my debt, aye, with life, if necessary; 
otherwise,  I  shall  be  no  better  than  a 
common  thief  purloining  my  food  all 
these  years.  I  shall  surely  use  all  my 
followers  against your sons in this coming 
war. I  cannot deceive you. Please forgive 
me."  
"But  yet,"  continued  he,  "I  cannot  have 
my  mother  plead  completely  in  vain.  Part 
with  Arjuna  to  me.  Either  he  or  myself 
must  die  in  this  war.  I  will  not  kill  your 
other  sons,  whatever  they  may  do  unto 
me. Mother of  warrior  sons,  you will still 
have  five  sons.  Either  I  or  Arjuna  will 
survive  this  war. And  with  the  other  four 
sons, you will still have five".  
When  Kunti  heard  her  first-born  speak 
thus  firmly,  adhering  to  the  kshatriya 
code, her heart was full of tumultuous and 
contrary  feelings  and,  without  trusting 
herself  to  speak.  She  embraced  him  and 
departed in silence.  
"Who  can  go  against  what  has  been 
ordained?" she  thought.  "He has, at  least, 
offered not to harm four of my sons. That 
is enough.  May God  bless  him," and she 
returned home. 
58. THE PANDAVA 
GENERALISSIMO 
GOVINDA  reached  Upaplavya  and  told 
the  Pandavas  what  had  happened  in 
Hastinapura.  
"I spoke  urging  what  was  right  and  what 
was also good for them. But, it was all in 
vain. There is now no way out except the 
fourth,  that  is,  the  last  alternative  of  war. 
The  foolish  Duryodhana  would  not  listen 
to the advice tendered to him by  the elders 
in the assembly. We must now prepare for 
war  without  delay.  Kurukshetra  is  waiting 
for the holocaust."  
"There  is  no  longer  any  hope  of  peace," 
said  Yudhishthira,  addressing  his  brothers, 
and  issued  orders  for  marshalling  their 
forces in, battle array.  
They  formed  the  army  in  seven  divisions 
and 
appointed 
Drupada, 
Virata, 
Dhrishtadyumna, 
Sikhandin, 
Satyaki, 
Chekitana  and  Bhimasena  at  the  head  of 
each  division.  They  then  considered  who 
should be appointed Generalissimo.  
Addressing  Sahadeva,  Yudhishthira  said: 
"We should select one of these seven to be 
Supreme  Commander.  He  should  be  one 
capable  of  successfully  facing  the  great 
Bhishma, who can burn enemies to ashes. 
He  should  be  one  who  knows  how  to 
dispose  his  forces  as  circumstances 
require  from  time  to  time.  Who  do  you 
think  is  most  fitted  for  this 
responsibility?"  
In  the  olden days, it  was the practice to 
ascertain  the  views  of  younger  people 
first,  before  consulting  elders.  This 
instilled  enthusiasm  and  self-confidence 
in  the  younger  folk.  If  the  elders  were 
consulted  first,  it  would  not  be  possible 
for  others  to  speak  with  freedom,  and 
even  honest  differences  of  opinion  might 
savor of disrespect.  
"Let us take as our Supreme Commander 
the king of Virata who helped us when we 
lived  in  disguise  and  with  whose  support 
we  now  demand  our  share  of  the 
kingdom," replied Sahadeva. 
"It seems to me best to make Drupada the 
Generalissimo,  for,  in  point  of  age, 
wisdom, courage, birth and strength, he is 
supreme," said Nakula.  
"Drupada,  the  father  of  Draupadi,  has 
learnt  archery  from  Bharadwaja,  and  has 
for  long  been  waiting  for  an  encounter 
with  Drona.  He  is much respected  by  all 
kings, and is supporting us, as if we were 
his  own  sons.  He  should  lead  our  army 
against Drona and Bhishma."  
Dharmaputra  then  asked  Dhananjaya  for 
his  opinion.  "I  think,  Dhrishtadyumna 
should be  our  chief in  the  battlefield. The 
hero who has his senses under control and 
who has been born to bring about Drona's 
Convert pdf to web form - SDK control project:C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
How to Convert PDF to HTML Webpage with C# PDF Conversion SDK
www.rasteredge.com
Convert pdf to web form - SDK control project:VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
PDF to HTML Webpage Converter SDK for VB.NET PDF to HTML Conversion
www.rasteredge.com
end.  Dhrishtadyumna  alone  can  withstand 
the  arrows  of  Bhishma  whose  skill  in 
archery  made  even  the  great  Parasurama 
hold back. He is the only man fitted to be 
our  commander.  I  can  think  of  no  one 
else," replied Arjuna.  
Bhimasena  said:  "O  king,  what  Arjuna 
says is true, but the rishis and elders have 
said  that  Sikhandin  has  come  into  the 
world  to  kill  Bhishma.  My  inclination 
would  be  to  give  the  command  to 
Sikhandin  whose  radiant  face  is  like  that 
of Parasurama. I do not think any one else 
can defeat Bhishma."  
Yudhishthira  finally  asked  Kesava  for  his 
opinion.  "The  warriors  mentioned  are, 
each  one  of  them,  worthy  of  selection," 
said Krishna. "Any one of them would fill 
the  Kauravas  with  fear.  All  things 
considered,  I  would  endorse  Arjuna's 
choice. 
Anoint 
Dhrishtadyumna, 
therefore, as your Supreme Commander." 
Accordingly,  Dhrishtadyumna,  Drupada's 
illustrious  son,  who  led  Draupadi  at  the 
swayamvara and gave her away to Arjuna, 
who  for thirteen  long  years was brooding 
over the insult that his sister had to suffer 
in  Duryodhana's  court,  and  who  was 
waiting  for  an  opportunity  to  avenge  the 
wrong, 
was 
anointed 
Supreme 
Commander of the Pandava army.  
The  lion-roar  of  warriors,  the  blowing  of 
conchs  and  shells  and  the  trumpeting  of 
elephants rent the air, With warlike cheers 
which  made  the  sky  ring,  the  Pandava 
army  entered  Kurukshetra  in  martial 
array.  
59. BALARAMA 
BALARAMA,  the  illustrious  brother  of 
Krishna,  visited  the  Pandavas,  in  their 
encampment.  As  Halayudha  (plough 
bearer),  clad  in  blue  silk,  entered 
majestically  like  a  lion.  Yudhishthira, 
Krishna  and  others  gave  the  broad-
shouldered  warrior  a  glad  welcome. 
Bowing to Drupada and Virata, the visitor 
seated himself beside Dharmaputra. 
"I  have  come  to  Kurukshetra,"  said  he, 
"learning  that  the  descendants  of  Bharata 
have  let  themselves  be  overwhelmed  by 
greed, anger and hatred and that the peace 
talks have broken down and that war has 
been declared." 
Overcome  by  emotion,  he  paused  for  a 
while  and  then  continued:  "Dharmaputra, 
dreadful destruction is ahead. The earth is 
going  to  is  a  bloody  morass  strewn  with 
mangled  bodies!  It  is  an  evil  destiny  that 
has  maddened  the  kshatriya  world  to 
foregather  here  to  meet  its  doom.  Often 
have  I  told  Krishna,  'Duryodhana  is  the 
same to us as the Pandavas. We may not 
take  sides  in  their  foolish  quarrels.'  He 
would not listen to me. His great affection 
for Dhananjaya has misled Krishna and he 
is with you in this war which I see he has 
approved.  How  can  Krishna  and  I  be  in 
opposite  camps?  For  Bhima  and 
Duryodhana,  both  of  them  my  pupils,  I 
have equal regard and love. How then can 
I support one against the other? Nor can I 
bear to see the Kauravas destroyed. I will 
therefore have nothing to do with this war, 
this  conflagration  that  will  consume 
everything.  This  tragedy  has  made  me 
lose all interest in the world and so I shall 
wander among holy places." 
Having thus  spoken  against the  calamitous 
war,  Krishna's  brother  left  the  place,  his 
heart  laden  with  sorrow  and  his  mind 
seeking consolation in God.  
This  episode  of  Balarama’s,  keeping  out 
of  the  Mahabharata  war  is  illustrative  of 
the  perplexing  situations  in  which  good 
and honest men often find themselves.  
Compelled to choose between two equally 
justifiable,  but contrary,  courses of action, 
the  unhappy  individual  is  caught  on  the 
horns of a dilemma. It is only honest men 
that  find  themselves  in  this  predicament. 
The  dishonest  ones  of  the  earth  have  no 
SDK control project:C#: How to Determine the Display Format for Web Doucment Viewing
RasterEdge web document viewer for .NET can convert PDF, Word, Excel into Bitmap, as well as SVG files at the same time, and then render image form to show
www.rasteredge.com
SDK control project:C#: How to Add HTML5 Document Viewer Control to Your Web Page
the necessary resources for creating web document viewer addCommand(new RECommand("convert")); _tabFile.addCommand new UserCommand("pdf"); _userCmdDemoPdf.
www.rasteredge.com
such  problems,  guided  as  they  are  solely 
by their own attachments and desires, that 
is, by self-interest.  
Not so the great men who have renounced 
all  desire.  Witness  the  great  trials  to 
which,  in  the  Mahabharata,  Bhishma, 
Vidura, Yudhishthira and Karna were put.  
We read in that epic how they solved their 
several  difficulties.  Their  solutions  did  not 
conform  to  a  single  moral  pattern  but 
reflected  their  several  individualities.  The 
conduct  of  each  was  the  reaction  of  his 
personality and character  to the  impact  of 
circumstances.  
Modern  critics  and  expositors  sometimes 
forget  this  underlying  basic  factor  and 
seek  to  weigh  all  in  the  same  scales, 
which  is  quite  wrong.  We  may  profit  by 
the  way  in  which,  in  the  Ramayana, 
Dasaratha, 
Kumbhakarna, 
Maricha, 
Bharata  and  Lakshmana  reacted  to  the 
difficulties  with  which  each  of  them  was 
faced.  
Likewise,  Balarama's  neutrality  in  the 
Mahabharata  war  has a  lesson. Only two 
princes  kept  out  of  that  war.  One  was 
Balarama  and  the  other  was  Rukma,  the 
ruler  of  Bhojakata.  The  story  of  Rukma, 
whose  younger  sister  Rukmini  married 
Krishna, is told in the next chapter.  
60. RUKMINI 
BHISHMAKA, the king of Vidarbha, had 
five  sons  and  an  only  daughter,  Rukmini, 
a princess of matchless beauty, charm and 
strength of character.  
Having heard  of  Krishna  and his  renown, 
she wished to be united to him in wedlock 
and the desire daily grew in intensity. Her 
relatives approved the idea, all except her 
eldest  brother  Rukma,  the  heir  apparent, 
between whom and Krishna there was no 
love lost.  
Rukma  pressed  his  father  not  to  give 
Rukmini  in  marriage  to  the  ruler  of 
Dwaraka  but  to  marry  her  instead  to 
Sisupala,  the  king  of  Chedi.  The  king 
being  old,  Rukma's  became  the  dominant 
voice  and  it  looked  as  though  Rukmini 
would be compelled to marry Sisupala. 
Rukmini,  whose  heart  was  wholly 
Krishna's  because  she  was  Lakshmi 
incarnate,  was  disconsolate.  She  feared 
that  her  father  would  be  helpless  against 
her domineering brother and would not be 
able to prevent the unhappy marriage.  
Mustering  all  her  strength  of  mind, 
Rukmini resolved  somehow to  find a way 
out of her  predicament. She took counsel 
with  a  brahmana  whom,  abandoning  all 
maidenly reserve, she sent as her emissary 
to  Krishna,  charging  him  to  explain 
matters to her beloved and sue for help. 
The 
brahmana 
accordingly 
went 
toDwaraka  and  conveyed  to  Krishna 
Rukmini's sad plight and her entreaty, and 
handed to him the letter Rukmini had sent 
through him. The letter ran as follows: 
"My  heart  has  already  accepted  you  as 
lord and master. I charge you therefore to 
come  and  succour  me  before  Sisupala 
carries me off by force. The matter cannot 
brook  any  delay;  so  you  must  be  here 
tomorrow.  Sisupala's  forces,  as  well  as 
Jarasandha's,  will  oppose  you  and  will 
have to be overcome before you can have 
me. May you  be the triumphant hero and 
capture  me!  My  brother  has  decided  to 
marry me to Sisupala  and, as part of the 
wedding  ceremonies,  I  am  going  to  the 
temple  along  with  my  retinue  to  offer 
worship to Parvati. That would be the best 
time  for  you  to  come  and  rescue  me.  If 
you do not turn up, I will put an end to my 
life so that I may at  least  join you in my 
next birth." 
Krishna  read  this  and  immediately 
mounted  his  chariot.  At the  king's  behest, 
Kundinapura, the capital of Vidarbha, was 
most 
gorgeously 
decorated 
and 
preparations  for  the  wedding  of  the 
princess with Sisupala were in full swing.  
SDK control project:C# PDF: How to Create PDF Document Viewer in C#.NET with
to images or svg file; Free to convert viewing PDF print designed PDF document using C# code; PDF document viewer can be created in C# Web Forms, Windows
www.rasteredge.com
SDK control project:C# PDF Convert to SVG SDK: Convert PDF to SVG files in C#.net, ASP
In some situations, it is quite necessary to convert PDF document into SVG image format. indexed, scripted, and supported by most of the up to date web browsers
www.rasteredge.com
The  bridegroom  elect  and  his  associates, 
all sworn enemies of Krishna, had already 
assembled  in  the  capital.  Balarama  came 
to  know  of  Krishna's  sudden  and  secret 
departure, all by himself.  
Guessing  that  it  must  be  about  the 
daughter  of  the  king  of  Vidarbha  and 
anxious lest Krishna should be hemmed in 
alone  by  mortal  enemies  thirsting  for  his 
blood,  he  hurriedly  assembled  a  great 
force and marched on to Kundinapura. 
Leaving  her  apartments,  Rukmini, 
accompanied  by  her  retinue,  went  in 
procession  to  the  temple,  where  divine 
service was held. 
"Oh  Devi,"  implored  Rukmini,  praying  for 
her intercession. "I prostrate myself before 
thee who knowest my devotion. Grant that 
Krishna may espouse me." 
Stepping  out  of  the  temple,  Rukmini 
sighted  Krishna's  chariot  and  ran  straight 
as  a needle  to  the  attracting  magnet. She 
fled  to  him  and got  into  his chariot. And 
Krishna  drove  off  with  her,  to  the 
bewilderment of all around.  
The  servants  ran  to  Rukma,  the  heir 
apparent, and related what had happened. 
"I  will  not  return  without  killing 
Janardana,"  swore  Rukma,  and  went  in 
pursuit of Krishna with a large force.  
But,  meanwhile,  Balarama  had  arrived 
with  his  army,  and  a  great  battle  ensued 
between the two opposing forces in which 
the  enemy  was  utterly  routed.  Balarama 
and  Krishna  returned  home  in  triumph, 
where  Rukmini's  wedding  with  Krishna 
was celebrated with customary rites.  
The  defeated  Rukma  was  ashamed  to 
return  to  Kundinapura  and  built  at  the 
very  site  of  the  battle  between  Krishna 
and  himself  a  new  city,  Bhojakata,  over 
which he ruled.  
Hearing of the  Kurukshetra  battle, Rukma 
arrived  there  with  a  huge  force.  Thinking 
that he could thereby win the friendship of 
Vasudeva,  he  offered  help  to  the 
Pandavas. 
"Oh  Pandavas,"  said  he  addressing 
Dhananjaya,  "the  enemy  forces  are  very 
large. I have come to  help you. Give  me 
the  word  and  I  shall  attack  whichever 
sector of the  enemy formation  you  would 
like  me  to.  I  have  the  strength  to  attack 
Drona,  Kripa  or  even  Bhishma.  I  shall 
bring you victory. Only let me know your 
wish." 
Turning  to  Vasudeva,  Dhananjaya 
laughed.  
"Oh, ruler of Bhojakata," said Arjuna, "we 
are  not  afraid  of  the  size  of  the  enemy 
forces. We have no need of your help and 
do  not  particularly  desire  it.  You  may 
either  go  away  or  stay  on,  just  as  you 
like."  
At this,  Rukma was  filled with  anger  and 
shame  and  went  to  Duryodhana's  camp 
with  his  army.  "The  Pandavas  have 
refused  my  proffered  assistance."  Said  he 
to  Duryodhana.  "My  forces  are  at  your 
disposal."  
"Is it not after the Pandavas rejected your 
assistance  that  you  have  come  here?" 
exclaimed  Duryodhana,  and  added:  "I  am 
not  in  such  dire need  yet  as  to  welcome 
their leavings."  
Rukma, thus put to disgrace by both sides, 
returned  to  his  kingdom  without  taking 
part in battle. Neutrality in war may be of 
several kinds.  
It  may  arise  from  conscientious  objection 
to war or it may be due to mere conceit 
and  self-interest.  Yet  others  may  keep 
aloof through cowardice or sheer inertia.  
Balarama  was  neutral  in  the  Mahabharata 
war because of his love of peace. Rukma, 
on the other hand, abstained as a result of 
his conceit.  
Instead of acting according to dharma, he 
thought of personal glory, and neither side 
would have him. 
61. NON-COOPERATION 
SDK control project:C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
C#.NET can manipulate & convert standard PDF developers to conduct high fidelity PDF file conversion C#.NET applications, like ASP.NET web form application and
www.rasteredge.com
SDK control project:C# Image: How to Integrate Web Document and Image Viewer
RasterEdgeImagingDeveloperGuide8.0.pdf: from this user manual, you can find the detailed instructions and Now, you may add a new Web Form to your web project.
www.rasteredge.com
IT was the day before the commencement 
of the great battle. The grandsire, now the 
Kaurava 
Generalissimo,  was 
with 
Duryodhana  seeking  to  inspire  him  with 
his own heroic spirit and cheerfulness.  
Bhishma  spoke  of  the  strength,  skill  and 
prowess  of  the  warriors  ranged  on  the 
Kauravas'  side.  Duryodhana  was  cheered 
up.  Presently,  Karna  became  the  subject 
of their talk. 
"Karna  has  earned  your  affection,"  said 
Bhishma, "but I do not think much of him. 
I  do  not  like  his  great  hatred  of  the 
Pandavas, and he is too boastful. There is 
no limit  to  his  arrogance and he  is  much 
given  to  disparaging  others.  I  would  not 
place  him  in  the  highest  rank  among  the 
warriors of the land. Besides, he has given 
away the divine armor with which he was 
born.  He  is  not  therefore  likely  to  be  of 
great  help to me in  this battle. The curse 
of  Parasurama  is  on  him  too.  His 
command  of  supernatural  weapons  will 
fail him in his hour of need, for he will not 
be able to remember the mantras. And the 
battle  that  will  ensue  between  him  and 
Arjuna will prove fatal for Karna."  
Thus  spoke  Bhishma  without  mincing 
matters,  and  this  was  exceedingly 
unpalatable to Duryodhana and Karna. To 
make  matters  worse,  Drona  agreed  with 
the grandsire and said: 
"Karna  is  full  of  pride  and 
overconfidence,  which  will  cause  him  to 
be  neglectful  of  the  finer  points  of 
strategy,  and  through  carelessness, he  will 
suffer defeat." 
Enraged  by  these  harsh  words,  Karna 
turned  to  the  grandsire with  flaming  eyes. 
"You  sir,"  said  he,  "have  always  slighted 
me  through  mere  dislike  and  envy  and 
have  never  neglected  an  opportunity  of 
humiliating  me,  though  I  gave  you  no 
reason. I  bore all  your  taunts  and thrusts 
for  the  sake  of  Duryodhana.  You  have 
said that I would not be of much help in 
the  impending  war.  Let  me  tell  you  my 
settled  conviction,  it  is  you,  not  I,  who 
will fail the Kauravas. Why hide your real 
feelings? The fact of the matter is that you 
have 
no 
genuine 
affection 
for 
Duryodhana,  but  he  does  not  know  it. 
Hating me you seek to come between me 
and  Duryodhana  and  poison  his  mind 
against  me.  And  in  furtherance  of  your 
wicked  design,  you  have  been  belittling 
my  strength  and  running  me  down.  You 
have  stooped  to  behavior  unworthy  of  a 
kshatriya.  Age  alone  does  not  confer  a 
title to  honor and respect among warriors, 
but  prowess  does.  Desist  from  poisoning 
our relations."  
Turning then to Duryodhana, Karna said: 
"Illustrious  warrior, think well  and look  to 
your own good. Do not place too great a 
reliance  on  the  grandsire.  He  is  trying  to 
sow  dissension  in  our  ranks.  His 
appraisement of me will injure your cause. 
By running me down, he seeks to dampen 
my enthusiasm. He has become senile and 
his time is up. His arrogance does not let 
him  have  regard  for  anyone  else.  Age 
must be respected  and experience is useful 
but, as the sastras warn us, there is a point 
when  age  becomes  senility  and  ripeness 
falls  into rottenness  and  decay.  You  have 
made  Bhishma  your  Generalissimo  who 
will,  I  have  no  doubt,  earn  some  fame 
from the heroic deeds of others. But I will 
not  bear  arms  while  he  is  in  command. 
Only after he has fallen will I do so." 
The  arrogant  man  is  never  conscious  of 
his own arrogance. When accused of it, he 
charges  the  accuser  with  that  very  fault. 
His judgment is  warped and he  considers 
it a crime on the part of anyone to  point 
out  his  defect.  This  is  well  illustrated  in 
this episode. 
Controlling  his  anger,  Bhishma  replied: 
"Son of Surya, we are in a crisis and that 
is  why  you  have  not  ceased  to  live  this 
moment. You have been the evil genius of 
SDK control project:C# Image: Save or Print Document and Image in Web Viewer
this. During the process, your web file will be automatically convert to PDF or TIFF file and then be printed out. Please
www.rasteredge.com
SDK control project:C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
and quickly convert a large-size multi-page PDF document to a group of high-quality separate JPEG image files within .NET projects, including ASP.NET web and
www.rasteredge.com
the  Kauravas."  Duryodhana  was  in 
distress. 
"Son  of  Ganga,  I  need  the  help  of  you 
both," he said. "You will both do deeds of 
great  heroism,  I  have  no  doubt.  At  the 
break of dawn, the  battle joins. Let there 
be no fighting among friends, with the foe 
in full force before us!" 
But Karna was adamant in that he  would 
not take up arms so long as Bhishma was 
in  supreme  command.  Duryodhana 
eventually  yielded  to  Karna  and  suffered 
him to carry out his threat. 
Karna kept out during the first ten days of 
the  battle,  though  all  his  men  participated 
in it. At the end of the tenth day, when the 
great  Bhishma  lay  on  the  battlefield 
covered all over with arrows, Karna went 
to  him  and  bowed  reverently  and  asked 
for  forgiveness  and  blessings,  which  he 
received. 
Thereafter,  Karna  cooperated  and  himself 
proposed  Drona  for  the  command  of  the 
Kaurava forces in  succession  to  Bhishma. 
When Drona also fell, Karna took over the 
command and led the Kaurava forces. 
62. KRISHNA TEACHES 
ALL  was  ready  for  the  battle.  The 
warriors  on  both  sides  gathered  together 
and  solemnly  bound  themselves  to  honor 
the traditional rules of war.  
The code of conduct in war and methods 
of  warfare  vary  from  time  to  time.  It  is 
only if what  was in  vogue at  the  time of 
the Mahabharata war is kept in mind that 
we  can  understand  the  epic.  Otherwise, 
the story would be puzzling in places. 
From  what  follows,  the  reader  may  have 
some idea of the rules of warfare followed 
in  the  Kurukshetra  battle.  Each  day,  the 
battle was over at sunset, and the hostiles 
mixed freely like friends.  
Single  combats  might  only  be  between 
equals and one could not use methods not 
in  accordance  with  dharma.  Thus  those 
who left the field or retired would not be 
attacked. A horseman could attack only a 
horseman, not one on foot.  
Likewise,  charioteers,  elephant troops  and 
infantrymen  could  engage  themselves  in 
battle  only with  their  opposite numbers  in 
the enemy ranks.  
Those  who  sought  quarter  or  surrendered 
were  safe  from  slaughter.  Nor  might  one, 
for  the  moment  disengaged,  direct  his 
weapons  against  another  who  was 
engaged in combat. 
It  was  wrong  to slay  one who had  been 
disarmed  or whose  attention was  directed 
elsewhere  or  who  was  retreating  or  who 
had lost his armor. And no shafts were to 
be  directed  against  non-combatant 
attendants  or  those  engaged  in  blowing 
conchs or beating drums.  
These  were  the  rules  that  the  Kauravas 
and  the  Pandavas  solemnly  declared  they 
would follow. 
The  passage  of  time  has  witnessed  many 
changes in men's ideas of right and wrong. 
Nothing  is  exempt  from  attack in modern 
warfare.  
Not only are munitions made the target of 
attack,  but  dumb  animals  such  as  horses, 
camels,  mules  and  medical  stores,  nay, 
non-combatants of all  ages, are destroyed 
without compunction. 
Sometimes  the  established  conventions 
went  overboard  even  in  the  Mahabharata 
war.  
We see clearly in the story that occasional 
transgressions  took  place  for  one  reason 
or  another.  But,  on  the  whole,  the 
accepted  rules  of  honorable  and  humane 
war  were  observed  by  both  sides  in  the 
Kurukshetra  battle.  And  the  occasional 
violations were looked upon as wrong and 
shameful. 
Addressing  the  princes  under  his 
command,  Bhishma  said:  "Heroes,  yours 
is a  glorious  opportunity.  Before you,  are 
the gates of heaven wide open. The joy of 
living  with  Indra  and  Brahma  awaits  you. 
SDK control project:C# TIFF: C#.NET Code to Create Online TIFF Document Viewer
We still demonstrate how to create more web viewers on PDF and Word documents at the DLL into your C#.NET web page, you may create a new Web Form (Default.aspx
www.rasteredge.com
Pursue  the  path  of  your  ancestors  and 
follow  the  kshatriya  dharma.  Fight  with 
joy  and  attain  fame  and  greatness.  A 
kshatriya does not  wish to die of  disease 
or old age in his bed but prefers to die on 
the  battlefield," and the princes responded 
by  ordering  their  trumpets to  be  sounded 
and shouted victory to the Kauravas.  
On  Bhishma's  flag  shone  brightly  the 
palm tree and five stars. On Aswatthama's 
the lion tail fluttered in the air.  
In  Drona's  golden-hued  standard,  the 
ascetic's bowl and  the bow glistened, and 
the  cobra  of  Duryodhana's  famed  banner 
danced proudly with outspread hood.  
On Kripa's flag was depicted a bull, while 
Jayadratha's carried a wild boar. Likewise 
others  and the battlefield thus presented a 
pageant of flags.  
Seeing the Kaurava forces ranged in battle 
array, Yudhishthira gave orders to Arjuna: 
"The enemy force is very large. Our army 
being  smaller,  our  tactics  should  be 
concentration  rather  than  deployment  that 
will  only  weaken  us.  Array  our  forces,  
therefore, in needle formation." 
Now,  when  Arjuna  saw  men  arrayed  on 
both  sides  for  mutual  slaughter,  he  was 
deeply agitated and Krishna spoke to him 
in  order  to quell  his agitation and  remove 
his doubts. 
Krishna's  exhortation  to  Arjuna  at  this 
juncture  is  the  Bhagavad  Gita,  which  is 
enshrined  in  millions  of  hearts  as  the 
Word  of  God.  The  Bhagavad  Gita  is 
acknowledged  by  all  as  one  of  the 
supreme treasures of human literature.  
Its  gospel  of  devotion  to  duty,  without 
attachment or desire of reward, has shown 
the  way  of life for all men, rich or poor, 
learned  or  ignorant,  who  have  sought  for 
light in the dark problems of life. 
63. YUDHISHTHIRA SEEKS 
BENEDICTION 
EVERYTHING  was  ready  for  the  battle 
to  begin.  At  this  tense  moment,  both 
armies  saw  with  amazement  Yudhishthira, 
the  steadfast  and  brave  son  of  Pandu, 
suddenly doff his armor and put away his 
weapons.  Descending  from his  chariot,  he 
proceeded on foot towards the commander 
of the Kaurava forces.  
"What  is  this  that  Yudhishthira  is  doing?" 
asked  everyone  and  was  puzzled  by  this 
sudden  and  silent  proceeding  on  the  part 
of the Pandava. 
Dhananjaya  too  was  perplexed  and  he 
jumped down  from his chariot and  ran  to 
Yudhishthira.  The  other  brothers  and 
Krishna also joined.  
They  feared  that  perhaps  Yudhishthira, 
surrendering  to  his  natural  inclination,  had 
suddenly  decided  to  seek  peace  on  any 
terms and was going forward to announce 
this. 
"King,  why  are  you  proceeding  to  the 
enemy's  lines in this strange manner? You 
have told us nothing. The enemy  is ready 
for  battle, their soldiers sheathed in armor 
and  with  uplifted  weapons.  But  you  have 
doffed your armor and thrown  aside  your 
weapons  and  are  proceeding  forward, 
unattended and on foot. Tell us what  you 
are  about."  Thus  said  Arjuna  to 
Dharmaputra.  But  Yudhishthira  was 
immersed  in  deep  thought  and  proceeded 
forward silently.  
Then  Vasudeva,  who  knew  the  hearts  of 
men, smiled and said: "He is going to the 
elders  to  ask  for  their  benediction  before 
commencing  this  terrible  fight.  He  feels  it 
is  not  right  to  start  such  a  grave 
proceeding  without  formally  taking  such 
benediction  and  permission.  He  goes  to 
the grandsire to take his blessing and that 
of Dronacharya. So he goes unarmed. It is 
right  that  he  does  this.  He  knows 
proprieties.  It  is  only  thus  that  we  might 
fare well in this battle." 
The  men  in  Duryodhana's  army,  when 
they  saw  Yudhishthira  advancing  with 
hands  clasped  in  humble  attitude,  thought: 
"Here  is  the  Pandava  coming  to  sue  for 
peace,  frightened  at  our  strength.  Truly 
this  man  brings  disgrace  to  the  race  of 
kshatriyas.  Why  was  this  coward  born 
among  us?"  Thus  did  they  talk  among 
themselves  reviling  Dharmaputra  though 
delighted  at  the  prospect  of  securing 
victory without a blow. 
Yudhishthira  went  through  the  lines  of 
soldiers  armed  from  head  to  foot  and 
proceeded straight  to  where Bhishma was 
and, bending low and  touching  his feet  in 
salutation, said:  
"Grandsire,  permit  us  to  begin  the  battle. 
We have dared to give battle to you, our 
unconquerable 
and 
incomparable 
grandsire.  We  seek  benediction  before 
beginning the fight." 
"Child,"  replied the grandsire, "born in the 
race of Bharatas, you have acted worthily 
and according to our code of conduct. It 
gives  me  joy  to  see  this.  Fight  and  you 
will have victory. I am not a free agent. I 
am  bound  by  my  obligation  to  the  king 
and  must  fight  on  the  side  of  the 
Kauravas. But you will not be defeated." 
After  thus  obtaining  the  permission  and 
the  blessings 
of  the 
grandsire, 
Yudhishthira  went  to  Drona  and 
circumambulated  and bowed, according to 
form,  to  the  acharya,  who  also  gave  his 
blessings, saying: 
"I am under inescapable obligations to the 
Kauravas,  O  son  of  Dharma.  Our vested 
interests  enslave  us  and  become  our 
masters. Thus have I become bound to the 
Kauravas.  I  shall  fight  on  their  side.  But 
yours will be the victory." 
Yudhishthira  similarly  approached  and 
obtained  the blessings of Kripacharya and 
uncle  Salya  and  returned  to  the  Pandava 
lines. 
The  battle  began,  commencing  with  single 
combats between the leading chiefs armed 
with  equal  weapons. Bhishma and  Partha, 
Satyaki  and  Kritavarma,  Abhimanyu  and 
Brihatbala,  Duryodhana  and  Bhima, 
Yudhishthira 
and 
Salya, 
and 
Dbrishtadyumna  and  Drona  were  thus 
engaged in great battles.  
Similarly,  thousands  of  other  warriors 
fought  severally  according  to  the  rules  of 
war of those days.  
Besides  these  numerous  single  combats 
between  renowned  warriors,  there  was 
also 
indiscriminate 
fighting 
among 
common  soldiers.  The  name  of  "sankula 
yuddha"  was  given  to  such  free  fighting 
and 
promiscuous 
carnage. 
The 
Kurukshetra  battle  witnessed  many  such 
"sankula"  fights  wherein  countless  men 
fought and died  in the mad lust of  battle. 
On  the  field  lay  piles  of  slaughtered 
soldiers,  charioteers, elephants  and horses. 
The  ground  became  a  bloody  mire  in 
which  it  was  difficult  for  the  chariots  to 
move about. In modern battles there is no 
such  thing  as  single  combats.  It  is  all 
"sankula." 
The  Kauravas  fought  under  Bhishma's 
command  for  ten  days.  After  him,  Drona 
took  the  command.  When  Drona  died, 
Karna succeeded to the  command. Karna 
fell  towards  the  close  of  the  seventeenth 
day's  battle.  And  Salya  led  the  Kaurava 
army on the eighteenth and last day. 
Towards the latter part of the battle, many 
savage and unchivalrous deeds were done. 
Chivalry  and  rules  of  war  die  hard,  for 
there  is  an  innate  nobility  in  human 
nature.  But  difficult  situations  and 
temptations arise which men are too weak 
to  resist,  especially  when  they  are 
exhausted  with  fighting  and  warped  with 
hatred and bloodshed.  
Even  great  men  commit  wrong  and  their 
lapses  thereafter  furnish  bad  examples  to 
others,  and  dharma  comes  to  be 
disregarded  more  and  more  easily  and 
frequently.  Thus  does  violence  beget  and 
nourish  adharma  and  plunge  the  world  in 
wickedness. 
64. THE FIRST DAY'S BATTLE 
DUHSASANA  was  leading  the  Kaurava 
forces and Bhimasena did the same on the 
Pandava  side.  The  noise  of  battle  rolled 
and  rent  the  air.  The  kettledrums, 
trumpets, horns and conchs  made the sky 
ring with their clamor. 
Horses  neighed,  charging  elephants 
trumpeted  and  the  warriors  uttered  their 
lion-roars.  Arrows  flew  in  the  air  like 
burning  meteors.  Fathers  and  sons,  uncles 
and nephews slew one another forgetful of 
old  affection  and  ties of  blood.  It  was  a 
mad and terrible carnage. In  the forenoon 
of  the first  day's  battle  the Pandava army 
was  badly  shaken.  Wherever  Bhishma's 
chariot went, it was like the dance of the 
destroyer.  Abhimanyu  could  not  bear  this 
and  he  attacked  the  grandsire.  When  the 
oldest and the youngest warriors thus  met 
in  battle,  the  gods  came  to  watch  the 
combat.  Abhimanyu's  flag,  displaying  the 
golden  karnikara  tree  brightly  waved  on 
his chariot.  
Kritavarma was  hit  by one  of  his  arrows 
and  Salya  was  hit  five  times.  Bhishma 
himself  was  hit  nine  times  by 
Abhimanyu's 
shafts. 
Durmukha's 
charioteer  was  struck  by  one  of 
Abhimanyu's  sword-edge  arrow  and  his 
severed head rolled on the ground.  
Another  broke  Kripa's  bow.  Abhimanyu's 
feats  brought  down  showers  of  flowers 
from  the  gods  who  looked  on.  Bhishma 
and  the warrior supporting him  exclaimed: 
"Indeed, a worthy son to Dhananjaya!" 
Then  the  Kaurava  warriors  made  a 
combined attack on  the valiant youth. But 
he stood against them all. He parried with 
his  own  all  the  shafts  discharged  by 
Bhishma.  
One of his well-aimed arrows brought the 
grandsire's  palm  tree  flag  down.  Seeing 
this,  Bhimasena  was  overjoyed  and  made 
a  great  lion-roar  that  further  inspired  the 
valiant  nephew.  Great  was  the  grandsire's 
joy,  seeing  the  valor  of  the  young  hero. 
Unwillingly,  he  had  to  use  his  full 
strength  against  the  boy.  Virata,  his  son 
Uttara,  Dhrishtadyumna,  the  son  of 
Drupada  and  Bhima  came  to  relieve  the 
young  hero  and  attacked  the  grandsire 
who then turned his attentions on them.  
Uttara, the son of Virata, rode an elephant 
and led a fierce  charge on  Salya. Salya's 
chariot horses were trampled to death and 
thereupon he hurled a javelin at Uttara. It 
went with unerring aim and pierced him in 
the chest.  
The goad he had in his hand dropped and 
he rolled down dead. But the elephant did 
not  withdraw.  It  continued  charging  until 
Salya  cut  off  its  trunk and  hit it  in many 
places with his arrows. And then it uttered 
a  loud  cry  and  fell  dead.  Salya  got  into 
Kritavarma's car. 
Virata's  son  Sveta  saw  Salya  slay  his 
younger  brother.  His  anger  rose,  like  fire 
fed  by  libations  of  butter.  And  he  drove 
his  chariot  towards  Salya.  Seven  chariot 
warriors  at  once  came  up  in  support  of 
Salya and protected him from all sides.  
Arrows were showered on Sveta and the 
missiles  sped  across  like  lightning  in 
clouds. 
Sveta 
defended 
himself 
marvelously.  He  parried  their  shafts  with 
his  own  and  cut  their  javelins  down  as 
they  sped  towards  him.  The  warriors  in 
both  armies  were  amazed  at  the  skill 
displayed  by  Sveta.  Duryodhana  lost  no 
time now and sent forces to relieve Salya. 
Whereupon  there  was  a  great  battle. 
Thousands  of  soldiers  perished,  and 
numerous  were  the  chariots  broken  and 
the  horses  and  elephants  killed.  Sveta 
succeeded in putting Duryodhana's men to 
flight and he pushed forward and attacked 
Bhishma.  
Bhishma's  flag  was  brought  down  by 
Sveta.  Bhishma,  in  his  turn,  killed Sveta's 
horses  and  charioteer.  There  upon,  they 
hurled  javelins  at  one  another  and  fought 
on.  
Sveta took a mace, and swinging it, sent it 
at  Bhishma's  car  which  was  smashed  to 
pieces. But the grandsire, even before the 
mace  dashed  against  the  chariot,  had 
anticipated it and jumped down. From the 
ground he pulled the string of his bow to 
his  ear  and  sent  a  fatal  arrow  at  Sveta. 
Sveta was struck and fell dead. Duhsasana 
blew his horn and danced in joy. This was 
followed by a great attack on the Pandava 
army by Bhishma. 
The  Pandava  forces  suffered  greatly  on 
the  first  day  of  the  battle.  Dharmaputra 
was  seized  with  apprehension,  and 
Duryodhana's  joy  was  unbounded.  The 
brothers  came  to  Krishna  and  were 
engaged in anxious consultations. 
"Chief  among  Bharatas,"  said  Krishna  to 
Yudhishthira,  "do  not  fear.  God  has 
blessed  you  with  valiant  brothers.  Why 
should  you entertain  any doubts?  There is 
Satyaki and there are Virata, Drupada and 
Dhrishtadyumna,  besides  myself.  What 
reason is there for you to be dejected? Do 
you  forget  that  Sikhandin  is  awaiting  for 
his  predestined  victim  Bhishma?"  Thus 
did Krishna comfort Yudhishthira.  
65. THE SECOND DAY 
THE  Pandava  army,  having  fared  badly 
on  the  first  day  of  the  battle, 
Dhrishtadyumna, 
the 
Generalissimo, 
devised measures  to  avoid  a repetition  of 
it. On the second day, the army was most 
carefully  arrayed and  everything  was done 
to instil confidence.  
Duryodhana,  filled  with  conceit  on 
account  of  the  success  on  the  first  day, 
stood  in  the  center  of  his  army  and 
addressed his warriors. 
"Heroes in armor", he said in a loud voice, 
"our victory is assured. Fight and care not 
for life." 
The Kaurava army, led by Bhishma, again 
made strong attack on the Pandava forces 
and  broke  their  formation,  killing  large 
numbers. 
Arjuna,  turning  to  Krishna,  his  charioteer, 
said: "If we continue in this way, our army 
will  soon  be  totally  destroyed  by  the 
grandsire.  Unless  we  slay  Bhishma,  I  am 
afraid we can not save our army." 
"Dhananjaya, then get  ready.  There  is the 
grandsire's  chariot,"  replied  Krishna,  and 
drove straight towards him. 
The chariot sped forward  at a great pace. 
The  grandsire  sent  his  shafts  welcoming 
the  challenge.  Duryodhana  had  ordered 
his  men  to  protect  the  grandsire  most 
vigilantly  and  never  to  let  him  expose 
himself to danger.  
Accordingly,  all  the  warriors,  supporting 
the  grandsire,  at  once  intervened  and 
attacked Arjuna  who,  however, fought  on 
unconcerned.  
It  was  well  known  that  there  were  but 
three on the Kaurava side who could stand 
against Arjuna with any chance of success 
the  grandsire  Bhishma,  Drona  and  Karna. 
Arjuna  made  short  work  of  the  warriors, 
who intervened in support of Bhishma.  
The  way  in  which  he  wielded  his  great 
bow  on  this  occasion,  extorted  the 
admiration  of  all the  great generals in the 
army.  His  chariot  flashed  hither  and 
thither  sundering  hostile  ranks  like  forked 
lightning,  so rapidly that the  eye  ached  to 
follow its career. 
Duryodhana's  heart  beat  fast  as  he 
watched  this  combat.  His  confidence  in 
the great Bhishma began to be shaken. 
"Son  of  Ganga,"  Duryodhana  said,  "it 
seems as if even while you and Drona are 
alive  and  fighting,  this  irresistible 
combination  of  Arjuna  and  Krishna  will 
destroy  our  entire  army.  Karna  whose 
devotion  and  loyalty  to  me  are  most 
genuine stands aside and does not fight for 
me only because of you. I fear I shall be 
deceived  and  you  will  not  take  steps 
quickly to destroy Phalguna (Arjuna)." 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested