.rasteredge.com
Library control component:C# powerpoint - Convert PowerPoint to HTML in C#.NET
HTML in C#.NET. How to Convert PowerPoint to HTML Webpage with C# PowerPoint Conversion SDK. PowerPoint to HTML Conversion Overview.
www.rasteredge.com
consistentwiththat ofhigh-redshift SNeasrequiredforaccurate
measurementofthecosmologicalparameters.Ofcourse,theneed
to account for the specific characteristics of these many different
instruments,and their cross-calibration,made the calibration a
particularly challenging component of this analysis, which we
have addressed in a unique fashion.
Our photometric calibration procedure issubdivided into three
parts:
1. Determinationofzero points,colorterms,andatmospheric
extinction for photometric nights on telescopes at high-quality
sites, simultaneously employing observations of both Landolt
(1992) standard stars and SN field tertiary standard stars.
2. Use of the tertiary standard stars to simultaneously deter-
minecolortermsforallotherinstruments, andzero pointsforall
other images.
3. Determination of SN magnitudes, including the SN host
subtractionandphotometriccorrectionnecessary fornonstandard
bandpasses.
In steps1 and 2 the robustness ofthe fits wasensuredby heavily
deweighting significant outliers, using an automated iterative
prescription.
Elaboratingfurtheronstep1,theinstrumentalmagnitudeswere
converted tomagnitudesonthestandardBV(RI)
KC
systemusing
the relation
m
x
¼m˜
x
þm
zp
þk
x
þ c
x
(m
x
m
y
);
ð1Þ
where m˜
x
isthe instrumental magnitude measuredin bandx, m
x
and m
y
are the apparentmagnitudesinbandsx and y,isthe air
mass,m
zp
isthe zeropoint,andk
x
and c
x
arethe atmospheric ex-
tinctionand filtercorrectiontermsforbandx.Asimultaneousfit
in two bandsof standard stars cataloged by Landolt (1992) and
ourSN field starsalloweddeterminationof m
zp
,k
x
,,andc
x
,as
well as m
x
and m
y
for our tertiary standard stars. In total, 125
Landolt standards, spread across 16 photometric nights, were
used for calibration in B, V, R, and I, respectively. Accordingly,
the uncertainties on the night and telescope-dependent termsk
x
and c
x
are typically very small. Their covariance with the other
parametersisproperlyaccountedfor.Thecatalogoftertiarystan-
dard stars generated as a by-product of this procedure are re-
ported in Appendix B.
Then,instep2,theapparentmagnitudesfromthetertiarystan-
dard stars were used to determine color terms for all remaining
instruments and zero points for all images. Since BVRIdo not re-
quire airmass–colorcrosstermsoverthe rangeofairmassescov-
eredbyourobservations,andsinceabsorptionbyanycloudspresent
would be gray, it waspossible to absorb the atmospheric extinc-
tion intothe zero pointofeach image.The catalog oftertiarystan-
dardstarsincludesbothratherblueandredstars,thereforeallowing
reliabledeterminationofthecolorterms.The colortermsobtained
for all instruments are summarized in Table 7 of Appendix A.
Inorderto determine the counts fromthe SN in a given aper-
ture, the counts expected from the underlying host galaxy must
be subtracted. In our approach, the image with the SN and the
reference images without SN light are first convolved to have
matching point-spread functions.Stars in the imagesare usedto
approximate the PSF asa Gaussian, which for the purposes of
determiningtheconvolutionkernelneededtomatchone PSFto
anotherisusually adequate.The instrumental magnitudesofob-
jects(including galaxies) in the field are then used to determine
the ratio of counts between the images. For a given image, the
countsdue to theSNare obtained bysubtractingthecountsfrom
the reference image scaled by the ratio of countsaveraged over
all objects. Note that with this approach the images are never
spatiallytranslated,therebyminimizingpixel-to-pixelcorrelations
due to resampling.
Several contributions to the uncertainty were evaluated and
addedinquadrature: photonstatistics,uncertaintiesintheimage
zero points, and uncertainties in the scaling between reference
andSNimage.Inaddition,possiblesystematicerrorsintroduced
during sky subtraction andflat-fielding are evaluatedusing field
stars. The variance of field star residuals is used to rescale all
uncertainties.Also,anerrorfloorisdeterminedforallinstruments
by investigation of the variance of the residuals asa function of
thecalculateduncertainty.Suchanerrormightoccurduetolarge-
scale variation in the flat-field. An appropriate error floor was
found to be typically 1%–2% of the signal counts.
2.2. Bandpass Determination
The bandpasses for all telescopes have to be established in
order to correctfor potential mismatchesto the Landolt/Bessell
system (Landolt 1992; Bessell 1990).
The bandpass isthe product of the quantum efficiency of the
CCD,the filter transmission curve,the atmospheric transmission,
and the reflectivity of the telescope mirrors. Figure 1 showsthe
bandpass curves for the various instruments used in this work.
The relevant data were obtained either fromthe instrument doc-
umentation or through private communication.
We testforconsistencyofthebandpassesusingsyntheticpho-
tometry(for arelated study,see Stritzingeretal. 2002).Forthis,
stellarspectra thatbestmatchthe published UBVRIcolorsofour
standard stars are selected from the catalog of Gunn & Stryker
(1983). The spectra that best match the published colors of the
standardstars are furtheradjusted usingcubic splinestoexactly
matchthe published colors.Forinstrumentswithoutstandardstar
observations,a second catalog is generated using our determina-
tionofBVRImagnitudesoffieldstars.Withthespectraofstandard
and field stars at hand, we perform synthetic photometry for the
variousbandpassfunctions.Thebandpassfunctionsarethenshifted
in central wavelength by k until they optimally reproduce the
observedinstrumentalmagnitudes.Thechangeincolor-term,c
x
,
when shifting the passband is dc
x
/dk  0:001, 0.0008, 0.0005,
0.0003 8
1
for B, V, R, and I, respectively. An alternative pro-
cedure is to evaluate the color terms for a given bandpass in an
analogousway as forthe observed magnitudes(see eq.[1]).We
then determine the wavelength shift to apply to the bandpasses
in order to reproduce the instrumental color terms. The two ap-
proaches agree on average to within 1 8 with an rms of about
20 8.TheresultsaresummarizedinTable 8ofAppendixA.The
associated systematic uncertainty on the photometric zero point
due to this shift depends on the color of the object and for B
V 1 will remain below 0.02 mag.
3. LIGHT CURVES
3.1. Light Cur
v
es from the SCP Nearby 1999
Superno
v
aCampaign
Figure 2 shows the BVRI light curves from the SCP Nearby
1999campaign(thedataareprovidedinTable10).Differenttele-
scopesaremarkedbydifferentsymbols.Emptysymbolsrepresent
uncorrected photometric data, and filled symbols represent data
correctedfornonstandardbandpasses, theso-called S-corrections
(Suntzeff 2000). The S-corrections represent the magnitude shift
needed to bring the data obtained with different bandpasses to
acommonstandard system(inourcasetheBessell system).The
S-corrections are obtained from a synthetic photometry calcu-
lation using the ‘‘instrument-dependent’’ bandpass functions
KOWALSKI ET AL.
752
Vol. 686
Library control component:C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view, annotate, create and convert PDF
edit PDF document page in ASPX webpage, set and edit RasterEdge provide HTML5 PDF Viewer and Editor to help C# users to view, annotate, convert and edit
www.rasteredge.com
Library control component:VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
Best VB.NET adobe PDF to Microsoft Office Word converter SDK for Visual Studio .NET. Convert PDF to Word in both .NET WinForms and ASP.NET webpage.
www.rasteredge.com
described above anda spectrophotometric lightcurve model.The
spectrophotometric SN light curve model was adjusted using
spline functionsto match the colorsofthe light curve modelsof
ourSNe. The lightcurve modelsare shown inFigure 2 to guide
the eye only.They are obtainedintwo differentwaysdepending
onthequalityofthe availablephotometricdata.ForthefourSNe
with z< 0:1, we have used the fit method explained in Wang
et al. (2006), which has six parameters per band. This method
allowseffective fitting ofR- and I-band data, which exhibits a
second ‘‘bump’’ of variable strength appearing approximately
30 daysafterthemaximum.However,since thisfitmethod has
sixfree parametersperfitted band, one can use it only for light
curveswithdense temporal sampling withhighsignal-to-noise
ratio. For the more distant SNe 1999ar, 1999bi, 1999bm, and
1999bn we use a more constrained light curve fitting method
based on template matching. A library of template light curves
obtainedfromwell-observedsupernovaeisK-correctedtotheob-
served redshift. The best-matching light curve is chosen as a
model for the supernova. The light curve models along with the
S-correctionsshowninFigure2aremeanttoguidetheeyeandwill
not be used in the remainder of the paper; we continue with the
concept of using instrumental magnitudesalongwithinstrument-
dependent passbands when fitting the light curve parameters.
The light curve parameters such as peak magnitude, stretch,
and color at maximum are obtained using the spectral template
methodofGuyetal.(2005),whichisdescribed in moredetailin
x3.3.Themethodiswellsuitedtothistasksinceitusestelescope-
specific bandpassfunctionsformodeling theobserver-frame light
curves. The B-band (left)and V-band (right)observer-frame light
curves are shown in Figure 3, along with the light curves pre-
dicted by the spectral template for the corresponding bandpass.
In the bottom part of the plots we show the residuals from the
modelprediction.Inmostcasesthemodeldescribesthedata rea-
sonably well, with 
2
/dof 1. Systematic deviations, such as
observed in the late-time behavior of the B-band light curve of
SN1999aw,are likelyto be attributable to the limitations of the
two-parameter spectral template model in capturing the full di-
versity of Type Ia supernovae light curves.
Figure 4 (right and middle) shows the fitted BV color at
maximum,aswellasthestretchdistribution.Thestretchdistribution
hasonelow-stretchsupernova(SN 1999bm)butisotherwise dom-
inatedbysupernovaewithlargerstretches.TwolowerstretchSNeIa
were found in these searchesbut are notpresented here because of
theirfaintness—inonecase combined withproximitytothecuspy
core ofan elliptical host—prevented an analysisusing the tech-
niquesdescribedhere.Inanycase,thelargernumberof high-stretch
supernovae is not very significant (a K-S test resulted in a 20%
probabilitythatthetwodistributionsareconsistentwitheachother).
Fortwooftheeightsupernovae,lightcurvedatahavepreviously
been published. Jha et al. (2006), Krisciunas et al. (2000), and
Altavilla etal.(2004)presentedindependent dataonSN1999aa.
When comparing the fit results for SN 1999aa we find agree-
ment to within 1% in maximum B-band luminosity,color, and
stretch. Spectroscopic and photometric data on SN 1999aw
werepreviously reportedbyStrolgeret al.(2002).While theraw
data of Strolger et al. (2002) are largely the same as that pre-
sented here, the reduction pipelines used are independent. A
main difference isthe treatment of nonstandard bandpasses. We
reportthe originalmagnitudesandcorrectfornonstandardband-
passes during the fit of the light curve, while in Strolger et al.
Fig. 1.—BandpassesforthevariousinstrumentsusedintheSpring1999NearbySupernovaCampaign.Forcomparison,the filledregionsrepresentthe passband
transmissionfunctionsof the Bessell (1990) system.
IMPROVED COSMOLOGICAL CONSTRAINTS
753
No. 2, 2008
Library control component:C# Excel - Convert Excel to HTML in C#.NET
C# Excel - Convert Excel to HTML in C#.NET. How to Convert Excel to HTML Webpage with C# Excel Conversion SDK. Excel to HTML Conversion Overview.
www.rasteredge.com
Library control component:VB.NET TIFF: Convert TIFF to HTML Web Page Using VB.NET TIFF
converters, like VB.NET PDF to HTML converter toolkit to convert PDF document to HTML webpage and VB.NET Word to HTML conversion add-on to transform Microsoft
www.rasteredge.com
(2002)correctionsbasedonthecolorcoefficienthavebeenapplied
to the data. When fitting for peak B-band magnitude, color, and
stretch,weobtaindifferencesofB ¼ 0:04; (BV) ¼ 0:02,
and s ¼ 0:005.
Figure 4 (left) shows the redshift distribution relative to the
sample of othernearby supernovae (see x 3.2 for a definition of
thatsample).Ascanbe seen,the distributionextendsto redshifts
z0:15, an underpopulated region in the Hubble diagram.
3.2. Literature Superno
v
ae
Here we discuss the set of previously published nearby and
distantsupernovaeincludedintheanalysis.NotallSNlightcurves
are of sufficiently good quality to allow theiruse in the following
cosmological analysis. Forall supernovae in the sample,we re-
quire that data from at least two bands with rest-frame central
wavelengthbetween34708(U band)and66008(Rband)exist
and that there are in total at least five data points available.
Further,we requirethat there isatleast one observation exist-
ing between15 daysbefore and6 daysafterthedate ofmaximal
B-bandbrightness,asobtainedfromaninitialfittothelightcurves
(see x 3.3). The 6 day cut is scaled by stretch for consistency. In
addition, we observed that for a smaller number of poorer light
curves, the uncertainties resulting from the fits are unphysically
small compared to what is expected from the photometric data.
Inthesecases,werandomlyperturb eachdatapointbya tenth(or
if necessary bya fifth) of itsphotometric error and refit the light
curves. The remaining 16 SNe, where convergence cannot be
obtained even after perturbation of the data, are excluded from
further analysis (note that these SNe are generally poorly mea-
sured and wouldhave lowweightinany cosmologicalanalysis).
Forthe nearbySNsample,we useonlysupernovaewithCMB-
centric redshifts z > 0:015, in order to reduce the impact of un-
certainty due to host galaxy peculiarvelocities. We checked that
ourresultsdonotdependsignificantlyonthevalueoftheredshift
cutoff (tested for a range z ¼ 0:01
0:03).
The number of SNe passing these cuts are summarized in
Table 2. Eachindividual supernova islistedin Table 11,andthe
last column indicates any cutsthat the supernova failed.
The list contains 17 supernovae from Hamuy et al. (1996),
11fromRiessetal.(1999),16from Jha etal.(2006),and6 from
Krisciunaset al.(2004a, 2004b, 2001). Our light curve data for
SN 1999aa are merged with that ofJha et al. (2006). To thislist
of nearby supernovae fromtheliterature we addthe newnearby
supernovaepresentedhere. ForSN1999aw,weuseonlythe light
curvedata presented inthispaper.Hence,thesample contains58
nearby supernovae.
Fig. 2.—SNelightcurvesofthe SCPNearby1999campaign. ThefilledsymbolsrepresenttheS-correcteddata, andtheemptysymbolstherawphotometricdata.
BoththeS-correcteddataaswellasthemodelparameterization(dashedline)areshowntoguidetheeyeonlyandarenotusedanyfurtherintheremainingpaper.[See
the electronic edition of the Journal foracolorversion of thisfigure.]
KOWALSKI ET AL.
754
Fig. 3.—Band Vlight curvesand residuals. The multiple curvesrepresent the model predictionsfor the differentbandpassesand are obtainedbyintegratingthe
product of passbandandtheredshifted spectral template. [See the electronic editionof theJournal foracolorversion of thisfigure.]
Fig. 3—Continued
The sample of high-redshift supernovae iscomparably hetero-
geneous. We use all of the 11 SNe from Knop et al. (2003) that
havelightcurvesobtained with HST.Ofthe 42supernovae from
Perlmutter et al. (1999), 30 satisfy the selection cuts described
above (ascanbeseeninthephotometrydataof Table12).Of the
16 SNe used by the High-Z Team (HZT; Riess et al. 1998;
Garnavich et al. 1998; Schmidt et al. 1998), two are already in-
cludedin the Perlmutteret al.(1999)sample,andofthe remain-
ing 14, 12 pass our cuts.
Included also are 22 SNe from Barris et al. (2004) and the
8SNe from Tonry et al. (2003) that are typed to be secure or
likelySNe Ia. We do not use SN 1999fv and SN1999 fh, asthe
Fig. 3—Continued
Fig. 4.—Left: Redshift distribution; middle:stretch distribution; right: BVj
t¼B
max
distribution.
IMPROVED COSMOLOGICAL CONSTRAINTS
757
number of available data points does not exceed the number of
light curve fit parameters.
Weaddthe 73 SNe Ia fromthefirstyearofSNLS(Astieretal.
2006), of which one doesnot pass the first phase cut (03D3cc).
Note that in Astieret al.(2006) 2of the 73 supernovae were ex-
cluded fromtheircosmological parameterfitsbecause theywere
significant outliers (see discussion in x 4.3). Riess et al. (2004,
2007) have published 37 supernovae that were discovered and
followed using HST.Of these, 29 passed ourlight curve quality
cuts.Thissamplecontainsthehighest-redshiftsupernovae inour
compilation. Finally, we use the 84 SNe from the ESSENCE
survey(Miknaitisetal.2007;Wood-Vaseyetal.2007),ofwhich
75 pass our cuts.
3.3. Light Cur
v
eFitting
The spectral-template–based fit method of Guy et al. (2005),
also known as SALT, is used to fit consistently both new and
literature light curve data. This method is based on a spectral
template (Nugent et al. 2002) that has been adapted in an iter-
ativeprocedure toreproduce a trainingset of nearbySNe UBVR
light curve data. The training set consists of mostly z < 0:015
SNe and hence does not overlap with the sample we use for
determinationofcosmological parameters.Toobtain an expected
magnitudefora supernova ata certainphase,themodelspectrum
is first redshifted to the corresponding redshift followed by an
integrationofthe productofspectrumandbandpasstransmission.
Thespectral-template–basedfit methodhastheadvantagethat it
consistentlyallowsthesimultaneousfitofmultibandlightcurves
with arbitrary (but known) bandpass transmission functions. In
view of the large numberof filters and instruments used for the
newnearbySNsamplesaswellastheverydiverselightcurvedata
found in the literature, this is particularly important here. In ad-
dition,frequentpracticalproblemsassociatedwithK-corrections—
such as the propagation of photometric errors—are handled
naturally.
Thespectraltemplatebased fitmethodofGuyetal.(2005)fits
forthe time ofmaximum,theflux normalization as wellas rest-
frame color at maximum defined as c ¼ BVj
t¼B
max
þ0:057
and timescale stretch s. It is worth noting that by construction,
the stretch in SALT has a related meaning to the conventional
time-axisstretch(Perlmutteretal.1997;Goldhaber et al. 2001).
However,asaparameterof the light curve modelitalsoabsorbs
other,lesspronounced,stretch-dependentlightcurvedependencies.
The same is true for the colorc.
Recently, direct comparisons between alternative fitters,such
asSALT, itsupdate (Guy et al. 2007),and MLCS2k2 (Jha et al.
2007) show good consistency between the fit results, e.g., the
amount of reddening (Conley et al. 2007). Our own tests have
shown that forwell-observed supernovae, the method produces
veryconsistentresults(peakmagnitude,stretch)whencompared
to the more traditional method of using light-curve templates
(Perlmutter et al. 1997).However, we noticed that fitsof poorly
observed light curves in some cases do not converge properly.
Part ofthe explanation isthatinthecase of the spectraltemplate
basedfit method,the databeforet < 15daysarenotusedasan
additionalconstraint.Moretypically,theSALTfittercanfallinto
an apparent false minimum, and we then found it necessary to
restart it repeatedly to obtain convergence. Note that the small
differencesbetweenthe lightcurvefitparametersof Table11and
the values shown in Table 10 of Wood-Vasey et al. (2007) are
primarilycaseswhere the Wood-Vaseyetal.(2007)SALTfit did
not converge (some of which are noted in Wood-Vasey et al.
2007)anda fewcaseswherewefounditnecessary to remove an
extreme outlier photometry point from the light curve.
Thelight curvesfrom Barrisetal.(2004)and the I-band light
curvesof4 supernovae ofP99 (SNe1997O,1997Q,1997R,and
1997am; see also Knop et al. 2003) need a different analysis
procedure, since in these cases the light of the host galaxy was
notfully subtracted duringtheimagereduction.Wehence allow
for a constant contribution of light from the host galaxy in the
light curve fits. The supernovae were fitted with additional pa-
rameters:thezeroleveloftheI-bandlightcurvein thecaseofthe
fourSNe fromthe P99setand thezerolevelofallthebandsinthe
case of the Tonry et al. (2003)data. The additional uncertainties
due to these unknown zero levels have been propagated into the
resulting light curve fit parameters.
The fitted light curve parameters of all SNe can be found in
Table 11.
42
4. HUBBLE DIAGRAM CONSTRUCTION
AND COSMOLOGICAL PARAMETER FITTING
The full set of light curves as described in x 3.2 have been
fitted,yielding B-bandmaximummagnitude mmax
B
,stretchs,and
color c ¼ BVj
t¼B
max
þ0:057. In this section, these are input
to the determination of the distance modulus. The analysis
method is chosen to minimize bias in the estimated parameters
(seex 4.2).An outlierrejectionbasedontruncationisperformed
that is further described in x 4.3,before constraintson the cosmo-
logical parameters are computed.
4.1. Blind Analysis
FollowingConleyetal.(2006)weadoptablindanalysisstrat-
egy. The basic aim of pursuing a blind analysis is to remove
potential bias introduced by the analyst. In particular, there is a
documented tendency (see, e.g.,Yaoet al. 2006) foran analysis
to bechecked forerrors in the procedure (even astrivialasbugs
in the code)up until the expected resultsare foundbutnot much
beyond.The idea of a blind analysisis to hide the experimental
outcome until the analysis strategy is finalized and debugged.
However,one doesnotwant to blind oneselfentirelytothedata,
as the analysisstrategy will be partially determinedby the prop-
ertiesofthedata.Thefollowingblindnessstrategyisused,which
issimilartothe oneinventedinConleyetal.(2006).Thedataare
fit assuming a CDM cosmology, with the resulting fit for 
M
stored without being reported. The flux of each supernova data
point is then rescaled according to the ratio of luminosity dis-
tancesobtainedfromthe fitted parametersand arbitrarily chosen
dummy parameters(in this case 
M
¼0:25; 
¼0:75). This
procedure preserves the stretch and color distribution and, as
42
Seehttp://supernova.lbl.gov/Union.
TABLE 2
Number of Supernovae after Consecutive
Application of Cuts
Requirement
N
SN
All......................................................
414
z>0:015............................................
382
Fit successful......................................
366
Color available...................................
351
First phase <6 days...........................
320
5 data points...................................
315
Outlier rejection.................................
307
Note.—Seex4.3foradiscussionoftheoutlier
rejectioncut.
KOWALSKI ET AL.
758
Vol. 686
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested