51
showing that the discharges of the more than two hundred industries  located in the Industrial
City (maquiladoras), northeast of Tijuana, contain lead, aluminum, corrosive substances and a
high concentration of vegetable oils. Also the Alamar Creek, which is Tijuana’s only water
source,  is  contaminated  upstream  by  Tecate  sewage  and  the  maquiladoras’  discharges.
Furthermore, the reports point to the strong contamination of well waters that supply residents
downstream from the industrial city. The author faults the maquiladora owners as well as the
government for the severe pollution problems and lack of recycling and refuse disposal facilities
in Tijuana.
Overall,  awareness  with  regards  to  sustainable  development  and  environmental
protection is growing.  However, lack of binding laws, lack of active  monitoring by the
government  and  lack  of  education  slow  the  progress.    To  better  address  the  potential
environmental problems related to industrial activities (both EPZ and domestic), we need a
better qualitative and quantitative understanding of their impact.  The following steps would be
productive in this light:
1.  
Undertake site and industry specific analysis of  refuse composition.  Industrial refuse
affects water, soil, air, and thus human and wild life health.  For new EPZs and firms
wishing to join established EPZs this process can just be incorporated into the business
application forms.  Zone authorities can just request a disclosure by firms listing the
expected content and volume of their refuse.  For existing firms in established zones, a
brief survey by the management should provide the basic information.
51
For instance, some have voluntarily given up “acid-wash” processes for jeans because of the
consequent water and soil pollution. Others fly in their own consultants from the US to monitor
Convert pdf to html - SDK application service:C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
How to Convert PDF to HTML Webpage with C# PDF Conversion SDK
www.rasteredge.com
Convert pdf to html - SDK application service:VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
PDF to HTML Webpage Converter SDK for VB.NET PDF to HTML Conversion
www.rasteredge.com
52
The  same  procedure  could  be  adapted  for  domestic  firms,  with  both  new  and
established firms reporting to a domestic overseeing organization
52,53
.  
2.  
The national governments need to identify how and how much EPZ and domestic
industries  impact  their  environment  -  for  instance    in  terms  of  absolute  versus
incremental damage, toxic versus non-toxic levels of pollution, long term versus short
term impacts.   They can then draw up regulations, educate, provide incentives and
monitoring to optimize environmental protection.
J. EPZs and the Economic and Policy Environment
Overall  stable  and  business/FDI  friendly  economic  and  political  atmosphere  is  a
necessary first step and long term component for the success of EPZs.  Aside from including the
basic incentives described above, this stability includes political  continuity and sound macro-
economic and exchange rate policies.  Where there has been divergence from this basic
principle, the performance record of EPZs has suffered.  This correlation is even discernible in
the case of successful zones such as the ones in Mauritius.  Alter notes that “throughout the
EPZ’s  history,  its  development  closely  paralleled  movements  in  the  Mauritian  economy
(1991:8).”
The South Korean and Taiwanese zones were designed as part of an overall
economic reform program and performed well in this framework.  The Zairian EPZ plans were
emissions.
52
International organizations and developed countries could  cooperate with national entities to identify,
mitigate and even neutralize the negative environmental externalities.  One aspect of  this cooperation
would involve transfer of  technological and scientific know-how in identifying hazardous compounds.
A second aspect involves training nationals in identification, monitoring techniques and safe clean-up
and disposal of  hazardous and non-hazardous refuse.
SDK application service:Online Convert PDF to HTML5 files. Best free online PDF html
PDF to HTML converter library control is a 100% clean .NET document image solution, which is designed to help .NET developers convert PDF to HTML webpage using
www.rasteredge.com
SDK application service:VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.
PDF from RTF. Create PDF from Text. PDF Export. Convert PDF to Word (.docx). Convert PDF to Tiff. Convert PDF to HTML. Convert PDF to
www.rasteredge.com
53
however dashed once the political unrest gripped the country in the early 1990s. Actually all
private investment (domestic and international) virtually disappeared after 1990 and for a period
of several years. The promising start of the Togolais EPZ was stifled in the early 1990s, when
political unrest destabilized the country, but has made a come back since 1994.
There is however, disagreement about the actual policy paths governments take in
response to EPZs and their performances
54
.  There are two schools of thought on this issue. The
optimists argue that a successful zone
55
has a great deal of demonstration effect in an economy
that is not liberalized.  It highlights the impacts and benefits of pursuing outward oriented and
export promotion policies as a “growth and development” path.  As such, EPZs may play a
decisive role in encouraging trade policy reforms in the whole economy.  As examples, they use
the Mauritian and Dominican Republic success stories
The pessimists argue that successful EPZs may act as escape valve (in terms of creating
employment and providing foreign exchange)  for non-liberalizing host nations.  Then policy
makers and politicians may not feel pressured into enacting economy wide reforms, but rather
may continue with protectionist or import substitution policies.  The Tunisian EPFs may be a
case in point.  According to Felah (1994), they have been successful exporters:  in 1994 their
exports constituted 40 percent of national exports. They were also employing some 117,700
workers in 1993.  However, the author suggests that one of the major reasons for the lack of
integration (backward linkage/technology transfer) between EPZs and the Tunisian economy is
53
The discussion in footnote 43 applies directly to the issues of environmental protection as well.
54
On this general topic see also World Bank (1992).
SDK application service:VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF to MS Office Word in VB.NET. VB.NET Tutorial for How to Convert PDF to Word (.docx) Document in VB.NET. Best
www.rasteredge.com
SDK application service:C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
C# PDF - Convert PDF to JPEG in C#.NET. C#.NET PDF to JPEG Converting & Conversion Control. Convert PDF to JPEG Using C#.NET. Add necessary references:
www.rasteredge.com
54
that domestic firms have been subject to  national protectionist policies.  He suggests domestic
economic liberalization as a step towards enabling backward linkage.
Recently, some post -macro and trade- reform countries, disappointed in the tepid
response  of  foreign  direct  investments  to  their  ‘liberalized  economic  environment’  are
considering establishing / or have established EPZs (among other export promotion tools) to
bolster these flows.  Uganda is one such case.  However, other constraints may be the reasons
for lackluster FDI inflows. They include inadequate private property or labor laws, the domestic
endowment mix (labor education and productivity relative to real wages, industrialization level of
the country, natural resources), specific transportation disadvantages (e.g. being landlocked), or
absence of bilateral or multilateral preferential trade arrangements advantageous to investors.
Addressing the constraints directly would be more efficient to the economy in the long run.
Resorting to new distortionary trade policy tools such as an EPZ  would, indeed, raise
three potential problems.  First, it would introduce a discretionary, potentially protectionist,
factor into policy making.  Second,  these measures may not comply with the WTO mandates
and time-lines regarding export promotion measures.  Finally, even if the interventions are
deemed WTO acceptable, establishing an EPZ may not be the right interventionist tool to use
and may not resolve the unattractiveness of the country as an FDI destination.
55
A successful zone is one that reaches its expected (planned) target in all three areas: earn foreign direct
investment, provide jobs and act as a catalyst (demonstration effect).
SDK application service:VB.NET PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in vb.
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF to TIFF Using VB in VB.NET. Free VB.NET Guide to Render and Convert PDF Document to TIFF in Visual Basic Class.
www.rasteredge.com
SDK application service:C# PDF Convert to SVG SDK: Convert PDF to SVG files in C#.net, ASP
PDFDocument pdf = new PDFDocument(@"C:\input.pdf"); pdf.ConvertToVectorImages( ContextType.SVG, @"C:\demoOutput Description: Convert to html/svg files and
www.rasteredge.com
55
III. EPZs, Globalization, Regional Integration Agreements and WTO
A.  EPZs in the context of regional integration/trade arrangements
The recent renewed interest in the creation or  revival of regional trade/integration
arrangements (RTA/RIA) has raised questions regarding the potential status and role of EPZs in
such economic entities.  This relationship is multifaceted and complex.  Whether EPZ firms and
countries in which they operate would be hurt by the creation or revival of an RTA/RIA is not
only determined by the membership in or exclusion  from of their countries such an arrangement.
A host of dynamic global, regional, domestic and firm level forces may affect their performance.
These forces are briefly noted and discussed below.
1. 
Changes in global production and consumption patterns.
In the case of many consumer goods typically produced in EPZs, changes in consumer
preferences and the increased pressure to meet these changes as quickly as possible have
impacted  the  geographical  investment  choices  of  producers.    For  instance  in  the  highly
competitive garment industry, were speed  in production  and delivery is a  determinant  of
success, some argue that a production platform close to the final markets provides more
production flexibility, lower transportation costs and shorter delivery time.    These qualities may
well compensate the potential higher taxes or labor costs. An American garment producer
based his decision to move his production sites from Sri Lanka to Mexico on these reasons and
lower duties (ILO,1998) resulting from the enforcement of NAFTA.
The  impact  of  rapid  consumer  preference  changes  may  be  compounded  by  the
globalization of the production process.  This globalization of production, the easier movements
SDK application service:C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net
C#.NET PDF SDK - Convert PDF to TIFF in C#.NET. Online C# Tutorial for How to Convert PDF File to Tiff Image File with .NET XDoc.PDF Control in C#.NET Class.
www.rasteredge.com
SDK application service:C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
C#.NET PDF SDK - Convert PDF to Word in C#.NET. C#.NET DLLs and Demo Code: Convert PDF to Word Document in C#.NET Project. Add necessary references:
www.rasteredge.com
56
of capital and lower transportation time and costs, have facilitated segmentation of production
processes, reducing the need for country specific technical expertise.  This phenomenon has a
differential impact on industries as a function of their technical sophistication.  The need for
generic low-tech skills can be satisfied by a number of countries, providing producers a larger
selection of sites. This is the case for garment, which is a highly competitive, low profit margins
industry where technical expertise requirements and production processes are not sophisticated
and therefore do not entail country specific talents, but rather cheap and abundant labor.  It may
apply to a lesser degree to most low tech electronics and electrical assembly lines, which
together with garment, dominate production in most EPZs. It would not match the more highly
technical requirements of the chemical or high-end electronics industries in some EPZs such as
S. Korea and Taiwan.
2.
Relative competitiveness of incentives in the context of RTAs/RIAs.
Given the globalization of production and the segmentation of production processes,
countries may tend to rely on relative competitiveness of incentives to attract FDI.  These
incentives  include but  are  not limited  to  concessions  on  tariffs  and  duties,  generous  tax
advantages,  waivers  on  domestic  content  requirements,  and  being  signatories  to  trade
agreements (bilateral or regional) that provide preferential tariff treatments or market access to
prospective producers.
The role of EPZs in - and their contribution to - a regional integration process is not
clear-cut. Three alternative scenarios emerge, with potentially divergent final outcome.  Firms
may be attracted to EPZs in a regional arrangement that has preferential market access to non-
57
RIA/RTA members.  They would then use the RIA as an export platform to these export
markets (such as the US or EU). But then, preferential market access may also be granted to
individual countries as well and was one of the reasons for Mauritius' success in attracting firms.
So a regional arrangement may not be a key factor in the attractiveness of a zone in this case.
A second scenario is that firms intent to use the zone as a hub for production and sales
within the regional arrangement.  The argument is that such an enlarged market will render zones
more attractive for foreign and domestic private investment.  While this is a possibility, one
should be cautious about the complex rules of origin regulations embedded in many regional
agreements.   The administrative capacity necessary to draft and implement such regulations is
not a trivial,  neither is the potential reaction of regional partners to such rules. It have affected
the existence of several developing countries regional arrangements, including, most recently
SADC.  Negotiations among the SADC members came to an abrupt halt over the disagreement
on rules of origin regulations in June 1999.
Finally, zone firms may suffer because the country they are active in is excluded from an
RIA/RTA.  An ILO document reports that the preferential duty granted to Mexico since the
entry into force of NAFTA, together with the 1994 peso devaluation has placed the Caribbean
states at a disadvantage relative to Mexico.  According to the Caribbean Textile and Apparel
Institute, since the introduction of NAFTA, over 150 companies and 123,000 jobs have been
lost in the Caribbean apparel industry
56
.  The impact of NAFTA is not limited to the Caribbean
region however.  The ILO report suggests that the Asian apparel exports has also been
56
ILO, Labour Law and labour Relations Branch (LEG/REL).  1999.  Export Processing Zones.
http://www.ilo.org/public/english/80relpro/legrel/tc/epz/index.htm#global.
58
affected, with some international firms re-directing their investment to Mexico because to save in
time, transport costs and duties and despite the country’s much higher wage rates.
3.  Firm level factors in determining their success in an  RIA/RTAs environment.
Being inside an RIA/RTA doesn't necessarily mean that all zone firms in all industries
will benefit.  Several factors will affect the firms’ successful transition from pre to post –RIA
environment.  The firm productivity level and product mix, its ability to adapt to changing market
conditions and compete in a newly enlarged and more competitive internal market will be
important determinants in its success.  So is its ability to adapt to RIA/RTA regulations and
incentives (content requirements, etc...) .  The firms’  original market orientation – whether it
was mainly an exporter or had a domestic market inlet – and whether they intend on keeping
their orientation or will try to redirect their products will also impact their success.
Galhardi  (1997)  studies  these  factors  and  other  issues  related  to  the  Mexican
Maquiladoras.  She argues that in the case at hand, labor intensive, low tech maquiladoras
(traditional) will lose out because they are not well positioned to enter the domestic market and
Nafta’s effect on the wages will drive them to cheaper labor locations.  On the other hand, the
newer maquilas, those not centered on a corporate strategy based on cheap labor, and who
have already established a presence in the domestic markets will gain.  Basically, the survival of
the maquiladoras will be contingent on:
-   whether they already sell domestically or are gearing to do so.
-   whether they are not just low labor cost, assembly firms
-   whether they invest in their workers in the form of training and upgrading of skills
59
-   whether they are newer (higher tech) maquilas and therefore benefit from more updated
technologies or are more amenable to upgrading.
B.  The Uruguay Round, Export subsidies and EPZs.
This section first outline the Uruguay round Agreement on Subsidies and Countervailing
Measures.  A brief discussion on its potential relevance and impact on EPZs and countries in
which they operate follows.
1.  The Uruguay Round Agreement on Subsidies and Countervailing Measures
57
.
This WTO agreement was reached in the mid 1990s as part of the larger multilateral
trade negotiations
58
 It provides specific definitions, restrictions, time-lines and terms of action
and retaliation on the use of export subsidies.  These terms could affect incentives granted to
EPZ firms in developing countries.
The agreement considers an export subsidy "the full or partial exemption, remission, or
deferral specifically related to exports, of direct taxes or social welfare charges paid or payable
by industrial or commercial enterprises" (ibid.)
 
Here direct taxes are defined as "taxes on
57
Information from WTO, Agreement on Subsidies and Countervailing Measures, Full text and summary,
from WTO.com internet site.
58
The Uruguay round agreement went into effect in January 1995.
60
wages, profits, interests, rents, royalties, and all other forms of income, and taxes on ownership
of real property."  Annex 1 of the agreement provides an illustrative list of export subsidies
59
.
The agreement on subsidies and countervailing measures establishes that only a specific
subsidy - one targeted to one industry or a group of enterprises or industries within the
jurisdiction of the authority applying the subsidy 
60
- would be subject to disciplines or actions. It
further refines this definition by specifying three categories of subsidies: prohibited, actionable
and non-actionable.  Only the first two are subject to discipline.  Prohibited subsidies are "those
contingent,  in  law or fact,  whether solely or as  one  of  several  conditions, upon  export
performance; and those contingent, whether solely or as one of other conditions, upon the use
of domestic over imported goods" (WTO)
61
.
The agreement also defines actionable subsidies:  "no member should cause, through the
use of subsidies, adverse effect to the interests of other signatories, injury to the domestic
industry of other signatory, nullification or impairment of benefits accruing to other members
directly or indirectly to the other signatories of the GATT, and serious prejudice to the interests
of another member
62
". Affected members can take action against this type of injury
63
.
59
These include but are not limited to: transport or freight charge subsidies on export shipment provided
or mandated by the government; the provision by governments of export credit guarantees or
insurance programs at premiums that are inadequate to cover the long-term operating costs and losses
of the programs
59
.
60
Geographical as well as judicial or administrative delineation is made in the article 2 of the agreement.
61
Complaining members are to follow procedures or actions mirroring - with some slight divergences -
those described in footnote 7
62
Serious prejudice is deemed to occur in the case of some subsidies including the total ad valorem
subsidization of a product exceeding 5 per cent and subsidies to cover operating losses sustained by
an industry.  If case is proven, the injury causing member has to withdraw the subsidy or remove the
effect caused by subsidy.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested