The gods came down to watch the combat 
between Bhishma and Arjuna. These were 
two of the greatest warriors on earth. Both 
chariots were drawn by white steeds.  
From either  side flew arrows in countless 
number.  Shaft  met  shaft  in  the  air  and 
sometimes  the  grandsire's  missile  hit 
Arjuna's  breast  and  that  of  Madhava 
(Krishna).  And  the  blood  flowing  made 
Madhava  more  beautiful  than  ever  as  he 
stood like a green palasa tree in full bloom 
with crimson flowers. 
Arjuna's wrath rose when he saw his dear 
charioteer  hit  and  he  pulled  his  bow  and 
sent  well-aimed  arrows  at  the  grandsire. 
The combatants were equal and the battle 
raged for a long while.  
In  the  movements the  chariots made  they 
were so  close to one another and moved 
about so fast that it was not possible to say 
where  Arjuna  was  and  where  Bhishma. 
Only the flag could be distinguished.  
As  this  great  and  wonderful  scene  was 
enacted in one part of the field, at another 
place  a  fierce  battle  was  being  fought 
between  Drona  and  his  born  enemy 
Dhrishtadyumna,  the  son  of  the  king  of 
the Panchalas and brother of Draupadi.  
Drona's  attack  was  powerful  and 
Dhrishtadyumna  was  wounded  badly.  But 
the  latter  retaliated  with  equal  vigor  and 
with  a grin of hatred he shot arrows and 
sped other missiles at Drona.  
Drona  defended  himself  with  great  skill. 
He  parried  the  sharp  missiles  and  the 
heavy  maces  hurled  at  him  with  his 
arrows and broke them to pieces even as 
they sped in the air.  
Many  times  did  Dhrishtadyumna's  bow 
break,  hit  by  Drona's  arrows.  One  of 
Drona's  arrows  killed  the  Panchala 
prince's 
charioteer. 
Thereupon 
Dhrishtadyumna  took  up  a  mace  and, 
jumping  down  from  the  chariot,  went 
forward on foot.  
Drona sent an arrow that brought the mace 
down.  Dhrishtadyumna  then  drew  his 
sword  and  rushed  forward  like  a  lion 
springing  on  its  elephant prey.  But  Drona 
again  disabled  him  and  prevented  his 
advance.  
Just  then  Bhima, who  saw the  Panchala's 
predicament,  sent  a shower  of  arrows  on 
Drona  and  carried  Dhrishtadyumna  to 
safety in his chariot. 
Duryodhana  who  saw  this  sent  the 
Kalinga  forces  against  Bhimasena.  Bhima 
killed  the  Kalinga  warriors  in  great 
number. Like Death itself he moved about 
among his enemies and felled them to the 
ground. So fierce was the destruction that 
the entire army trembled in fear.  
When  Bhishma  saw  this,  he  came  to 
relieve  the  Kalingas.  Satyaki,  Abhimanyu 
and other warriors came up in support of 
Bhima.  One  of  Satyaki's  shafts  brought 
Bhishma's charioteer  down  and the horses 
of  Bhishma's  chariot,  left  uncontrolled, 
bolted  carrying  Bhishma  away  from  the 
field.  
The  Pandava  army  was  wild  with 
enthusiasm  when  Bhishma's  chariot  sped 
thus out of the field. They took advantage 
of  the  situation  and  made  a  fierce  attack 
on the Kaurava army.  
Great  was  the  loss  the  Kaurava  army 
suffered  in that  day's  battle as a result  of 
Arjuna's  deeds  of  valor.  The  generals  of 
the  Kaurava  army  were  greatly  perturbed 
and  their  previous  day's  enthusiasm  had 
all disappeared.  
They  eagerly  looked  forward  to  sunset 
when there would be  an end to the day's 
battle.  As  the  sun  sank  in  the  west, 
Bhishma said to Drona: "It is well we stop 
the  fighting  now.  Our  army  is 
disheartened and weary." 
On the  side of  the Pandavas, Dhananjaya 
and others returned in great cheer to their 
camp,  with  bands  playing.  At  the  end  of 
the second day's battle, the Kauravas were 
Convert pdf form to html - Library application class:C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
How to Convert PDF to HTML Webpage with C# PDF Conversion SDK
www.rasteredge.com
Convert pdf form to html - Library application class:VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
PDF to HTML Webpage Converter SDK for VB.NET PDF to HTML Conversion
www.rasteredge.com
in the mood that the Pandavas were in the 
previous evening.  
66. THE THIRD DAY'S BATTLE 
ON the morning of the third day Bhishma 
arrayed  his  army  in  eagle  formation  and 
himself  led  it  while  Duryodhana  and  his 
forces protected the rear. So great was the 
care  taken  over  every  detail  that  the 
Kauravas were certain that there could be 
no mishap for them that day.  
The  Pandavas  too  arrayed  their  forces 
with 
skill. 
Dhananjaya 
and 
Dhrishtadyumna  decided  in  favor  of  a 
crescent  formation  of  their  army  so  as 
more  effectually  to  cope  with  the  eagle 
formation of the enemy's forces.  
On  the  right  horn  of  the  crescent  stood 
Bhima  and on the left Arjuna, leading the 
respective  divisions.  The  battle  began.  All 
arms  were  at  once  engaged  and  blood 
flowed  in  torrents  and  the  dust  that  was 
raised  by  chariots,  horses  and  elephants 
rose to hide the sun.  
Dhananjaya's  attack  was powerful  but  the 
enemy  stood  firm.  A  counter-attack  was 
made  by  the  Kauravas  concentrating  on 
Arjuna's  position.  Javelins  and  spears  and 
other  missiles  flew  in  the  air  shining  like 
forked lightning in a thunderstorm.  
Like  a  great  cloud  of  locusts  the  shafts 
covered  Arjuna's  chariot.  But  with 
amazing  skill  he  raised  a  moving 
fortification  around  his  chariot  with 
arrows  discharged  in  an  unending  stream 
from his famous bow.  
At another point Sakuni  led a large  force 
against  Satyaki  and  Abhimanyu.  Satyaki's 
chariot was broken to pieces and he had to 
scramble  up  Abhimanyu's  chariot  and 
thereafter  both  fought  from  the  same 
chariot.  
They were able to destroy Sakuni's forces. 
Drona  and  Bhishma  jointly  attacked 
Dharmaputra's  division  and  Nakula  and 
Sahadeva joined  their brother  in  opposing 
Drona's offensive.  
Bhima  and  his  son  Ghatotkacha  attacked 
Duryodhana's  division  and  in  that  day's 
battle the son appeared to excel his great 
father in valor.  
Bhima's  shafts hit Duryodhana  and  he lay 
in  swoon  in  his  chariot.  His  charioteer 
quickly  drove  the  chariot  away  from  the 
scene.  He feared  that  the  Kaurava  forces 
would  be  completely  demoralised  if  they 
saw that the prince had been disabled.  
But  even  this  movement  created  great 
confusion.  Bhimasena  took  full  advantage 
of  the  position and  worked havoc  among 
the fleeing Kaurava forces. 
Drona  and  Bhishma  who  saw  the 
discomfiture  and  confusion  of  the 
Kaurava  army  came  up  quickly  and 
restored  confidence.  The  scattered  forces 
were  brought  together  and  Duryodhana 
was again seen leading them. 
"How  can  you  stand  thus,"  said 
Duryodhana  to  the  grandsire,  "looking  on 
when  our forces are  scattered and put to 
disgraceful flight? I  fear  you are  too  kind 
to the Pandavas. Why did you not tell me 
frankly 
'I 
love 
the 
Pandavas; 
Dhrishtadyumna  and  Satyaki  are  my 
friends  and  I  cannot attack or  slay them.' 
You  should  have  stated  the  position 
explicitly to me. Surely these men are not 
equal to you. And if you were so minded, 
you  could  deal  with  them  easily.  Even 
now, it  would  be best  if  you  and  Drona 
told me frankly your mind in the matter." 
The  chagrin of  defeat, and the knowledge 
that the grandsire disapproved of his ways 
made Duryodhana speak thus bitterly. But 
Bhishma  merely  smiled  and  said:  "Wasn't 
I  quite  frank  in  my  advice  to  you?  That 
advice you rejected when you decided on 
war.  I tried to prevent the  war but,  now 
that  it  has  come,  I am fulfilling my duties 
by  you  with  all  my  might.  I  am  an  old 
man  and  what  I  am  doing  is  quite  my 
utmost." 
Library application class:VB.NET PDF Form Data Read library: extract form data from PDF in
RasterEdge .NET PDF SDK is such one provide various of form field edit functions. Demo Code to Retrieve All Form Fields from a PDF File in VB.NET.
www.rasteredge.com
Library application class:C# PDF Form Data Read Library: extract form data from PDF in C#.
A best PDF document SDK library enable users abilities to read and extract PDF form data in Visual C#.NET WinForm and ASP.NET WebForm applications.
www.rasteredge.com
Saying  thus,  the  grandsire  resumed  his 
operations.  The  turn  of  events  in  the 
forenoon had been so much in their favor 
that  the  delighted  Pandavas  were  now 
somewhat careless.  
They  did  not  expect  Bhishma  to  rally  his 
forces and attack them again. But stung by 
Duryodhana's  reproaches,  the  grandsire 
raged about the field like a destroying fire.  
He rallied his men and delivered the most 
severe  attack  yet  made  on  the  Pandava 
army. The latter thought that the grandsire 
had  multiplied  himself  into  a  number  of 
Bhishmas  fighting  at  several  points.  So 
swift were his movements that afternoon.  
Those  who  opposed  him  were  struck 
down and perished like months in the fire. 
The Pandava army was thoroughly broken 
and  began  to  scatter.  Vasudeva,  Partha 
and  Sikhandin  tried  hard  to restore order 
and confidence, but were unsuccessful.  
"Dhanjaya,"  said  Krishna,  "now  has  the 
critical  time  come.  Be  true  to  your 
decision  not  to  flinch  from  your  duty  to 
kill  in  battle  Bhishma,  Drona  and  all  the 
other  friends  and  relatives  and  respected 
elders.  You  have  pledged  yourself  to  it 
and  you  have  now  to  carry  it  out. 
Otherwise  our  army  is  lost  beyond 
redemption.  You  must  now  attack  the 
grandsire." 
"Drive on," said Arjuna.  
As  Dhananjaya's chariot  sped on  towards 
Bhishma,  it  met  a  hot  reception  from  the 
grandsire, who covered it with his arrows.  
But,  Arjuna  bent his bow  and discharged 
three shafts that broke the grandsire's bow. 
Bhishma picked up another bow but it too 
met  the  same  fate.  The  grandsire's  heart 
was gladdened when he saw Arjuna's skill 
in archery. 
"Hail,  brave  warrior!"  applauded  the 
grandsire, even as, taking up another bow; 
he  poured  shafts  on  Arjuna's  chariot  with 
unerring aim. 
Krishna was not happy at the way Arjuna 
met  the  attack.  The  grandsire's  bow  was 
working  fiercely.  But  Arjuna's  hands  did 
not do their best, for his heart was not in 
it.  
He  had  too  much  regard  for  his  great 
grandsire.  Krishna  thought  that,  if  Arjuna 
went  on  like  this,  the  army,  which  had 
been so badly demoralized already, would 
be utterly destroyed and all would be lost.  
Krishna  managed  the  chariot  skilfully,  but 
in spite of it, both he and Arjuna were hit 
many times by Bhishma's arrows.  
Janardana's  (Krishna)  anger  rose.  "I  can 
stand  this  no  longer,  Arjuna.  I  shall  kill 
Bhishma  myself  if  you will  not do it!"  he 
exclaimed, and dropping the reins, he took 
up his  discus and  jumped down  from the 
chariot  and  dashed  forward  towards 
Bhishma. 
Bhishma  was  far from being perturbed at 
this.  On  the  contrary,  his  face  expanded 
with ecstatic joy. "Come, come, Oh Lotus-
eyed One!" he exclaimed.  
"I bow to you, Oh Madhava. Lord of the 
World, have you indeed come down from 
the  chariot  for  my  sake?  I  offer  you  my 
life.  If  I  be  slain  by  you,  I  shall  be 
glorified in the three worlds. Give me that 
boon. May your hands take this life away 
and save me for eternity." 
Arjuna  was  distressed  to  see  this.  He 
jumped  down  and  ran  after  Krishna. 
Overtaking  him  with  great  difficulty,  he 
entreated Krishna to turn back. 
"Do  not  lose  your  patience  with  me. 
Desist  and  I  promise  not  to  flinch,"  he 
said, and persuaded Krishna to return. The 
chariot  reins  were  again  in  Krishna's 
hands. Arjuna attacked the Kaurava forces 
furiously  and  thousands  were  slain  by 
him. 
The Kauravas suffered a severe defeat on 
the  evening  of  the  third  day.  As  they 
returned  to  their  camps  in  torchlight,  they 
said  to  one  another:  "Who  can  equal 
Library application class:VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.
C#: Convert PDF to HTML; C#: Convert PDF to Jpeg; C# File: Compress PDF; C# File: Merge PDF; C# Protect: Add Password to PDF; C# Form: extract value from fields;
www.rasteredge.com
Library application class:C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
C# PDF - Convert PDF to JPEG in C#.NET. C#.NET PDF to JPEG Converting & Conversion Control. Convert PDF to JPEG Using C#.NET. Add necessary references:
www.rasteredge.com
Arjuna?  There  is  nothing  strange  in  his 
being  victorious."  So  marvelous  was 
Arjuna's prowess that day. 
67. THE FOURTH DAY 
THE battle was very much the same every 
day  and  the  narrative  is  one  of 
monotonous  fighting  and  killing.  Still,  the 
great  battle  is  the  central  event  in  the 
Mahabharata  and,  if  we  skip  over  it,  we 
cannot  fully understand the epic heroes of 
that crowded stage.  
At  break  of  day,  Bhishma  arrayed  the 
Kaurava  forces  again.  Surrounded  by 
Drona,  Duryodhana  and  others,  the 
grandsire  looked  verily  like  great  Indra, 
holding  his  thunder  bolt,  surrounded  by 
the devas.  
The  Kaurava  army,  with  its  chariots, 
elephants  and  horses  all  arrayed  in  battle 
order  and  ready  for  the  fight,  presented 
the  appearance  of  the  sky  in  a  great 
thunderstorm. 
The  grandsire  gave  orders  for  advance. 
Arjuna  watched  the  hostile  movements 
from  his  chariot,  whereon  the  Hanuman 
flag was waving, and he too got ready.  
The  battle  commenced.  Aswatthama, 
Bhurisravas, Salya, Chitrasena and the son 
of  Chala  surrounded  Abhimanyu  and 
attacked  him.  The  warrior  fought  like  a 
lion opposing five elephants.  
Arjuna  saw  this  combined  attack  on  his 
son  and,  with  a  wrathful  lion  roar  joined 
his  son  whereat  the  tempo  of  fighting 
flared  up.  Dhrishtadyumna  also  arrived 
with a large force. The son of Chala was 
killed.  
Chala  himself  now  joined  and  he  with 
Salya,  made  a  strong  attack  on 
Dhrishtadyumna.  The  latter's  bow  was 
severed  into  two  by  a  sharp  missile 
discharged by Salya. 
Abhimanyu saw this and sent a shower of 
arrows  on  Salya  and  put  him  in  such 
danger  that  Duryodhana  and  his  brothers 
rushed  to  Salya's  help.  Bhimasena  also 
appeared on the scene at this juncture.  
When  Bhima  raised  his  mace  aloft, 
Duryodhana's  brothers  lost  courage. 
Duryodhana,  who  saw  this,  was 
exceedingly  angry  and  immediately 
charged  against  Bhima  with  a  large  force 
of elephants.  
As  soon  as  Bhima  saw  the  elephants 
coming up, he descended from his chariot, 
iron  mace  in  hand,  attacked  them  so 
fiercely  that  they  scattered  in  a  wild 
stampede,  throwing  the  Kaurava  ranks 
into disorder.  
It  will  be  seen  that  even  in  our  Puranic 
stories elephants fared as badly in battle as 
they did in the wars of the Greeks and the 
Romans.  Bhima's  attack  on  the  elephants 
was  like  Indra's  devastating  onslaught  on 
the winged mountains.  
The slaughtered elephants lay dead on the 
field  like  great  hills.  Those  that  escaped 
fled in panic and caused great havoc in the 
Kaurava  army,  trampling  numerous 
soldiers  in  their  wild  race.  Duryodhana, 
thereupon, ordered  a  wholesale  attack  on 
Bhima.  
But he stood firm as a rock and presently, 
the Pandava warriors came up and joined 
him.  A  number  of  Duryodhana's  arrows 
struck  Bhima's  chest  and  he  climbed  up 
his chariot again.  
"Visoka,  now  is  the  glad  hour,"  said 
Bhima  to  his  charioteer.  "I  see  a number 
of Dhritarashtra's sons before me, ready to 
be shaken down like ripe fruits on a tree. 
Keep  your  hold  well  on  the  reins  and 
drive  on.  I  am  going  to  dispatch  these 
wretches  to  Yama's  abode."  Bhima's 
arrows  would  have  killed  Duryodhana 
then  and  there,  had  it  not  been  for  his 
armor.  
Eight  of  Duryodhana's  brothers  were slain 
in that day's battle by Bhima. Duryodhana 
fought  fiercely.  Bhima's  bow  was 
smashed  by  one  of  Duryodhana's  arrows. 
Library application class:VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF to MS Office Word in VB.NET. VB.NET Tutorial for How to Convert PDF to Word (.docx) Document in VB.NET. Best
www.rasteredge.com
Library application class:VB.NET PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in vb.
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF to TIFF Using VB in VB.NET. Free VB.NET Guide to Render and Convert PDF Document to TIFF in Visual Basic Class.
www.rasteredge.com
Taking  up  a  fresh  bow,  Bhima  sent  an 
arrow  with  a  knife-edge  at  Duryodhana 
that cut the latter's bow into two.  
Not baffled by this, Duryodhana took up a 
fresh  bow  and  discharged  a  well-aimed 
shaft  which  struck  Bhima  on  his  chest 
with  such  force  that  he  reeled  and  sat 
down.  
The Pandava warriors now poured a great 
shower  of  arrows  on  Duryodhana. 
Ghatotkacha, who saw his father sit dazed 
with  the  force  of  the  blow,  got 
exceedingly angry and fell on the Kaurava 
army,  which  was  unable  to  stand  against 
his onslaught. 
"We  cannot  fight  this  Rakshasa  today." 
said  Bhishma  to  Drona.  "Our  men  are 
weary. It is nearing sunset and at night of 
the  Rakshasas  grows  stronger  with  the 
darkness.  Let  us  deal  with  Ghatotkacha 
tomorrow." 
The  grandsire  ordered  his  army  to  retire 
for  the  night.  Duryodhana  sat  musing  in 
his tent, his eyes filled with tears. He had 
lost  many  of  his  brothers  in  that  day's 
battle. 
"Sanjaya," 
exclaimed 
Dhritarashtra. 
"Every day, you  give me nothing  but  bad 
news.  Your  tale  has  ever  been  one  of 
sorrow, of defeat and loss of dear ones! I 
cannot  stand  this  any  more.  What 
stratagem can  save  my  people?  How  are 
we going to win in this fight? Indeed, I am 
full of fear. It seems fate is more powerful 
than human effort." 
"King "  said Sanjaya in reply, "is this  not 
all  the  result  of  your  own folly? Of  what 
avail  is  grief?  How  can  I  manufacture 
good news for you? You should hear the 
truth with fortitude." 
"Ah!  Vidura's  words  are  coming  true," 
said  the  blind  old  king,  plunged  in  great 
grief. 
68. THE FIFTH DAY 
"I AM like a shipwrecked man seeking to 
save  himself  by  swimming  in  a  storm 
tossed  ocean.  I  shall  surely  drown, 
overwhelmed in this sea of sorrow." 
Again and again, when Sanjaya related the 
happenings  of  the  great  battle, 
Dhritarashtra  would  thus  lament,  unable 
to bear his grief. 
"Bhima  is  going  to  kill  all  my  sons,"  he 
said. "I do not believe there is anyone with 
prowess enough in our army to protect my 
sons  from  death.  Did  Bhishma,  Drona, 
Kripa  and  Aswatthama  look  on 
unconcerned  when  our  army  fled  in 
terror?  What  indeed  is  their  plan?  When 
and  how  are  they  going  to  help 
Duryodhana? How are my sons to escape 
from destruction?" 
Saying  thus,  the  blind  old  king  burst  into 
tears.  
"Calm  yourself,  King,"  said  Sanjaya.  "The 
Pandavas  rest  on  the  strength  of  a  just 
cause. So, they win. Your sons are brave 
but  their  thoughts  are  wicked.  Therefore, 
luck does not favor them. They have done 
great  injustice  to  the  Pandavas,  and  they 
are  reaping  the  harvest  of  their  sins.  The 
Pandavas  are  not  winning  by  charms  or 
magic  incantations.  They  are  fighting 
according  to  the  practice  of  kshatriyas. 
Their cause being just, they have strength. 
Friends  advised  you,  but  you  discarded 
wise  counsel.  Vidura,  Bhishma,  Drona 
and  I  tried  to  stop  you  in  your  unwise 
course,  but  you  did  not  listen  and  you 
went  on.  Like  a  foolish  sick  man  who 
refuses  to  drink  bitter  medicine,  you 
obstinately  refused  to  follow  our  advice, 
which  would  have  saved  your  people, 
preferring  to  do  as  your  foolish  son 
desired.  You  are  in  distress  now.  Last 
night,  Duryodhana  asked  Bhishma  the 
same question as you put to me now. And 
Bhishma  gave  the  same  answer as I  give 
you." 
When  the  fighting  was  stopped  on  the 
evening  of  the  fourth  day,  Duryodhana 
Library application class:C# PDF Convert to SVG SDK: Convert PDF to SVG files in C#.net, ASP
PDFDocument pdf = new PDFDocument(@"C:\input.pdf"); pdf.ConvertToVectorImages( ContextType.SVG, @"C:\demoOutput Description: Convert to html/svg files and
www.rasteredge.com
Library application class:C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net
C#.NET PDF SDK - Convert PDF to TIFF in C#.NET. Online C# Tutorial for How to Convert PDF File to Tiff Image File with .NET XDoc.PDF Control in C#.NET Class.
www.rasteredge.com
went  by  himself  to  Bhishma's  tent  and, 
bowing reverently, said: 
"Grandsire, the world  knows that you are 
a warrior who knows not fear. The same is 
the  case  with Drona,  Kripa,  Aswatthama, 
Kritavarma, 
Sudakshin, 
Bhurisravas, 
Vikarna  and  Bhagadatta.  Death  has  no 
terror  for  these  veterans.  There  is  no 
doubt, the prowess of these great warriors 
is  limitless,  even  like  your  own.  All  the 
Pandavas combined cannot defeat any one 
of  you.  What  then  is  the  mystery  behind 
this daily defeat of our army at the hands 
of the sons of Kunti?" 
Bhishma  replied:  "Prince,  listen  to  me.  I 
have  given  you  advice  on  every occasion 
and told you what was good for you. But, 
you  have  always  refused  to  follow  what 
your elders counselled you to do. Again, I 
tell  you  that  it  is  best  for  you  to  make 
peace with Pandu's sons. For your good as 
well  as for  that  of  the  world,  that  is  the 
only  course  that  should  be  followed. 
Belonging  to  the  same  royal  house,  you 
can all enjoy this vast country as yours. I 
gave you  this  advice, but you disregarded 
it  and  have  grievously  wronged  the 
Pandavas, the fruit of which  you are now 
reaping.  The  Pandavas  are  protected  by 
Krishna  himself.  How  then  can  you  hope 
for  victory?  Even  now,  it  is  not  loo  late 
for  making  peace and  that is  the  way  to 
rule  your  kingdom,  making  the  Pandavas, 
your  powerful  brothers,  friends  instead  of 
enemies.  Destruction  awaits  you  if  you 
insult  Dhananjaya  and  Krishna,  who  are 
none other than Nara and Narayana." 
Duryodhana  took  leave  and  went  to  his 
tent, but he could not sleep that night. 
The battle was resumed the next morning. 
Bhishma  arrayed  the  Kaurava  forces  in a 
strong  formation.  So  did  Dhrishtadyumna 
for the Pandava army.  
Bhima  stood  at  the  head  of  the  advance 
lines  as  usual.  And  Sikhandin, 
Dhrishtadyumna  and  Satyaki  stood 
behind,  securely  guarding  the  main  body, 
aided by other generals.  
Dharmaputra  and  the  twin  brothers  held 
the  rear.  Bhishma  bent  his  bow  and 
discharged  his  shafts.  The  Pandava  army 
suffered  greatly  under  the  grandsire's 
attack. 
Dhananjaya  saw  this  and  retaliated  by 
fierce  shafts  aimed  at  Bhishma. 
Duryodhana  went  to  Drona  and 
complained  bitterly  according  to  his 
custom.  
Drona  upbraided  him  severely:  "Obstinate 
prince,  you  talk  without  understanding. 
You  are  ignorant  of  the  Pandavas' 
strength. We are doing our best."  
Drona's  powerful  attack  on  the  Pandava 
army was too much for Satyaki who was 
meeting  it  and  Bhima  therefore turned  his 
attentions  to  Drona.  The  battle  grew 
fiercer  still.  Drona,  Bhishma  and  Salya 
made a combined attack on Bhima.  
Sikhandin  supported  Bhima  by  pouring  a 
shower of arrows on Bhishma. As soon as 
Sikhandin  stepped  in,  Bhishma  turned 
away. For Sikhandin was born a girl, and 
Bhishma's principles did not permit him to 
attack a woman.  
In the end, this same objection proved to 
be  the  cause  of  Bhishma's  death.  When 
Drona  saw  Bhishma  turn  away,  he 
attacked  Sikhandin  fiercely  and  compelled 
him to withdraw. 
There was a promiscuous battle the whole 
of  the  morning  of  the  fifth  day,  and  the 
slaughter  was  terrific.  In  the  after  noon, 
Duryodhana  sent  a  large  force to  oppose 
Satyaki.  
But  Satyaki  destroyed  it  completely  and 
advanced 
to 
attack 
Bhurisravas. 
Bhurisravas,  who  was  a  powerful 
opponent,  put  Satyaki's men  to fight, and 
pressed Satyaki himself so fiercely that he 
was in distress.  
Satyaki's  ten  sons saw their father's plight 
and sought to relieve him  by launching an 
offensive 
against 
Bhurisravas, 
but 
Bhurisravas  undaunted  by  numbers, 
opposed the combined attack and was not 
to  be shaken. His well-aimed darts broke 
their  weapons  and  they  were  all  slain, 
strewn on the field like so many tall trees 
struck  down  by  lightning.  Satyaki,  wild 
with  rage  and  grief,  drove  forward  at  a 
furious pace to slay Bhurisravas.  
The  chariots  of  the  two  warriors  dashed 
against each other and crumbled to pieces. 
And  the  warriors stood face to face with 
sword  and  shield  in  desperate  single 
combat. 
Then, Bhima came and took away Satyaki 
by force into his chariot and drove away. 
For Bhima  knew  that Bhurisravas was  an 
unrivalled swordsman and he did not want 
Satyaki to be slain. 
Arjuna  killed  thousands  of  warriors  that 
evening.  The  soldiers,  dispatched  against 
him  by  Duryodhana,  perished  like  moths 
in  the  fire.  As  the  sun  went  down  and 
Bhishma gave orders to cease fighting, the 
princes  on  the  Pandava  army  surrounded 
Arjuna and greeted him with loud cries of 
admiration and victory. 
The armies on both sides retired to camp, 
along with the tired horses and elephants.  
69. THE SIXTH DAY 
ACCORDING  to  Yudhishthira's  order 
Dhrishtadyumna  arrayed  the  Pandava 
army  in  makara  (fish)  formation  for  the 
sixth day's battle. The Kaurava army  was 
arrayed in krauncha (heron) formation.  
We  know,  how,  similarly,  names  were 
given  to  physical  exercise,  asanas,  or 
postures. Vyuha was the general name for 
battle  array.  Which  Vyuha  was  best  for 
any  particular  occasion,  depended  on  the 
requirements  of  the  offensive  and 
defensive plans of the day.  
What the  strength and composition of the 
forces  arrayed  should  be  and  what 
positions  they  should  take  up  were 
decided upon, according to the situation as 
it developed from time to time.  
The sixth day was marked by a prodigious 
slaughter,  even  in  the  first  part  of  the 
morning.  Drona's  charioteer  was  killed 
and  Drona  took  the  reins  of  the  horses 
himself and used his bow as well.  
Great was the destruction he effected. He 
went  about  like  fire  among  cotton  heaps. 
The  formations  of both armies were  soon 
broken  and  indiscriminate  and  fierce 
fighting went on. Blood  flowed  in torrents 
and the field was covered by dead bodies 
of  soldiers,  elephants  and  horses  and  the 
debris of chariots. 
Bhimasena  pierced  the  enemy's  lines  to 
seek out Duryodhana's brothers and finish 
them. They, for their part, did not wait to 
be  sought,  but  rushed  on  him,  in  a 
combined  attack  from  all  sides.  He  was 
attacked  by  Duhsasana,  Durvishaha, 
Durmata,  Jaya,  Jayatsena,  Vikarna, 
Chitrasena, 
Sudarsana, 
Charuchitra, 
Suvarma,  Dushkarna  and  others,  all 
together.  
Bhimasena,  who  did  not  know  what  fear 
was,  stood up  and  fought  them  all.  They 
desired to take him prisoner and he to kill 
them all on the spot.  
The  battle  raged  fiercely,  even  like  the 
ancient  battle  between  the  gods  and  the 
asuras. Suddenly, the son of Pandu lost his 
patience  and  jumped  down  from  his 
chariot,  mace  in  band,  and  made  straight 
on  foot  for  the  sons  of  Dhritarashtra,  in 
hot haste to slay them. 
When  Dhrishtadyumna  saw  Bhima's 
chariot  disappear  in  the  enemy  lines,  he 
was  alarmed  and  rushed  to  prevent 
disaster.  He  reached  Bhima's  car,  but 
found  it  was  occupied  only  by  the 
charioteer  and  Bhima was  not  in  it. With 
tears in his eyes, he  asked the charioteer: 
"Visoka,  where  is  Bhima  dearer  to  me 
than  life?"  Dhrishtadyumna  naturally 
thought Bhima had fallen. 
Visoka  bowed  and  said  to  the  son  of 
Drupada: "The son of Pandu asked me to 
stay  here  and,  without  waiting  for  my 
reply  rushed  forward  on  foot,  mace  in 
hand, into the enemy ranks."  
Fearing 
that 
Bhima 
would 
be 
overpowered  and  killed  Dhrishtadyumna 
drove  his  chariot  into  the  enemy  lines  in 
search  of  Bhimasena,  whose  path  was 
marked by the bodies of slain elephants.  
When  Dhrishtadyumna  found  Bhima,  he 
saw  him  surrounded  on  all  sides  by 
enemies  fighting  from  their  chariots. 
Bhima  stood  against  them  all,  mace  in 
hand, wounded all over and breathing fire.  
Dhrishtadyumna  embraced  him  and  took 
him into his chariot and proceeded to pick 
out  the  shafts that had stuck in his body. 
Duryodhana  now  ordered  his  warriors  to 
attack  Bhimasena  and  Dhrishtadyumna 
and  not  to  wait  for  them  to  attack  or 
challenge.  
Accordingly,  they  made  a  combined 
attack even  though they  were  not inclined 
to  engage  themselves  in  further  fighting. 
Dhrishtadyumna  had  a  secret  weapon, 
which  he  had  obtained  from  Dronacharya 
and,  discharging  it,  threw  the  enemy 
forces into a stupor.  
But  Duryodhana  then  joined  the  fray  and 
discharged weapons  to  counter the stupor 
weapons  of  Dhrishtadyumna.  Just  then, 
reinforcements  sent  by  Yudhishthira 
arrived.  
A  force  of  twelve  chariots  with  their 
retinue  led by  Abhimanyu  came  upon  the 
scene to support Bhima.  
Dhrishtadyumna  was  greatly  relieved 
when he saw this. Bhimasena had also by 
now  refreshed  himself  and  was  ready  to 
renew  the  fight.  He  got  into  Kekaya's 
chariot  and  took  up  his  position  along 
with the rest.  
Drona, however, was terrible that day. He 
killed  Dhrishtadyumna's  charioteer  and 
horses  and  smashed  his  chariot  and 
Drupada's  son  had  to  seek  a  place  in 
Abhimanyu's  car.  The  Pandava  forces 
began to waver and Drona was cheered by 
the Kaurava army. 
Indiscriminate  mass  fighting  and  slaughter 
went on that day. At one time, Bhima and 
Duryodhana  met  face  to  face.  The  usual 
exchange of hot words took place and was 
followed by a great battle of archery.  
Duryodhana  was  hit  and  fell  unconscious. 
Kripa  extricated  him  with  great  skill  and 
took  him  away  in  his  own  chariot. 
Bhishma  personally  arrived  at  the  spot 
now and led the  attack and scattered the 
Pandava forces.  
The  sun  was  sinking,  but  the  battle  was 
continued for an hour yet and  the  fighting 
was  fierce  and  many  thousands  perished. 
Then the  day's  battle  ceased. Yudhishthira 
was  glad  that  Dhrishtadyumna  and  Bhima 
returned to camp alive. 
70. THE SEVENTH DAY 
DURYODHANA,  wounded  all  over  and 
suffering  greatly,  went  to  Bhishma  and 
said:  
"The  battle  had  been  going  against  us 
every day. Our formations are broken and 
our  warriors  are  being  slain  in  large 
numbers.  You  are  looking  on  doing 
nothing." 
The  grandsire  soothed  Duryodhana  with 
comforting words:  
"Why do you let yourself be disheartened? 
Here  are  all  of  us,  Drona,  Salya, 
Kritavarma, 
Aswatthama, 
Vikarna, 
Bhagadatta,  Sakuni,  the  two  brothers  of 
Avanti,  the  Trigarta  chief,  the  king  of 
Magadha,  and  Kripacharya.  When  these 
great  warriors are  here,  ready to give  up 
their  lives  for  you,  why  should  you  feel 
downhearted?  Get  rid  of  this  mood  of 
dejection." 
Saying this, he issued orders for the day. 
"See  there,"  the  grandsire  said  to 
Duryodhana.  "These  thousands  of  cars, 
horses and horsemen, great war elephants, 
and  those  armed  foot  soldiers  from 
various kingdoms are all ready to fight for 
you.  With  this  fine  army,  you  can 
vanquish even the gods. Fear not."  
Thus  cheering  up  the  dejected 
Duryodhana,  he  gave  him  a  healing  balm 
for  his  wounds.  Duryodhana  rubbed  it 
over  his  numerous  wounds  and  felt 
relieved. 
He  went  to  the  field,  heartened  by  the 
grandsire's words of confidence. The army 
was that day arrayed in circular formation. 
With  each  war  elephant  were  seven 
chariots fully equipped. 
Each  chariot  was  supported  by  seven 
horsemen.  To  each  horseman  were 
attached  ten  shield  bearers.  Everyone 
wore armor.  
Duryodhana  stood  resplendent  like  Indra 
at  the  center  of  this  great  and  well-
equipped  army.  Yudhishthira  arrayed  the 
Pandava  army  in  vajravyuha.  This  day's 
battle  was  fiercely  fought  simultaneously 
at many sectors.  
Bhishma  personally  opposed  Arjuna's 
attacks.  Drona  and  Virata  were  engaged 
with  each  other  at  another  point. 
Sikhandin  and  Aswatthama  fought  a  big 
battle at another sector.  
Duryodhana  and  Dhrishtadyumna  fought 
with  each  other  at  yet  another  point. 
Nakula and Sahadeva attacked their uncle 
Salya.  The  Avanti  kings  opposed 
Yudhamanyu,  while  Bhimasena  opposed 
Kritavarma,  Chitrasena,  Vikarna  and 
Durmarsha.  
There  were  great  battles  between 
Ghatotkacha  and  Bhagadatta,  between 
Alambasa 
and 
Satyaki, 
between 
Bhurisravas  and  Dhrishtaketu,  between 
Yudhishthira  and  Srutayu  and  between 
Chekitana and Kripa.  
In  the  battle  between  Drona  and  Virata, 
the latter was worsted and he had to climb 
into  the  chariot  of  his  son  Sanga,  having 
lost  his  own  chariot,  horses  and 
charioteer.  
Virata's  sons  Uttara  and  Sveta  had  fallen 
in  the  first  day's  battle.  On  this  seventh 
day, Sanga also was slain just as his father 
came up to his side.  Sikhandin, Drupada's 
son, was defeated by Aswatthama.  
His  chariot  was  smashed  and  he  jumped 
down and stood sword and shield in hand. 
Aswatthama  aimed  his  shaft  at  his  sword 
and  broke  it.  Sikhandin  then  whirled  the 
broken sword and hurled it at Aswatthama 
with  tremendous force, but it was met by 
Aswatthama's arrow.  
Sikhandin, badly beaten, got into Satyaki's 
chariot  and  retired.  In  the  fight  between 
Satyaki and Alambasa, the former had the 
worst  of  it  at  first  but  later  recovered 
ground and Alambasa had to flee. 
In the  battle between Dhrishtadyumna and 
Duryodhana, the horses of the latter were 
killed  and  he  had  to  alight  from  his 
chariot.  He,  however,  continued  the  fight, 
sword in hand. Sakuni came then and took 
the prince away in his chariot.  
Kritavarma  made  a  strong  attack  on 
Bhima  but  was  worsted.  He  lost  his 
chariot  and  horses  and  acknowledging 
defeat,  fled  towards  Sakuni's  car,  with 
Bhima's  arrows  sticking  all  over  him, 
making  him  look  like  a  porcupine 
speeding away in the forest. 
Vinda  and  Anuvinda  of  Avanti  were 
defeated  by  Yudhamanyu,  and  their 
armies  were  completely  destroyed. 
Bhagadatta  attacked  Ghatotkacha  and  put 
to flight all his supporters.  
But,  alone,  Ghatotkacha stood and  fought 
bravely. But in the end, he too had to save 
himself  by  flight,  which  gladdened  the 
whole Kaurava army. 
Salya  attacked  his  nephews.  Nakula's 
horses were killed and he  had to join his 
brother  in  the  latter's  chariot.  Both 
continued  the  fight  from  the  same  car. 
Salya  was  hit  by  Sahadeva's  arrow  and 
swooned.  The  charioteer  skilfully  drove 
the car away and saved Salya.  
When  the  Madra  king  (Salya)  was  seen 
retreating  from  the  field  Duryodhana's 
army lost heart and the twin sons of Madri 
blew  their  conchs  in  triumph.  Taking 
advantage  of  the  situation,  they  inflicted 
heavy damage on Salya's forces. 
At  noon,  Yudhishthira  led  an  attack  on 
Srutayu.  The  latter's  well-aimed  arrows 
intercepted  Dharmaputra's  missiles,  and 
his armor was pierced and he was severely 
wounded. 
Yudhishthira  then lost his temper and  sent 
a  powerful  arrow  that  pierced  Srutayu's 
breast-plate.  That  day,  Yudhishthira  was 
not his normal self and burnt with anger.  
Srutayu's  charioteer  and  horses  were 
killed and the chariot was smashed and he 
had  to  flee  on  foot  from  the  field.  This 
completed 
the 
demorahsation 
of 
Duryodhana's army.  
In  the  attack  on  Kripa,  Chekitana,  losing 
his  chariot  and  charioteer,  alighted  and 
attacked  Kripa's  charioteer  and  horses 
with mace in hand and killed them.  
Kripa  also  alighted,  and  standing  on  the 
ground,  discharged  his  arrows.  Chekitana 
was  badly  hit.  He  then  whirled  his  mace 
and hurled it at Kripacharya, but the latter 
was  able  to  intercept  it  with  his  own 
arrow.  
Thereupon  they  closed  with  each  other, 
sword  in  hand.  Both  were  wounded  and 
fell on the ground, when Bhima came and 
took  Chekitana  away  in  his  chariot. 
Sakuni  similarly  took  wounded  Kripa 
away in his car.  
Ninety-six  arrows  of  Dhrishtaketu  struck 
Bhurisravas.  And  the  great  warrior  was 
like  a  sun  radiating  glory,  as  the  arrows, 
all  sticking  in  his  breast-plate,  shone 
bright  around  his  radiant  face.  Even  in 
that  condition,  he  compelled  Dhrishtaketu 
to  admit  defeat  and  retire.    Three  of 
Duryodhana's 
brothers 
attacked 
Abhimanyu  who  inflicted  a  heavy  defeat 
on  them  but  spared  their  lives,  because 
Bhima had sworn to kill them. Thereupon, 
Bhishma attacked Abhimanyu. 
Arjuna saw  this  and  said  to his  illustrious 
charioteer: "Krishna, drive the car towards 
Bhishma." 
At  that  moment,  the  other  Pandavas  also 
joined Arjuna. But the grandsire was able 
to  hold  his  own  against  all  five  until  the 
sunset,  and  the  battle  was  suspended  for 
the  day.  And  the  warriors  of  both  sides, 
weary and  wounded, retired to their tents 
for  rest  and  for  having  their  injuries 
attended to. 
After  this,  for  an  hour,  soft  music  was 
played, soothing the warriors to their rest. 
That  hour  was  spent,  says  the  poet, 
without a word about war or hatred. It was 
an  hour  of  heavenly  bliss,  and  it  was  a 
glad sight to see. One can see herein what 
the great lesson of the Mahabharata is. 
71. THE EIGHTH DAY 
WHEN  the  eighth  day  dawned,  Bhishma 
arrayed  his  army  in  tortoise  formation. 
Yudhishthira said to Dhrishtadyumna: 
"See  there,  the  enemy  is  in  kurma  vyuha 
(tortoise  formation).  You  have  to  answer 
at once with a formation that can break it." 
Dhrishtadyumna  immediately  proceeded 
to  his  task.  The  Pandava  forces  were 
arrayed in a three-pronged formation.  
Bhima  was  at  the  head  of  one  prong, 
Satyaki  of  another,  and  Yudhishthira  at 
the  crest  of  the  middle  division.  Our 
ancestors  had  developed  the  science  of 
war very well.  
It  was  not  reduced  to  writing  but  was 
preserved  by  tradition  in  the  families  of 
kshatriyas.  Armor  and  tactics  were 
employed suitably to meet the weapons of 
offence  and  the  tactics  that  the  enemy 
used in those days. 
The  Kurukshetra  battle  was  fought  some 
thousands of years ago. Reading the story 
of  the  battle  in  the  Mahabharata,  we 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested