fought Arjuna fiercely and the field was 
strewn  with  the  dead.  Finally,  he 
withdrew  defeated and  went  back  to  join 
Drona's forces. 
Savyasachi's  car  swiftly  proceeded 
forward  and  passed  Drona.  "Illustrious 
one, grieving for my son, I have come to 
wreak  vengeance  on  the  Sindhu  king.  I 
crave  your  blessings  for  the  fulfilment  of 
my vow," said Arjuna to the acharya.  
The acharya smiled and said: "Arjuna, you 
must  first  fight  and  defeat  me before you 
can  reach  Jayadratha."  Saying  this  Drona 
discharged a shower of arrows on Arjuna's 
car.  Partha  also  replied  with  his  arrows 
but  these  the  acharya  parried  with  ease 
and  sent  flaming  shafts  that  hit  Krishna 
and Arjuna.  
The Pandava then decided to cut Drona's 
bow  and  bent  his  Gandiva  for  that 
purpose.  Even  as  he  was  pulling  his 
bowstring Drona's shaft came and cut the 
string.  
The  acharya,  still  retaining  the  smile  on 
his  face,  rained  a  shower  of  arrows  on 
Arjuna and his horses and chariot. Arjuna 
fought back, but the acharya showered his 
arrows that covered Arjuna and his chariot 
in darkness. 
Krishna  saw  things  were  not  going  at  all 
well and said: "Partha, no  more waste  of 
time. Let us proceed. It is no use fighting 
this  brahmana,  who  seems  to  know  no 
fatigue."  Saying  this,  Krishna  drove 
Arjuna's chariot to the left  of the  acharya 
and proceeded forward. 
"Stop, surely you will not proceed without 
defeating your enemy," said Drona. 
"You  are  my  guru,  not  my  enemy,  O 
acharya.  I am in  the position of a son to 
you.  There  is  no  one  in  the  wide  world 
that can defeat you," said Arjuna and they 
proceeded  forward  at  a  swift  pace 
bypassing Drona. 
Then  Arjuna  pierced  the  Bhoja  army. 
Kritavarma  and  Sudakshina  who  opposed 
his  passage  were  defeated.  Srutayudha 
also tried to stop Arjuna's progress. There 
was  a  fierce  battle  in  which  Srutayudha 
lost his  horses and he hurled his  mace  at 
Krishna. 
His  mother  had  obtained  this  mace  as  a 
result  of  her  offering  but  the  condition 
attached to the boon operated and it came 
back and struck  Srutayudha himself dead. 
This is the story of the mace. 
Parnasa  went  through  penances  that 
pleased  Varuna  and  obtained  from  that 
god a boon that  her son Srutayudha may 
not be killed by any enemy. 
"I  shall  give  your  son  a  divine  weapon. 
Let him use it in all his battles. No enemy 
will be able to defeat him or kill him. But 
he should not use the weapon against one 
who does not fight. If he does, the weapon 
will  recoil  and  kill  him.  Saying  this,  god 
Varuna  gave  a  mace.  Srutayudha,  when 
fighting 
Arjuna, 
disregarding 
the 
injunction,  hurled  the  mace  at  Krishna 
who was not fighting but was only driving 
Arjuna's chariot.  
The  missile  hit  Janardana's  chest  and 
immediately  rebounded  fiercely  back  to 
Srutayudha.  And  like  a  demon  recoiling 
fatally  on  the  magician,  that  commits  an 
error  in  uttering  the  spell  of  power  that 
holds  it  in  thrall,  it  slew  Srutayudha  and 
laid  him  dead  on  the  field,  like  a  great 
forest tree blown down by a storm. 
Then the  king  of  Kamboja  led his  forces 
against Arjuna.  After a fierce fight, he lay 
stretched  dead  on  the  field  like  a  great 
flagstaff after the festival is over. 
When  they  saw  the  strong  warriors, 
Srutayudha  and  the  king  of  Kamboja, 
slain,  the  Kaurava  force  was  in  great 
confusion.  
Srutayu  and  his  brother  Asrutayu  then 
attacked  Partha  on  both  sides  trying  to 
save  the  situation,  and  greatly  harassed 
him.  At  one  stage  of  this  battle,  Arjuna 
Best pdf to html converter - SDK software service:C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
How to Convert PDF to HTML Webpage with C# PDF Conversion SDK
www.rasteredge.com
Best pdf to html converter - SDK software service:VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
PDF to HTML Webpage Converter SDK for VB.NET PDF to HTML Conversion
www.rasteredge.com
leaned  on  the  flagstaff,  dazed  with  the 
wounds he received.  
But  Krishna  spoke  to  him  encouragingly 
and  Arjuna  recovered  and  resumed  the 
fight,  slaying  the  two  brothers  as  well  as 
their two sons who continued the struggle. 
Arjuna  marched  on  and,  killing  many 
more  warriors  successfully  made  his  way 
to Jayadratha. 
83. BORROWED ARMOR 
WHEN  Dhritarashtra  heard  Sanjaya  relate 
the  success  of  Arjuna,  he  exclaimed: "Oh 
Sanjaya!  When  Janardana  came  to 
Hastinapura  seeking  a  settlement,  I  told 
Duryodhana  that  it  was  a  great 
opportunity and he must not lose it. I told 
him  to  make  peace  with  his  cousins. 
'Kesava has come to do us a good turn. Do 
not  disregard  his  advice,'  I  said.  But 
Duryodhana heeded not. What Karna and 
Duhsasana  said  seemed  to  him  better 
advice  than  mine.  The  Destroyer  entered 
his  mind  and  he  sought  his  own  ruin. 
Drona  deprecated  war,  so  also  did 
Bhishma,  Bhurisravas,  Kripa  and  others. 
But  my  obstinate  son  would  not  listen. 
Impelled  by  inordinate  ambition,  he  got 
entangled in anger and hatred, and invited 
this ruinous war." 
To  Dhritarashtra  thus  lamenting,  Sanjaya 
said: "Of what avail are your regrets now? 
The  life-giving  water  has  all  run to waste 
and you now seek to stop the breach. Why 
did you not prevent the son of Kunti from 
gambling?  Had  you  done  the  right  thing 
then, all this  great  grief  would  have  been 
stopped  at  the  source.  Even  later,  if  you 
had been firm and stopped your son from 
his  evil  ways,  this  calamity  could  have 
been  avoided.  You  saw  the  evil  and yet, 
against  your  own  sound  judgment,  you 
followed  the  foolish  advice  of  Karna  and 
Sakuni.  Kesava,  Yudhishthira  and  Drona 
do not respect you now as they did before. 
Vasudeva  now  knows  that  your  rectitude 
is only hypocrisy. The Kauravas are  now 
doing  their  utmost  as  warriors,  but  they 
are  unequal  to  opposing  the  strength  of 
Arjuna,  Krishna,  Satyaki  and  Bhima. 
Duryodhana has not spared himself. He is 
putting  forth  his  utmost  strength.  It  is not 
meet  that  you  should  now  accuse  him  or 
his devoted soldiers." 
"Dear  Sanjaya,  I  admit  my  dereliction  of 
duty. What you say  is  right. No one can 
change  the  course  of  fate.  Tell  me  what 
happened.  Tell  me  all,  be  it  ever  so 
unpleasant,"  said  the  old  king  convulsed 
with  grief.  And obedient to the  old  king's 
behest, Sanjaya continued his narration.  
Duryodhana was greatly  agitated  when  he 
saw 
Arjuna's 
chariot 
proceeding 
triumphantly  towards  the  Sindhu  king.  He 
rushed to Drona and complained bitterly: 
"Arjuna has effected a breach in the great 
army  and  has  advanced  to  Jayadratha's 
position.  Seeing  our  discomfiture,  the 
warriors,  protecting  the  Sindhu  king,  will 
surely lose heart. They had believed that it 
was impossible for Arjuna to get past you 
and  that  has  now  been  falsified.  He 
advanced  before  your  eyes  and  nothing 
was done to prevent it. You seem indeed 
bent  on  helping  the  Pandavas.  I  am  in 
great distress of mind. Sir, tell me, in what 
matter have I offended you? Why are you 
letting  me  down  in  this  way?  If  I  had 
known  that  you  would  do  this,  I  should 
not have asked Jayadratha to stay here. It 
was  a  great  mistake  I  committed  in  not 
letting him go, as he  desired, back to his 
own  country.  If  Arjuna  attacks  him,  it  is 
not  possible  for  him  to  escape  death. 
Forgive  me.  I  am  talking  foolishly, 
distracted  by  grief.  Do  go  in  person 
yourself to save the Saindhava."  
To this frantic appeal Drona made answer: 
"King,  I  shall  not  take  offence  at  your 
thoughtless  and  unworthy  remarks.  You 
are like a son to me. Aswatthama himself 
is not dearer! Do what I ask you. Take this 
coat of armor and, donning it, go and stop 
SDK software service:Online Convert PDF to HTML5 files. Best free online PDF html
Our PDF to HTML converter library control is a 100% clean .NET document image solution, which is designed to help .NET developers convert PDF to HTML webpage
www.rasteredge.com
SDK software service:Purchase RasterEdge Product License Online
Now. Converter XDoc.Converter for .NET. Best file conversions for most common business files, including Adobe PDF, Microsoft Word, Excel, PowerPoint, HTML, Open
www.rasteredge.com
Arjuna. I cannot do so for my presence is 
necessary  in  this  part  of  the  field.  See 
there, the clouds of  arrows! The  Pandava 
army  is  attacking  us  in  great  force. 
Yudhishthira  is  here  unsupported  by 
Arjuna and is this not just the opportunity 
we wanted? Our very plan has borne fruit 
and  I  must  now  take  Yudhishthira 
prisoner  and deliver  him to you. I  cannot 
give  up  this  objective  and  run  after 
Phalguna  now.  If  I  go  after  Arjuna  now, 
our battle array will be  hopelessly  broken 
and we shall be lost. Let me put this armor 
on  you.  Go  in  confidence.  Do  not  fear. 
You have valor, skill and experience. This 
coat will protect  you  against all weapons. 
It will not let any blow pass through your 
body.  Go  forth  to  battle,  Duryodhana,  in 
confidence as Indra did, clad in the armor 
given by  Brahma.  May  victory  be  yours." 
Duryodhana's  confidence  was  restored 
and,  as  the  acharya  directed,  he  went, 
dressed  in  magic  armor  and  accompanied 
by  a  large  force  of  soldiers,  to  attack 
Arjuna.  
Arjuna had crossed the Kaurava army and 
gone far ahead towards  where Jayadratha 
had been kept  for  safety. Seeing  that  the 
horses  were  somewhat  fatigued,  Krishna 
stopped  the  chariot  and  was  about  to 
unyoke  the  tired  animals,  when  the 
brothers  Vinda  and  Anuvinda  came  up 
suddenly and began to attack Arjuna.  
They  were  defeated  and Arjuna scattered 
their  forces  and  slew  them  both.  After 
this,  Krishna  unyoked  the  chariot  and  let 
the  horses  roll  in  the  mud.  The  horses 
rested  for  a  while  and  were  refreshed. 
Then,  they  proceeded  again  according  to 
plan. 
"Dhananjaya,  look  behind!  There  comes 
the  foolhardy  Duryodhana.  What  good 
luck!  Long  have  you  suppressed  your 
anger, and now is the time for you to let 
yourself  go. Here is the man who caused 
all  this  grief,  delivering  himself  into  your 
hands. But remember he is a great archer, 
well-versed  in  bow lore,  and also a keen 
and  strong-limbed  fighter."  Thus  said 
Krishna  and  they  halted  to  give  battle  to 
the Kaurava. 
Duryodhana approached without fear.  
"They  say,  Arjuna,  that  you  have  done 
acts  of  prowess.  I  have  not  seen  this 
myself.  Let  me  see  if  your  courage  and 
your  skill  are  indeed  as  great  as  your 
reputation," said Duryodhana to Arjuna  as 
he began to battle. 
The  combat  was  fierce  indeed  and 
Krishna was surprised.  
"Partha,  I  am  astonished,"  said  Krishna, 
"How  is  it  your  arrows  do  not  seem  to 
hurt  Duryodhana?  This  is  the  first  time  I 
see  the  shafts  proceeding  from  the 
Gandiva  bow  strike  their  targets  without 
effect.  This  is  strange,  Have  your  arms 
lost their power? Or has the Gandiva bow 
lost its quality? Why do your arrows strike 
Duryodhana  and  drop  to  the  ground 
without  piercing  him?  This  is  most 
puzzling."  
Arjuna  smiled  and  replied:  "I  understand. 
This  man  has  come  dressed  by Drona in 
charmed  armor.  The  acharya  has  taught 
me  the secret of  this  armor, but this man 
wears  it as a  bullock  might  do.  You will 
see some fun now!"  
Saying  thus,  Arjuna  proceeded  to  shoot 
his  arrows,  first  depriving  Duryodhana  of 
his  horses,  his  charioteer  and  his  car. 
Then, Arjuna broke his bow and disarmed 
him  completely.  There  after  he  sent 
needle-eye  darts  which  pierced  just  those 
parts of Duryodhana's body that were not 
covered by armor, until he could bear it no 
longer and turned and fled. 
When  Duryodhana  was  thus  discomfited, 
Krishna blew his conch and it sent a thrill 
of fear in Jayadratha's army. The warriors 
around  the  Sindhu  king  were  surprised. 
They  at  once  got  ready  in  their  chariots 
and 
Bhurisravas, 
Chala, 
Karna, 
SDK software service:C# PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images in C#
Graphics, and REImage in C#.NET Project. Best PDF converter SDK for Visual Studio .NET for converting PDF to image in C#.NET application.
www.rasteredge.com
SDK software service:Online Convert PDF file to Tiff. Best free online PDF Tif
Online PDF to Tiff Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF File to Tiff. Just upload your file by clicking on the blue button
www.rasteredge.com
Vrishasena,  Kripa,  Salya,  Aswatthama 
and  Jayadratha,  eight  of  them,  arrayed 
their forces against Arjuna.  
84. YUDHISHTHIRA'S MISGIVINGS 
WHEN  the  Pandavas  saw  Duryodhana 
proceeding in the direction of Arjuna, they 
attacked the Kaurava army in force so as 
to hold Drona and prevent him from going 
to Jayadratha's rescue.  
So,  Dhrishtadyumna  led  his  forces 
repeatedly  against  Drona.  As  a  result  of 
all this, the Kaurava army had to fight on 
three fronts, and was greatly weakened. 
Driving  his  chariot  right  against  Drona's, 
Dhrishtadyumna  attacked  him  violently. 
Drona's chestnut horses and the Panchala's 
dove-colored  ones  were  entangled  with 
one  another  and  presented  a  picturesque 
sight like the clouds at sunset.  
Dhrishtadyumna threw away his  bow and, 
sword and shield in hand, he sprang upon 
Drona's  chariot.  Now  standing  on  the 
shafts  of  the  vehicle,  now  on  the  horses 
and now on the yoke, he attacked Drona 
bewilderingly,  all  the  while  seeming  to 
scorch  him  with  baleful  and  bloodshot 
eyes.  
Long  did  this  fight  go  on.  Drona  pulled 
his  bow  in  great  wrath  and  sent  a  shaft, 
which  would  have  drunk  the  Panchala's 
life  but  for  the unexpected  intervention  of 
Satyaki  who  sent  an  arrow  and  diverted 
the acharya's shaft.  
Drona  then  turned  and  attacked  Satyaki, 
which  enabled  the  Panchala  warriors  to 
take  Dhrishtadyumna  away.  Drona, 
hissing  like  a  black  cobra,  his  eyes  red 
with anger, advanced on Satyaki who was 
among  the  front  rank  warriors  on  the 
Pandava  side  and  who,  when  he  saw 
Drona  desiring  battle,  went  forward  to 
accept the challenge.  
"Here  is  the  man  who,  giving  up  his 
vocation as  a  brahmana has  taken up  the 
profession  of  fighting  and  is  causing 
distress to  the Pandavas,"  Satyaki  said to 
his  charioteer.  "This  man  is  the  principal 
cause  of  Duryodhana's  arrogance.  This 
man  fancies  himself  a  very  great  soldier 
and  is  ever  bursting  with  conceit.  I  must 
teach  him  a  lesson.  Take  the  chariot  up 
quickly." 
Satyaki's  charioteer  accordingly  lashed  the 
silver-white horses  and  took the  car  at a 
great pace. Satyaki and Drona shot shafts 
at one another so quick that they covered 
the  sun,  and  the  battlefield  was  in 
darkness  for  a  while.  The  steel  shafts 
swished  glimmering  like  newly-sloughed 
snakes rushing about. 
The  chariot  hoods  and  the  flagstaffs  on 
both sides were battered down. Drona as 
well  as  Satyaki  were  bleeding  profusely. 
The  warriors  on  either  side  stood  still 
watching  the  duel  and  they  did  not  blow 
their  conchs  or  raise  their  war  cries  or 
sound their lion-roars.  
The Devas,  Vidyadharas,  Gandharvas  and 
Yakshas  watched  the  great  battle  from 
above. Drona's bow was broken by a well-
aimed  shaft  from  Satyaki,  and  the  son  of 
Bharadwaja had to take another bow and, 
even as he strung it, Satyaki shot it down 
again.  Drona  took  up  another  bow    that 
too was shot down.  
And  so  it  went  on  till  Drona  lost  a 
hundred and one bows without being able 
to shoot an arrow. The great acharya said 
to himself:  "This man Satyaki  is a  warrior 
in  the  class  of  Sri  Rama,  Kartavirya, 
Dhananjaya  and  Bhishma,"and  was  glad 
he had an opponent worthy of him.  
It  was  a  craftsman's  professional  joy  at 
skill  displayed  in  the  art  he  loved.  For 
every  specially-charged  shaft  that  Drona 
sent,  Satyaki  had  a  ready  answer  of 
equivalent  quality.  Long  did  this  equal 
combat  continue.  Drona  of  unrivalled  skill 
in archery then resolved on killing Satyaki 
and  sent  the  fire  astra.  But  Satyaki  saw 
this  and,  losing  no  time,  sent  the  Varuna 
astra to counteract it. 
SDK software service:Online Convert PDF to Jpeg images. Best free online PDF JPEG
Online PDF to JPEG Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF File to JPG. Drag and drop your PDF in the box above and we'll convert the files for you.
www.rasteredge.com
SDK software service:C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to other
HTML Document Viewer for Azure, C# HTML Document Viewer Best PDF Viewer control as well as a powerful An advanced .NET WPF PDF converter library for converting
www.rasteredge.com
But  now  Satyaki's  strength  began  to  fail 
and,  seeing  this,  the  Kaurava  warriors 
were  glad  and  shouted  in  satisfaction. 
When  Yudhishthira  saw  Satyaki was hard 
pressed,  he  told  those  nearby  to  go  to 
Satyaki's relief. "Our great and good hero 
Yuyudhana 
(Satyaki) 
is 
being 
overpowered  by  Drona.  You  should  go 
there at once," he said to Dhrishtadyumna.  
"The  brahmana  will  otherwise  slay 
Satyaki  in  a  few  minutes.  Why  are  you 
hesitating?  Go  at  once.  Drona  is  playing 
with  Satyaki  as  a  cat  plays  with  a  bird. 
Satyaki  is  indeed  in  the  paws  of  the 
Destroyer."  Yudhishthira  ordered  the 
army to make a powerful attack on Drona. 
Satyaki  was  saved  with  difficulty.  Just 
then,  the  sound  of  Krishna's  conch  was 
heard  from  the  sector  where  Arjuna  was 
fighting. 
"O  Satyaki,  I  hear  Panchajanya,"  cried 
Yudhishthira;  "but  the  twang  of  Arjuna's 
bow does not accompany it. I fear Arjuna 
has  been  surrounded  by  Jayadratha's 
friends  and  is  in  danger.  Arjuna  is 
opposed  by  forces  both  in  front  of  him 
and  in  his  rear.  He  pierced  the  Kaurava 
ranks in the morning and he has not come 
back yet though the greater part of the day 
is  gone.  How  is  it  that  only  Krishna's 
conch  is  heard?  I  fear  Dhananjaya  has 
been slain and therefore Krishna has taken 
up  arms.  Satyaki,  there  is  nothing  you 
cannot  accomplish.  Your  bosom  friend 
Arjuna,  he,  who  taught  you,  is  in  mortal 
danger.  Often  has  Arjuna  spoken  to  me 
admiringly  of  your  great  skill  and 
prowess. 'There  is not another soldier like 
Satyaki,' he said to me when we were in 
the  forest.  Oh,  look  there!  The  dust  is 
rising  that  side.  I  am  certain  Arjuna  has 
been surrounded. Jayadratha is a powerful 
warrior,  and  there  are  many  enemy 
warriors there helping him and resolved to 
die  in  defence  of  him.  Go  at  once, 
Satyaki."  Thus  did  Dharmaputra  speak  in 
great trepidation. 
Satyaki,  who  was  weary  after  his  battle 
with  Drona,  replied:  "Faultless  among 
men,  I  shall  obey  your  command.  What 
would I not do for Dhananjaya's sake? My 
life  is the  merest trifle in my  eyes. If you 
order  me,  I  am  ready  to  fight  the  gods 
themselves.  But  allow  me  to  put  before 
you  what  the  wise  Vasudeva  and  Arjuna 
told  me  when  they  left.  'Until  we  return 
after  slaying  Jayadratha  you  should  not 
leave  Yudhishthira's  side.  Be  vigilant  in 
protecting  him.  We  entrust  this  to  you  in 
confidence  and  go.  There  is  only  one 
warrior  in  the  Kaurava  army  whom  we 
fear,  and  he  is  Drona.  You  know  his 
sworn  intention.  We  go  leaving 
Dharmaputra's  safety  in  our  hands.'  Thus 
said  Vasudeva  and  Arjuna  to  me  when 
they  went.  Arjuna  laid  this  trust  on  me, 
believing  me  fit  for  it.  How  can  I 
disregard his command? Do not have any 
fear  about  Arjuna's  safety.  No  one  can 
defeat  him.  The  Sindhu  king  and  the 
others cannot cope with a sixteenth part of 
Arjuna.  Dharmaputra,  to  whom  shall  I 
entrust your safety if I must go? I see no 
one here  who can  stand  against  Drona if 
he comes to seize you. Do not ask me to 
go.  Consider  well  before  you  command 
me to leave."  
"Satyaki,"  replied  Yudhishthira,  "I  have 
thought  over  it.  As  I  have  weighed  the 
danger  against  the  need  and  I  have 
concluded  that  you  must  go.  You  leave 
me  with  my  full  permission.  Here  is  the 
powerful  Bhima  to  look  to  my  safety. 
There  is  Dhrishtadyumna  also,  and  there 
are many others besides. There is no need 
to worry about me." 
So  saying,  Yudhishthira  placed  a  boxful 
of arrows and other weapons  in Satyaki's 
chariot and got fresh horses yoked thereto 
and  sent  Satyaki  uttering  benedictions  on 
him.  
SDK software service:C# PDF Print Library: Print PDF documents in C#.net, ASP.NET
C# HTML Document Viewer for Azure, C# HTML Document Viewer NET PDF Document Printer A best PDF printer control for Visual Studio .NET and compatible with C#
www.rasteredge.com
SDK software service:VB.NET PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in vb.
Free VB.NET Guide to Render and Convert PDF Document to TIFF in Visual Basic Class. Best VB.NET adobe PDF to Tiff converter SDK for Visual Studio .NET.
www.rasteredge.com
"Bhimasena,  Yudhishthira  is  your  charge. 
Be  vigilant,"  said  Satyaki,  and  went  to 
join Dhananjaya. 
Satyaki  met  with  violent  resistance  as  he 
proceeded  to  dash  through  the  Kaurava 
forces. But he cut his way through bearing 
down  all  opposition.  But  the  resistance 
was very stiff and his progress was slow.  
When  Drona  saw  Satyaki  part  from 
Yudhishthira,  he  began  to  assault  the 
Pandava  formation  without  rest  or 
interval, until it began to break and retreat. 
Yudhishthira was greatly agitated. 
85. YUDHISHTHIRA'S FOND HOPE 
"ARJUNA  has  not  returned,  nor  has 
Satyaki,  who  was  sent  after  him.  Bhima, 
my  fear  grows.  I  hear  the  Panchajanya, 
but  not  the  twang  of  Arjuna's  bowstring. 
Satyaki,  that  bravest  and  most  loyal  of 
friends,  has  not  come  back  with  any 
tidings.  My  anxiety  is  increasing  every 
moment,"  said  Yudhishthira  to  Bhima  in 
great perplexity of mind. 
"I  have  never  seen  you  so  agitated," 
replied  Bhimasena.  "Do,  not  let  your 
fortitude  grow less. Command  me  as  you 
please. Do not let the wheels of your mind 
stick in the mud of anxiety." 
"Dearest  Bhima,  I  fear  your  brother  has 
been  slain,  and  it  seems  to me  Madhava 
has now himself taken up arms. I hear the 
conch  of  Madhava  but  I  hear  not  the 
resounding  twang  of  Gandiva.  I  fear 
Dhananjaya,  the  unrivalled  hero,  in  whom 
were  centerd  all  our  hopes,  has  been 
killed. My mind is confused. If you would 
do  as  I  tell  you,  go  at  once  to  where 
Arjuna  is.  Join  him  and  Satyaki,  and  do 
what  needs to  be  done, and  come back. 
Satyaki,  under  orders  from  me,  pierced 
the  Kaurava  ranks  and  proceeded  in  the 
direction of Arjuna. You go now, and do 
likewise and, if you indeed see them alive, 
I shall know it by your lion-roar."  
"My Lord, do not grieve. I shall go and let 
you know they are safe," said Bhima, and 
immediately  turning  to  Dhrishtadyumna 
said:  "Panchala,  you  know  very  well  that 
Drona is seeking, by some means or other, 
to  seize  Dharmaputra  alive.  Our  foremost 
duty is to protect the King. But I must also 
obey  him  and fulfil his  command. And so 
I go, trusting him to your care." 
"Bhima, do not be concerned. Go with an 
assured  mind.  Drona  cannot  take 
Yudhishthira  without  first  killing  me," 
said  the  heroic  son  of  Drupada,  sworn 
enemy  of  Drona.  And  Bhima  hurried 
away. 
The  Kauravas  surrounded  Bhima  in  full 
force  and  vowed  to  prevent  him  from 
going  to  Arjuna's  relief.  But  like  a  lion 
scattering  less  noble  beasts  he  put  his 
enemies  to  flight,  killing  no  less  than 
eleven of the sons of Dhritarashtra. Bhima 
then  approached  Drona  himself.  "Stop," 
cried  Drona.  "Here  I  am,  your  enemy. 
You  cannot  proceed  further  without 
defeating  me.  Your  brother  Arjuna  went 
in  with my consent.  But I  cannot let  you 
go."  Drona  spoke  thus  believing  that  he 
would  receive  the  same  courtesy  from 
Bhima  as he did  from Arjuna. But  Bhima 
was  furious  at  hearing  these  words  of 
Drona, and answered scornfully. 
"Oh  brahmana,  it  was  not  with  your 
permission  that  Arjuna  went.  He  broke 
your  resistance  and  pierced  your  battle 
lines  fighting  his  way  through,  but  he  did 
not hurt you  out of pity.  But  I  shall  not, 
like Arjuna, show mercy to you. I am your 
enemy. Once  upon  a  time,  you were our 
preceptor and were like a father to us. We 
respected  you  as  such.  Now,  you  have 
yourself  said  you  are  our  enemy.  May  it 
be  so!"  Saying  this,  Bhima  aimed  his 
mace  at Drona's  chariot  that  crumbled to 
pieces. And Drona had to take to another 
chariot.  
The  second  chariot  too  was  broken  to 
pieces.  And  Bhima  forced  his  way 
through  overcoming  all  opposition.  Drona 
lost eight chariots that day. And the army 
of  the  Bhojas,  that  tried  to  stop  Bhima, 
was completely destroyed.  
He  proceeded  mowing  down  all 
opposition and reached where Arjuna was 
fighting Jayadratha's forces. 
As soon as he saw Arjuna, Bhima roared 
like a lion. Hearing that roar, Krishna and 
Arjuna  were  exceedingly  pleased  and 
raised  yells  of  joy.  Yudhishthira  heard 
these roars and, relieved of his doubts and 
anxieties,  he  pronounced  blessings  on 
Arjuna. And he thought within himself:  
"Before  the  sun  sets  today, Arjuna's  oath 
will be fulfilled. He will slay the man who 
caused  Abhimanyu's  death  and  will  return 
in  triumph.  Duryodhana  may  sue  for 
peace  after  Jayadratha's  death.  Seeing  so 
many  of  his  brothers  slain,  it  is  possible 
that  foolish  Duryodhana  may  see  light. 
The  lives  of  numerous  kings  and  great 
warriors  have  been sacrificed  on  the field 
of  battle  and  even  the  stubborn  and 
narrow-visioned  Duryodhana  may  now 
see his  fault and ask  for peace. Will  this 
indeed  happen?  The  great  grandsire 
Bhishma  has  been  offered  as  a  sacrifice. 
Will  this  wicked  enmity  end  with  it  and 
shall  we  be  saved  from  further  cruel 
destruction?"  
While  thus  Yudhishthira  was  fondly 
hoping  and  dreaming  of  peace,  the  battle 
was  raging  with  great  fury  where  Bhima, 
Satyaki  and  Arjuna  were  engaging  the 
enemy.  
Only the Lord knows through what travail 
the  world  must  evolve.  His  ways  are 
inscrutable.  
86. KARNA AND BHIMA 
ARJUNA  had  left  Yudhishthira  behind  to 
repel  Drona's  attacks  and  had  gone  to 
make  good  his  word  that  before  sunset 
Jayadratha  would lie dead  on the  field  of 
battle.  
Jayadratha  had  been  the  main  cause  of 
Abhimanyu's  death.  He  it  was  who  had 
effectively  prevented  the  relief  of 
Abhimanyu  by  the Pandavas,  and  thereby 
caused  Abhimanyu  to  be  isolated, 
overpowered and slain. 
We  have  seen  how  Yudhishthira  in  his 
anxiety  sent  first  Satyaki  and  then  Bhima 
to  join  Arjuna  in  his  battle  against 
Jayadratha.  Bhima  reached  where  Arjuna 
was  engaged  and  sounded  his  simhanada 
(lion-roar).  Dharmaputra  heard  the  lion-
roar of Bhima  and knew that Arjuna was 
found alive. 
It  was  the  fourteenth  day  and  the  battle 
raged  fiercely  at  many  points,  between 
Satyaki  and  Bhurisravas  at  one  place, 
between Bhima and Karna at another and 
between Arjuna and Jayadratha at a third.  
Drona remained at the main front resisting 
the  attack  of  the  Panchalas  and  the 
Pandavas,  and  leading  a  counter-offensive 
against them. 
Duryodhana arrived  with his forces  at  the 
sector  where  Arjuna  attacked  Jayadratha, 
but  was  soon  defeated  and  turned  back. 
The  battle  thus  raged  long  and  furiously 
on more than one front. The armies were 
so deployed that each side was exposed to 
danger in its rear.  
Duryodhana was speaking to Drona:  
"Arjuna,  Bhima  and  Satyaki  have  treated 
us  with  contempt  and  proceeded 
successfully  to  Jayadratha's  sector  and 
they are pressing hard on the Sindhu king. 
It  is  indeed  strange  that,  under  your 
command,  our  battle  array  should  have 
been  broken  and  our  plans  completely 
foiled.  Everyone  asks  how  it  is  that  the 
great  Drona  with  all  his  mastery  of  the 
science  of  war  has  been  so  badly 
outmaneuvered.  What  answer  shall  I 
make? I have been betrayed by you." 
Duryodhana  thus,  once  again,  bitterly 
reproached 
Drona, 
who 
replied 
unperturbed: 
"Duryodhana,  your  accusations  are  as 
unworthy  as  they  are  contrary  to  truth. 
There  is  nothing  to  be  gained  by  talking 
about  what  is  past  and  beyond  repair. 
Think of what is to be done now." 
"Sir,  it  is  for  you  to  advise  me.  Tell  me 
what  should  be  done.  Give  your  best 
consideration  to  the  difficulties  of  the 
situation  and  decide  and  let  us  do  it 
quickly."  Puzzled  and  perplexed,  thus  did 
Duryodhana plead. 
Drona replied: "My son, the situation is no 
doubt  serious.  Three  great  generals  have 
advanced,  outmanoeuvring  us.  But  they 
have as much reason to be anxious as we, 
for their rear is now left as open to attack 
as ours. We are on both sides of them and 
their  position  is  not  therefore  safe.  Be 
heartened, go up to Jayadratha again, and 
do all you can to support him. It is of no 
avail  to  dishearten  oneself  by dwelling  on 
past  defeats  and  difficulties.  It  is  best  I 
stay here  and  send  you  reinforcements  as 
and  when  required.  I  must  keep  the 
Panchalas  and  Pandava  army  engaged 
here.  Otherwise,  we  shall  be  wholly 
destroyed." 
Accordingly,  Duryodhana  went  with  fresh 
reinforcements again to  where Arjuna was 
directing his attack on Jayadratha.  
The  narrative  of  the  fourteenth  day's 
fighting  at  Kurukshetra  shows  that,  even 
in  the  Mahabharata  times,  the  modern 
tactics  of  turning  and  enveloping 
movements was not unknown. 
The advantages and risks of such strategy 
appear to have  been fully understood and 
discussed  even  in  those  days.  Arjuna's 
flanking  manoeuvres  perplexed  his 
enemies  greatly.  The  story  of  that  day's 
battle  between  Bhima  and  Karna  reads 
very  much  like  a  chapter  from  the 
narrative of a modern war.  
Bhima  did  not  desire  to  fight  Karna  or 
remain  long  engaged  with  him.  He  was 
eager  to  reach  where  Arjuna  was.  But 
Radheya would, by no means, permit him 
to  do  this.  He  showered  his  arrows  on 
Bhimasena  and  stopped  him  from 
proceeding.  
The  contrast  between  the  two  warriors 
was  striking.  Karna's  handsome  lotus-like 
face  was  radiant  with  smiles  when  he 
attacked  Bhima  saying:  "Do  not  show 
your  back,"  "Now,  do  not  flee  like  a 
coward," and so on.  
Bhima  was all  anger  when  taunted  in  this 
manner.  He  was  maddened  by  Karna's 
smiles.  The  battle  was  fierce  but  Karna 
did  everything  with  a  smiling  air  of  ease 
whereas  Bhima's  face  glowed  with  rage 
and his movements were violent.  
Karna would keep at a distance and send 
his  well-aimed  shafts  but  Bhima  would 
disregard  the  arrows  and  javelins  failing 
thick  upon  him  and  always  try  to  close 
with Karna.  
Radheya  did  everything  he  did,  calmly 
and  with  graceful  ease,  whereas 
Bhimasena  fumed  and  fretted  with 
impatience,  as  he  showed  his  amazing 
strength of limb.  
Bhima  was  red  with  bleeding  wounds  all 
over  and  presented  the  appearance of  an 
Asoka tree in full blossom. But he minded 
them  not,  as  he  attacked  Karna  cutting 
bows in twain and smashing his chariot.  
When Karna had to run for a fresh chariot, 
there was no smile on his face. For anger 
rose  in  him,  like  the  sea  on  a  full  moon 
day, as he  attacked  Bhima. Both showed 
the  strength  of  tigers  and  the  speed  of 
eagles  and  their  anger  was  now  like  that 
of serpents in a fury.  
Bhima  brought  before  his  mind  all  the 
insults  and  injuries  which  he  and  his 
brothers  and  Draupadi  had  suffered,  and 
fought desperately, caring not for life.  
The  two  cars  dashed  against  each  other 
and  the  milk  white  horses  of  Karna's 
chariot  and  Bhimasena's  black  horses 
jostled  in  the  combat  like  clouds  in  a 
thunderstorm.  
Karna's  bow  was  shattered  and  his 
charioteer  reeled  and  fell.  Karna  then 
hurled  a  javelin  at  Bhima.  But  Bhima 
parried  it  and  continued  pouring  his 
arrows  on  Karna,  who  had  taken  up  a 
fresh bow. 
Again  and  again  did  Karna  lose  his 
chariot.  Duryodhana  saw  Karna's  plight 
and calling  his  brother  Durjaya said: "This 
wicked  Pandava  will  kill  Karna.  Go  at 
once and  attack  Bhima  and  save Karna's 
life." 
Durjaya  went  as  ordered  and  attacked 
Bhima  who,  in  a  rage  sent  seven  shafts 
which  sent  Durjaya's  horses  and  his 
charioteer  to  the  abode  of  Yama  and 
Durjaya himself fell mortally wounded.  
Seeing  his bleeding body  wriggling on  the 
ground like a wounded  snake, Karna was 
overwhelmed  with  grief  and  circled  round 
the  hero,  paying  mournful  honor  to  the 
dead. 
Bhima did not stop but continued the fight 
and  greatly  harassed  Karna.  Karna  once 
again had to find a fresh chariot. He sent 
well aimed shafts and hit Bhima who in a 
fury  hurled  his  mace  at  Karna  and  it 
crashed  on  Karna's  chariot  and  killed  his 
charioteer  and  horses  and  broke  the 
flagstaff.  Karna now  stood on  the  ground 
with bent bow.  
Duryodhana  now  sent  another  brother  to 
relieve 
Karna. 
Durmukha 
went 
accordingly and took Karna on his chariot.  
Seeing  yet  another  son  of  Dhritarashtra 
come  to offer himself up  to death, Bhima 
licked  his  lips  in  gusto  and  sent  nine 
shafts  on  the  newly  arrived  enemy.  And, 
even as Karna climbed up to take his seat 
in  the  chariot,  Durmukha's  armor  was 
broken and he fell lifeless. 
When  Karna  saw  the  warrior  bathed  in 
blood and lying dead by his side, he was 
again  overwhelmed  with  grief  and  stood 
motionless for a while.  
Bhima  relentlessly  continued  his  attack  on 
Karna.  His  sharp  arrows  pierced  Karna's 
coat of armor and he was in pain.  
But he too at once returned the attack and 
wounded Bhima all over.  
Still  the  Pandava  would  not  stop  and 
attacked  Karna  furiously.  The  sight  of  so 
many  of  Duryodhana's  brothers  dying  for 
his  sake  one after  another was  too much 
for Karna. 
This,  and  the  physical  pain  of  his  own 
wounds  made  him  lose  courage  and  he 
turned  away  defeated.  But,  when  Bhima 
stood  up  on  the  field  of  battle  red  with 
wounds  all  over  like  a  flaming  fire  and 
emitted  a  triumphant  yell,  he  could  not 
brook it but returned to the combat. 
87. PLEDGE RESPECTED 
DHRITARASHTRA,  hearing  of  the 
slaughter  of  his  sons  and  the  check 
received  by  Karna,  was  desolate.  "O 
Sanjaya,  like  moths  falling  in  the  fire,  my 
sons  are  being  destroyed.  The  stubborn 
Duryodhana  has  led  the  lads  Durmukha 
and Durjaya,  to  their doom.  Alas, I  have 
lost  these  boys!  The  fool  said:  'Karna, 
unrivalled among men for courage and the 
accomplishment  of  war,  is  on  our  side.  
Who  then  can  defeat  us?  Even  the  gods 
cannot  win  a  battle  against  me  when 
Karna  is  on  my  side.  What  can  these 
Pandavas do to me?' But now he has seen 
Karna  beating  a  retreat  when  Bhimasena 
attacked him. Has he seen wisdom at least 
now?  Alas,  Sanjaya,  my  son  has  earned 
the  undying  hatred  of  the  son  of  Vayu, 
Bhima, who has the strength of the god of 
death! We are indeed ruined!"  
Sanjaya  replied:  "O  king,  was  it  not  you 
who  brought  about  this  unquenchable 
hatred,  listening  to  the  words  of  your 
foolish  and  stubborn  son? To  you  indeed 
must  be  traced  this  greater  disaster.  You 
are  now  but  reaping  the  fruit  of  your 
discarding  the  advice of Bhishma  and  the 
other elders. Blame yourself, king. Do not 
blame Karna  and the  brave warriors  who 
have done their best in battle." 
After  thus  admonishing  the  blind  king, 
Sanjaya  proceeded  to  tell  him  what 
happened.  Five  sons  of  Dhritarashtra, 
Durmarsha,  Dussaha,  Durmata,  Durdhara 
and  Jaya,  when  they  saw  Karna  put  to 
flight  by  Bhima  at  once  rushed  on  the 
latter.  
When  Karna  saw  this,  he  was  heartened 
and  turned  back  to  resume  his  attack. 
Bhimasena  at  first  ignored  the  sons  of 
Dhritarashtra and concentrated on Karna.  
But they became so violent in their assault 
that  Bhima  got  incensed  and,  turning  his 
attentions  on  them, disposed of all five of 
them.  They  lay  dead  on  the  field,  with 
their horses and their charioteers.  
The  young  warriors  with  their  bleeding 
wounds  presented  the  appearance  of  a 
forest  with  trees,  uprooted  by  a  strong 
wind  and  lying  flat  on  the  ground  with 
their beautiful red blossoms. 
When Karna saw another batch of princes 
slaughtered  for  his  sake  he  fought  more 
grimly  than  ever  before.  Bhima  too  was 
more  violent  than  before,  thinking  of  all 
the  evil  that  Karna  had  wrought  against 
the Pandavas.  
He used  his  bow  so  as  to  disarm  Karna 
completely.  His  horses  and  charioteer 
were  also  laid  low.  Karna  now  jumped 
down  from  his  chariot  and  hurled  his 
mace at Bhima.  
But  Bhima warded  it  off  with  shafts  from 
his powerful bow and covered Karna with 
a shower of arrows and forced him to turn 
back and walk on foot. 
Duryodhana,  who  watched  this  combat, 
was  greatly grieved and  sent seven of his 
brothers  Chitra,  Upachitra,  Chitraksha, 
Charuchitra,  Sarasana,  Chitrayudha  and 
Chitravarman, to relieve Radheya.  
They  gave  battle  to  Bhima  displaying 
great  skill  and  energy.  But  fell  dead  one 
after  another,  for  Bhima's  passion  was 
roused and his attack was irresistible.  
When Karna saw so many of the sons of 
Dhritarashtra  sacrificing  themselves  for 
him,  his  face  was  wet  with  tears  and  he 
mounted  a  fresh  chariot  and  began  to 
attack Bhima with deadly effect.  
The two combatants clashed like clouds in 
a  thunderstorm.  Kesava,  Satyaki  and 
Arjuna  were  filled  with  admiration  and 
joy as they watched Bhima fighting.  
Bhurisravas,  Kripacharya,  Aswatthama, 
Salya, Jayadratha and many other warriors 
of  the  Kaurava  army  also  broke  into 
exclamations,  astonished  at  the  way  in 
which Bhima fought.  
Duryodhana  was  stung  to  the  quick  and 
burned  with  anger.  Karna's  plight  caused 
him  extreme  anxiety.  He  feared  Bhima 
would  kill  Radheya  that  day,  and  sent 
seven  more  of  his brothers directing them 
to  surround  Bhima  and  attack  him 
simultaneously. 
The  seven  brothers  sent  by  Duryodhana 
attacked Bhima. But fell one after another, 
struck down by his arrows. Vikarna, who 
was killed last, was beloved of all.  
When  Bhima  saw  him  fall  dead  after  a 
brave  fight,  he  was  deeply  moved  and 
exclaimed:  "Alas,  O  Vikarna,  you  were 
just  and  knew  what  was  dharma!  You 
fought  in  loyal  obedience  to  the  call  of 
duty.  I  had  to  kill  even  you.  Indeed  this 
battle is a curse upon us wherein men like 
you  and  the  grandsire  Bhishma  have  had 
to be slaughtered." 
Seeing  Duryodhana's  brothers,  who  came 
to help him, slain one after another in this 
manner,  Karna  was  overwhelmed  by 
anguish.  He  leant back  on his seat in the 
chariot and closed his eyes unable to bear 
the sight.  
Then recovering control over his  emotions 
he hardened his heart and began again his 
attack  on  Bhima.  Bow  after  bow  was 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested