11
and locationally limited context. The labor work health and safety and environmental issues
related to EPZs are discussed in more depth.   Finally the  pros and cons of establishing an EPZ
in an economy that already has a liberal trade and macro policy framework (as in the case of
Uganda) is discussed.
A third section discusses the  recent issues related to EPZs compatibility with Uruguay
round agreements and how they would fare if the country in which they operate participated in a
preferential arrangement (regional, bilateral or multilateral).  Here, we highlight the fact that while
exclusion from a preferential arrangements may hurt the firms active in the excluded country,
membership in such an arrangement does not insure gains and success for firms.
Section four outlines the practical aspects of setting up an EPZ as means of ensuring its
success.   Section five presents reviews the overall EPZ experience from the perspective of two
countries in Africa. Section six concludes, providing policy suggestions with regards to the
appropriateness of, and general administrative and regulatory guidelines for establishing an EPZ
(including pre and post trade liberalization scenarios).
A.  Definition
A.1 What are EPZs?
An export processing zone is one of many trade policy instrument used to promote non-
traditional exports.  Other such instruments include but are not limited to import tariff drawback
arrangements, temporary admissions and export subsidies.  Often, when countries or firms use
3
OECD cites Lloyd’s 1995 unpublished paper on this topic.
Changing pdf to html - SDK Library service:C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
How to Convert PDF to HTML Webpage with C# PDF Conversion SDK
www.rasteredge.com
Changing pdf to html - SDK Library service:VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
PDF to HTML Webpage Converter SDK for VB.NET PDF to HTML Conversion
www.rasteredge.com
12
these alternative trade tools to promote non-traditional exports successfully, EPZs do not play a
large role in exports or in the economy
4
.
An export processing zone has adopted features from the much older industrial park
and free trade area concepts
5
and appeared in the late 1950s to early 1960s
6
in widely
separated locations.    It has since propagated across developed and developing countries,
mutating to match the economic environment and the policy agenda of each host country.
When discussing EPZs, a variety of terminologies, such as industrial free zones, free
trade zones, special economic zones and maquiladoras are used interchangeably through most
of the literature.  Johansson (1994) supports such a clustering,  arguing that the general concept
of all these terminologies is basically the same.  On the other hand,  Rhee, et. al. (1990:4) argue
that free trade zones (FTZs) include export processing zones, but that many export processing
zones are not free trade zones
7
.
The World Bank (1992) has based its analysis on the premise that   “ an export
processing zone is an industrial estate, usually a fenced-in area of 10 to 300 hectares, that
specializes in manufacturing for export.  It offers firms free trade conditions and a liberal
regulatory environment (pg. 7).”
4
Taiwan and S. Korea are examples of such a case.
5
The appendix in the World Bank publication Export Processing Zones, 1992, provides an excellent
historical background on the zones.
6
The World Bank (1992) considers the Shannon Free Zone in Ireland, set up in 1959, as one of the first
EPZs.
7
He defines FTZs as EPZs with free trade and other equal footing export policies, which include:  realistic
exchange rates; free access to raw materials, inputs and capital goods at world prices, easy access to
short term trade financing at market interest rates; and easy access to investment licensing and
financing for the creation of export production capacities.
SDK Library service:C# PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net
Enable batch changing PDF page orientation without other PDF reader control. Support to overwrite PDF and save rotation changes to original PDF file.
www.rasteredge.com
SDK Library service:VB.NET Word: Word Conversion SDK for Changing Word Document into
VB.NET Word - Convert Word to PDF Using VB. How to Convert Word Document to PDF File in VB.NET Application. Visual C#. VB.NET. Home
www.rasteredge.com
13
The ILO/UNCTC study (1988) provides a similar definition
8
.
Both the World Bank and ILO/UNCTC definitions are restrictive and exclude a large
number of  EPZs in developing countries that espouse a more accommodating set up. For
instance, some firms are not geographically constrained in industrial estates (Mauritius, China).
In others, firms are allowed to sell a percent of their output within the domestic market
(Dominican Republic, 20 percent ; Mexico today, 20-40%).  Some, like the existing Manaus
(Brazil) EPZ and the prospective EPZ in Papua New Guinea, are permitted unlimited sales to
the domestic market.
The ILO/UNCTC report acknowledges that such  “off-shore manufacturing facilities”
...“represent, in terms of employment or output, approximately half of the weight of EPZs
proper:  in 1986, for instance, there were some 620,000 workers employed throughout the
developing world in offshore manufacturing facilities other than EPZs, against 1.3 million in the
narrowly defined EPZs” (1988:6).
There  are  however  both theoretical  and practical  reasons for adopting  a  narrow
definition of export processing zones.  The ILO/UNCTC report opts for it on two grounds.
The first is a practical one:  the qualitative and quantitative data are better in the enclaves.  The
second is an analytical choice:  enclave manufacturing for export is essentially segregated from
the rest of the society.  Its existence and performance raises interesting questions regarding its
contribution to the growth and development of the host country.
8
The ILO/UNCTC study suggests the following definition: “...an EPZ could be defined here as a clearly
delineated industrial estate which constitutes a free trade enclave in the customs and trade regime of a
country, and where foreign manufacturing firms producing mainly for export benefit from a certain
number of fiscal and financial incentives” (1988:4).
SDK Library service:VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
to the target one, this PDF file merge function will put the two target PDF together and save as new PDF, without changing the previous two PDF documents at all
www.rasteredge.com
SDK Library service:C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net
PDF. Supports tiff compression selection. Supports for changing image size. Also supports convert PDF files to jpg, jpeg images. C#
www.rasteredge.com
14
We have opted to base our work on a more inclusive definition than the ones used by
the World Bank (1992) and ILO/UNCTC (1988).  We will include the EPFs as well as those
EPZs allowed to sell some share of their output in the domestic market.  We made this choice
for two basic reasons.  First, adhering to a narrow definition of EPZ would be empirically
somewhat outdated.  It would strip the policy analysis of much of its breadth and depth since
many of the zones are based or have evolved into the more inclusive definition of the EPZ.  Our
definition of EPZs will include Mauritius, Mexico and Dominican Republic but still exclude the
China SEZs and the Manaus (Brazil) zone
9
. We will also exclude all socialist, ex-socialist and
newly  independent  states  as  well  as  developed  countries  from  this  study  due  to  space
constraints or lack of data.
Overall, throughout the analysis we will draw on examples from East Asia, Central and
Latin America, Africa and Bangladesh. Two African examples  will be presented in more detail
in section V.  Appendix B provides limited information on another five African countries’ EPZs.
A.2. Primary goals and characteristics of EPZs and EPFs
There is an overall consensus on the primary goals of an export processing zone:
1.  
Provide foreign exchange earnings by promoting non-traditional exports.
2.  
Provide jobs to alleviate unemployment or under-employment problems in the
host country; assist in income creation.
3.  
Attract foreign direct investment (FDI)  to the host country.
9
For more details on the Chinese Special Economic Zones, refer to China:  Foreign Trade Reform, World
Bank, 1994, Annexes 6.2 and 6.3.
SDK Library service:C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
Able to perform PDF file password adding, deleting and changing in Visual Studio .NET project use C# source code in .NET class. Allow
www.rasteredge.com
SDK Library service:VB.NET PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for vb.net, ASP.NET
creating, loading, merge and splitting PDF pages and Files, adding a page into PDF document, deleting unnecessary page from PDF file and changing the position
www.rasteredge.com
15
4. 
In  the  case  of  a  successful  EPZ  foreign  direct  investment  would  be
accompanied  by  technological  transfer,    knowledge  spill-over  and
demonstration effects that would act as catalysts for domestic entrepreneurs to
engage in production of non-traditional products.
While there is agreement about the objectives of an EPZ, there is no general consensus
about their definitive characteristics.   There are none the less,  a few common features to these
zones.  They were originally conceived as fenced-in production areas (a la industrial parks).  A
long existing – and in the 1990s increasingly popular - alternative been the export processing
firm  (EPF),  which  benefit from  some  of the  EPZ  incentives without  being  fenced in  an
identifiable area.
They also usually benefit from the following:
1.  
Unlimited,  duty-free  imports  of  raw,  intermediate  input  and  capital goods
necessary for the production of exports.
2.  
Less governmental red-tape, including more flexibility with labor laws for the
firms in the zone than in the domestic market.
3.  
Generous and long-term tax holidays and concessions to the firms.
4.  
Above average (compared to the rest of the host country) communications
services and infrastructure.  It is also common for countries to subsidize utilities
and rental rates.
5.  
Zone firms can be domestic, international or joint venture. In many cases there
is no limitation on foreign ownership of the firms or on the repatriation of the
profits.  The role of FDI is prominent in EPZ activities.
SDK Library service:VB.NET Image: How to Generate Freehand Annotation Through VB.NET
as PDF, TIFF, PNG, BMP, etc. If this VB.NET annotation library is used, you are able to create freehand line annotation in VB.NET application without changing
www.rasteredge.com
SDK Library service:VB.NET Image: Easy to Create Ellipse Annotation with VB.NET
png, gif & bmp; Add ellipse annotation to document files, like PDF & Word to customize ellipse annotation on your document or image by changing its parameters
www.rasteredge.com
16
EPZs can be differentiated by their ability to sell their output (in part or whole) in the
market of the host country.  Those which are not permitted such a transaction fit the more
traditional definition of EPZ.  Some countries have adopted a more flexible stance with regards
to such sales and allow some percent of the EPZ production to be sold on the domestic market
after appropriate import tariffs on the final goods are paid. For instance, Dominican Republic
allows up 20 percent of the EPZ products into its domestic market while Mexico lets 20-40
percent in.  A final category  of EPZs permits the free sale of  its products on the domestic
market. Manaus (Brazil) is one such zone
10
.
Zones can also be divided into public and private zones.  The older zones were typically
setup and run by the host government.  In the past 10 to 15 years however, an increasing
number of zones have been developed and are being managed by private entities.  We discuss
the superiority of private versus private zones later in this report (section IV.C).
Finally, zones can be categorized as high-end or low-end.  This distinction refers to the
wide range  of services  provided  by the  zone  (quality  of  management  and  facilities)  and
therefore, the type of firms populating a zone.
A.3. Why do countries use EPZ and EPF schemes?
EPZs  and EPFs are two of the many trade policy tools at the disposal of a developing
country government.  Typically, they are created as open market oases within an economy that
10
See Manuel-Rodriguez (1996) “The Manaus Free Zone of Brazil” in R. L. Bolin (ed.)  Impact of 57 New
EPZs in Mercosur, the Flagstaff Institute.  In fact the Manaus zone firms  processed imports for the
sole purpose of selling their final product on the domestic market.
SDK Library service:C# Excel - Excel Page Processing Overview
C#.NET programming. Allow for changing the order of pages in an Excel document in .NET applications using C# language. Enable you
www.rasteredge.com
SDK Library service:C#: How to Edit XDoc.HTML5 Viewer Toolbar Commands
This principle also applies equally to changing tabs order. var _userCmdDemoPdf = new UserCommand("pdf"); ID and Events take RE default.
www.rasteredge.com
17
is dominated by distortionary trade, macro and exchange rate regulations, and other regulatory
governmental controls.
Traditionally, there are four competing, but not exclusive, views on the role of EPZs in
an economy.  One considers it as an integral part to further economy wide reforms.  In this light
EPZs are to have a specific life span, losing their significance as countries implement systemic
trade, macroeconomic and exchange rate reforms.  As the economy opens up and a country
develops its capacity for competitive industrial exports, EPZ’s exports and employment share in
total export and employment falls. Both Taiwan and S. Korean EPZs fit into this category.
A second view sees EPZs and EPFs in terms of a safety valve.  They provide much
needed foreign currency to accommodate import needs for the host nation and create jobs to
alleviate some of the national unemployment or under-employment.  However, with the country
not liberalizing the rest of the economy, the EPZs remain enclave production areas with limited
economic contributions.  Tunisia is an example of such a case.
A third view is that EPZs be used as laboratories to experiment with market economy,
outward oriented policies. China’s early special economic zones have been seen as embodying
this third view (World Bank, 1994, appendix 6.2). Here, new production, labor and financial
relationships and dynamics were introduced and evaluated, before introduction into the larger
Chinese economy.
A final, less orthodox, and much more recent,  take on the role of EPZs comes from
some developing countries in which the level of FDI following trade and macro-policy reforms
has been  disappointing. Some are considering establishing  (or have  established)  EPZs  to
18
enhance the incentives to attract FDI, matching or surpassing the incentives provided by their
neighboring (and potentially competitor) countries for these investments.
All four views still consider the EPZs as source of  technological transfers and human
capital development.  There is, no doubt, a certain level of  catalytic and demonstration effect
(Rhee, 1990; Rhee and Belot, 1990) on the domestic private industries.  The zone may also be
providing a well-managed and efficient industrial structure in a nation that may not possess one.
The labor force also benefits from technical training and learning-by-doing in the zones, although
according to the literature, most of the zone firms use low-tech, labor intensive production
processes.  It appears the most valuable training for the labor force may be the work discipline
they acquire for industrial production.
It is also interesting to note that in the past 30 years EPZs have been implemented  at
two different development stages.  One set of countries have reverted to them in the early stages
of their industrial development, with the expectation that they provide the “engine of growth” to
propel  their  economies  into  industrialization.    They  also  sought  production  and  export
diversification. Mauritius certainly fits this bill, but so do the more recent African hosts of EPZs
such as Namibia and Togo.  A second set of countries (South Korea, Taiwan and some
developed countries such as the US) implemented EPZs when they already had a strong
industrial production and exports sectors
11
.
11
On this point  Rhee (1990:43) notes that  “by 1962, four years before the first FTZ existed, Taiwan’s share
of manufactured products in total exports has reached 50%, from less than 10 percent in the early
1950s.”
19
Potential gains and caveats to EPZs
Potential Gains from an EPZ
Caveats to these Gains
·  Increased foreign exchange earning
·  These gains may be overstated
·  Increased gross exports
·  Net exports not as impressive because of
high import content of exports
·  Job creation / income creation
·  Lack of job security, prone to demand
shocks
·  Average wage in EPZ higher than average
wage outside the zone
·  There is a large variance around this mean
·  Good source of labor training and learning
by doing. Assists countries in
developing an industrial labor force.
·  True but skills are generally low-tech.
·  Management and supervisory training
·  No caveats.
·  Catalyst effect/demonstration effect
·  No caveats
·  Provides efficient industrial structure in
countries that may not possess one.
·  Forgone taxes, tariff revenues and
opportunity cost of public investments related
to the zone may be high.
·  Environmental damage and labor and work
safety issues due to lax laws and/or
governmental supervision.
20
Three Current Issues Affecting EPZs and EPFs:
·    Rapid changes in tastes and consumption patterns and  the globalization of production
processes may have lasting impact on EPZs and EPFs.
In the case of many consumer goods typically produced in EPZs, changes in consumer
preferences and the increased pressure to meet these changes as quickly as possible have
impacted the geographical investment choices of producers.
The globalization of production, the easier movements of capital and lower transportation
time and costs, have facilitated segmentation of production processes, reducing the need for
country specific technical expertise. This phenomenon has a differential impact on industries as a
function of their technical sophistication.  For instance, the need for generic low-tech skills can
be satisfied by a number of countries, providing producers a larger selection of sites.
·    Exclusion of a country from a preferential arrangement seems to impact EPZ firms and
EPFs which operate there negatively (eg.  Impact  of NAFTA on  firms and EPZs in the
Dominican Republic). These firms may or may not flourish from the membership of their host
country in preferential trade arrangements. The EPZ firms’ (and EPFs) initial product mix,
market orientation, technological sophistication and strategic business planning will have a
material influence on their continued success and contributions to the country in which they
operate. These contributions will also be conditional on the firms’ ability to adapt to the new
rules of the trade arragement, the more competitive market conditions and demands, and new
technology.
·     The compatibility of EPZ incentives with WTO rules is country specific. Many of the
incentives offered to firms are considered export subsidies and developing countries may or may
not qualify for a timed or extended exemption from them. Least developed countries and
developing countries with less than $1000 per capita GNP are exempted from disciplines on
prohibited export subsidies. They have exemption from other prohibited subsidies until 2003
12
.
The export subsidy prohibitions will not apply for the remaining developing countries before
2003
13
.  These countries have a time-bound (5 years) exemption for the other prohibited
subsidies.
12
These other subsidies are those addressing domestic content rules and preferential treatment of domestic
vs. imported inputs. In this case, the rule does not apply to least developed countries for a period of  8
years.
13
For eight years from the date of the entry into force of the agreement.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested