41
Broad and Cavanaugh (1993) also relay another interesting economic observations
occurring in the Bataan Zone in the late 1980s.  They describe a process of sub-contracting
former EPZ  garment  jobs  (which  garnered  higher pay  and  benefits for the  workers)  as
homework to non-regular, nonunion workers.  These later are paid less and have no benefits.
Earlier, we noted the same phenomenon occurring in South Korea.
There are two competing views on this development.  Broad and Cavanaugh (1993)
believe that  this “out-sourcing” renders the job creation/labor income benefits of the EPZs more
questionable when compared with the social cost of creating them.  This is because these jobs
are less secure and pay less (and have no benefits) than the ones in EPZs.  An opposing view
argues that if there are no other comparable income earning alternatives in the host economies,
then such employment opportunities are positive ones.  There are also gains in  spreading
training, knowledge spillovers, backward linkages and catalyst behavior (see sections II.C and
II.D above).
G. Education/Training Benefits (Human Capital Development).
There has no doubt been a great deal of  knowledge spill-over effect from the creation
of EPZs in developing countries.  Anecdotal support abounds about how a previously unskilled
labor force has become semi-skilled and  skilled production workers through  training and
learning by doing on the job. Rhee’s 1990 survey of Dominican Republic zones provides more
concrete evidence. He reports a very steep labor productivity learning curve for the first three
years of a firm’s operation, followed by a noticeable flattening out of the curve.  By extension,
these improved skills and productivity increase the workers’ income earning capacity.  Given
Convert pdf link to html - Library software component:C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
How to Convert PDF to HTML Webpage with C# PDF Conversion SDK
www.rasteredge.com
Convert pdf link to html - Library software component:VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
PDF to HTML Webpage Converter SDK for VB.NET PDF to HTML Conversion
www.rasteredge.com
42
the high labor turn-over rate in the EPZs, domestic firms get the opportunity to benefits from this
training and skills by hiring workers previously employed in the zone firms.
Some employees  also receive training  at the managerial or  supervisory level, thus
enriching the entrepreneurial capital of the country.  Also, the presence of  EPZs allows
domestic entrepreneurs and workers to benefit from observing and copying the traits that make
the zone firms successful exporters.  These  traits may include managerial  and production
organizational  skills,  negotiations  and  marketing  skills  in  dealing  with  foreign  contractors,
general business know-how and foreign contacts.
In fact, many view the positive human capital gains and catalyst effect such valuable
EPZ spillovers as to argue for a reassessment of the pessimistic neo-classical view of EPZ
impacts (Johansson,1994).
This enthusiastic support of EPZs needs to be amended with two caveats. To start with,
the skills that production workers acquire through training and learning by doing are not very
sophisticated and may not advance their career opportunities once they move to the domestic
economy
41
.    After  all, the  literature  is  unanimous  in acknowledging that EPZ  production
processes are low-tech and require few industrial skills. Workers become semi-skilled but the
learning process is not necessarily continued beyond the basic learning and training. Rhee
(1990) work supports this statement.  He finds a steep increase in the labor productivity
learning suggesting that workers acquire the necessary expertise in the first three years. Since
41
Tzannatos and Kusago (1997) argue that the type of  short training workers receive does not help them
develop skills that would improve their career prospects after they stop working in EPZs.  Tzannatos
and Sayed (1996) claim that workers often do not need or acquire skills other than any other worker
would acquire during the ordinary course of their employment.
Library software component:C# PDF url edit Library: insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.
Empower to create clickable and active html links in .NET WinForms. Able to insert and delete PDF links. Able to embed link to specific PDF pages.
www.rasteredge.com
Library software component:VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net
Empower to create and insert clickable and active html links to PDF document. Able to embed link to specific PDF pages in VB.NET program.
www.rasteredge.com
43
the production process is low-tech, and no new higher technology is brought in (especially in the
garment industry), workers’ productivity stagnates after this initial period
42
.
What may be even more important and valuable in the long run than the actual skills is
the acquisition of the discipline required to work in an industrial environment.
Also, successful human resources development in this case depends on two critical
parameters:  the sophistication level of  the production work;  and  the starting level of education
and training of the workers being hired.  These two parameters define  a more or less steep
learning curve with concordant impact (positive spill-over a la Mankiw) on the economy.  In
other words, the build up of human capital is optimized when the absorption capacity of the
workers matches ( or is slightly surpassed) by the technology they need to acquire, so that short
term training, as it is provided by firms, ensures a steep learning curve and productivity increase.
H.  Wages, Labor and Safety Laws
Most of the literature emphasizes the importance of facilitating “doing business” to
attract FDI to the zone. One aspect of this is often thought to be low transaction cost and ease
of hiring and  firing  workers in allowing  firms to reduce their costs  rapidly  in a business
framework highly prone to demand shocks.  The burden of the cyclical nature of  demand is
placed on workers.
42
We assume no endogenous technological progress here.  Also note that the two dominant  EPZ
industries have not provided an opportunity for elongated  or repeated steep labor productivity
learning curve.  The technology has not really changed in production of garments in many years. And,
electronics firms in the zones are mostly engaged in basic assembly of goods. So one does not expect
a large knowledge or technical spill-over effect in these areas beyond the medium term.  There is a
possibility for  a labor force to experience repeated occurrences of steep productivity learning curve.
This is when a country successfully manages to upgrade /upscale the mix of the firms active in its
zones from garment to basic electronics assembly and then to high-tech production activities and
informatics.  This, however, is not a very common phenomenon.  Anecdotal information suggests that
most countries have had difficulty effecting such a transformation, even Mauritius.
Library software component:RasterEdge .NET Document Imaging Trial Package Download Link.
Demo▶: Convert PDF to Word; Convert PDF to Tiff; Convert PDF to HTML; Convert PDF to Image; Tiff; Online Convert PDF to Html. SUPPORT:
www.rasteredge.com
Library software component:C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
PDF Viewer provides C# users abilities to view, annotate, convert and create editing PDF document hyperlink (url) and quick navigation link in PDF bookmark.
www.rasteredge.com
44
In the process of achieving a “business friendly” environment, wage, labor and safety
laws are often relaxed.
1.  Minimum wage laws and wage levels.
a.  Minimum wage laws
In many countries the existence of minimum wage laws do not seem to affect zones’
wage setting patterns.  The reason for this is two fold.  First, in many countries the minimum
wage laws are not extended to the zone firms.  In some cases, they are explicitly left out to
attract FDI.  For instance, prior to 1993, the Dominican Republican labor law did not impose
the minimum wage on its EPZs. Where zones are not excluded from the laws, they are not
necessarily enforced.  This leads to some employers paying below domestic minimum wage
level
43
. Second, other employers pay wages higher than minimum wage anyway.  Some zones
are even said to pay above market clearing salaries, following, it seems,  the efficiency wage
argument
44
.  Table 7 conveys this dichotomy in setting minimum wages.  In Central America,
minimum  monthly  wage  in  EPZs  is  higher  than  the  national  minimum  monthly  wage  for
Guatemala, Honduras and  El Salvador.  The opposite is true for Costa Rica and Panama.
b.  Wage levels
43
They use tactics such as keeping trainees - who are paid less than  regular employees - in that position
for unjustifiably long period, or by not adjusting the salary of workers who are no longer trainees
(Jayasena, 1994).
44
That is, above equilibrium salaries increase worker productivity (reduces her slacking time at work)
because she does not want to risk to be fired. She does not want to be fired because her next best
option is either to join the pool of unemployed seeking an EPZ job or to accept a job at a domestic firm
at much lower salaries (Mankiw, 1987).   Efficiency wages also increase company loyalty among
workers and reduce turn-over, which is reported to be large in many EPZs.
Library software component:VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.
PDF to Text. Convert PDF to JPEG. Convert PDF to Png to PDF. Image: Remove Image from PDF Page. Image Link: Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit Bookmark. Metadata: Edit, Delete
www.rasteredge.com
Library software component:How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
C# programmers can convert Word, Excel, PowerPoint Tiff, Jpeg, Bmp of PDF document, including editing PDF url links and quick navigation link in bookmark
www.rasteredge.com
45
A majority of  sources,  including OECD (1996)
45
and  Romero (1995), agree that
overall, wages in EPZs are higher on average  than wages outside the zones
46
. According to
Karp (1989), the Caribbean and Central America  zones typically paid 5-20 percent higher
salaries than domestic firms. In  the early 1990s the Malaysian electronics and textile zone firms
paid 30 percent higher average wages than similar domestic firms.
Despite this general positive wage trend, wage rates vary according to the size of the
firms,  their  nationality  and  policy,  type  of  industrial  production,  country  regulations  and
institutions, and labor market conditions. Tzannatos and Kusago (1997)  show this wage
variance across several countries and even among different industries within Malaysian EPZs .
Zhu (1992) also documents this phenomenon for the Lat Krabang Zone (Thailand), the Masan
Zone (South Korea)
47
and Kaosiung Zone (Taiwan).  The Lat Krabang Zone paid wages
similar to those in the metropolitan Bangkok area, or an average monthly rate of US $140 in
1990.  For the Masan Zone, the real national manufacturing wage was often more than 10
percent higher than zone wages over 1971-1987, except for 1975 and 1985.  In 1988 and
1989, this trend reversed due to large wage increases accorded to the zone workers.  The
average monthly wage in the Masan Zone was some US $820.
In Taiwan, zone workers earned an average US $677 in 1990.  Yet, the real wages in
the Kaosiung Zone (Taiwan) trailed national manufacturing wages consistently over 1967-1988,
expect for 1985.  Zhu (1992) puts this difference at 14%.
45
OECD (1996) references a 1993 ILO publication.
46
For a list of reasons why averages wages are believed to be higher in EPZs than outside the zone, refer
to Romero (1995:253) or Maskus (1996:14).
Library software component:VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF to MS Office Word in VB.NET. VB.NET Tutorial for How to Convert PDF to Word (.docx) Document in VB.NET. Best
www.rasteredge.com
Library software component:C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
C# PDF - Convert PDF to JPEG in C#.NET. C#.NET PDF to JPEG Converting & Conversion Control. Convert PDF to JPEG Using C#.NET. Add necessary references:
www.rasteredge.com
46
2.  Labor laws
There seems to be a definite relaxation of domestic labor laws to accommodate zone
firms. This relaxation has several facets:  zone exemption from compliance with national labor
laws; lax governmental supervision where the zones are not exempted; and frequent overt or
covert opposition to labor unionization and union activities.
There are countries where domestic labor laws apply to the zones, but are hardly or
ever abided by. The lax governmental supervisory attitude gives firms much leeway in their hiring
and firing practices as well as the management and payment of overtime work. OECD (1996)
recognizes that while only 6 countries have deliberately reduced zone core labor standards
compared with the rest of the economy, there are a few other governments who do “not
sanction adequately cases on non-observance of the labor laws in EPZ (pg. 100)”.  Other
countries have either drawn up specific favorable labor laws for EPZs or exempted or relaxed
domestic laws to accommodate them.  Zimbabwe, and Malaysia are such examples (Maskus,
1996).
Unionization (freedom of assembly and association), while not illegal in many EPZs, is
discouraged by many government and firm tactics
48
 One such tactic would be to fire or not
hire known union leader or labor activists.  In Sri Lanka and Jamaica labor organizers are even
prevented from entering EPZs (OECD, 1996). Work conditions can also make it difficult to
organize.  In El Salvador EPZs there are no active unions due to the short work contracts(3-6
47
See also Romero, 1995.
48
A list of such steps is provided in Annex IV of A. T. Romero’s 1995 paper.  It includes both laws and
employer tactics to discourage unionization in 16 different developing countries.
47
months) (Dijkstra and Aleman ,1996). Other countries declare unions and unionization illegal in
the EPZs.  For instance South Korea restricted collective bargaining and unionization until 1987
and re-imposed restrictions in 1989 by declaring EPZ firms “public interest companies” (World
Bank, 1994).  Bangladesh has a ban on unions in its zones.  Pakistan, and India also have  some
restrictions on unions in their zones.  Only a few countries allow active unions.  They include
Mexico, Mauritius and Philippines.  Even then, the Bataan zone unionization (Philippines) was
not an automatic extension of the domestic law.  It occurred only after workers’ strikes.
Although unionization is declared by ILO to be one of  the core workers’ rights under
the international labor law, it does not have to be a necessary avenue to settle labor’s grievances
against their zone employers. Governments could firm up their labor and safety regulations and
insist on firms’ compliance with them.  The governments’ increased supervisory and mediatory
activities would resolve most potential labor issues before they become problems.  In fact, while
many experts highlight the importance of low transaction cost and ease of hiring and firing
workers in attracting FDI to the zone, they also point to labor protection and good working
conditions as key to higher labor productivity and less turn-over
49
.
3.  Work environment safety and health issues
The government of the developing countries in which EPZs are active often has a weak
or non-existent regulatory and/or supervisory presence with regard to the work environment
49
Most EPZs are known for having high labor turn-over rates.  Some is due to the natural attrition of
young female workers getting married and leaving their jobs.  The cyclical nature of EPZ employment is
another explanation.  A third reason for labor turn-over is prolonged periods of 50-60 hours work
weeks .  The Starnberg Institute (1988) reports on this fact  in certain factories in Costa Rica, the
Philippines, South Korea and Sri Lanka.   Romero (1995),  also reports a problem which she qualifies as
“excessive, and sometimes compulsory, overtime... in many zones”.
48
safety and health issues.   Occupational hazards are a subject of concern in some EPZs (Dunn,
1994), especially as they pertain to the electronics and garment industries.  These range from
allergies and stress from monotonous, repetitive movements to health risks associated with
inadequate  canteens  and  washroom  capacities,  refuse  disposal,  blocked  emergency  exit
passages, etc... Several deadly incidents have raised awareness with regards to the issue.  One
example is the 1993 Kader Industrial factory fire in Thailand where 240 workers died because
of blocked exits and the practice of storing flammable material on the factory site (Dunn,
1994:25).
Provision of amenities such as on-site canteens, day cares and health services enhances
the  employees’ work  and  living  standard  and  improves  their  productivity  while  reducing
absenteeism and labor turn-over. The literature agrees  that privately run, high-end zones tend to
fulfill these services better than private low-end or public EPZs.  For instance, the Dominican
Republican private EPZs were equipped with day care and health facilities early on.  The 1993
labor law made them mandatory for all EPZs.
From the scant information available, overall, the safety and the health of the workers
still seem to be determined by the firm, the zone management, the type of activity undertaken,
and the country.    The government  tends  to  have a  weak or  non-existent  regulatory  or
supervisory presence .
Maskus (1996) argues that there is a strong positive correlation between occupational
and health conditions and the presence of foreign firms, who tend to follow higher standards
(especially those coming from developed countries). Finally, overall, high-end zones across
nations have a better record in this area.
49
The  government  should  apply  uniform  regulations  to  all  zones.      Whether  these
regulations should be less or more stringent than the ones governing the domestic industries is
still under debate.  Proponents of a more stringent regulations argue that governments can use
them for demonstration effect, showing the domestic firms that cleaner, safer work environments
will not necessarily be more costly or  reduce their competitiveness.  Also, some would argue
that  it  may  discourage  polluting  industries  from  migrating  from  highly  regulated  settings
(especially foreign firms from developed countries) to zones with much laxer laws
50
.  The flip
side of  this analysis is that if countries opt for standards that are too stringent  - and therefore
potentially too costly to comply with -  they may bid their zones out of  the competition to
attract foreign firms.
In  any  event,  more  consistent  implementation  of  regulations  and  supervision  are
recommended to assuage overall work health and safety concerns.  Addressing these issues
improves workers’ living standards and productivity while reducing absenteeism and labor turn-
over.
I.  Environmental Issues
Determining the toxicity boundaries of acceptable industrial pollution is difficult.  So is
consistent  and  thorough monitoring of  industrial discharges.    Two  factors  compound this
difficulty. Some in developing countries’ governments and business communities believe  that
industrialization and growth take precedence over environmental protection at an earlier stage of
50
Of course, the hypothesis of migrating polluting industries is a very contentious and as yet unsettled
issue and we do not claim here that such an event has occurred in the zones.
50
development.    From  these  quarters  the  country  often  inherits  diluted  concerns  about
environmental issues and weak or non-binding laws.  In cases where awareness regarding
environmental degradation has increased, such as Dominican Republic, weak monitoring by the
government and lack of environmental education at the firm level, make progress slow.
Several authors  (Kennett,  1990;  Dunn,1994;  Broad  and  Cavanaugh,  1993)  have
expressed concern with regards to the environmental damage caused by zone activities. Others
dismiss such concerns arguing that EPZ firms are not outliers compared to the domestic
industries (World Bank, 1992), which in light of  many developing countries’ lax attitude toward
environmental issues, is not reassuring.
We are not aware of a thorough and reliable documentation on the extent and gravity of
the problem.  One of the few articles on this area ( Kennett, 1990) reports on the EPZ firms
contaminating water supplies in the Dominican Republic.  Kennett also notes that while the
government recognizes the importance of sustainable development, environmental laws are
fragmented and monitoring institutions lack coordination and have no control over EPZs. J.
Alvarez   provided  a more complete view.  He stated  that the increase  in environmental
awareness started a long time ago and many private park operators have been working on
environmental protection measures for a long time
51
.
The  maquiladora  activities  on  the  Mexican-US  border  have  also  raised  concern
because of  the severe border pollution.  In a 1995 report, Mungaray describes the severe
water pollution the city of Tijuana faces.  She refers to several studies by the state’s offices
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested