display pdf in iframe mvc : Convert url pdf to word control application system web page html azure console Lyons_BroadbandPricing_v10-part1366

WORKING
PAPER
No. 14-08 
MARCH 2014
INNOVATIONS IN MOBILE BROADBAND PRICING
by Daniel A. Lyons
The opinions expressed in this Working Paper are the author’s and do not represent 
official positions of the Mercatus Center or George Mason University.
Convert url pdf to word - control application system:C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
How to Convert PDF to HTML Webpage with C# PDF Conversion SDK
www.rasteredge.com
Convert url pdf to word - control application system:VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
PDF to HTML Webpage Converter SDK for VB.NET PDF to HTML Conversion
www.rasteredge.com
About the Author 
Daniel A. Lyons 
Assistant Professor 
Boston College Law School 
lyonsdk@bc.edu 
Acknowledgments 
Special thanks to Joe Kennedy, Crystal Lyons, and two anonymous commenters for their helpful 
comments and suggestions, and to Jonathan Hu for invaluable research assistance. 
Abstract 
Although intended to promote competition and innovation among Internet content providers, 
“net neutrality” rules reduce innovation by broadband service providers. Within limits, 
broadband providers may offer different plans that vary the quantity and quality of their service. 
But they usually cannot vary the service itself: broadband providers are generally required to 
offer customers access to all lawful Internet traffic, or none at all. This all-or-nothing broadband 
homogenization places America increasingly at odds with international markets, particularly 
with regard to mobile broadband. This paper examines the diverse array of wireless broadband 
products available worldwide, and uses these international innovations to illuminate the 
difficulties posed by net neutrality principles in the United States. Broadband access is merely 
one part of a much broader Internet ecosystem. Regulators’ focus on one narrow set of 
relationships in that ecosystem retards innovation and limits the ability of Americans to share in 
the global revolution currently taking place for mobile services. 
JEL codes: K00, K2, K23 
Keywords: net neutrality, broadband, wireless, mobile, Internet, FCC, Open Internet, 
international, pricing, antitrust, tying, innovation 
control application system:C# PDF url edit Library: insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.
Keep Microsoft Office Word, Excel and PowerPoint links in PDF document. Enable users to copy and paste PDF link. Help to extract and search url in PDF file.
www.rasteredge.com
control application system:VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net
Keep Microsoft Office Word, Excel and PowerPoint links in PDF document. Make PDF link open in a new window, blank page or tab. Edit PDF url in preview without
www.rasteredge.com
Innovations in Mobile Broadband Pricing 
Daniel A. Lyons 
Introduction 
Through its net neutrality rules, officially adopted in December 2010, the Federal 
Communications Commission sought to limit interference by broadband service providers in 
markets for Internet-based content and applications. But to do so, the Commission significantly 
reduced the amount of innovation possible in the broadband service market. Net neutrality 
permits broadband providers to offer different plans that vary the quantity of service available to 
customers, as well as the quality of that service. But they generally cannot vary the service itself: 
with limited exceptions, broadband providers must offer customers access to all lawful Internet 
traffic, or none at all. 
This all-or-nothing homogenization of the broadband product places America 
increasingly at odds with the rest of the world. This is especially true with regard to mobile 
broadband. In various parts of the world, customers are offered a variety of alternatives to the 
unlimited-Internet model, such as voice-plus plans with social-media functionality; cross-
promotional agreements in which wireless providers and content providers work together to sell 
additional services; and premium service plans that give wireless customers preferred or 
exclusive access to certain online content. 
The diverse array of wireless innovation happening globally illuminates the difficulties 
inherent in attempts to impose net neutrality principles on the wireless broadband industry. 
Broadband access is merely one part of a much broader Internet ecosystem, an ecosystem that 
also includes equipment manufacturers, content and application providers, operating-system 
programmers, network operators and engineers, and others. The Commission’s myopic focus on 
control application system:C#: How to Open a File from a URL (HTTP, FTP) in HTML5 Viewer
PDF to svg, C#.NET convert PDF to text, C#.NET convert PDF to images VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel C# HTML5 Viewer: Open a File from a URL.
www.rasteredge.com
control application system:VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
VB.NET Tutorial for How to Convert PDF to Word (.docx) Document in VB.NET. using RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF; Convert PDF to Word Document in VB.NET Demo Code.
www.rasteredge.com
one narrow set of relationships in that ecosystem retards innovation and limits the ability of 
Americans to share in the global revolution currently taking place for mobile services. 
To illustrate this observation, one need look no further than upstart wireless provider 
MetroPCS. In early 2011, MetroPCS was in a bind. It was a small player in a highly competitive 
market, with neither the scale nor the margins to compete effectively against industry giants such 
as Verizon and AT&T. As the industry began the capital-intensive transition to 4G networks, 
MetroPCS launched an innovative new pricing policy to gain share and escape its fifth-place 
position. The company offered a base plan of unlimited voice, text, and web-browsing services 
for only $40 each month.
1
As an added bonus, the plan also included free access to YouTube, 
courtesy of an arrangement with Google whereby the search giant helped optimize YouTube 
content for MetroPCS’s capacity-constrained networks.
2
For an additional $10 or $20 per month, 
customers could receive additional services, including turn-by-turn navigation and data access.
3
While these plans were more restrictive than the broadband plans of the larger carriers (in the 
sense that customers could not access non-YouTube streaming video and some other bandwidth-
intensive services), they were only one-third the cost.
4
Through these plans, MetroPCS sought to 
bring mobile Internet use to its core market of customers unable or unwilling to pay large carrier 
rates—thus fulfilling its marketing promise of providing “wireless for all.” 
1
See Ryan Kim, MetroPCS LTE Plans to Charge More for VoIP & Streaming, G
IGAOM
(Jan. 4, 2011, 9:26 AM 
PST), http://gigaom.com/2011/01/04/metropcs-lte-plans-charge-more-for-skype-and-streaming/. 
2
Thomas W. Hazlett, FCC, Net Neutrality Rules, and Efficiency, F
INANCIAL 
T
IMES
, Mar. 29, 2011, http://www.ft 
.com/intl/cms/s/0/f75fd638-5990-11e0-baa8-00144feab49a.html#axzz2gFHqNfak. In a letter to the FCC, MetroPCS 
explained that because of the limited broadband throughput of its 1xRTT CDMA (2G and 3G) networks that most 
customers relied upon, it could offer web services such as HTML browsing, but advanced broadband services such 
as multimedia did not work well. And the company’s limited spectrum posed similar challenges for the 4G LTE 
network that it had recently launched. Because YouTube content was a “competitive necessity” to keep pace with 
larger carriers, MetroPCS worked with Google to compress its content to consume less bandwidth when accessed 
over the company’s networks. See Letter from Carl W. Northrup to Chairman Julius Genachowski (Feb. 14, 2011) 
[hereinafter Northrup Letter], http://apps.fcc.gov/ecfs/document/view?id=7021029361. 
3
Kim, supra note 1. 
4
Hazlett, supra note 2. 
control application system:C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
C#.NET PDF SDK - Convert PDF to Word in C#.NET. C#.NET DLLs and Demo Code: Convert PDF to Word Document in C#.NET Project. Add necessary references:
www.rasteredge.com
control application system:VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
PDF to Text. Convert PDF to JPEG. Convert PDF to Png to PDF. Image: Remove Image from PDF Page. Image Link: Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit Bookmark. Metadata: Edit, Delete
www.rasteredge.com
But rather than cheering this creative attempt to narrow the mobile-digital divide, many 
consumer groups condemned MetroPCS for violating net neutrality—despite the fact that the 
Federal Communications Commission’s rules had not yet taken effect, and would not do so for 
another eleven months.
5
Net neutrality proponents accused MetroPCS of “restrict[ing] consumer 
choice and innovation in a developing mobile market, all for the sake of further padding its 
bottom line.”
6
In a letter to then-Commission Chairman Julius Genachowski, a coalition of 
groups such as the Center for Media Justice, Free Press, Media Access Project, and the New 
America Foundation urged the Commission to “investigate MetroPCS’s behavior and act to 
remedy its disparate treatment of mobile broadband services.”
7
Any traditional antitrust analysis would find this demand for regulatory intervention 
puzzling. At the time, MetroPCS had only eight million subscribers, a customer base less than 
one-tenth the size of industry leader Verizon Wireless.
8
The company had no market power and 
was in no position to extract supercompetitive profits or otherwise harm consumers. As Professor 
Tom Hazlett notes, its customers were mostly price-sensitive cord-cutters who had little use for 
the bells and whistles of larger carrier plans, especially at higher price points.
9
MetroPCS’s plan 
was poised to bring wireless data to this market segment. But instead it found itself facing the 
threat of agency action because its plan did not match the Federal Communications 
Commission’s preconceived notion of what the wireless broadband experience should be. 
5
See Preserving the Open Internet, 76 Fed. Reg. 59192 (2010). The commission originally released the Open Internet 
order in December 2010, but due in part to interagency review, the final rule did not take effect until November 2011. 
Id. These rules were codified in part at FCC Preserving the Open Internet Rule, 47 C.F.R. § 8 (2011). 
6
Press Release, Free Press, Free Press Urges FCC to Investigate MetroPCS 4G Service Plans (Jan. 4, 2011), http:// 
www.freepress.net/press-release/2011/1/4/free-press-urges-fcc-investigate-metropcs-4g-service-plans. 
7
Notice of Ex Parte Presentation: GN Docket No. 09-191 (Preserving the Open Internet); WC Docket 07-52 
(Broadband Industry Practices), Jan. 10, 2011, available at http://newamerica.net/publications/resources/2011/notice 
_of_ex_parte_presentation_gn_docket_no_09_191_preserving_the_open_. 
8
Hazlett, supra note 2. 
9
Id. 
control application system:VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
Able to render and convert PDF document to/from supported document package offers robust APIs for editing PDF document hyperlink (url), which provide
www.rasteredge.com
control application system:C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
NET extract PDF pages, VB.NET comment annotate PDF, VB.NET delete PDF pages, VB.NET convert PDF to SVG. Able to load PDF document from file formats and url.
www.rasteredge.com
So MetroPCS’s pricing experiment ended, not with a bang, but with a whimper. The 
company formally disputed the notion that its plans violated the pending net neutrality rule.
10
But, perhaps uninterested in being the test case for the Commission’s newly minted rules, the 
company ultimately shifted to a higher-priced data plan that did not treat streaming video and 
other data-intensive applications differently.
11
In the meantime, MetroPCS joined Verizon’s 
lawsuit challenging the Commission’s net neutrality rules in court.
12
MetroPCS found it 
increasingly difficult to survive against its better-capitalized and better-entrenched rivals, and by 
the end of 2012 had agreed to merge with fellow upstart T-Mobile, thus reducing the number of 
national facilities-based wireless providers from five to four.
13
The MetroPCS saga illustrates the chilling effect that even the Commission’s “light 
touch” wireless broadband net neutrality rules have on broadband innovation. The rules for 
residential fixed Internet providers are even more stringent, imposing significant restrictions on 
the types of services those providers can offer. Meanwhile, outside the United States, broadband 
companies are increasingly innovating with regard to the bundles they provide to consumers, 
especially in the wireless sector. This paper seeks to shine a spotlight on the way that net 
neutrality limits broadband innovation, by describing some of the diverse business models being 
offered internationally. 
10
See Northrup Letter, supra note 2. 
11
See Adi Robertson, MetroPCS Adds $70 a Month Pricing Tier for Unlimited LTE Data, Caps $60 Plan at 
5GB, T
HE 
V
ERGE
, Apr. 3, 2012, http://www.theverge.com/2012/4/3/2922425/metropcs-4g-lte-unlimited-data 
-pricing-change. 
12
See Stacey Higginbotham, MetroPCS Joins Verizon in Suing FCC over Net Neutrality, G
IGAOM
(Jan. 25, 2011, 
12:14 PM PST), http://gigaom.com/2011/01/25/metropcs-joins-verizon-in-suing-fcc-over-net-neutrality/. 
13
See David Goldman, T-Mobile and MetroPCS to Merge, CNNM
ONEY
, Oct. 3, 2012, http://money.cnn.com/2012 
/10/03/technology/mobile/t-mobile-metropcs-merger/. 
control application system:C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
provides C# users abilities to view, annotate, convert and create NET package offers robust APIs for editing PDF document hyperlink (url) and quick
www.rasteredge.com
control application system:VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
csv to PDF, C#.NET convert PDF to svg, C#.NET convert PDF to text, C#.NET convert PDF to images Able to load PDF document from file formats and url in ASP
www.rasteredge.com
I. Net Neutrality: A Brief Overview 
At the core of the net neutrality debate is the principle that Internet service providers should not 
favor certain Internet content and applications over others.
14
Rather, net neutrality proponents 
argue that broadband providers should grant consumers access to all services available on the 
network and should route all data packets to customers in the same fashion, regardless of the 
identity of the sender or the nature of the content inside. Professor Timothy Wu coined the term in 
a 2003 article, in which he argued that such a rule was necessary to guard against the risk that 
broadband providers could leverage their control over the Internet access market to distort 
innovation in the upstream market for Internet content.
15
Since then, the concept has been the 
subject of substantial debate among academics, engineers, policymakers, and industry participants. 
The Federal Communications Commission adopted rules codifying net neutrality 
principles in December 2010.
16
The rules provide that fixed-broadband providers (such as 
Verizon and Comcast, which provide high-speed wire-based Internet access to residential and 
business customers) “shall not block lawful content, applications, services, or non-harmful 
devices.”
17
The Commission’s order clarified that “[t]he phrase ‘content, applications, services’ 
refers to all traffic transmitted to or from end users of a broadband Internet access service, 
including traffic that may not fit cleanly into any of these categories.”
18
In addition, these providers “shall not unreasonably discriminate in transmitting lawful 
network traffic over a consumer’s broadband Internet access service.”
19
Although the 
14
See, e.g., Public Knowledge, Key Issues: Net Neutrality, http://publicknowledge.org/issues/network-neutrality 
(last visited Jan. 22, 2014). 
15
Tim Wu, Network Neutrality, Broadband Discrimination, 2 J.
T
ELECOMM
.
&
H
IGH 
T
ECH
.
L. 141, 145 (2003). 
16
See Preserving the Open Internet: Broadband Industry Practices, 25 FCC Rcd. 17905, 17906 (2010) [hereinafter 
Net Neutrality Rules]. 
17
Id. ¶ 63; see 47 C.F.R. § 8.5(a). 
18
Net Neutrality Rules ¶ 64. 
19
Id. ¶ 68; see 47 C.F.R. § 8.7. 
Commission did not provide a definition of “unreasonable discrimination,” it noted that such 
practices would include discrimination that harms an actual or potential competitor, impairs free 
expression, or “inhibit[s] end users from accessing the content, applications, services, or devices 
of their choice” online.
20
The Commission explicitly cited “pay-for-priority” agreements, 
whereby a provider such as Netflix would pay for preferential treatment over the network, as an 
example of a practice that is likely to be considered unreasonable, because it would give the 
provider a competitive advantage over its rivals when delivering its product to consumers.
21
The Commission imposed somewhat less onerous rules on wireless providers, though 
even this lighter touch imposes significant controls on this segment. The Commission recognized 
that mobile broadband was a less mature technology than its fixed counterpart, and that the 
wireless marketplace is more competitive than fixed broadband.
22
At the same time, however, it 
reiterated that “[t]here is one Internet, which should remain open for consumers and innovators 
alike, although it may be accessed through different technologies and services.”
23
Moreover, the 
Commission’s rationales for ordering the rules “are for the most part as applicable to mobile 
broadband as they are to fixed broadband.”
24
Under the rules, wireless broadband companies “shall not block consumers from 
accessing lawful websites.”
25
The Commission found that wireless web browsing was 
sufficiently “well-developed” to justify regulation. Consumers “expect to be able to access any 
lawful website through their broadband service, whether fixed or mobile.”
26
Mobile applications 
were a less mature technology, and the Commission recognized that downloading and running an 
20
Net Neutrality Rules ¶ 75. 
21
Id. ¶ 76. 
22
Id. ¶¶ 94–95. 
23
Id. ¶ 93. 
24
Id. 
25
Id. ¶ 99; see 47 C.F.R. § 8.5(b). 
26
Net Neutrality Rules ¶ 100. 
application may present network-management issues.
27
But the Commission also recognized that 
mobile broadband providers had incentives to interfere with apps that competed against the 
carrier’s own services. Therefore the rules also prohibited providers from “block[ing] 
applications that compete with the provider’s voice or video telephony services.”
28
The 
Commission explained that it intended to “proceed incrementally” with the wireless market and 
would “closely monitor developments in the mobile broadband market” to determine whether 
more regulations are required to admonish “any provider behavior that runs counter to general 
open Internet principles.”
29
Through net neutrality, the Commission sought to safeguard against barriers to 
innovation among Internet content and application providers. As the Commission explained, the 
framework “aims to ensure the Internet remains an open platform . . . that enables consumer 
choice, end-user control, competition through low barriers to entry, and the freedom to innovate 
without permission.”
30
The rules sought to preserve an environment that “enables innovators to 
create and offer new applications and services without needing approval from any controlling 
entity.”
31
Without these restrictions, broadband providers’ actions might “reduce the rate of 
innovation at the edge” of the network.
32
But to promote innovation on the Internet, the rules inhibited innovation by the networks 
that bring the Internet to consumers. The Commission was explicit about its desire to prevent 
broadband providers from changing their business models: “These rules are generally consistent 
27
Both the fixed and mobile broadband rules were subject to exceptions for “reasonable network management,” 
meaning a practice that is “appropriate and tailored to achieving a legitimate network management purpose, taking 
into account the particular network architecture and technology of the broadband Internet access service.” Id. ¶ 10; 
see 47 C.F.R. §§ 8.5, 8.7. 
28
Id. ¶ 100, ; see 47 C.F.R. § 8.5(b). 
29
Net Neutrality Rules ¶¶ 104–5. 
30
Id. ¶ 10. 
31
Id. ¶ 13. 
32
Id. ¶ 14. 
10 
with, and should not require significant changes to, broadband providers’ current practices, and 
are also consistent with the common understanding of broadband Internet access service as a 
service that enables one to go where one wants on the Internet and communicate with anyone 
else online.”
33
In fact, the Commission suggested that a company offering access to only a 
portion of the Internet would be suspected of trying to evade the rules: 
A key factor in determining whether a service is used to evade the scope of the rules is 
whether the service is used as a substitute for broadband Internet access service. For 
example, an Internet access service that provides access to a substantial subset of Internet 
endpoints based on end users preference to avoid certain content, applications, or 
services; Internet access services that allow some uses of the Internet (such as access to 
the World Wide Web) but not others (such as e-mail); or a “Best of the Web” Internet 
access service that provides access to 100 top websites could not be used to evade the 
open Internet rules applicable to “broadband Internet access service.”
34
Before the rules were adopted, several critics recognized that the Commission was 
biasing the market in favor of existing models and that it was myopic to sacrifice potential 
advancements from network diversity. Professor Christopher Yoo had long suggested that 
network differentiation, rather than network neutrality, may be the best approach to increasing 
consumer welfare.
35
In comments filed in the net neutrality proceeding, Yoo noted that the 
Internet is an incredibly complex phenomenon that exhibits growing heterogeneity among users, 
meaning a one-size-fits-all access model is unlikely to meet customer needs.
36
As the market 
becomes saturated, providers must be free to innovate to deliver increasing value to this disparate 
array of consumers.
37
Yoo highlighted the wireless broadband market in particular, which faces 
unique physical characteristics that may demand greater flexibility.
38
Companies often test new 
33
Id. ¶ 43. 
34
Id. ¶ 47. 
35
Christopher S. Yoo, Beyond Network Neutrality, 19 H
ARV
.
J.L
AND 
T
ECH
. 1 (2005). 
36
Comments of Christopher S. Yoo, In re Preserving the Open Internet: Broadband Industry Practices, at 13. 
37
Id. 
38
Id. at 13–26 (noting, for example, that the physics of wave propagation, the need for congestion management, and the 
heterogeneity of mobile devices suggest the need for greater flexibility when regulating the mobile access market). 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested