long as the fitted parameters are not too different from the tar-
get parameters, approximately preserves the residuals from the
Hubblediagram.In developingthe analysis,one is onlyexposed
to data blindedbytheprocedure describedabove.Only afterthe
analysis is finalized and the procedure frozen is the blinding
turned off.
Note thatthis prescription allows—in a consistentway—the
inclusion offuture data samples. A new data sample would be
firstinvestigatedinablindmannerfollowingthetestsoutlinedin
x4.4, and if no anomalies are observed, one would combine it
with the other data sets.
4.2. Unbiased Parameter Estimation
TypeIa supernovaeobeyaredder-dimmerrelationandawider-
brighter relation (Phillips 1993). The redder-dimmer relation in
principle can be explainedby dust extinction; however,the total
to selective extinction ratios generally obtained empirically are
smaller than expected from Milky-Way–like dust (Tripp 1998;
Tripp& Branch1999; Parodi etal.2000; Guy etal. 2005; Wang
et al. 2006). At the same time, the exact slope of the stretch-
magnitude relationis not (yet)predicted by theory.The absence
ofastrongtheoreticalpredictionmotivates anempiricaltreatment
of stretch and color corrections. Here we adoptthe corrections of
Tripp (1998; see also Tripp & Branch 1999; Wang et al. 2006;
Guy et al. 2005; Astier et al. 2006):
B
¼m
max
B
M þ (s  1) c:
ð2Þ
Since the-colorcorrectionterm mustaccountforboth dustand
any intrinsic color-magnitude relation, it is clearly an empirical
approximation. The validity of-color correction relies on only
one assumption—that is, nearby supernovae and distant super-
novae have an identical magnitude-color relation. If either the
intrinsic SNe properties or the dust extinction properties of the
supernovae are evolving with redshift, these assumptions may
be violated. Observational selection effects may also introduce
biases that invalidate equation (2). These potential sources of
systematic errorwill be evaluated in x 5.1.
The 
2
corresponding to that of equation (2) is given as
2
¼
X
SNe
B
(z; 
M
;
;w)
½
2
2
tot
þ2
sys
þ
P
ij
c
i
c
j
C
ij
:
ð3Þ
The sum inthe denominatorrepresents the statistical uncertainty
as obtained from the light-curve fit with C
ij
representing the co-
variancematrixoffittedparameters: peakmagnitudes,color,and
stretch(i.e.,C
11
¼
2
m
B
)andc
i
¼f1;;garethecorrespond-
ing correction parameters.
The quantity 
tot
represents an astrophysical dispersion ob-
tainedbyaddinginquadraturethedispersionduetolensing,
lens
¼
0:093z (seex 5.6),the uncertaintyin the Milky-Waydust extinc-
tion correction (see x 5.8), and a term reflecting the uncertainty
due to host galaxy peculiar velocities of 300 km s
1
.The dis-
persion term 
sys
contains an observed sample-dependent dis-
persion due to possible unaccounted-for systematic errors. In
x4.3 we discuss the contribution of 
sys
further.
Note that equation (3)can be derived usingminimizationofa
generalized 2. Defining a residual vector for a supernova R ¼
B

model
; s  s
0
; c c
0
ð
Þand supposingthatthe light-curve
fit returns covariance matrix C, we can write
2
¼
X
SNe
R
T
C
1
R:
ð4Þ
Here s0 and c0 take the role of the true stretch and color, which
have to be estimated from the measured ones. Minimizing this
equation over all possible values of s
0
and c
0
gives the 
2
in
equation (3).The
2
is minimized,not marginalized,over and
; marginalization would yield a biased result due to the asym-
metry of the 
2
about the minimum.
Frequently, equation (3) is minimized by updating the denom-
inatoriteratively,i.e.,onlybetweenminimizations(see,e.g.,Astier
etal.2006).As showninFigure5anddiscussednext,thismethod
produces biasedfitresults,anartifactpreviously noted byWang
et al. (2006).
We use a Monte Carlosimulation toestimate anybiases from
the fitting procedure. Random supernova samples resembling
Fig. 5.—Monte Carlo simulationof the resulting  (left)and  (right) distributions as fittedwiththe unbiased andbiased method.The true values  ¼ 1:5 and
¼ 2:5arerepresentedby the arrows.
IMPROVED COSMOLOGICAL CONSTRAINTS
759
No. 2, 2008
Convert pdf to html5 open source - application SDK utility:C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
How to Convert PDF to HTML Webpage with C# PDF Conversion SDK
www.rasteredge.com
Convert pdf to html5 open source - application SDK utility:VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
PDF to HTML Webpage Converter SDK for VB.NET PDF to HTML Conversion
www.rasteredge.com
the observed one are generated and then fitted. The true stretch
and color are sampled from a normal distribution of width 0.1
and forthepeak magnitudeanintrinsic dispersionof0.15 magis
assumed.Afurtherdispersioncorresponding tothe measurement
errors is added. By construction, the SN samples have the same
redshiftandstretch,color,andpeakmagnitudeuncertaintiesasthe
real sample. The test values for  and  were chosen as 1.5 and
2.5. This bias on  and , as would be obtained from the itera-
tivemethod’s fits to the simulated data sets,is visible in Figure 5
as the unshaded histogram. The large potential bias on  ( 
0:5), if the 2 had been chosen according to equation (3)with
the iteratively updated denominator, is a result of the fact that
the measurement error on c for high-redshift SNe is similar
to and often even exceeds the width of the color distribution
itself.
Wehave investigatedothersources ofbias inthe fitted param-
eters. A measurement bias will be introduced because overall,
brighter SNe will have smaller photometric errors, and hence
larger weights, than dimmer ones. If the photometric error bars
are small enough that the intrinsic dispersion dominates the un-
certainty,thisbiaswillbesmall.Hence,low-redshift,well-observed
SNe are biased less than high-redshift, poorly observed SNe, re-
sultinginbiased cosmologicalparameters.This bias was studied
usingtheMonte Carlo simulationdescribedabove.Forthesam-
ple under investigation we found a bias M ¼ 0:01 had been
introduced. In principle this bias can be corrected; however,
since it is roughly a factorof3smallerthanthe statistical or sys-
tematic uncertainties, we chose not to carry out this step.
4.3. Robust Statistics
Figure6shows thedistributionofrest-frameB-bandcorrected
magnitude residuals (left) from the best fit as obtained with the
full dataset.The rightplot showsthepulldistribution,where the
pull is defined as the corrected B magnitude residual dividedby
its uncertainty.The distributions haveoutliers that,ifinterpreted
as statistical fluctuations, are highly improbable. Hence, these
outliers point to non-Gaussian behavior of the underlying data,
due toeithersystematicerrorsinthe observations,contamination,
or intrinsic variations in Type Ia SNe. The fact that an outlier is
presenteveninthehigh-qualitySNLSsupernova set(seeTable 3)
suggests that contamination or unmodeled intrinsic variations
might be present. However, other samples that typically were
observed with a more heterogeneous setof telescopes and instru-
ments show largerfractions ofoutliers,indicatingadditional po-
tential observation-related problems.
In order to limit the influence of outliers, we use a robust
analysis technique.First,the SNsamples arefittedforM,the ab-
solute magnitude of the SNe, using median statistics (see Gott
et al. 2001 for a discussion of median statistics in the context
ofSNcosmology).The quantityminimized is  ¼
P
SNe
j
B
ð
model
j/Þ,where the uncertainty  in the denominatorincludes
thecovariance termsinthe denominatoroftheright-hand sideof
equation (3). We then proceed to fit each sample by itself us-
ing the , , and 
M
from the combined fit, as  is not a well-
behaved quantity for small numbers of SNe.
Foreach sample, we remove SNe witha pullexceeding acer-
tainvalue 
cut
relativeto the median fit ofthe sample. Currently
available algorithms, which correct the peak magnitude using,
e.g., stretch or m
15
,are capable of standardizing SNe Ia to a
level of0.10–0.15mag. To reflect this we add in quadrature a
systematicdispersiontotheknownuncertainties.Thelistofknown
uncertainties includeobservationalerrors,distance modulus un-
certainties due to peculiar velocities (with v ¼ 300 km s
1
)
and gravitational lensing (relevant only for the highest-redshift
SNe; see x 5.6 for a discussion). The additional systematic dis-
persionhas two components:a commonirreducibleone,possibly
associated with intrinsic variations in the SN explosion mech-
anism, as well as an observer-dependent component. To obtain
self-consistency the systematic dispersion is recalculated dur-
ing the analysis. One starts by assuming a systematic dispersion
of 
sys
¼0:15 magnitudes, then computes the best-fitting cos-
mologyfortheparticularsampleusingmedianstatistics,removes
theoutlierSNe with residuals largerthan a cutvalue 
cut
,iterates
sys
such that the total 
2
per degree of freedom is unity, and in
afinalstepredetermines thebest-fitting cosmologyusingregular
2
statistics to obtain an updated 
sys
.From that point in the
Fig. 6.—Residual of rest-frame, stretch and color-corrected, B-band magnitude (left) and pull distribution (right) from the best-fitting cosmology. The filled
histogram shows the rejectedoutliers. Thepull distributionis overlaidwith anormal distributionofunit width.
KOWALSKI ET AL.
760
Vol. 686
application SDK utility:C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
it is feasible for users to extract text content from source PDF document file the following C# example code for text extraction from PDF page Open a document
www.rasteredge.com
application SDK utility:VB.NET PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in
Decode source PDF document file into an in-memory object, namely 2.pdf" Dim outputFilePath As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" Annot_8.pdf" ' open a PDF file
www.rasteredge.com
analysis, after outliers are rejected and 
sys
determined, only
regular 
2
statistics are applied.
When using a robust analysis, it is necessary to check that
(1)in theabsenceofcontaminationtheresults arenotalteredfrom
theGaussian case and(2)inthe presenceofa contaminatingcon-
tribution, its impact is indeed reduced. In order to investigate
this, we begin with a model for the contamination. We assume
the data sample to be composed of two types of objects, one
representing the desired SNe Ia and a second contribution char-
acterizingthe contamination.Wethen use amaximum-likelihood
analysisofthe observedpulldistributionshowninFigure6(right)
to determine the normalization, width and mean of the contami-
nating distribution. The uncontaminated pull distribution is as-
sumed to be a Gaussiandistribution ofunitwidth and zero mean.
The observed pull distribution is best-fitted by an additional
contaminating contribution that is 50% wider (
m
¼0:23 mag)
and thathasa meanshifted bym ¼ 0:3
m
,normalizedto18%
ofthe area.Amocksimulation thatis basedonthissuperposition
of two normal distributions illustrates the benefits of using the
robust analysis. Figure 7 (right) shows the bias of the mean rel-
ative to the center of the main component as a function of the
outlier rejection cut value. Outlier rejection can reduce the
bias byafactorof 3 with aremainingbias of less than0.01mag.
Evenforawiderangeofcontaminantparameters (
m
¼0:15
2;
m ¼ 0
2mag)thebias obtainedfortherobustanalysis remains
below0.015mag.Only incases wherethecontamination is larger
than 30% does the outlierrejection algorithm become unstable.
Besides reducing the potential bias due to contamination, ro-
buststatisticscanalsoleadtotighterparameterconstraintsthrough
reduction of the intrinsic dispersion. The right panel of Figure 7
shows forthe simulated data the average standard deviation as a
functionoftheoutlierrejectioncutforthe16%contaminationcase
described above. As a reference, the case of a single uncontami-
nated population ofSNe is shown as well.Note that a cut at 3 
reduces the dispersion noticeably in the case of a contaminated
sample, while the uncontaminated single population is affected
negligibly (the standarddeviationis reducedby1.3%,e.g.,from
0.15 to 0.148 mag).
Forthe realdata,weconsidertwovalues 
cut
¼2; 3 as wellas
thecaseinwhichallSNearekept.Wechoseasourmaincutvalue
cut
¼3 since,after application ofthe outlier rejection,standard
2
statistics is still agoodapproximationwhile at thesame timea
potentialbiasintroducedbycontaminationis significantlyreduced.
Note also that the impact of individual SNe that have residuals
closeto
cut
is small forlarge statistics:anadditionalSN willshift
themeandistance modulusof N
SNe
byatmost
cut
N
1/2
SNe
standard
deviations.Hence,forN
SNe
k10and 
cut
¼3the algorithm can
be considered stable relative to fluctuations of individual SNe.
4.4. Sample Characteristics, Dispersion, and Pull
Figure 8 illustrates the heterogeneous character of the sam-
ples. It shows the Hubble and residual diagrams for the various
samples, as well as the histogram of the SN residuals and pulls
from the best fit. The difference in photometric quality is illus-
trated inthe rightmost column of Figure 8,by showingthe error
onthe colormeasurement.As can be seen,some samples showa
significantredshift-dependentgradientintheerrors,whileothers
have small, nearly constant errors (most notably the sample of
Knop et al. 2003). The sample of Astier et al. (2006) shows a
small coloruncertainty up to z  0:8and degrades significantly
once the color measurement relies on the poorer z-band data
(cf.SALT2 [Guyetal.2007],which is capable ofincorporating
light curve data bluer than rest-frame U).
Our analysis is optimized for large, multicolor samples such
as that of Astier et al. (2006),since these now dominate the total
sample. There is often a better analysis approach for any given
specific sample that wouldemphasize the strengths of thatsam-
ple’s measurements and yield a tighter dispersion and more sta-
tistical weight. However, for this combined analysis of many
samples it was more important to use a single uniform analysis
forevery sample,atthecost ofdegrading the results forsome of
the smaller samples. This particularly affects some of the very
earliest samples, such as Riess et al. (1998), Perlmutter et al.
(1999), and Barris et al. (2004), where the color measurements
hadoriginallybeenusedwithdifferentpriors concerningthedust
distribution. Treating these samples withthe currentanalysis thus
gives significantly larger dispersions (and hence less weight) to
these samples than theiroriginal analyses. As a check, we have
verified that by repeating the analysis according to Perlmutter
et al. (1999) we reproduce the original dispersions.
TABLE 3
Number of Supernovae Passing the Different Outlier Rejection Cuts, and Sample-dependent
Systematic Dispersion (
sys
)and rms around the Best-Fit Model
No Outlier Cut
cut
¼3
cut
¼2
Set
SNe
sys
(68%)
rms (68%)
SNe
sys
(68%)
rms (68%)
SNe
sys
(68%)
rms (68%)
Hamuy et al. (1996).....................
17
0:14
þ0:04
0:03
0:16
þ0:03
0:03
17
0:14
þ0:04
0:03
0:16
þ0:03
0:03
16
0:12
þ0:05
0:03
0:15
þ0:02
0:03
Krisciunas et al. (2005)...............
6
0:06þ0:11
0:05
0:10þ0:03
0:04
6
0:05þ0:11
0:05
0:10þ0:03
0:04
6
0:08þ0:12
0:07
0:12þ0:03
0:04
Riess et al. (1999)........................
11
0:16þ0:07
0:04
0:18þ0:03
0:04
11
0:16þ0:07
0:03
0:17þ0:03
0:04
11
0:18þ0:08
0:04
0:20þ0:04
0:05
Jha et al. (2006)...........................
16
0:30
þ0:09
0:05
0:31
þ0:05
0:06
15
0:26
þ0:08
0:05
0:27
þ0:05
0:06
11
0:10
þ0:08
0:06
0:15
þ0:03
0:04
This work.....................................
8
0:01þ0:06
0:01
0:09þ0:02
0:03
8
0:00þ0:05
0:00
0:07þ0:02
0:02
8
0:07þ0:06
0:03
0:12þ0:03
0:04
Riess et al. (1998)+HZT..............
12
0:29þ0:20
0:11
0:50þ0:09
0:12
12
0:28þ0:19
0:10
0:48þ0:09
0:11
10
0:16þ0:19
0:10
0:49þ0:10
0:13
Perlmutter et al. (1999)................
30
0:43
þ0:13
0:09
0:65
þ0:08
0:09
29
0:33
þ0:10
0:07
0:50
þ0:06
0:07
24
0:19
þ0:11
0:09
0:43
þ0:06
0:07
Tonry et al. (2003).......................
6
0:00þ0:33
0:00
0:24þ0:06
0:09
6
0:06þ0:28
0:06
0:24þ0:06
0:09
6
0:00þ0:32
0:00
0:26þ0:07
0:09
Barris et al. (2004).......................
22
0:31þ0:12
0:07
0:64þ0:09
0:11
21
0:23þ0:12
0:08
0:62þ0:09
0:10
19
0:11þ0:16
0:11
0:71þ0:11
0:13
Knop et al. (2003).......................
11
0:10þ0:08
0:04
0:17þ0:03
0:04
11
0:10þ0:07
0:04
0:17þ0:03
0:04
11
0:11þ0:08
0:05
0:18þ0:04
0:04
Riess et al. (2007)........................
29
0:22þ0:05
0:04
0:31þ0:04
0:04
27
0:16þ0:05
0:04
0:26þ0:03
0:04
24
0:08þ0:05
0:06
0:22þ0:03
0:03
Astier et al. (2006).......................
72
0:14þ0:03
0:02
0:31þ0:03
0:03
71
0:12þ0:03
0:02
0:29þ0:02
0:03
70
0:12þ0:03
0:02
0:30þ0:02
0:03
Miknaitis et al. (2007).................
75
0:21þ0:04
0:03
0:32þ0:02
0:03
73
0:18þ0:04
0:03
0:30þ0:02
0:03
66
0:00þ0:05
0:00
0:23þ0:02
0:02
Union............................................
315
307
282
Note.—The compilation obtained with the 
cut
¼3cut will be referred to as the Union robust set.
IMPROVED COSMOLOGICAL CONSTRAINTS
761
No. 2, 2008
application SDK utility:C# PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.
Description: Combine the source PDF streams into one PDF file and save it to a new PDF file on the disk. Parameters: Name, Description, Valid Value.
www.rasteredge.com
application SDK utility:C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
Online C# source code for extracting, copying and pasting PDF The portable document format, known as PDF document, is of file that allows users to open & read
www.rasteredge.com
Fig.7.—Mocksimulationofbias (left)andstandarddeviation(right)ofthemeanmagnitudeas afunctionoftheoutlierrejectioncut.ThesimulatedSNset consists
ofonepopulationof270SNewithintrinsicdispersionof0.15magandzeromeanandasecondpopulationof50SNewithintrinsicdispersionof0.26magandmean
0.13mag. The effectofoutlier rejectionona singlepopulationwithoutcontaminationis shownas a reference curve.
application SDK utility:C# Word - MailMerge Processing in C#.NET
da.Fill(data); //Open the document DOCXDocument document0 = DOCXDocument.Open( docFilePath ); int counter = 1; // Loop though all records in the data source.
www.rasteredge.com
application SDK utility:C# Create PDF from OpenOffice to convert odt, odp files to PDF in
Convert OpenOffice Text Document to PDF with embedded fonts. to change ODT, ODS, ODP forms to fillable PDF formats in Visual Online source code for C#.NET class.
www.rasteredge.com
Figure 9shows diagnosticvariables usedtotestforconsistency
between the various samples. The leftmost plot shows the sys-
tematicdispersionand rmsaroundthebest-fitmodel.One expects
that there is an intrinsic dispersion associated with all SNe that
provides alowerlimittothesample-dependentsystematicdisper-
sion. To estimate the intrinsic dispersion one can look at various
quantities,such as thesmallest
sys
or,perhapsmoreappropriately,
the median of
sys
.The median of 
sys
,which is about 0.15 mag
(shownas the leftmostdashed verticalline),is a robustmeasure of
the intrinsic dispersion, as long as the majority of samples are not
dominated by observer-dependent, unaccounted-for uncertainties.
As a test for tension between the data sets, we compare for
eachsampletheaverageresidualfromthe best-fitcosmology.This
is shown in the middle panel of Figure 9. As can be seen, most
samples fall within 1 ,and none deviate by more then 2 . The
largersamples shownoindicationofinconsistency.This changes
ifoneconsiders,insteadofthemean,theslope,d
residual
/dz,of the
residuals as a function of theredshift.The right panel of Figure 9
shows a large fraction of significant outliers in the slope. The
largestslope outlier is foundfor the Miknaitis et al. (2007)sam-
ple (see also the middle panel of Fig. 8). The sign of the slope is
consistent with the presence of a Malmquist bias (see Wood-
Vaseyet al.2007 for a discussion).The uncertainties associated
with such a Malmquist bias are discussed inx 5.5.While in gen-
eralthere is nocleartrendinthe sign ofthe slope deviations,it is
clearthat any results thatdepend on the detailedslope,such as a
changing equation of state, should be treated with caution.
5. SYSTEMATIC ERRORS
Detailedstudies ofthesystematic effects have been published
as part of the analysis of individual data sets. The list includes
photometric zero points,Vegaspectrum, light curve fitting,con-
tamination,evolution, Malmquist bias, K-corrections,and grav-
itationallensing,which have also been discussed inearlierwork
byauthorsofthispaper(Perlmutteretal.1997,1999;Knopetal.
2003;Astieretal.2006; Ruiz-Lapuente2007;Wood-Vaseyetal.
2007).
Some sources ofsystematic errors are common to all surveys
andwillbespecificallyaddressedforthefullsample.Othersources
ofsystematicerrors arecontrolledbytheindividualobservers.The
degree with which this has been done forthe various data sam-
plesenteringthe analysisis very different.The SNLS—which is
usingasingletelescopeandinstrumentforthesearchandfollow-up
and which has detailed multiband photometry for nearly all its
SNe—hasastronghandleonasubsetoftheobservation-dependent
systematics uncertainties. With the exception of the ESSENCE
SN data sample, other high-redshift samples are smaller and will
contribute less to the final results.
We handle the two types of systematic errors separately: sys-
tematic errors that can be associated with a sample (e.g., due to
observationaleffects) and those that are common to all the sam-
ples (e.g.,due toastrophysicalorfundamentalcalibration effects).
To first order, the measurement of cosmological parameters de-
pends on the relative brightness of nearby SNe (z  0:05) com-
pared to their high-redshift counterparts (z  0:5). If low- and
high-redshift SNe are different, this can be absorbed in different
absolute magnitudes M. We hence cast the common systematic
uncertainties intoanuncertaintyinthe difference M ¼ M
low
M
high
-
z
.We have chosen z
div
¼0:2 as the dividing redshift as
it conveniently splits the samples according nearby and distant
SNsearches.Note, however,that ourresultingsystematic errors
changebyless than25%ofitsvalueforz
div
inthe range0.1–0.5.
Inaddition we allow fora set ofextra parameters,M
i
,one for
each sample i.
Systematic uncertainties are then propagated by adding these
nuisance parameters to 
B
:
0
B
¼
B
þM
i
for z
div
<0:2;
B
þM
i
þM
for z
div
0:2;
ð5Þ
with the term M
2
/
2
M
þ
P
N
samples
i¼1
M
2
i
/
2
M
i
beingadded to
the 
2
as defined through equation (3).
We have checked that this treatment of systematic errors is
consistent(inourcasetobetterthan5%ofitsvalue)withthemore
common procedure,applicable to one-dimensionalconstraints,in
which part of the input data are offset by 
M
to obtain the
systematic variations in the resulting parameter (e.g., w or 
M
).
Inthefollowingwe discuss thedifferentcontributions to
M
,
andsummarize them in x5.9.The resulting systematic errors on
the cosmological parameters are discussed in x 6.
5.1. Stretch and E
v
olution
Withthelargestatistics athandonecantesttheerrors associated
with theempiricalstretch andcolorcorrections.Thesecorrections
would become sources of systematic error if (1) different SN
populationsweretorequiredifferentcorrections and(2)iftheSN
Fig. 9.—From lefttoright: Systematicdispersion( filledcircles)andrmsaroundthebest-fitmodel (opencircles); themean, sample averaged,deviationfrom the
best-fitmodel;theslopeof theHubbleresidual(inmagnitudes)vs.redshift,d
residual
/dz.Theparameterscharacterizingthedifferentsamplesareusedtouncoverpotential
systematicproblems. [See theelectronic edition of theJournal for acolor versionofthis figure.]
IMPROVED COSMOLOGICAL CONSTRAINTS
763
application SDK utility:VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
addition, texts, pictures and font formatting of source PDF file are accurately retained in converted Word document file. Why do we need to convert PDF to Word
www.rasteredge.com
application SDK utility:VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
Separate source PDF document file by defined page range in VB.NET class application. Divide PDF file into multiple files by outputting PDF file size.
www.rasteredge.com
populations were toshowdifferencesbetweennearbyanddistant
objects (either due to selection effects ordue to evolution of the
SN environment).
Apotential redshift dependence of the correction parameters
canbe testedby separately fittinglow-redshift and high-redshift
objects. For this test, a CDM cosmology was assumed with
M
¼0:28 and 
M
¼0:72(thevalues weobtainfrom the fit of
the full sample); however,the results areratherinsensitive to the
assumed cosmological parameters. The obtained fitted parame-
ters  and  are presented in Table 4.
The values of  at high and low redshift agree very well, pro-
viding strong constraints on evolution of the color-correction.
Suchevolutioneffects couldarise,forexample,due toa different
mix of dust reddening and intrinsic color at different redshifts.
Thefactthatagrees sowellsupports thechoice oftheempirical
color correction.43
The  at low redshift and high redshift are only marginally
consistent with each other. We will take the difference at face
value and estimate the impact it would have on the final result.
Theaverage stretch is hsi  0:96 and hence thedifference in the
average stretch correction is h1 si  0:015. If  indeed is
redshift-dependent and this was not accounted for, one would
obtain a bias of M ¼ 0:015 mag.
Effects ofpotentially different SN populations should be con-
sidered as well. It has recently been argued by Scannapieco &
Bildsten (2005) and Mannucci et al. (2006) that one needs to
allow for two types of SN-progenitor timescales to explain the
observed rates in different galaxy types. One class of objects
traces the star formationrate directly,while the second class has
adelaytimetrailingthe starformationratebyafewbillionyears.
If indeed two populations are present, they might evolve dif-
ferently with redshift. It is therefore important to check that the
empirical corrections suit both populations. To test the effect of
differentSNpopulationsonecansubdividethesampleaccording
toSNsubtypesorhostenvironments (Sullivanetal.2003;Howell
et al. 2007).
Sullivan et al. (2006) have found using well-observed SNe
and hosts from SNLSthatthestretch ofalightcurveiscorrelated
with its host environment as well as with the two classes of
SN-progenitor systems postulated by Scannapieco & Bildsten
(2005)andMannucci et al.(2006).Therefore,we dividethe SN
sample into two approximate equally large samples with s <
0:96 and s  0:96.The twoindependent samples are thenfitted,
with the results shown in Table 4. The resulting parameters
M
(for a flat universe) and w (for a flat universe together with
BAO+CMB) for the two samples are less than 1  apart, and
hence, there is no evidence for an underlying systematic effect.
Nevertheless,thiswillbeaveryimportantnumbertowatch,once
future high-quality SN data sets are added. (Note that, while the
resultingvaluesofs forthetwosamplesareconsistentwitheach
other, they appear inconsistent with the value obtained for the
completesample.Thisapparentinconsistencyarisesinpartdueto
abias introducedbydividingthestretchdistributioninthemiddle.
Larger stretch SNe, misclassified due to measurement errors as
belongingto thelow-stretchSNe sample,as wellaslowerstretch
SNe, misclassifiedas belonging tothelarge stretch SNe sample,
will for both samples result in a  biased to larger values.)
We have also investigated whether the sample can be sub-
dividedaccording to the color of the SNe.We found that the re-
sultsofsuchatestcanbeverymisleading.While inprincipleone
wouldexpecttofindthatthebest-fittedcosmologicalparameters
do not depend on color selection criteria (e.g., c < c
cut
and c >
c
cut
), we find by means ofMonte Carlo simulation described in
x4.2 that a significant bias is introduced into the measurements.
This bias is alsoobserved inthe data. Forexample,by choosing
c
cut
¼0:02 we find that for our sample of SNe 
M
changes by
0.1. The bias arises from truncating an asymmetric distribu-
tion. In the case of color, the asymmetry in the distribution is
introduced by the fact that extinction by dust leads only to red-
dening. Hence, the number of objects that would belong to
c
true
<c
cut
but, due to a large measurement error,are fitted with
c
observed
>c
cut
,are not compensated by objects misclassified in
the oppositeway.The numberofmisclassified objects is a func-
tionofthemeasurementerrorsand,hence,islargertowardhigher
redshift.Thesimulateddatasetsresultina significantbiasbothin
M
as well as . The size of the bias, however, depends on as-
sumptions made for the underlying color distribution. Hence,for
the current data sample, splitting the data set in two color bins
introduces abiassolarge anddifficulttocontrolthattheresultsof
the test become meaningless.Note that if one had very small er-
rorbars onthe colormeasurementoverthe full redshiftrange(as
obtained from adedicatedspace-based survey[Aldering2005]),
the bias can be kept small.This would allow foradditional tests
of systematic uncertainties due to reddening corrections.
5.2. Sample Contamination
As discussed in x 4.3, the method of robust statistics was ap-
plied to limit the effect ofoutliers,which could be present ifthe
data are contaminated by non–Type Ia SNe, or by other events
thatdo not have the standard candle properties of regular SN Ia.
It was shown in x 4.3 that the bias due to contamination can be
limited for this analysis to M ¼ 0:015 mag, which we hence
use as the uncertainty due to contamination.
In previous compilations, such as that of Riess et al. (2004,
2007)noformal outliercriteriawere applied.Instead,withsome
exceptions,theoriginalclassificationsmadebytheauthorsofthe
data sample were used. Spurious candidates are sometimes re-
movedfromthedatasamplesbyhand(see,e.g.,Astieretal.2006),
makingitextremelydifficulttoestimatetheeffectof the remaining
contamination. Our method ofoutlier rejection provides a simple
and objective alternative.
5.3. Light Cur
v
eModel and K-Corrections
The light curve model (Guy et al. 2005) is a parametric de-
scription with two free parameters.As such, it has limitations in
capturingthefull diversity of Type Ia SNe.By visual inspection
wefind,forexample,thatthefittedmaximum magnitudecandif-
ferfrom thedatabya fewhundredths ofamagnitude.Aparticular
problem could arise if the observation strategies for nearby and
distant SNe differ. In fact, the high-redshift data sets have on
TABLE 4
Fit Parameters as Obtained for Different Supernova Subsamples
Subset
N
SN
M
a
w
b
All................ 307 1.24(0.10) 2.28 (0.11) 0.29(0.03) 0.97 (0.06)
z> 0:2.......... 250 1.46(0.16) 2.26 (0.14)
...
...
z 0:2..........
57 1.07(0.12) 2.23 (0.21)
...
...
s< 0:96........ 155 1.56(0.27) 2.18 (0.18) 0.27(0.05) 0.98 (0.09)
s 0:96........ 152 1.51(0.37) 2.34 (0.17) 0.30(0.04) 0.93 (0.07)
a
Aflat universe was assumed in the constraints on 
M
.
b
Constraintsonw wereobtainedfromcombiningSNewithCMB andBAO
measurements.A flat universewas alsoassumed. (seex 6formoredetails).
43
Notethat if werenotobtainedbyfittingbutinsteadwas fixed,e.g., ¼
R
B
¼4:1, a bias can be expected (andmight have already beenobserved, see
Conleyet al. 2007)ifthe averagereddeningchanges as a functionofredshift.
KOWALSKI ET AL.
764
Vol. 686
application SDK utility:C# PDF: PDF Document Viewer & Reader SDK for Windows Forms
page, view PDF file in different display formats, and save source PDF file using C# UpPage: Scroll to previous visible page in the currently open PDF document.
www.rasteredge.com
average earlier observations of the light curve, which is a re-
sult of the rolling-search techniques frequently used to find and
follow-upSNe.Hence,whencomparinglow-ztohigh-zSNe,the
fitted light curve parameters are obtained from slightly different
parts ofthe lightcurve. The mismatchbetween template andthe
data light curve might thus be more pronounced in one sample
than the other. To quantify the effect, we have performed an ex-
tensive Monte Carlo simulation. A set of BVR light curve tem-
plates are obtainedfrom a quarticspline fitto data, includingthe
well-observed SNe 1990N, 1994D, 1998aq, 2001el, 2002bo,
2003du, 2004eo,and 2005cf(Strovink 2007).Thetemplates are
thenused to samplerandom realizations ofthe light curves with
cadence, S/N, and date of the first detection of the nearby and
distant SN sample. These simulated light curves are then fitted.
The difference in thestretch and color-correctedpeak magnitude
between the nearby and distant sample can be used to estimate
the systematic uncertainty. Forthe nine templates we obtain the
averagedifferencebetween nearbyanddistantSNe of0.02mag
with an rms scatter of 0.015. We adopt an associated systematic
uncertainty ofM ¼ 0:02 mag due to this.
Thereisanothersourceof uncertaintyarisingfromthediversity
ofSNe Ia lightcurves.Ifa certainclass of SNe is misrepresented
(e.g., if they are brighter than average for their typically fitted
stretchvalue)andifthefractionofsuchSNechangesasafunction
of redshift, it will lead to a systematic bias in the cosmological
parameters. Appendix D has addressed this issue by subdividing
the sample according to stretch and redshift. Ifa significant light
curve misrepresentationwere present,onewouldexpecttoseedif-
ferences in the fitted lightcurve–correctionparameters.No sta-
tisticallysignificantdifferences havebeenobserved,andweassign
no additionalcontribution to theuncertainties from suchaneffect.
The light curve model is based on a spectral template series.
IttherebyeliminatestheneedforaseparateK-correction(seex3.3).
The modelhasbeentrainedwithnearbySNe dataand hencewill
be affectedbysystematic errorsassociatedwith thattraining data.
These are largestforthe U band, which suffers from lowtraining
statistics anddifficultfluxcalibration.However,the validityofthe
model in the U bandhas beenverifiedwith the SNLSdata setto
better than 0.02 mag (Astier et al. 2006). Here we adopt their
assessment of the resulting systematic error of M ¼ 0:02.
5.4. Photometric Zero Points
With present methods, ground-based photometric zero-point
calibration is generally limited to an accuracy of k1% (Stubbs
&Tonry 2006). The largestcontributiontothe photometric error
of the peak magnitude arises from the color correction M 
c.Thecolormeasurementis basedonthemeasurementofthe
relative flux in two (or more) bands and as a result some of the
uncertainties cancel. Nevertheless, since the colorofSNe at dif-
ferent redshifts are obtained from different spectral regions, the
uncertainty in the reference Vega spectrum limits the achiev-
able accuracyto c  0:01
0:015 mag (Stritzinger etal.2005;
Bohlin & Gilliland 2004).
Here we assume an uncertainty of M ¼ 0:03 for the pho-
tometricpeakmagnitudedue tozero-pointcalibration.Partofthis
uncertainty is common to all samples (as the same set ofcalibra-
tion stars is being used),while the otherpartissample-dependent
(e.g., tied to the calibration procedure), and we divide the error
equally among the two categories.
5.5. Malmquist Bias
Malmquist bias arises in flux-limited surveys, when SNe are
detected because they are overly bright. What matters for cos-
mology is whether the bias is different for the low-z and high-z
samples.Perlmutter et al.(1999), Knop et al. (2003), and Astier
etal.(2006)have evaluated theeffects of Malmquistbias forthe
SCPandSNLSSNsamplesas wellasthenearby SNsample and
found that they nearly cancel. Since an individual estimate of
Malmquistbias forallthe different samples is beyond the scope
of this work, we attribute a conservative systematic uncertainty
ofM ¼ 0:02(Astier et al. 2006)forallsamples,which is con-
sistent with previous estimates.
In addition, we investigated whether the significant redshift
dependence of the Hubble residuals observed for the Miknaitis
etal.(2007)sample(seex4.4),ifinterpretedasduetoMalmquist
bias,exceeds ourclaimeduncertainty.Asimulationwasperformed
in which we introduced a magnitude cutoff such that the result-
ing slope, d/dz, matches the observed slope of 0.6. The as-
sociated Malmquist bias with that sample is then 0.05 mag.
If this is compared to the average Malmquist bias obtained for
magnitude-limited searches, the extra bias is only 0.03 mag
larger—not much larger than the systematic uncertainty we
have adopted. While we do not treat the ESSENCE data sam-
ple differently from the others, we note that Wood-Vasey et al.
(2007) made their extinction prior redshift-dependent to ac-
count for the fact that at higher redshifts an increasingly larger
fraction of the reddened SNe was not detected. The linear color
correction employed in our analysis is independent of a prior
and therefore unaffected by a redshift-dependent reddening
distribution.
5.6. Gra
v
itational Lensing
Gravitationallensingdecreases themodeofthe brightness dis-
tribution and causes increased dispersion in the Hubble diagram
at high redshift (see Fig. 10). The effect has been discussed in
detailinthe literature(Sasaki1987;Linder1988; Bergstro¨m et al.
2000; Holz & Linder 2005). We treat lensing as a statistical
phenomenon only, although with the detailed optical and NIR
data available forthe GOODS field, the mass distribution in the
line of sight and hence the lensing (de)magnification may be
estimated for individual SNe (Jo¨nsson et al. 2006). What is
importantforthisworkisthat theyfindnoevidence forselection
effects (i.e., Malmquist bias) due to lensing of the high-redshift
SNe.
Considering both strong and weak lensing, Holz & Linder
(2005) found that lensing will add a dispersion of 0:093z mag,
which, if the statistics of SNe is large enough, can be approxi-
mated as an additional Gaussian error. Here we added the ad-
ditionaldispersionfrom gravitationallensinginquadraturetothe
‘‘constant’’ systematic dispersion and observational error. This
effectively deweights the high-redshift SNe. However, only for
the highest-redshiftSNeisthe additionaluncertaintycomparable
to that of the intrinsic dispersion.
Fluxmagnificationanddemagnificationeffectsdue toover-or
underdensities of matter near the line of sight cancel. But one
obtains a biasifmagnitudes instead offluxes areused.However,
the bias is 0:004z mag and therefore still much smaller than the
statistical errorontheluminosity distance obtained from the en-
semble of high-redshift SNe. While not yet relevant for this
analysis,future high-statistics samples will have to take this ef-
fect into account.
Anotherpotentialbiasisintroducedbythe3outlierrejection,
since the lensing PDF is asymmetric. Using the PDFs of Holz
&Linder (2005) we have checked that the bias is never larger
than0:006z mag.Wetaketheworst-casevalue of0.009mag(i.e.,
for a SNe at z  1:5) as a conservative systematic uncertainty
for gravitational lensing,since this is still an almost negligible
value.
IMPROVED COSMOLOGICAL CONSTRAINTS
765
No. 2, 2008
5.7. Gray Intergalactic Dust
The possibility thatSNe are dimmed due tohypotheticalgray
intergalacticdust,assuggestedbyAguirre(1999),wasconstrained
by O
¨
stman & Mo¨rtsell (2005) and Mo¨rtsell & Goobar (2003) by
studying the colors of high-redshift quasars. Applying their con-
straints on intergalactic dust, we find that the cosmological pa-
rameters areshiftedbyabout1 statisticalstandard deviation,i.e.,
foraflatuniverse
M
¼0:03.This should notbe considered
asystematicuncertainty,butratheranupperlimitontheeffectof
hypothetical large grains of cosmic dust in the line of sight.
5.8. Galactic Extinction
All lightcurve data were corrected forGalactic extinction us-
ingthe extinctionlawofCardellietal.(1989)usinganR
V
of 3.1.
TheE(B  V)values were derivedfrom the sky mapofSchlegel
etal.(1998)andhaveatypicalstatisticalerrorof10%.Fornearby
SNe we hence obtain an additional uncertainty of

B
(R
B
) E(B  V )
ð
Þ 0:2E(B  V );
ð6Þ
where  is the colorcorrection coefficientfrom equation (2).We
add this statistical errorinquadraturetoeachnearby SNe.High-
redshift SNe are measured in redder bands and, since R
R
,
are less affected by Galactic extinction.
There is also acommonsystematicerrorof 10% in theoverall
reddening normalization. The average Galactic E(B  V) for
the low-redshift sample is 0.063, and we add a 0:063 ;0:2 ¼
0:013 mag systematic uncertainty to M.
5.9. Summary of Systematic Errors
Inour treatment of the above systematicerrors we distinguish
between systematic errors commonbetween datasets,which are
largelyofastrophysicalnature,andthemoreobserver-dependent
ones associated with individual samples. Table 5 summarizes
what are considered the relevant contributions to the systematic
uncertainties in this analysis. They are propagated into the final
result through equation (5).
6. COSMOLOGICAL FIT RESULTS
Our analysis of cosmological model fits includes both statis-
tical and systematic errors. The individual contributions to the
systematic error identified in Table 5 are of very different na-
ture and hence are assumed uncorrelated. We hence obtain the
combined systematic error by adding in quadrature the individ-
ual contributions. The resulting error was propagated according
to theprescription described in x5.Ourconstraintsonthematter
density
M
,assumingaflatuniverse,aresummarizedinTable6.
Bothstatistical(68%confidence)andsystematicerrorsarequoted.
Figure 11 plots ourresults forthe joint fittothematterdensity
and cosmological constant energy density,
M
and 
,and the
effect of varying the outlier cut, while Figure 12 illustrates the
effects of systematics. Forcomparison withprevious work,Fig-
ure13shows ourjointconstraintson
M
and
(statisticalerror
only) and the Riess et al. (2007) constraints obtained from the
Gold compilation of data primarily from the HZT, SCP, and
SNLS(Riessetal.2007)andarecentcompilation ofDavis et al.
(2007),which is based onlightcurvefits from Riess etal.(2007)
and Wood-Vaseyet al. (2007).The results obtained in this work
areconsistentwiththose ofpreviousstudies;however,compared
to the recent SN fit results of Astier et al. (2006), Riess et al.
(2007),Wood-Vaseyetal.(2007),andDavis etal.(2007),weob-
tain a 15%–30% reduction in the statistical error.
About halfthe improvementcanbe attributed to the new SCP
Nearby 1999 SNe.Theirimpact is evident in the rightmost col-
umnofFigure13(aswell as inFig.14).Theimpactofthese SNe
is somewhat larger because the sample has a best-fit systematic
uncertainty of zero. If instead one would introduce the require-
ment that
sys
0:1,there wouldbeanincrease ofabout10%in
the uncertainties of the cosmological parameters.
Figure 13 shows the constraints on the equation of state pa-
rameter w (assumed constant) and 
M
.A flat universe was as-
sumed. Again, the constraints are consistent with, but stronger
Fig.10.—Top:BinnedHubblediagram(binsizez ¼ 0:01).Bottom:Binnedresidualsfrom thebest-fittingcosmology.[SeetheelectroniceditionoftheJournalfor
acolor version of this figure.]
TABLE 5
Most Relevant Common and Sample-dependent Systematic
Errors of This Analysis
Source
Common
(mag)
Sample-dependent
(mag)
and  correction..............................
0.015
...
Contamination.....................................
...
0.015
Light curve model...............................
0.028
...
Zeropoint............................................
0.021
0.021
Malmquist bias....................................
...
0.020
Gravitational lensing...........................
...
0.009
Galactic extinction normalization.......
0.013
...
Total in mag........................................
M ¼ 0:040
M
i
¼0:033
KOWALSKI ET AL.
766
Vol. 686
than, those from Riess et al. (2007) and Davis et al. (2007). The
current SNdata do notprovide strongconstraints on theequation
ofstateparameterwbyitself,sinceitis toalargeextentdegenerate
with 
M
.However, the degeneracy can be broken by combin-
ing with othermeasurements involving 
M
.Figure14 shows the
constraints obtained from the detection of baryon acoustic oscil-
lations (BAOs; Eisenstein et al. 2005) and from the 5 year data
release of the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (CMB;
Dunkley et al. 2008). The constraints from the CMB data fol-
lowfrom the reduced distancetothesurface oflast scatteringat
z¼ 1089 (orshift parameter). It is important to realize thatfor
parameter values far from the concordance model, the shift in
the soundhorizon must also be taken into account. The reduced
distance R is often written as
R
conc
¼(
M
H
2
0
)
1=2
Z
1089
0
dz=H(z);
ð7Þ
where the Hubble parameter is H(z) ¼ H
0
½
M
(1þ z)
3
þ(1
M
)(1þ z)
3(1þw)
1/2. The WMAP 5 year CMB data alone yield
R
0
¼1:715  0:021 for a fit assuming a constant w (Komatsu
et al. 2008; WMAP Web site
44
). Defining the corresponding 
2
as 
2
¼½(R
conc
R
0
)/
R
0
2
,onecanthendeduceconstraints on
M
and w.However, this assumes a standard matter (andradia-
tion) dominated epoch for calculating the sound horizon. The
more proper expression forthe shift parameter accounts for de-
viation in the sound horizon:
R¼ (
M
H
2
0
)
1=2
Z
1089
0
dz=H(z)
;
Z
1
1089
dz=
ffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffi
M
(1þ z)
3
p
Z
1
1089
dz=(H(z)=H
0
)
:
ð8Þ
Sincedarkenergyis generallynegligibleathighredshift,thefac-
tor in square brackets is usually unity [for example, it deviates
from unity by less than 1% even for w
0
¼1, w
a
¼0:9, i.e.,
w(z ¼ 1089) ¼ 0:1]. However, for extreme models that upset
the matter-dominated behavior at high redshifts, the correc-
tion willbe importantin calculatingwhether the geometric shift
parameteraccords withCMBobservations (apart from any issue
offitting otherobservations). Violation ofearly matter domina-
tion causes the‘‘wall’’in likelihood apparent in Figure 16.Also
see, e.g., Linder & Miquel (2004) and Wright (2007).
TABLE 6
Fit Results on Cosmological Parameters 
M
,
k
,and w
Fit
M
k
w
SNe....................................
0:287þ0:029þ0:039
0:0270:036
0(fixed)
1 (fixed)
SNe + BAO......................
0:285þ0:020þ0:011
0:0200:009
0(fixed)
1:011þ0:076þ0:083
0:0820:087
SNe + CMB......................
0:265
þ0:022þ0:018
0:0210:016
0(fixed)
0:955
þ0:060þ0:059
0:0660:060
SNe + BAO + CMB.........
0:274þ0:016þ0:013
0:0160:012
0(fixed)
0:969þ0:059þ0:063
0:0630:066
SNe + BAO + CMB.........
0:285þ0:020þ0:011
0:0190:011
0:009þ0:009þ0:002
0:0100:003
1 (fixed)
SNe + BAO + CMB.........
0:285
þ0:020þ0:010
0:0200:010
0:010
þ0:010þ0:006
0:0110:004
1:001
þ0:069þ0:080
0:0730:082
Notes.—Theparametervaluesarefollowedbytheirstatistical(
stat
)andsystematic(
sys
)uncertainties.
Theparametervaluesandtheirstatisticalerrorswereobtainedfromminimizingthe
2
ofeq.(3).Thefittothe
SNedataaloneresultsina
2
of 310.8for303degreesoffreedomwitha
2
of lessthanonefortheother
fits.Thesystematic errors wereobtainedfrom fittingwithextranuisanceparameters accordingeq. (5)and
subtractingfrom theresultingerror,
w/sys
,thestatistical error: 
sys
¼(2
w/sys
2
stat
)
1/2
.
44
WMAPWebsite.2008,http://lambda.gsfc.nasa.gov/product/map/dr3/params/
wcdm
_
sz
_
lens
_
wmap5.cfm.
Fig. 11.—Contours at68.3%,95.4%,and99.7%confidencelevelon
and
M
planefrom the UnionSNe set. The result from therobustifiedset, obtained
witha 
cut
¼3outliercut,is shownas filledcontours. Theemptycontours are
obtainedwiththefull dataset(dottedline)and
cut
¼2outlierrejecteddataset
(dashed line). As can be seen, outlier rejection shifts the contours along the
degenerate axis by as muchas 0.5  toward a flat universe. In the remaining
figures,we refertothe
cut
¼3outlierrejectedset as the Unionset.
IMPROVED COSMOLOGICAL CONSTRAINTS
767
No. 2, 2008
Fig. 12.—Left plot: Contours at68.3%,95.4%, and99.7%confidencelevel on
and
M
obtainedwiththe Unionset, without (filled contours)andwith(open
contours) inclusionofsystematic errors. Theright plotshows the correspondingconfidencelevel contoursonthe equationof state parameterw and
M
,assuminga
constantw.
768
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested