display pdf in iframe mvc : Best website to convert pdf to word software Library cloud windows asp.net html class kowalski2-part141

Fig. 13.—Contoursat68.3%, 95.4%, and99.7% confidence levelon
and 
M
(top row) and
M
andw(bottom row).The resultsfromthe Unionsetare shownas
filled contours. The empty contours in the left column represent the Gold sample (Riess et al. 2004, 2007), and the middle column the constraints from Davis et al.
(2007). While our results are statistically consistentwith the previouswork, the improvements inthe constraintsonthe cosmological parametersare evident. The right
column shows the impact of the SCPNearby 1999 data.
769
Best website to convert pdf to word - software Library cloud:C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
How to Convert PDF to HTML Webpage with C# PDF Conversion SDK
www.rasteredge.com
Best website to convert pdf to word - software Library cloud:VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
PDF to HTML Webpage Converter SDK for VB.NET PDF to HTML Conversion
www.rasteredge.com
BAO measurements from the SDSS data (Eisenstein et al.
2005) providea distanceconstraint ata redshift z ¼ 0:35. Percival
et al. (2007) have derived BAO distances for z ¼ 0:2, in addition
to the z ¼ 035 SDSS-data point, using the combined data from
SDSS and 2dFGRS. However, somepoints of tension were noted
between the data sets (Percival et al. 2007; see also Sa
´
nchez
&Cole 2008), especially evident for CDM models. We con-
firm this observation and found that the z ¼ 0:2 data point, if
combined with SN and CMB dataaccording to the prescription
in Appendix A of Percival et al. (2007) leads to an 2.5  incon-
sistency.Neither the z ¼ 0:35 BAO datapoint from Percival et al.
(2007) nor the slightly weaker constraint from Eisenstein et al.
(2005) shows such kind of tension. Given the differences be-
tween the two data sets, we use the z ¼ 0:35 SDSS data point of
Eisenstein et al. (2005) but with the caveat that BAO constraints
need further clarification. Eisenstein et al. (2005) provides a con-
straint on the distance parameter A:
A(z) ¼ (
M
H
2
0
)
1=2
H(z)
1=3
z
2=3
Z
z
0
dz
0
=H(z
0
)
2=3
;
Z
1
1089
dz=
ffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffi
M
(1þ z)
3
q
Z
1
1089
dz=(H(z)=H
0
)
; ð9Þ
tobeA(z ¼ 0:35) ¼ 0:469  0:017.NotethatBAOsalso depend
on accurateaccounting of thesound horizon and receive thesame
correction factor shown in brackets in equation (8). This results in
asimilar wall to the acceptable confidence contour reflecting vi-
olation of early matter domination. To see that such violation has
severe implications, note that most models above the wall have
atotal linear growth factor a factor of 10 below the concordance
cosmology.
The joint constraintsfrom SN data, BAO,and CMB areshown
in Figure 14, and thecorresponding numbers aregiven in Table 6.
As can be seen, the constraints obtained from combining either
BAO or CMB with SNe data give consistent results and compa-
rable error bars, while the combination of all three measurements
improves only the statistical error. The impact of including sys-
tematicerrors(only from SNe, from eq. [5]) is shown in the upper
right panel of Figure 14.
The results quoted so far were derived assuming a flatuniverse.
Allowing for spatial curvature 
k
,our constraints from combin-
ing SNe, CMB and BAO are consistent with a flat CDM uni-
verse (as seen in Table 6). Figure 15 shows the corresponding
constraints in the 
M
-
plane.
Finally, one can attempt to investigate constraints on aredshift-
dependent equation of state (EOS) parameter w(z). Initially, we
consider this in terms of
w(z) ¼ w
0
þw
a
z
1þ z
;
ð10Þ
shown by Linder (2003) to provideexcellent approximation to a
wide variety of scalar field and other dark energy models. Later,
we examine other aspects of time variation of the dark energy
EOS.Assuming aflat universeand combining theUnion set with
constraints from CMB, we obtain constraints on w
0
,the present
value of theEOS, and w
a
,giving ameasure of its timevariation,
as shown in Figure 16. (A cosmological constant has w
0
¼1,
w
a
¼0.) Due to degeneracies within the EOS and between the
EOS and the matter density 
M
,the SN data set alone does not
give appreciable leverage on the dark energy properties. By ad-
ding other measurements, the degeneracies can be broken and
currently modest cosmology constraints obtained.
software Library cloud:VB.NET PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images
Best adobe PDF to image converter SDK for Visual Our website offers PDF to Raster Images Conversion Control for VB from local file or stream and convert it into
www.rasteredge.com
software Library cloud:C#: How to Add HTML5 Document Viewer Control to Your Web Page
may easily test all the best-in-class Create a new website or open your existing one save")); _tabFile.addCommand(new RECommand("convert")); _tabFile.addCommand
www.rasteredge.com
Figure 16 (left) shows the combination of the SN data with
either the CMB constraints or the BAO constraints. The results
aresimilar; note that including either one results in a sharp cutoff
at w
0
þw
a
¼0, from the physics as mentioned in regards to
equation (8). Since w(z31) ¼ w
0
þw
a
in this parameterization,
any model with more positive high-redshift w will not yield a
matter-dominated early universe, altering the sound horizon in
conflict with observations.
Note that BAO do not provide a purely ‘‘low’’ redshift con-
straint, becauseimplicit within the BAO dataanalysis, and hence
the constraint, is that the high-redshift universe was matter-
dominated (so the sound horizon at decoupling is properly cal-
culated). Thus, one cannot avoid the issue of modeling how
the dark energy EOS behaves at high redshifts by using this con-
straint rather than the CMB. (We differ here from Riess et al.
2007, who treat BAO as a low-redshift constraint.) SN data are
especially useful in constraining w(z) because there is no de-
pendence at all on the high-redshift behavior, unlike CMB and
BAO data.
As one might expect, because of the different orientations of
the confidence contours and the different physics that enters,
combining both theCMB and BAO constraints with the SN data
clears up thedegeneracies somewhat, as seen in Figure 16, with
and without systematics. Inclusion of curvature does not sub-
stantially increase the contours.
We emphasize that the wall in w
0
-w
a
space is not imposed a
priori and does not represent a breakdown of the parameteriza-
tion, but a real physical effect from violating early matter dom-
ination. Nevertheless, we can ask what limitscould beput on the
early dark energy behavior—either its presence or its equa-
tion of state—if we do not use the w
0
-w
a
parameterization. A
simple but general model for w(z) creates a series of redshift
bins and assumes w is constant over each bin. The constraints
from this are shown in Figure 17. Note that the data points are
correlated.
Riesset al. (2007)madeasomewhat similarinvestigation with
the emphasis on the impact of the highest-redshift SNe. A differ-
ence to the work of Riess et al. (2007) is that we do not decor-
relate the constraints in the different redshift bins. While this
implies that the binwise constraints shown in Figure 17 are cor-
related, it ensures that the w-constraints shown for a given bin
are confined to the exact redshift range of the bin. If instead
one applies a decorrelation procedure, some of the tight con-
straints from lower redshifts feed through to higher redshifts
(i.e., z > 1). See de Putter & Linder (2007) for general discus-
sion of thisissue. UnlikeRiesset al. (2007) weadditionally place
aw bin at higher redshift than the SN data (z > 2), to account
for theexpansion history of theearly universe, anddo not fix win
this bin. The Riess ‘‘strong’’ prior has a fourth bin for z > 1:8,
but fixes w ¼ 1. The ‘‘strongest’’ prior does not have a fourth
bin. Forcing either of these behaviors on the z > 2 universe
results in unfairly tight constraintsand thedangerof bias(Linder
2007; de Putter & Linder 2007); in failing to separate the SN
bins from those of the CMB and BAO essentially the entire
constraint in the redshift zk 1 bin is from the CMB (see also
Wright 2007).
Consider the top row of Figure 17. These results are for bins
with z < 0:5, 0:5 < z < 1:0, 1:0 < z < 2:0, and z > 2:0. The
only constraint that can be concluded from the highest-redshift
bin is that w
½2;1
P0, but this constraint comes entirely from
CMB and BAO, which requires that the early universe is matter-
dominated (see the above discussion of the wall in the w
a
-w
0
plane). We then look at the z ¼ 1
2bin for constraints on w,
which would be due to the z > 1 SNeand we find essentially no
constraint.
The lowest-redshift bin is constrained to w
½0;0:5
1  0:1.
The next bin is compatible with 1, but the central value is
high. This deviation from 1 seems to be due to the unexpected
brightness (by about 0.1 mag) of the Hubble data at z > 1 (see
Fig. 10). (Recall that w at some z influences distances at larger
redshifts.) We clearly see that to be sensitive to appreciable de-
viations from w ¼ 1 such as 0.1 mag at z  1, which is key
to constraining theories of dark energy, one requires better sta-
tistics for the very high-redshift supernovae (and comparably
good systematics).
Given that the strongest constraints on w are contained in the
first bin, onemight attempt to search for aredshift dependenceof
wat lower redshifts by changing the borders of the bins. The
smallest errors are obtained roughly with the binning z < 0:1,
Fig. 15.—Contoursat68.3%,95.4%, and99.7%confidence levelon
and
M
obtained from CMB, BAO, and the Union SN set, as well as their combination (as-
sumingw ¼ 1).[See the electronic edition ofthe Journalforacolorversionofthis
figure.]
IMPROVED COSMOLOGICAL CONSTRAINTS
771
No. 2, 2008
software Library cloud:C# TIFF: C#.NET Code to Create Online TIFF Document Viewer
based TIFF file viewer that will suit you best, with which how to create more web viewers on PDF and Word Create an ASP.NET website in Visual Studio 2005 or
www.rasteredge.com
software Library cloud:VB.NET Image: VB.NET Web Image Viewer Installation and Integration
2. Using Visual Studio to create a website project with VB.NET programming language. If you want to get more details on sample (PDF) Web Doc Image Viewer
www.rasteredge.com
Fig. 16.—Contoursat68.3%, 95.4%,and 99.7%confidence levelon w
a
and w
0
fora flat universe. Left:The Union SNsetwascombined withCMBor BAO constraints.
Right:Combinationof SNe, CMB, and BAO data, with and without systematic uncertainties included. The diagonalline represents w
0
þw
a
¼0;note how the likelihoods
based on observationaldata remain below it, favoring matter domination atz31. [See the electronic edition of the Journal for a color version ofthis figure.]
Fig. 17.—Constraintsat68% confidence levelon w(z),wherew(z)is assumedto be constantover eachredshiftbin. The leftcolumncombinesthe UnionSN setwith
BAO constraints only, while the right column includes also constraints from the CMB. The top row illustrates the fact that only extremely weak constraints on the
equation ofstate existatz > 1.Thebottomrow showsa differentbinningthatminimizesthe meanbinerror. Notethatforz > 2(dark gray:No SN constraint)onlyupper
limits exist, basically enforcing matter domination, coming from either CMBdata or, in the case without CMB data, from requiring substantialstructure formation
(a linear growth factor within a factor of 10 of thatobserved).
software Library cloud:C# Word: How to Create Word Online Viewer in C# Application
SDK & web viewer add-on are the best choice for TIFF web viewer creating, you can go to PDF Web Viewer Create a website project in Visual Studio 2005 or later
www.rasteredge.com
software Library cloud:VB.NET TIFF: An Easy VB.NET Solution to Delete or Remove TIFF File
appreciate your online user guide." Best regards, Charles the software I need on your website." Yours, Susan & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
www.rasteredge.com
0:1 < z < 0:4, 0:4 < z < 2:0, and 2:0 < z. These constraints
are shown in the bottom row of Figure 17. The results are simi-
lar to the results from the other binning, with the lowest two
bins centered around w ¼ 1 and the next bin centered around a
more positive value. No significant redshift dependence is ob-
served. Note the tight limit on the 0:4 < z < 2 bin is not saying
w(z > 1)  1, even approximately, since the leverage on w(z)
is coming from the 0:4 < z < 1 part of the bin (this illustrates
the importance of considering multiple binnings).
To sum up, even in combination with current BAO and CMB
data, current SN data sets cannot tell us whether an energy
density component other than matter existed at z > 1 and cannot
tell us whethersuch acomponent, if it existed,had an equation of
statewith negative pressure. In the future, however, SN data that
achieve Hubble diagram accuracy of 0.02 mag out to z ¼ 1:7
will be able to address these questions and provide independent
checks of the z > 1 universe.
Note that while constraints on a possible redshift depen-
dency of w have been shown in Figures 16 and 17, we do not
present values for the projected, one-dimensional constraints
for several reasons. First, the bounds are still very weak and
as a result the error bars show highly non-Gaussian errors (as
visible in Fig. 16). In addition, our treatment of systematic er-
rors has not been optimized for a redshift-dependent w and a
potential systematic redshift dependence of the distance modu-
lus is only partially taken into account. As a consequence, the
resulting (already large) systematic errors on w(z) would be
underestimated.
In this analysisso far wehave not excluded any SNebased on
extreme values of stretch or color, therefore including also the
peculiar class of underluminous 1991bg-like SNe that are typi-
cally associated with small stretch values. After unblinding, in
an effort to study the robustness of our results, we have intro-
duced a stretch cut, s > 0:6, to eliminate SN1991bg-like SNe
from the sample. The most significant consequence of this cut
came with the removal of SN 1995ap, a supernova in the Riess
et al. (1998) sample. By itself the removal of this one super-
nova can change the cosmological fitted parameters in the
M
-
and 
M
-w planes by nearly 1  along the more de-
generate contour axis (and away from a flat universe). How-
ever, without SN 1995ap, the test for tension between data sets
that we applied in x 4.4 would show the Riess et al. (1998) data
set to be a 3.5  outlier and one would be forced, unless the
tension can be resolved otherwise, to remove the data set from
thecompilation. Thenet result ofthes > 0:6 cut would then be a
0.25  change in w; 
M
,and 
in the direction of the more
degenerate contour axis. The results presented in this paper are
based on the sample without the stretch cut; however, since the
parameters along the direction of the degeneracy are well con-
strained once CMB or BAO data are added, the combined con-
straints essentially do not depend on whether or not the stretch
cut is applied.
7. CONCLUSION
Thecosmological parameterconstraints from theUnion SN Ia
compilation shown in Figures 12, 14, 16, and 17 reflect the cur-
rent best knowledge of the world’s Type Ia supernova data sets.
Specifically, in addition to the older data, they include the new
data sets of nearby Hubble-flow SNe Ia we presented in this
paper, the recent large, homogeneous, high–S/N SNLS and
ESSENCE datasetspublished by Astier et al. (2006) and Miknaitis
et al. (2007) as well as the high-redshift supernovae in Riess et al.
(2004, 2007). Equally important is that a number of outstanding
analysis issues have been addressed that improve the reliabil-
ity and reduce the biasesof thecurrent Union SN Ia compilation,
and should stand us in good stead forfuturecompilations.Weare
making the ingredientsand resultsoftheUnion compilation avail-
able at theassociated Web site (seefootnote 42), and we intend to
provide occasional updates to this as new information becomes
available.
Several conclusions can be drawn from the new larger SCP
Union SNIacompilation that couldnot beapproached with smaller
data sets. In particular, the large statistics can be used to address
systematic uncertainties in novel ways.
Wetest forevolution by subdividing thesampleinto low-stretch
and high-stretch SNe.According to recentevidence(Sullivan et al.
2006) these two samples might be dominated by different pro-
genitor systems (Scannapieco & Bildsten 2005; Mannucci et al.
2006), which are likely to show different evolutions. Hence, per-
forming consistent but independent cosmology fits for the two
subsamples provides a powerful test for potential evolutionary
effects. The resulting cosmological fitted parameters are found
to be consistent. This comparison is particularly meaningful,
as thestatistical uncertainties from thesubsamplesarecompar-
able to the total (stat+sys) uncertainties obtained from the full
sample.
With the larger Union data set, it is possible to begin to ex-
aminethe rate of trueoutliers from theHubble-plot fit. It appears
that the current selection criteria for SNe Ia can find very homo-
geneous sets of supernovae, but not perfectly homogeneous sets.
With thesecriteria,thereareapparently trueoutliers,at thepercent
level for the SNLS sample and up to 10% for other samples. The
analysisperformed here wasmaderobust to outliers, reducing the
associatederroron cosmological parametersto alevel comparable
to other sources of systematic error.
Compilations offer the chance to test for observer-dependent
systematic effects, i.e., tension between the data sets. The blind
analysis performed here is an important element in rigorous esti-
mation of systematics. While in general we find a high degree of
consistency between samples, we see modest tension when com-
paring the slope of the Hubble residuals as a function of redshift,
d/dz. For thepresent compilation, our cosmology results are ex-
pectedtoholdwithin thequotedsystematicuncertainties. However,
once the homogeneous data sets get larger—and the systematic
errors dominate over the statistical ones for the different sets—
such tests will becomeeven moreimportant, asthey allow one to
perform cross-checks with different data sets calibrated in dif-
ferentways. Futuredatasamplescan beadded to theUnion set, by
first blinding the data and then performing a diagnostic analysis
similar to the one performed here. Only after any inconsistencies
can be resolved, would the new data be unblinded.
We proposed a scheme to incorporate both sample-dependent
and common systematicerrors. Weshowed in x5 that systematic
errors can be approached by treating the systematics as a normal
distribution of a parameterized systematic term. We find that the
combination of SNeconstraints with CMBconstraints,due to their
larger complementarity with SNe data, results in smaller system-
atic errors than the combination with BAO constraints. Adding
BAO, CMB, and SNe constraints leads to yet smaller statisti-
cal error bars, while the error bars including systematics do not
improve.
The robustness of the detection of the accelerating expan-
sion of the universe is continually increasing as improved sys-
tematicsanalysis isreinforced by largerSN datasets. Thecurrent
IMPROVED COSMOLOGICAL CONSTRAINTS
773
knowledge of the natureof dark energy is still modest, however,
with the uncertainty on the assumed-constant equation of state
only under 10% if multiple probes are combined. The current
‘‘world’’ estimate presented here employing the full set of
current SN data, plus other measurements, gives a best con-
straint of w ¼ 0:969
þ0:059
0:063
(stat)
þ0:063
0:066
(sys) on a constant EOS
parameter w at 68.3% confidence level. However, allowing for
time variation in the dark energy equation of state further opens
the possibilities for the physics driving the acceleration, con-
sistent with all current observations. In particular, present SN
data sets do not have the sensitivity to answer the questions of
whether dark energy persists to z > 1 or whether it had negative
pressure then.
On the positiveside, with themore sophisticated analyses and
tests carried out here, we still have encountered no limits to the
potential use of future, high-accuracy SN data as cosmological
probes. New data sets for nearby, moderate-redshift, and high-
redshift well-characterized SNe Ia are forthcoming and we ex-
pect realistic, robust constraints to catch up with our optimistic
hopes on understanding the accelerating universe.
This work is based on observations made with: the Lick and
Keck Observatories; the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observa-
tory 4m BlancoTelescope; theYale/AURA/Lisbon/OSU(YALO)
1m Telescope at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory; the
Apache Point Observatory 3.5 m telescope, which is owned and
operated by the Astrophysical Research Consortium; the WIYN
Observatory, owned and operated by the WIYN Consortium,
which consistsoftheUniversityofWisconsin,IndianaUniversity,
YaleUniversity,andthe National OpticalAstronomy Observatory
(NOAO); the Isaac Newton Telescope, which is operated on the
island of La Palma by the Isaac Newton Group in the Spanish
Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de
Astrofı´sica Canarias; the Nordic Optical Telescope, operated on
the island of La Palma jointly by Denmark, Finland, Iceland,
Norway, and Sweden, in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque
de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias;
and the MDM Observatory 2.4 m HiltnerTelescope. The authors
wish to thank thetelescope allocation committees and the obser-
vatory staffs for their support for the extensive supernova search
campaign and follow-up observations that contributed to the re-
sultsreported here. In particular, wewish to thank C. Bailyn and
S. Tourtellotte for assistance with YALO observations, D. Harner
for obtaining WIYN data, and D. Folha and S. Smartt for the
INT 2.5 m serviceobserving. For their efforts in the coordinated
supernovasearch, wewish toacknowledgetheNEATsearch team
(E. Helin, S. Pravdo, D. Rabinowitz, and K.Lawrence)at JPLand
the Spacewatch program at the University of Arizona (which in-
cludes R. S. McMillan, T. Gehrels, J.A. Larsen, J. L. Montani,
J. V. Scotti, N. Danzl, and A. Gleason). We also wish to thank
B. Schmidt, A. Filippenko, M. Schwartz, A. Gal-Yam, and
D. Maoz for providing us with early announcements of super-
nova candidates.
This work was supported in part by the Director, Office of
Science, Office of High Energy and Nuclear Physics, US De-
partment of Energy, through contract DE-AC02-05CH11231.
This research used resources of the National Energy Research
Scientific Computing Center, which is supported by the Office
of Science of theUS Department of Energy under contract DE-
AC02-05CH11231. The use of Portuguese time for the YALO
telescope was supported by Fundac¸a˜o para a Cieˆncia e Tecno-
logia, Portugal, and by Project PESO/ESO/P/PRO/1257/98.
M. K. acknowledges support from the Deutsche Forschungs-
gemeinschaft (DFG). P. E. N. acknowledges support from the
US Department of Energy Scientific Discovery through Advanced
Computing program under contract DE-FG02-06ER06-04. A. M.
M. acknowledges financial support from Fundac¸a˜o para aCieˆncia
eTecnologia (FCT), Portugal, through project PESO/P/PRO/
15139/99.
APPENDIX A
INSTRUMENTS AND COLOR TERMS
Thecolortermsobtained for all instrumentsaresummarized in Table7. Table 8 shows theapplied shiftsof the passbands, which are
needed to reproduce the colors of the observed standard and field stars.
TABLE 7
Color Terms for Instruments and Bands
Telescope and Instrument
cbv
b
cbv
v
cvr
r
cvi
i
CTIO 1.5 m SITE2K6...................
0.095 (0.003)
0.029 (0.001)
0.028 (0.002)
0.018 (0.001)
CTIO 1.5 m TK1...........................
0.017 (0.002)
0.037 (0.001)
0.026 (0.002)
0.015 (0.001)
CTIO 0.9 m TK2...........................
0.097 (0.005)
0.016 (0.002)
0.006 (0.004)
0.022 (0.002)
DANISH DFOSC..........................
0.133 (0.002)
0.033 (0.001)
0.067 (0.001)
0.000 (0.3001)
JKT Tek1.......................................
0.055 (0.006)
0.020 (0.004)
0.030 (0.008)
0.053 (0.007)
LICK 1 m DEWAR2.....................
0.094 (0.007)
0.026 (0.007)
0.052 (0.007)
0.018 (0.004)
LICK 1 m DEWAR5.....................
0.226 (0.033)
0.073 (0.016)
0.106 (0.007)
0.034 (0.002)
YALO ANDICAM.........................
0.094 (0.002)
0.035 (0.001)
0.373 (0.002)
0.041 (0.001)
ESO 3.6 m EFOSC........................
0.048 (0.005)
0.048 (0.002)
0.048 (0.002)
0.010 (0.001)
KPNO 2.1 m T1KA ......................
0.103 (0.006)
0.021 (0.002)
0.029 (0.007)
0.023 (0.002)
CFHT STIS2..................................
0.105 (0.009)
0.002 (0.009)
0.079 (0.005)
0.043 (0.002)
WIYN S2KB..................................
0.059 (0.019)
0.002 (0.019)
0.018 (0.035)
0.016 (0.015)
MARLY .........................................
...
...
0.296 (0.003)
0.017 (0.002)
KOWALSKI ET AL.
774
Vol. 686
APPENDIX B
TERTIARY STANDARD STAR CATALOG
Table 9 lists the coordinates and magnitudes of the tertiary calibration stars.
TABLE 8
The Applied Shifts of the Passbands, Which Are Needed to Reproduce the Colors
of the Observed Standard and Field Stars
Instrument
k
B
(8)
k
V
(8)
k
R
(8)
k
I
(8)
CTIO 1.5 m SITE2K6...................................
20
0
30
80
CTIO 1.5 m SITE2K6 (small) ......................
20
0
30
90
CTIO 1.5 m TK1...........................................
10
10
40
90
CTIO 0.9 m TK2...........................................
10
10
10
10
DANISH DFOSC..........................................
100
30
30
50
JKT Tek1 .......................................................
0
20
50
60
LICK 1 m DEWAR5 (small).........................
90
10
30
40
LICK 1 m DEWAR2.....................................
90
10
10
0
LICK 1 m DEWAR5.....................................
100
30
40
0
YALO ANDICAM.........................................
10
20
340
50
ESO 3.6 m EFOSC........................................
20
20
0
50
KPNO 2.1 m T1KA ......................................
30
30
40
60
CFHT STIS2..................................................
70
10
100
50
TABLE 9
Coordinates and Magnitudes of Tertiary Calibration Stars
Number
R.A. (J2000.0)
Decl. (J2000.0)
V
B V
V R
V I
SN 1999aa
1............................
08 27 37.43
21 31 18.8
14.495 (0.003)
0.5145 (0.006)
0.3005 (0.005)
0.6109 (0.006)
2............................
08 27 41.27
21 25 01.9
14.978 (0.006)
0.6927 (0.013)
0.4188 (0.004)
0.2622 (0.008)
3............................
08 28 02.64
21 33 56.1
14.817 (0.005)
0.9347 (0.014)
0.4969 (0.004)
0.1772 (0.012)
4............................
08 27 38.16
21 29 54.5
15.115 (0.004)
0.6558 (0.008)
0.4143 (0.004)
0.7879 (0.006)
5............................
08 27 47.99
21 33 01.1
15.550 (0.007)
0.5243 (0.010)
0.3240 (0.005)
0.6872 (0.007)
6............................
08 27 44.64
21 31 11.6
15.382 (0.004)
0.7130 (0.010)
0.4010 (0.004)
0.7809 (0.007)
7............................
08 27 48.47
21 33 20.1
15.575 (0.008)
0.5614 (0.016)
0.3434 (0.006)
0.7287 (0.008)
8............................
08 27 21.11
21 29 17.8
15.438 (0.007)
0.7989 (0.015)
0.4610 (0.005)
0.8839 (0.007)
9............................
08 27 55.51
21 24 46.4
15.693 (0.008)
0.6203 (0.018)
0.3835 (0.006)
0.8045 (0.008)
10..........................
08 27 29.04
21 27 07.9
15.514 (0.006)
0.8045 (0.013)
0.4345 (0.005)
0.6378 (0.008)
Note.—Unitsofright ascension are hours, minutes, and seconds, andunitsof declinationare degrees, arcminutes, and arcseconds. Uncertainties are givenin
parentheses. Table 9 is available in its entirety in the electronic edition of the AstrophysicalJournal. A portion isshown here for guidance regarding itsformand
content.
IMPROVED COSMOLOGICAL CONSTRAINTS
775
No. 2, 2008
APPENDIX C
LIGHT CURVES FROM THE NEARBY SUPERNOVA CAMPAIGN
Table 10 shows the BVRI magnitudes from the Nearby Supernova Campaign. The fitted light curve parameters of all SNe can be
found in Table 11.
TABLE 11
Supernovae of the Union Compilation
Name
z
mmax
B
s
c
Reference
Cut
1993ag....................
0.0500
17.79 (0.05)
0.91 (0.02)
0.09 (0.02)
36.77 (0.15)
1
1993o......................
0.0529
17.61 (0.05)
0.90 (0.01)
0.01 (0.02)
36.82 (0.15)
1
1993h......................
0.0251
16.74 (0.09)
0.68 (0.01)
0.21 (0.01)
35.17 (0.17)
1
1993b......................
0.0701
18.38 (0.09)
0.99 (0.03)
0.04 (0.04)
37.57 (0.15)
1
1992bs....................
0.0627
18.18 (0.05)
1.00 (0.02)
0.03 (0.02)
37.55 (0.15)
1
1992br ....................
0.0876
19.40 (0.11)
0.65 (0.04)
0.03 (0.05)
38.19 (0.16)
1
1992bp....................
0.0786
18.28 (0.03)
0.87 (0.02)
0.04 (0.02)
37.52 (0.15)
1
1992bo....................
0.0172
15.75 (0.13)
0.74 (0.01)
0.03 (0.01)
34.65 (0.19)
1
1992bl ....................
0.0422
17.29 (0.06)
0.79 (0.02)
0.01 (0.02)
36.36 (0.15)
1
1992bh....................
0.0453
17.59 (0.05)
0.98 (0.01)
0.10 (0.01)
36.66 (0.15)
1
Notes.—Uncertaintiesare givenin parentheses.Explanationof cuts:(o) 3outlier;(p)insufficientearlydata;(c)nocolor;(d) toofew
data points; (f) fitnot converged. Table 11 is available in its entirety in the electronic edition of the AstrophysicalJournal. A portion is
shown here for guidance regarding its form and content.
References.—(1) Hamuy et al. 1996; (2) Krisciunas et al. 2004a, 2004b; (3) Riess et al. 1999; (4) Jha et al. 2006; (5) this work;
(6) Riesset al. 1998+HZT;(7) Perlmutter etal. 1999;(8) Tonryetal. 2003;(9) Barrisetal. 2004;(10)Knopetal. 2003;(11) Riessetal.
2007; (12) Astier et al. 2006; (13) Miknaitis et al. 2007.
TABLE 10
BVRI Magnitudes
JD
Telescope
B
V
R
I
SN 1999aa
221.81.............
LICK 1 m DEWAR2
15.828 (0.032)
...
...
...
222.67.............
YALO
15.642 (0.018)
15.680 (0.028)
15.689 (0.040)
15.717 (0.105)
223.67.............
YALO
15.462 (0.020)
...
15.486 (0.036)
15.514 (0.083)
225.65.............
YALO
15.211 (0.017)
15.260 (0.028)
15.276 (0.030)
15.312 (0.025)
227.73.............
LICK 1 m DEWAR2
15.006 (0.016)
15.060 (0.024)
15.080 (0.018)
...
229.62.............
YALO
14.924 (0.017)
14.965 (0.026)
15.092 (0.030)
...
232.61.............
YALO
14.908 (0.017)
14.913 (0.028)
15.062 (0.030)
15.253 (0.025)
235.60.............
YALO
14.919 (0.021)
14.898 (0.032)
15.037 (0.031)
15.307 (0.029)
241.60.............
YALO
15.183 (0.013)
15.062 (0.027)
15.266 (0.030)
15.575 (0.024)
243.88.............
LICK 1 m DEWAR5
...
...
15.236 (0.051)
15.724 (0.039)
Notes.—Uncertainties are given in parentheses. Table 10 is available in its entirety in the electronic edition of the Astrophysical
Journal. A portion is shown here for guidance regarding its form and content.
KOWALSKI ET AL.
776
Vol. 686
APPENDIX D
LIGHT CURVE DATA FROM PERLMUTTER ET AL.
The photometric light curve data from the 42 supernovae of Perlmutter et al. (1999) are shown in Table 12.
REFERENCES
Aguirre, A. 1999, ApJ, 525, 583
Aldering, G. 2000, in AIP Conf. Ser. 522, Cosmic Explosions: Tenth Astro-
physics Conference, ed. S. S. Holt & W. W. Zhang (New York: AIP), 75
———. 2005, NewA Rev., 49, 346
Aldering, G., Nugent, P., Helin, E., Pravdo, S., Rabinowitz, D., Lawrence, K.,
Kunkel, W., & Phillips, M. 1999, IAU Circ., 7122, 1
Altavilla, G., et al. 2004, MNRAS, 349, 1344
Armstrong, M., & Schwartz, M. 1999, IAU Circ., 7108, 1
Astier, P., et al. 2006, A&A, 447, 31
Barris, B. J., et al. 2004, ApJ, 602, 571
Bergstro¨m, L., Goliath, M., Goobar, A., & Mo¨rtsell, E. 2000, A&A, 358, 13
Bessell, M. S. 1990, PASP, 102, 1181
Blanc, G., et al. 2004, A&A, 423, 881
Bohlin, R. C., & Gilliland, R. L. 2004, AJ, 127, 3508
Cardelli, J. A., Clayton, G. C., & Mathis, J. S. 1989, ApJ, 345, 245
Conley, A., Carlberg, R. G., Guy, J., Howell, D. A., Jha, S., Riess, A. G., &
Sullivan, M. 2007, ApJ, 664, L13
Conley, A., et al. 2006, ApJ, 644, 1
Davis, T. M., et al. 2007, ApJ, 666, 716
de Putter, R., & Linder, E. V. 2007, preprint (arXiv:0710.0373)
Dunkley, J., et al. 2008, preprint (arXiv:0803.0586)
Eisenstein, D. J., et al. 2005, ApJ, 633, 560
Filippenko, A. V., Li, W. D., Treffers, R. R., & Modjaz, M. 2001, in ASP Conf.
Ser. 246, IAU Colloq. 183, Small Telescope Astronomy on Global Scales,
ed. B. Paczynski, W.-P. Chen, & C. Lemme (San Francisco: ASP), 121
Folatelli, G. 2004, Ph.D. thesis, Stockholm Univ.
Gal-Yam, A., Maoz, D., Guhathakurta, P., & Filippenko, A. 2008, ApJ, 680,550
Gal-Yam, A., et al. 1999, IAU Circ., 7130, 1
Garavini, G., et al. 2004, AJ, 128, 387
———. 2005, AJ, 130, 2278
———. 2007, A&A, 470, 411
Garnavich, P. M., et al. 1998, ApJ, 493, L53
Germany, L. M., Reiss, D. J., Schmidt, B. P., Stubbs, C. W., & Suntzeff, N. B.
2004, A&A, 415, 863
Goldhaber, G., et al. 2001, ApJ, 558, 359
Gott, J. R. I., Vogeley, M. S., Podariu, S., & Ratra, B. 2001, ApJ, 549, 1
Gunn, J. E., & Stryker, L. L. 1983, ApJS, 52, 121
Guy, J., Astier, P., Nobili, S., Regnault, N., & Pain, R. 2005, A&A, 443, 781
Guy, J., et al. 2007, A&A, 466, 11
Hamuy, M., et al. 1996, AJ, 112, 2408
Holz, D. E., & Linder, E. V. 2005, ApJ, 631, 678
Howell, D. A., Sullivan, M., Conley, A., & Carlberg, R. 2007, ApJ, 667,
L37
Jha, S., Riess, A. G., & Kirshner, R. P. 2007, ApJ, 659, 122
Jha, S., et al. 2006, AJ, 131, 527
Jo¨nsson, J., Dahle
´
n, T., Goobar, A., Gunnarsson, C., Mo¨rtsell, E., & Lee, K.
2006, ApJ, 639, 991
Kim, A., Regnault, N., Nugent, P., Aldering, G., Dahlen, T., Goobar, A., &
Hook, I. 1999a, IAU Circ., 7136, 1
Kim, A., et al. 1999b, IAU Circ., 7117, 1
Knop, R. A., et al. 2003, ApJ, 598, 102
Komatsu, E., et al. 2008, preprint (arXiv:0803.0547)
Krisciunas, K., Hastings, N. C., Loomis, K., McMillan, R., Rest, A., Riess, A. G.,
&Stubbs, C. 2000, ApJ, 539, 658
Krisciunas, K., et al. 2001, AJ, 122, 1616
———. 2004a, AJ, 127, 1664
———. 2004b, AJ, 128, 3034
Landolt, A. U. 1992, AJ, 104, 340
Linder, E. V. 1988, A&A, 206, 190
———. 2003, Phys. Rev. Lett., 90, 091301
———. 2006, Phys. Rev. D, 74, 103518
———. 2007, preprint (arXiv:0708.0024)
Linder, E. V., & Miquel, R. 2004, Phys. Rev. D, 70, 123516
Mannucci, F., Della Valle, M., & Panagia, N. 2006, MNRAS, 370, 773
Miknaitis, G., et al. 2007, ApJ, 666, 674
Mo¨rtsell, E., & Goobar, A. 2003, J. Cosmol. Astropart. Phys., 9, 9
Nugent, P., Aldering, G., & Phillips, M. M. 1999a, IAU Circ., 7133, 1
Nugent, P., Kim, A., & Perlmutter, S. 2002, PASP, 114, 803
Nugent, P., et al. 1999b, IAU Circ., 7134, 1
———. 1999c, IAU Circ., 7134, 1
O
¨
stman, L., & Mo¨rtsell, E. 2005, J. Cosmol. Astropart. Phys., 2, 5
Parodi, B. R., Saha, A., Sandage, A., & Tammann, G. A. 2000, ApJ, 540, 634
Percival, W. J., Cole, S., Eisenstein, D. J., Nichol, R. C., Peacock, J. A., Pope,
A. C., & Szalay, A. S. 2007, MNRAS, 381, 1053
Perlmutter, S., & Schmidt, B. P. 2003, in Supernovae and Gamma-Ray Bursters,
ed. K. Weiler (Berlin: Springer), 195
TABLE 12
The Photometric Light Curve Data from the 42 Supernovae of Perlmutter et al. (1999)
R
I
MJD
Flux
(zp ¼ 30 mag)
(flux)
MJD
Flux
(zp ¼ 30 mag)
(flux)
SN 1997s (z ¼ 0:612)
50431.85...............
9.89E+01
5.71E+01
50459.04
5.84E+02
2.20E+02
50432.82...............
1.11E+02
5.85E+01
50465.96
3.68E+02
3.64E+02
50454.82...............
6.49E+02
4.05E+01
50466.92
7.34E+02
2.29E+02
50459.01...............
5.49E+02
4.47E+01
50480.86
4.28E+02
9.23E+01
50462.82...............
6.82E+02
4.05E+01
50489.79
9.54E+02
1.16E+02
50465.82...............
5.92E+02
7.19E+01
50513.78
4.54E+02
1.85E+02
50480.83...............
2.18E+02
3.04E+01
50514.77
6.36E+02
1.06E+02
50489.76...............
2.37E+02
3.30E+01
50518.77
3.95E+02
1.51E+02
50513.74...............
4.10E+01
2.98E+01
50514.73...............
6.83E+01
6.09E+01
Notes.—Data consistof BessellR andI banddata andarepresentedasflux,withacommonzeropointofzp ¼ 30 mag.
Multiple data pointsfora givennightwerecombined intoa single data point.Sincereferenceimageswereusedto subtract
the host galaxy light, the data points are correlated. We recommendusing the data fromhttp://supernova.lbl.gov/Union,
whichincludesthe covariance matrix.MoreinformationabouttheSNe canbefoundinPerlmutteretal. (1999).Table 12is
available in its entirety in the electronic edition of the Astrophysical Journal. A portion is shown here for guidance re-
garding itsform and content.
IMPROVED COSMOLOGICAL CONSTRAINTS
777
No. 2, 2008
Perlmutter, S., et al. 1997, ApJ, 483, 565
———. 1998, Nature, 391, 51
———. 1999, ApJ, 517, 565
Phillips, M. M. 1993, ApJ, 413, L105
Pravdo, S. H., et al. 1999, AJ, 117, 1616
Qiao, Q. Y., Wei, J. Y., Qiu, Y. L., & Hu, J. Y. 1999, IAU Circ., 7109, 3
Rengstorf, A. W., et al. 2004, ApJ, 606, 741
Riess, A. G., et al. 1998, AJ, 116, 1009
———. 1999a, AJ, 117, 707
———. 2004, ApJ, 607, 665
———. 2007, ApJ, 659, 98
Reiss, D., Sabine, S., Germany, L., & Schmidt, B. 1999b, IAU Circ., 7124, 2
Ruiz-Lapuente, P. 2007, Classical Quantum Gravity, 24, 91
Sa´nchez, A. G., & Cole, S. 2008, MNRAS, 385, 830
Sasaki, M. 1987, MNRAS, 228, 653
Scannapieco, E., & Bildsten, L. 2005, ApJ, 629, L85
Schlegel, D. J., Finkbeiner, D. P., & Davis, M. 1998, ApJ, 500, 525
Schmidt, B. P., et al. 1998, ApJ, 507, 46
Stritzinger, M., Suntzeff, N. B., Hamuy, M., Challis, P., Demarco, R., Germany,
L., & Soderberg, A. M. 2005, PASP, 117, 810
Stritzinger, M., et al. 2002, AJ, 124, 2100
Strolger, L.-G. 2003, Ph.D. thesis, Univ. Michigan
Strolger, L. G., Smith, R. C., Nugent, P., & Phillips, M. 1999a, IAU Circ.,
7131, 1
Strolger, L. G., et al. 1999b, IAU Circ., 7125, 1
———. 2002, AJ, 124, 2905
Strovink, M. 2007, preprint (arXiv:0705.0726)
Stubbs, C. W., & Tonry, J. L. 2006, ApJ, 646, 1436
Sullivan, M., et al. 2003, MNRAS, 340, 1057
———. 2006, ApJ, 648, 868
Suntzeff, N. B. 2000, in AIP Conf. Ser. 522, Cosmic Explosions: Tenth Astro-
physics Conference, ed. S. S. Holt & W. W. Zhang (New York: AIP), 65
Tonry, J. L., et al. 2003, ApJ, 594, 1
Tripp, R. 1998, A&A, 331, 815
Tripp, R., & Branch, D. 1999, ApJ, 525, 209
Wang, L., Strovink, M., Conley, A., Goldhaber, G., Kowalski, M., Perlmutter, S.,
&Siegrist, J. 2006, ApJ, 641, 50
Wood-Vasey, W. M., et al. 2007, ApJ, 666, 694
Wright, E. L. 2007, ApJ, 664, 633
Yao, W. M., et al. 2006, J. Phys. G, 33, 1
KOWALSKI ET AL.
778
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested