Mergers & Acquisitions
for High Technology Companies
Converting pdf to html email - SDK Library service:C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
How to Convert PDF to HTML Webpage with C# PDF Conversion SDK
www.rasteredge.com
Converting pdf to html email - SDK Library service:VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
PDF to HTML Webpage Converter SDK for VB.NET PDF to HTML Conversion
www.rasteredge.com
© 2002, 1995, Fenwick & West LLP. All Rights Reserved.
About the Firm
Fenwick & West LLP provides comprehensive legal services to high technology and 
biotechnology clients of national and international prominence. We have over 250 attorneys 
and a network of correspondent firms in major cities throughout the world. We have offices  
in Mountain View and San Francisco, California.
Fenwick & West LLP is committed to providing excellent, cost-effective and practical legal 
services and solutions that focus on global high technology industries and issues. We  
believe that technology will continue to drive our national and global economies, and look 
forward to partnering with our clients to create the products and services that will help build 
great companies. We differentiate ourselves by having greater depth in our understanding  
of our clients’ technologies, industry environment and business needs than is typically 
expected of lawyers.
Fenwick & West is a full service law firm with nationally ranked practice groups covering:
Corporate (emerging growth, financings, securities, mergers & acquisitions)
Intellectual Property (patent, copyright, licensing, trademark)
Litigation (commercial, IP litigation and alternative dispute-resolution)
Tax (domestic, international tax planning and litigation)
Corporate Group
For 30 years, Fenwick & West’s corporate practice has represented entrepreneurs, high 
technology companies and the venture capital and investment banking firms that finance 
them. We have represented hundreds of growth-oriented high technology companies from 
inception and throughout a full range of complex corporate transactions and exit strategies. 
Our business, technical and related expertise spans numerous technology sectors, including 
software, Internet, networking, hardware, semiconductor, communications, nanotechnology 
and biotechnology.
Our Offices
Silicon Valley Center 
Embarcadero Center West 
801 California Street 
275 Battery Street 
Mountain View, CA 94041 
San Francisco, CA 94111 
Tel: 650.988.8500 
Tel: 415.875.2300 
Fax: 650.938.5200 
Fax: 415.281.1350 
For more information about Fenwick & West LLP, please visit our Web site at: www.fenwick.com. 
The contents of this publication are not intended, and cannot be considered, as legal advice or opinion.
SDK Library service:C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
batch converting PDF documents in C#.NET program. Convert PDF to multiple MS Word formats such as .doc and .docx. Create editable Word file online without email
www.rasteredge.com
SDK Library service:About RasterEdge.com - A Professional Image Solution Provider
Email to: support@rasteredge.com. controls, PDF document, image to pdf files and components for capturing, viewing, processing, converting, compressing and
www.rasteredge.com
How to Use This Booklet
This booklet is written for the directors and executives of emerging technology companies 
(referred to as TechCos) who are considering selling their company to a larger, more 
sophisticated company (referred to as LargeCo). TechCos are privately held companies that 
exploit something new (technology, products or niche markets), experience rapid change 
(growth, market, profitability or cash flow) and typically are short on infrastructure and 
capital resources. These TechCo characteristics create special issues when TechCo decides 
to be acquired by LargeCo. This booklet summarizes TechCo’s key issues when it prepares 
for and negotiates a successful sale of its business to LargeCo. Before they begin acquisition 
negotiations, the booklet can help TechCo’s executives frame the issues of importance to 
them. During negotiations, it can be a useful resource to TechCo’s executives for evaluating 
and responding to LargeCo’s proposals.
The booklet is divided into five sections. The “Introduction” explains why companies merge 
or are acquired and what factors lead to successful and unsuccessful acquisitions. “Deciding 
To Be Acquired” explains why companies may decide it is preferable to be acquired instead of 
going public, and when TechCo should consider being acquired. “Key Deal Issues” outlines 
the key deal issues from both LargeCo’s and TechCo’s perspectives. “Troubled Company M&A 
Issues” highlights employee retention issues when TechCo is valued at less than its liquidation 
preference as well as special issues when TechCo is near insolvency. “Implementing The 
Deal” outlines the mechanics necessary to close a typical acquisition. The booklet concludes 
with two appendices. Appendix A is a sample Letter of Intent for a merger, illustrating typical 
provisions requested by LargeCo. Appendix B is a sample Time and Responsibility Schedule for 
a merger being accomplished pursuant to a Form S-4 Registration Statement.
This booklet does not discuss all the investment banking considerations or legal and 
accounting issues involved in acquisitions. It also is not a substitute for obtaining expert 
professional advice. Acquisitions are inherently complex, with a premium on executing 
the transaction quickly and getting it right. TechCo can obtain a better deal, with a higher 
probability of success, if it obtains early advice from experienced professionals. TechCo may 
want to obtain investment banking advice on choosing an acquirer with the best strategic fit or 
on positioning TechCo to obtain the best valuation. TechCo will need experienced legal advice 
on tax, structuring, securities and contractual issues that arise in acquisitions. TechCo also will 
need qualified accounting advice on whether its financial statements comply with generally 
accepted accounting principles. 
SDK Library service:VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
Create editable Word file online without email. Supports transfer from password protected PDF. The PDF to Word converting toolkit is a thread-safe VB.NET
www.rasteredge.com
SDK Library service:VB.NET Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF
Viewer, C# HTML Document Viewer for Sharepoint, C# HTML Document Viewer for Azure, C# HTML Document Viewer VB.NET Demo Code for Converting Excel to PDF.
www.rasteredge.com
Mergers & Acquisitions for High Technology Companies
Table of Contents
Introduction  .......................................................................................................................1
Why Do Companies Acquire Other Companies? .............................................................1
What Creates Value in an Acquisition? .........................................................................2
What Destroys Value in an Acquisition? .......................................................................2
Why Do Some Acquisitions Fail? ...................................................................................3
Deciding to Be Acquired  ....................................................................................................4
Acquisition vs. IPO .....................................................................................................4
Positioning TechCo to Be Acquired ...............................................................................5
When Should TechCo Consider Being Acquired? ............................................................5
The Acquisition Process ..............................................................................................6
Use of an Investment Banker .......................................................................................6
Key Deal Issues  .................................................................................................................8
Valuation and Pricing Issues .......................................................................................8
Risk Reduction Mechanisms .......................................................................................11
Personnel Issues .......................................................................................................15
Acquisition Structure .................................................................................................17
Type of Consideration Used ........................................................................................18
Tax-Free Acquisition ..................................................................................................19
Acquisition Accounting ..............................................................................................22
Troubled Company M&A Issues  .......................................................................................24
Employee Incentive Issues .........................................................................................24
When TechCo is Near Bankruptcy ...............................................................................26
Implementing the Deal  ....................................................................................................30
Letter of Intent ..........................................................................................................30
Disclosure of Acquisitions ..........................................................................................30
Time and Responsibility Schedule ..............................................................................31
Definitive Agreements ...............................................................................................31
Board Approval .........................................................................................................32
Necessary Consents ..................................................................................................32
Integration Issues .....................................................................................................39
Conclusion  .......................................................................................................................41
Appendix A:  Letter of Intent  ............................................................................................42
Appendix B:  S-4 Merger Time and Responsibility Schedule  .............................................46
About the Author   ............................................................................................................47
SDK Library service:RasterEdge.com General FAQs for Products
assistance, please contact us via email (support@rasteredge PDF document, image to pdf files and for capturing, viewing, processing, converting, compressing and
www.rasteredge.com
SDK Library service:.NET RasterEdge XDoc.PDF Purchase Details
PDF Print. Have a Question Email us at. support@rasteredge.com. imaging controls and components for capturing, viewing, processing, converting, compressing and
www.rasteredge.com
fenwick & west  
mergers and acquisitions  1
Introduction
A recent survey showed that between two and five emerging technology companies (TechCos) 
are acquired for every one that does an initial public offering (IPO). Acquisitions can provide 
strategic, operating and financial benefits to both TechCo and the company acquiring it 
(LargeCo). A strategic acquisition can provide TechCo’s shareholders with earlier liquidity 
than an IPO, with less risk and dilution. It also can provide TechCo with the immediate 
leverage of LargeCo’s established manufacturing or distribution infrastructure, without the 
dilution, time and risk of internal development. A strategic acquisition can provide LargeCo 
with the new products and technologies necessary to maintain its competitive advantage, 
growth rate and profitability. Ill-conceived or badly done acquisitions, however, can result 
in expense and disruption to both businesses, the discontinuance of good technologies 
and products, employee dissatisfaction and defection, and poor operating results by the 
combined company. By understanding the key factors that lead to a successful acquisition, 
TechCo and LargeCo can improve the probability of achieving one.
Why Do Companies Acquire Other Companies?
When considering an acquisition, TechCo’s first step should be to identify the strategic 
reasons why it wants to be acquired. For example, while TechCo may seek liquidity for 
its founders and investors, it also may have concluded that its future success requires 
the synergies of complementary resources and access to the infrastructure of a major 
corporation. An IPO could provide TechCo’s shareholders with liquidity, but would not 
immediately address TechCo’s need for product synergy or provide an established 
infrastructure. Those needs could be better met by finding a strategic buyer for TechCo.
Equally important is to identify LargeCo’s strategic objectives in acquiring TechCo. For 
example, LargeCo may seek to acquire a product line or key technology, gain creative, 
technical or management talent, or eliminate a competitor. Ultimately, LargeCo will acquire 
TechCo because it believes acquisition is a more effective means of meeting a strategic need 
and increasing shareholder value than internal development. If TechCo understands its own 
and LargeCo’s strategic objectives, it can focus on candidates that are most likely to meet its 
needs and value the assets that it has to offer. While the objectives of individual companies 
will vary, the following table identifies common strategic objectives that TechCos and 
LargeCos try to achieve through an acquisition?
SDK Library service:VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to
PDF in VB.NET, VB.NET convert PDF to HTML, VB.NET convert PDF to Word, VB.NET extract text from PDF VB.NET Demo Code for Converting PowerPoint to PDF.
www.rasteredge.com
SDK Library service:RasterEdge Product Refund Policy
Refund Agreement that we will email to you. controls, PDF document, image to pdf files and for capturing, viewing, processing, converting, compressing and
www.rasteredge.com
2 mergers and acquisitions 
fenwick & west
What Creates Value in an Acquisition?
LargeCo’s acquisition objectives will determine which TechCo attributes are the most 
valuable. If TechCo identifies early the strategic objectives for the most likely LargeCo merger 
candidates, it can focus its energy on developing those attributes. There are, however, 
certain TechCo attributes that are likely to enhance TechCo’s value. Proprietary technology or 
products with significant competitive advantage are always valuable. Market leadership in a 
fast-growing market segment also increases TechCo’s value. Studies show that market-share 
leaders are significantly more profitable than companies with smaller market shares. Strong 
management in TechCo’s areas of value will lend credibility to TechCo’s projections of future 
growth. Nonduplicative infrastructure and relationships add to TechCo’s value since LargeCo 
will not have to terminate redundant personnel or unwind arrangements with unwanted third 
parties. The greatest source of TechCo value, however, is the financial performance and joint 
economics expected in the hands of LargeCo. If TechCo reached $5 million in sales in a fast-
growing market segment without the benefit of a sales force or an institutional presence, 
LargeCo’s sales force, brand name recognition and established customer base may allow it to 
increase those results dramatically in the first year with minimal incremental cost.
What Destroys Value in an Acquisition?
Just as there are certain TechCo attributes that are likely to enhance its value, there are also 
certain TechCo characteristics that are likely to reduce its value. An unprofitable TechCo 
or one with performance volatility will have difficulty persuading LargeCo that its future 
performance projections are credible. Excessive liabilities or litigation threats may frighten 
off LargeCo from an otherwise good deal, unless TechCo’s shareholders are willing to 
Table 1: Common Strategic Objectives for Acquisitions
TechCo Reasons to Be Acquired
LargeCo Reasons to Make an Acquisition
Access to complementary products and markets
Acquire key technology
Access to working capital
Acquire a new distribution channel
Avoid dilution of building own infrastructure
Assure a source of supply
Best liquidity event for founders and investors
Eliminate a competitor
Best and fastest return on investment
Expand or add a product line
Faster access to established infrastructure
Gain creative talent
Gain critical mass
Gain expertise and entry in a new market
Improve distribution capacity
Gain a time-to-market advantage
More rapid expansion of customer base
Increase earnings per share
SDK Library service:XDoc.Converter for .NET Purchase information
Online Convert PDF to Html. SUPPORT: controls, PDF document, image to pdf files and components for capturing, viewing, processing, converting, compressing and
www.rasteredge.com
SDK Library service:XDoc.HTML5 Viewer for .NET Purchase information
Online Convert PDF to Html. SUPPORT: controls, PDF document, image to pdf files and components for capturing, viewing, processing, converting, compressing and
www.rasteredge.com
fenwick & west  
mergers and acquisitions  3
indemnify LargeCo for those risks. If key TechCo managers are visibly reluctant to continue 
working with LargeCo after the acquisition, LargeCo may be concerned about TechCo’s ability 
to perform after the closing. A TechCo that requires substantial capital to accomplish its goals 
faces two hurdles. It must persuade LargeCo that the goals are attainable with the requested 
capital, and that it is worth both the purchase price and the additional capital. Strategically 
irrelevant TechCo operations tend to defocus or stall merger negotiations. LargeCo does 
not want to buy such assets, and TechCo will want to be paid for their value or to remove 
them from the company before the acquisition. It also is dangerous for TechCo to go into 
negotiations with a limited operating horizon (i.e., with minimal cash). It may find that its 
only source of bridge financing is LargeCo, which will put it in a much weaker negotiating 
position. TechCos with a divided Board of Directors, investor group or management team 
also have a more difficult time in acquisition negotiations. They will find that these groups 
spend more time negotiating among themselves than in negotiating with LargeCo. Gaining 
a reputation for being over-shopped also can reduce TechCo’s value. It leads LargeCo to 
believe that many other potential acquirers have already examined TechCo and rejected it as 
undesirable.
Why Do Some Acquisitions Fail?
Many acquisitions fail to deliver the synergies and value promised. To avoid these pitfalls, 
TechCo needs to understand the most common reasons why acquisitions fail. If LargeCo does 
inadequate technical due diligence, it may discover after closing that TechCo’s technology 
does not perform at the expected level. Sometimes, there is a clash between LargeCo’s 
and TechCo’s corporate cultures, and TechCo’s key personnel become disenchanted or 
leave. If TechCo’s personnel are a critical part of its value, LargeCo should make a special 
effort to “recruit” them, designing an employment package and environment that will 
retain and motivate them. There may not be a true strategic fit, and LargeCo may discover 
that its sale force cannot easily sell TechCo’s products. If LargeCo does an inadequate 
intellectual property audit, it may later discover that TechCo does not have clear title to its 
technology. Lastly, LargeCo may change its mind about the strategic importance of TechCo’s 
technology or products and conclude that it does not desire to continue them within 
LargeCo’s organization. Most of these problems can be avoided if they are addressed during 
negotiations and the due diligence process.
4  mergers and acquisitions 
fenwick & west
Deciding to Be Acquired
Acquisition vs. IPO
When should TechCo pursue a strategic acquisition and when should it pursue an IPO? When 
evaluating this issue, the following factors should be considered:
Infrastructure.  To go public and maintain its stock price, TechCo generally must establish a 
consistent, stable pattern of growth and profitability. To do that, TechCo will need to establish 
professional manufacturing, distribution, finance, and administration and management. 
Building the infrastructure necessary to operate as a successful, publicly traded company 
is time consuming, expensive and dilutive to the present equity holders. While TechCo may 
command a higher valuation in an IPO than it can in an acquisition, the potential for a higher 
valuation may not be worth the expected dilution. Moreover, an independent growth strategy 
can be risky if TechCo is likely to be overtaken by better capitalized competitors. 
IPO Windows.  The IPO market is volatile and reacts to factors that are outside TechCo’s 
control. IPO windows may open and close in a cycle different than TechCo’s growth, capital 
and liquidity needs. For example, the adoption of government regulation of, or bad press 
about, TechCo’s industry can affect TechCo’s ability to go public. It may not affect the 
profitability of TechCo’s business, however, nor its potential attractiveness to a LargeCo 
already in that industry.
Public Disclosure.  The process of going public requires that TechCo disclose important 
information about its strategy, competitive advantage and finances that it might prefer to 
keep confidential. Once public, such disclosures continue as TechCo is required to file regular 
10-Ks, 10-Qs and proxy statements. Moreover, there is an increasing risk that TechCo will be 
sued by its shareholders if, with hindsight, TechCo’s public disclosures prove to be materially 
inaccurate. TechCo may prefer to be acquired to avoid that public disclosure and potential 
liability. 
Cost.  A public offering is expensive. For example, if TechCo wanted to make a $40 million 
offering, the underwriters typically would take a 7% commission on the stock sold, and 
the legal, accounting and printing fees would exceed $1,200,000. Complying with the 
SEC’s public reporting requirements imposes additional administrative burdens, requires 
substantial executive attention and might cost TechCo an additional $50,000 to $150,000 per 
year. TechCo will find that being acquired generally is less expensive than doing an IPO and 
LargeCo typically will pay TechCo’s reasonable acquisition expenses.
Quarterly Financial Performance.  Once TechCo is public, it must publish financial statements 
and respond to the analysts on a quarterly basis. A public company frequently finds that it 
makes business decisions with one eye on how the market will respond. By getting acquired 
fenwick & west  
mergers and acquisitions  5
by LargeCo, many TechCos hope to be able to focus on long-term investment and business 
plan execution.
Liquidity for TechCo Shareholders.  While TechCo may think that going public will provide 
its shareholders with liquidity, that liquidity may be initially illusory. Many TechCos sell 
relatively few shares in their IPO and many more do not get serious analyst coverage. There 
may be little market interest in TechCo’s stock, with few shares trading daily (TechCo’s 
“float”). Further, underwriters will require TechCo’s shareholders to sign “Market Standoff 
Agreements,” agreeing not to sell any of their shares into the public market for at least 
180 days after TechCo’s IPO. TechCo’s shareholders may find that, although TechCo is now 
“public,” their stock is relatively illiquid. If TechCo’s shareholders receive freely tradable 
LargeCo stock that has a significant float, they may receive more real liquidity more quickly 
than is possible through a TechCo IPO.
Positioning TechCo to Be Acquired
The best way for TechCo to position itself to be acquired (or to go public) is to demonstrate 
consistent revenue and earnings growth and ownership of a fast-growing technology, 
customer or market franchise. TechCo should consider avoiding early and excessive product 
or market diversification. Attempting to create multiple products or to attack multiple 
markets simultaneously strains the resources of an emerging company and reduces the 
probability that TechCo will execute its strategy well. A more diverse product or market 
focus also reduces the likelihood of a good strategic fit with LargeCo and increases the 
probability that some of TechCo’s assets will have a low value to LargeCo. TechCo also may 
want to establish market acceptance of its products through partners instead of establishing 
its own sales and distribution capability. Using such partnering relationships can enable 
TechCo to avoid the cost and time of establishing its own production, sales or marketing 
infrastructure, which will often duplicate that of LargeCo. (See Fenwick & West’s booklet 
“Corporate Partnering:  A Strategy for High Technology Companies” for a more detailed 
discussion of partnering.) From a legal perspective, TechCo should ensure that it has clear 
title to its intellectual property and it should avoid nonassignable or onerous contracts. To 
avoid accounting disputes during negotiations, TechCo should keep its financial statements 
in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) and have annual audits.
When Should TechCo Consider Being Acquired?
It is difficult to predict at what stage TechCo will obtain the best valuation in an acquisition. 
However, TechCo may be an attractive acquisition candidate at an earlier stage than it 
expects. For example, TechCo may want to consider being acquired once it:
Produces a product or service that is:
critically acclaimed in the industry trade journals,  
● 
strongly endorsed by good, referenceable customers, and
● 
a strategic fit with LargeCo’s products and distribution
6 mergers and acquisitions 
fenwick & west
Has a strong development team in a mission-critical area
Has few conflicting or overlapping products or infrastructure; and
Is profitable and can demonstrate revenue and profit growth.
This stage may be optimal because TechCo can reach it most quickly, with the least amount of 
invested capital, personnel and risk. 
The Acquisition Process
Once TechCo concludes that it wants to be acquired, it needs to understand the acquisition 
process. There are several stages involved in preparing for, negotiating and closing an 
acquisition. Each stage requires the participation of different players. From first contact with 
an investment banker until completion of the integration of LargeCo and TechCo operations, 
the acquisition process can take more than a year. The following table shows some of the 
more important acquisition stages and the key participants during those stages of the 
process.
Use of an Investment Banker
Presale Preparation.  TechCo may want to obtain advice from an investment banker when 
it first considers being sold. TechCo should select its banker based on its experience in 
mergers and acquisitions in TechCo’s specific industry doing transactions of similar deal 
size and its contacts with relevant potential buyers. Before reaching the decision that it 
should be acquired, TechCo can have an investment banker review its business, financial 
and strategic plans, and help it evaluate its business alternatives. With early advice, TechCo 
can address value-enhancing or detracting factors and sometimes improve its valuation. 
Based on an analysis of TechCo’s business strengths and weaknesses, industry trends, 
TechCo’s competitive positioning, and recent M&A activity, the investment banker can advise 
TechCo on a range of expected acquisition values. These early activities can help TechCo 
position itself to command the highest valuation and attract the most qualified prospective 
Table 2: Acquisition Process and Participants
Participants
TechCo 
Market 
Plan  
Contact 
LargeCo 
Candidates
Negotiate 
Letter of 
Intent  
Conduct 
Due 
Diligence
Negotiate 
and Sign 
Agreements 
Closing 
of 
Merger
Company
Integration
Management
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
Board of  
Directors
x
x
x
Investment  
Banker
x
x
x
x
Lawyers 
x
x
x
x
Accountants
x
x
x
x
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested