convert byte array to pdf mvc : Convert fillable pdf to html application control utility html azure asp.net visual studio main0-part1893

Author's personal copy
Research Review
Word of mouth and interpersonal communication: A review and directions
for future research
Jonah Berger
WhartonSchool,UniversityofPennsylvania,700JonM.HuntsmanHall,3730WalnutStreet,Philadelphia,PA19104,USA
Received7January2014;receivedinrevisedform2May2014;accepted7May2014
Availableonline19May2014
Abstract
Peopleoftenshareopinionsandinformationwiththeirsocialties,andwordofmouthhasanimportantimpactonconsumerbehavior.Butwhat
drivesinterpersonalcommunicationandwhydopeopletalkaboutcertainthingsratherthanothers?Thisarticlearguesthatwordofmouthisgoal
drivenandservesfivekeyfunctions(i.e., impressionmanagement,emotionregulation,informationacquisition, social bonding,andpersuasion).
Importantly,I suggest thesemotivationsarepredominantlyself-(ratherthanother)servinganddrivewhat people talkabout evenwithout their
awareness.Further,thesedriversmakepredictionsaboutthetypesofnewsandinformationpeoplearemostlikelytodiscuss.Thisarticlereviews
thefiveproposedfunctionsandwellashowcontextualfactors(i.e.,audienceandcommunicationchannel)maymoderatewhichfunctionsplaya
largerrole.Takentogether,thepaperprovidesinsight intothe psychologicalfactorsthat shape wordofmouthandoutlinesadditionalquestions
thatdeserve furtherstudy.
©2014SocietyforConsumerPsychology.PublishedbyElsevierInc. Allrightsreserved.
Keywords:Wordofmouth;Socialinfluence;Viralmarketing
Contents
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 587
Whypeople talkandwhattheytalkabout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 588
Impressionmanagement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 588
(1)Self-enhancement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 588
(2)Identity-signaling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 589
(3)Fillingconversationalspace . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 590
Howimpressionmanagementdriveswhat peopleshare . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 590
(a)Entertainingthings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 590
(b)Usefulinformation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 590
(c)Self-concept relevant things . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 590
(d)Highstatusgoods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 591
(e)Unique things . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 591
(f)Commonground . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 591
(g)Emotional valence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 591
(h)Incidental arousal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 591
(i)Accessibility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 591
Emotionregulation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 592
(1)Generating social support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 592
(2)Venting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 592
E-mailaddress:jberger@wharton.upenn.edu.
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jcps.2014.05.002
1057-7408/©2014SocietyforConsumerPsychology.PublishedbyElsevierInc.Allrightsreserved.
Availableonlineatwww.sciencedirect.com
ScienceDirect
JournalofConsumerPsychology24,4(2014)586–607
Convert fillable pdf to html - control SDK platform:C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
How to Convert PDF to HTML Webpage with C# PDF Conversion SDK
www.rasteredge.com
Convert fillable pdf to html - control SDK platform:VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
PDF to HTML Webpage Converter SDK for VB.NET PDF to HTML Conversion
www.rasteredge.com
Author's personal copy
(3)Sensemaking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 592
(4)Reducingdissonance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 592
(5)Takingvengeance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 592
(6)Encouragingrehearsal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 593
Howemotionregulationdriveswhatpeopleshare . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 593
(a)Emotionality . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 593
(b)Valence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 593
(c)Emotionalarousal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 593
Informationacquisition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 594
(1)Seekingadvice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 594
(2)Resolvingproblems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 594
Howinformationacquisitiondriveswhat peopletalkabout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 594
(a)Risky,important,complex,oruncertainty-riddendecisions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 594
(b)Lackof(trustworthy)information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 594
Social bonding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 595
(1)Reinforcesharedviews . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 595
(2)Reducinglonelinessandsocialexclusion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 595
Howsocialbondingdriveswhatpeopleshare . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 595
(a)Commonground . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 595
(b)Emotionality . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 595
Persuadingothers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 596
Howpersuadingothersdriveswhat people share . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 596
(a)Polarizedvalence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 596
(b)Arousingcontent . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 596
Separatingfunctionsfrom consciousdeliberation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 596
Iswordofmouthself-serving? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 597
Altruism? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 597
Audiencetuning? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 597
Howdoesthe audience andchannelshapewordofmouth? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 598
Communicationaudience . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 598
(1)Tiestrength . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 598
(2)Audiencesize . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 599
(3)Tiestatus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 600
Communicationchannel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 600
(1)Writtenvs. oral . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 600
(2)Identifiability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 601
(3)Audiencesalience . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 601
Otherquestionsforfutureresearch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 601
Wheniswordofmouthcontext versuscontent driven? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 601
Evolutionofconversation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 602
Not justwhatpeople talkabout buthowtheytalk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 602
Technologyandwordofmouth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 602
Conclusion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 603
References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 603
Introduction
Consumersoftenshareopinions,news,andinformationwith
others.Theychitchataboutvacations,complainaboutmovies,or
rave about restaurants. They gossip about co-workers, discuss
important political issues, and debate the latest sports rumors.
Technologies like Facebook, Twitter, and texting have only
increased the speed and ease of communication.Thousands of
blogs,millionsof tweets,andbillionsof emailsarewritteneach
day.
Suchinterpersonalcommunicationcanbedescribedaswordof
mouth,or“informalcommunicationsdirectedatotherconsumers
abouttheownership,usage,orcharacteristicsof particular goods
andservices or their sellers,”(Westbrook,1987,261).Wordof
mouth includes productrelated discussion(e.g., the Nikes were
reallycomfortable)andsharingproductrelatedcontent(e.g.,Nike
adsonYouTube).Itincludesdirectrecommendations(e.g.,you'd
love this restaurant) and mere mentions (e.g., we went to this
restaurant). It includes literal word of mouth, or face-to-face
discussions,aswellas“wordofmouse,”or onlinementionsand
reviews.
Word of mouth has a huge impact on consumer behavior.
Social talk generates over 3.3billion brand impressions each
day (Keller & & Libai, , 2009) and shapes everything from the
movies consumers watch to the websites they visit(Chevalier
& Mayzlin, 2006; Chintagunta, Gopinath, & Venkataraman,
587
J.Berger/JournalofConsumerPsychology24,4(2014)586–607
control SDK platform:C# Create PDF from OpenOffice to convert odt, odp files to PDF in
Convert OpenOffice Text Document to PDF with embedded fonts. An advanced .NET control to change ODT, ODS, ODP forms to fillable PDF formats in Visual C# .NET.
www.rasteredge.com
control SDK platform:C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
HTML webpage to interactive PDF file creator freeware. Create and save editable PDF with a blank page, bookmarks, links Create fillable PDF document with fields.
www.rasteredge.com
Author's personal copy
2010; Godes & Mayzlin,2009; Trusov, Bucklin, & Pauwels,
2009).Interpersonalcommunicationincreasesproductaware-
ness and persuades people to try things (Van den Bulte e &
Wuyts,2009).Astudyby Bughin,Doogan,andVetvik(2010)
suggestthat“wordof mouthis theprimaryfactorbehind20to
50% of all purchasing decisions…and… generates more than
twicethesales of paidadvertising”(p.8).
But while it is clear that word of mouth is frequent, and
important, less is known about the intervening behavioral
processes.Indeed,somehavecalledwordofmouth“Theworld's
mosteffective,yetleastunderstoodmarketingstrategy”(Misner,
1999).Whatdrivespeopletosharewordofmouth?Whydosome
stories,rumors,orbrandsgettalkedaboutmorethanothers?And
how does who people are talking to (e.g.,friends vs. acquain-
tances) and the channel they are communicating through (e.g.,
face-tofaceoronline)impactwhatgetsdiscussed?
This article addresses these, and related questions, as it
integrates various research perspectives to shed light on the
behavioraldriversofwordofmouth.Isuggestthatwordofmouth
canbeunderstoodintermsoffivekeyfunctionsthatitservesfor
thewordofmouthtransmitter:impression-management,emotion
regulation, information acquisition,social bonding,and persua-
sion.Further,I arguethatthesefunctionstendtobeself- (rather
thanother)servinganddrivewhatpeopleshareevenoutsidetheir
awareness.AsI willdiscusslater,evenactsof sharingattributed
toaltruism may actuallybedriven by self-oriented motives.In
addition,Isuggestthataspects oftheaudienceandcommunica-
tionchannelmoderatewhichfunctionsplayarelativelylargerrole
at any given point in time. Finally, the article closes with a
discussionoffruitfulareasfor further research.
Aswithanypaper thatattemptstoreviewalargeanddiverse
literature,choicesmustbemade.Wordofmouthstronglyimpacts
consumerbehavior,butafullreview ofitsimpactisbeyondthe
scopeof this paper (seeGodesetal.,2005for a recentreview).
Similarly, a great deal of research has examined how social
networksshapethespreadofinformationandinfluence(seeVan
den Bulte & Wuyts, 2009; Watts, 2004 forreviews),butthis
paper focuses moreonmicro-level(i.e.,individual) processesof
transmission. Finally, when considering audience and channel
characteristics, this paper focuses on how they impact what
people talk about and share rather than their selection. Future
work is needed to understand how often people select who to
sharewithandwhichchanneltosharethrough,andwhypeople
mayselectoneoptionversusanother(foradeeperdiscussion,see
Otherquestionsfor futureresearchsection).
Whypeopletalkandwhat theytalk about
Early research on interpersonal communication examined
what topics receive more discussion. In 1922, for example,
Henry Moore walked up and down the streets of New York,
eavesdroppingonconversations.Hefoundthatmentalkedalot
aboutmoneyandbusiness,whilewomen,atleastinthe1920s,
talked a lot about clothes.LandisandBurtt(1924)found that
theprevalenceof differenttopicsvariedwiththesituation:food
wastalkedaboutinrestaurants whileclothesweretalkedabout
near store windows. More recent research found that people
often talk about personal relationships and experiences
(Dunbar,Marriott,&Duncan,1997).
Knowing what topics people talk about is interesting, but it
sayslittleaboutthedriversofdiscussion,orwhypeopletalkabout
someproductsandideasmorethanothers.Fortunately,however,
pockets of researchinpsychology, sociology,communications,
andconsumer behavior havebeguntoconsider thisissue.For a
popularperspective,seeBerger(2013).
Building on this research, I suggest that word of mouth
serves five key functions: Impression Management, Emotion
Regulation, Information Acquisition, Social Bonding, and
Persuading Others (Fig.1). Below,I review support for each
of these functions,noting both the underlyingpsychologythat
drives sharing (i.e., why people share), as well the types of
things thatparticular functionleads people toshare (i.e.,what
peopletalkabout).Notethatagiveninstanceofwordofmouth
maybe drivenbymultiplemotives atthesametime.Someone
mayshareinformationabouta new technology gadget both to
look smart (impression management) and to connect with
someoneelse(socialbonding).
Impression management
One reason consumers share word of mouth is toshapethe
impressions others haveof them (andtheyhaveof themselves).
Social interactions can be seen as a performance (Goffman,
1959),where people present themselvesin particularwaysto
achievedesired impressions. Consumers oftenmake choices to
communicatedesiredidentities andavoidcommunicating unde-
sired ones (Belk, 1988; ; Berger r & & Heath, , 2007; ; Escalas s &
Bettman, 2003; Kleine, Kleine, & Kernan, 1993; Levy, 1959).
Onereasonjobapplicantsdressupforinterviews,forexample,is
becausetheywanttosignalthattheyareprofessional.Similarly,
sharingwordofmouthmaypresentwhopeopleareorwanttobe.
Similarly, interpersonal communication facilitates impression
management in three ways: (1) self-enhancement, (2) identity-
signaling, and (3) filling conversational space. I review each
individually and then discuss how they, together, affect what
peopleshare.
(1) Self-enhancement
Onewaywordof mouthfacilitates impressionmanagement
isthroughself-enhancement.
The tendency to self-enhance is a fundamental human
motivation(Fiske,2001).People liketobe perceived positively
andpresentthemselvesinwaysthatgarnersuchimpressions.Just
likethecartheydrive,whatpeopletalkaboutimpactshowothers
see them (andhow theysee themselves).Consequently,people
aremorelikelytoshare things thatmake them lookgoodrather
than bad (Chung & & Darke, 2006; ; Hennig-Thurau, Gwinner,
Walsh, & Gremler, 2004; Sundaram,Mitra, & Webster, 1998)
andlookspecial,showconnoisseurship,orgarnerstatus(Dichter,
1966;Engel,Blackwell, & Miniard,1993; Rimé,2009).Some
suggestthatstatusseekingisthemainreasonpeoplepostonline
reviews(Lampel&Bhalla,2007) andpeople aremorelikelyto
588
J.Berger/JournalofConsumerPsychology24,4(2014)586–607
control SDK platform:VB.NET Create PDF from OpenOffice to convert odt, odp files to PDF
PDF in VB.NET, VB.NET convert PDF to HTML, VB.NET convert PDF to Convert OpenOffice Spreadsheet data to PDF. Turn ODT, ODS, ODP forms into fillable PDF formats.
www.rasteredge.com
control SDK platform:VB.NET Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file
Best VB.NET component to convert Microsoft Office Word Create and save editable PDF with a blank page Create fillable PDF document with fields in Visual Basic
www.rasteredge.com
Author's personal copy
talkaboutproductsthatconveyanimpressionofbeing“with-it”
(Chung&Darke,2006).
1
(2) Identity-signaling
Beyondgenerallylookinggood,peoplealsosharethings to
communicatespecificidentities,bothtothemselvesandothers.
Ifsomeonealwaystalksaboutnewrestaurants,othersmayinfer
thattheyareafoodie.If someonealwaysknowsthelatestsports
news,othersmayassumetheyareasports-nut.Thuspeoplemay
talkaboutparticular topics or ideas notonly toself-enhancebut
alsotosignalthattheyhavecertaincharacteristics,knowledge,or
expertiseinaparticulardomain(Chung&Darke,2006;Packard&
Wooten,2013).
Researchonindividualdifferences inthepropensitytoshare
wordofmouthisconsistentwiththisperspective.Marketmavens,
orthosewithgeneralmarketplaceknowledgeorexpertise,report
beingmorelikelytoshareinformationwithothersinavarietyof
product categories (Feick&Price,1987). Other worksuggests
1
Impressionmanagementshouldleadpeopletotalkaboutthings thatmake
themlookgood,butitisworthnotingthatthismaybedrivenmorebyavoiding
bad impressionsthan pursuinggoodones.Self-presentationcan beprotective
(e.g., avoiding social disapproval, Richins, 1983; Sedikides, 1993) or
acquisitive(e.g.,seeking socialapproval,Brown,Collins,&Schmidt,1988).
Protective self-presentation, however, occurs more frequently (Baumeister,
Bratslavsky,Finkenauer,&Vohs,2001;Hoorens,1995/1996;Ogilvie,1987).
Researchonself-servingbiases,forexample,findsthatpeoplearemorelikely
to underestimate their bad traits than they are to overestimate good ones
(Hoorens, 1995/1996). Concerns about the audience making negative
inferences may reduceacquisitiveself-presentation in word ofmouth. While
peoplemaywanttoaggrandizetheiraccomplishments,braggingtoomuchmay
havetheoppositeeffect,leadingothers tomakenegativeinferencesaboutthe
self. Consequently, people often avoid direct self-praise (Speer, 2012) and
engage in “humblebragging” (Wittels, 2012) sharing their accomplishments
whilebeingself-deprecatingintheprocess.
Function
Components
Effects On Sharing
Impression-
Management
Self-Enhancement
+ Entertaining content
+ Useful information
+ Self-Concept relevant things
+ High status things
+ Unique and special things
+ Common ground
+ Accessible things
+ When aroused
Shapes content valence
Identity-Signaling
Filling Conversational 
Space
Emotion 
Regulation
Generating Social Support
+ Emotional Content
+ Arousing Content
Shapes content valence
Venting
Facilitating Sense Making
Reducing Dissonance
Taking Vengeance
Encouraging Rehearsal
Information 
Acquisition
Seeking Advice
+ Sharing when decisions are 
important or uncertain
+Sharing when alternative info 
is unavailable or 
untrustworthy
Resolving Problems
Social 
Bonding
Reinforcing Shared Views
+ Common Ground Content
+ Emotional Content
Reducing Loneliness and 
Social Exclusion
Persuasion
Persuading Others
+ Polarized Content
+ Arousing Content
Word of Mouth and Interpersonal Communication 50
Fig.1.Thefivefunctionsofwordofmouth(forthetransmitter).
589
J.Berger/JournalofConsumerPsychology24,4(2014)586–607
control SDK platform:C# PDF Field Edit Library: insert, delete, update pdf form field
A professional PDF form creator supports to create fillable PDF form in C#.NET. An advanced PDF form maker allows users to create editable PDF form in C#.NET.
www.rasteredge.com
control SDK platform:VB.NET Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF
Create fillable and editable PDF documents from Excel in Create searchable and scanned PDF files from Excel in VB Convert to PDF with embedded fonts or without
www.rasteredge.com
Author's personal copy
thatopinionleadersalsotalkmore(Katz&Lazarsfeld,1955).In
bothcases,peoplemayshare to communicate their knowledge.
While cars, clothes, and other publicly visible goods are often
used to signal identity (Berger& Heath,2007), knowledge is
usuallyprivateandmuchmoredifficulttodisplay.Consequently,
experts or individuals that have (or desire) expertise in a given
area may be particularly interested in talking about that
knowledgetodisplayittoothers.
(3)Fillingconversational space
Finally, interpersonal communication should also facilitate
impressionmanagementthroughsmalltalk.
Beyondcommunicationcontent,peoplealsoinferthingsabout
othersbasedonconversationalstyle.Rateofspeechoravoidance
ofpausesbetweenconversationalturnsbothcommunicatethings
about the speaker (Tannen, 2005). Failures to live up to
expectations on these different dimensions can lead others to
makenegativeattributions aboutaperson(Loewenstein,Morris,
Chakravarti, Thompson, & Kopelman,2005).Transitionsfrom
onepartyspeakingtotheother,forexample,usuallyoccur with
nolonggaporsilenceinbetween.Consequently,takingtoolong
torespond may leadotherstomakenegativeinferences (Clark,
1996;Sacks,Schegloff,&Jefferson,1974;Tannen,2000).That
oneisnotagreatconversationalistsordoesn'thavemuchtosay.
As aresult,peoplemayengageinsmalltalk,sharingalmost
anythingtofillconversational space.Peopleoftenbumpintoa
colleagueinthehallorrunintoanacquaintanceonthestreet.In
these,and other similar situations,peoplemaynothaveagoal
tosaythemostinterestingthingpossible,buttheydonotwant
tostandthereinsilence.
Howimpressionmanagement drives what people share
Taken together, these underlying components (i.e., self-
enhancement, identity-signaling, and filling conversational
space) providesomesuggestionabouthow impressionmanage-
ment shapes what people talk about and share. In particular, I
suggestthatimpressionmanagementshouldencouragepeopleto
share (a) entertaining, (b) useful, (c) self-concept relevant, (d)
statusrelated,(e) unique,(f)commonground,and(g) accessible
things whilealso(h) leadingincidentalarousaltoboostsharing
and(i)affectingthevalenceofthecontentshared.
(a)Entertainingthings
Impressionmanagementshouldleadmoreentertaining(i.e.,
interesting, surprising, funny, or extreme) things to be
discussedbecause sharingentertainingthingsmakes thesharer
seem interesting,funny,andin-the-know.
Consistent with this suggestion, a variety of research finds
that interesting, surprising, novel, and funny things are more
likely to be shared. Interesting products (e.g., night vision
goggles) get more immediate (Berger&Schwartz,2011) and
online(Berger&Iyengar,2013) wordof mouththanmundane
products (e.g., toothpaste) and more interesting or surprising
New York Times articles are more likely to make the paper's
Most Emailed List (Berger & & Milkman, , 2012). Consumers
reportbeingmorelikelytosharewordofmouthaboutoriginal
products(Moldovan,Goldenberg,&Chattopadhyay2011)and
interesting and surprising urban legends (Heath, Bell, , &
Sternberg, 2001). Moderate controversy boosts word of
mouthbecause it makes discussion more interesting (Chen&
Berger,2013).
Researchonextremityisalsoconsistentwiththenotionthat
impressionmanagementleadsentertainingthingstobeshared.
Comparedto normative stories (e.g., John caught a 10-pound
fish), people are more likely to pass on extreme stories (e.g.,
John caught a 200-pound fish; Heath & & DeVoe, , 2005).
Impressionmanagementalsoleads people todistortthestories
they tell. Around 60% of stories are distorted in one way or
another(Marsh&Tversky,2004),andentertainmentgoalslead
people to exaggerate andmake stories more extreme (Burrus,
Kruger,&Jurgens,2006;alsosee Heath,1996).
(b) Usefulinformation
Impressionmanagementshouldalsoleadusefulinformation
(e.g., advice or discounts) to be shared because it makes the
sharer seemsmartandhelpful.
Consistent with this suggestion, researchers have long
theorizedthatpeoplesharerumors,folktales,andurbanlegends
notonly for entertainment, but “because they seem toconvey
true,worthwhileandrelevantinformation”(Brunvand,1981,p.
11; also see Allport & Postman, 1947; Rosnow, 1980;
Shibutani, 1966). Rumors about t a flu shot shortage, , for
example, provide information that it would be good to get
oneearlythis year toensureprotection.
Empirical evidencealso suggests that usefulinformation is
morelikelytobepassedon.Usefulstories(Berger&Milkman,
2012; Heath et al., 2001) and marketing g messages s (Chiu,
Chiou,Fang, Lin,& Wu, 2007)aremorelikelytobeshared.
Restaurantreviews,for instance,areparticularlylikelytomake
the New York Times most emailed list. Usefulness may also
explain why higher quality brands are more likely to be
discussed (Lovett,Peres,&Shachar,2013).
(c)Self-conceptrelevantthings
Impression management should lead people to discuss
identity-relevant information. Certain products (e.g., cars,
clothes, and hairstyles) are more symbolic of identity than
others (e.g., laundry detergent) and these products are often
usedaremarkers or signals of identity(Belk,1988;Berger&
Heath, 2007; Shavitt, 1990). Identity-relevance also o varies
between individual consumers. Some people care a lot about
politics andsee knowledge inthat domain as a signal of who
they are, while others could care less. These differences in
self-conceptrelevanceshouldimpactwordof mouth.
Consistentwiththis suggestion,peoplesharemore wordof
mouth for symbolic products than utilitarian ones (Chung &
Darke,2006).Similarly,thegreaterthegapbetweenactualand
ideal knowledge, the more likely people are to talk about a
domain(Packard&Wooten,2013).This indicates thatpeople
talk not onlytosignal whothey are,butwho theywould like
tobe.
590
J.Berger/JournalofConsumerPsychology24,4(2014)586–607
control SDK platform:VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to
Convert to PDF with embedded fonts or without original fonts fast. Convert multiple pages PowerPoint to fillable and editable PDF documents.
www.rasteredge.com
control SDK platform:VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
Create PDF files from both DOC and DOCX formats. Convert multiple pages Word to fillable and editable PDF documents.
www.rasteredge.com
Author's personal copy
(d) Highstatusgoods
Impressionmanagementshouldencourage highstatus goods
tobe talkedabout.Talkingaboutowninga Rolexshouldmake
people seem wealthy and high status. Indeed there is some
evidencethatpremium brands arediscussedmore(Lovettetal.,
2013).Informationcanalsoconnotestatus,andpeoplemayshare
knowledgetoshowtheyarein-the-know(Ritson&Elliott,1999).
(e) Unique things
Impression management should also encourage unique or
special products to be discussed. Talking about one's limited
editionsneakers or other distinctiveproducts andexperiences,
makespeopleseemmore uniqueor differentiatedfromothers.
Peoplewithhighneedsforuniqueness,however,maytalkin
ways that discourage product adoption. Talking about unique
products makes people seem unique, but it can also facilitate
others adoptio, which reduces the sharers' uniqueness. Conse-
quently,highneedfor uniquenessindividualsareless willingto
generatepositivewordofmouthforpubliclyconsumedproducts
they own (Cheema&Kaikati,2010). Similarly,early adopters
with high needs for uniqueness may“shareandscare,”sharing
favorable word of mouth but mentioning product complexity
(Moldovan,Steinhart,&Ofen,2012).
(f) Commonground
Impression management should also encourage people to
talk about things they have in common with others (Clark,
1996; Grice, 1989; Stalnaker, 1978; see e the Social bonding
section for a more in-depth discussion). Covering common
groundshouldleadtheconversationtogomoresmoothly,lead
conversationpartners toperceivemoreinterpersonalsimilarity,
and leadthe sharer tolookbetter as aresult.
(g) Emotionalvalence
Impression management should also influence the valence
of what people share, or whether they pass on positive or
negativewordof mouth.
Someresearchsuggeststhatpositivewordofmouthshouldbe
more likely to generate desired impressions. Talking about
positiveexperiencessupports one's expertise(i.e.,therestaurant
Ichoosewasgreat,Wojnicki&Godes,2011)andpeoplemayjust
wanttoavoidassociatingthemselveswithnegativethings.People
prefer interacting with positive others (Bell, 1978; ; Folkes &
Sears,1977;Kamins,Folkes,&Perner,1997),soconsumersmay
sharepositivethingstoavoidseeminglikeanegativepersonora
“Debbie Downer.” Consistent with this notion, people prefer
sharingpositive rather than negative news (Berger&Milkman,
2012;see Tesser& Rosen,1975forareview)inpartbecauseit
makesthemlookbetter.Self enhancementmayalsoexplainwhy
there are more positive than negative reviews (Chevalier &
Mayzlin,2006;East,Hammond,&Wright,2007).
Otherresearch,however,suggeststhatnegativewordofmouth
canfacilitate desiredimpressions.Reviewerswereseenas more
intelligent, competent, and expert when theywrote negative as
opposedtopositivereviews(Amabile,1983).Similarly,concerns
about public evaluation led people to express more negative
ratingsinsomesituations(Schlosser,2005).
One important moderator may be whether the item or
experiencebeingdiscussedsignalssomethingaboutthespeaker.
Whensomeonechoosesarestaurant,orsharesonlinecontent,the
valence of that thing reflects on them. If it is good (bad) that
makesthemlookgood(bad).Consequently,peoplemayspread
positivewordofmouthtoshowtheymakegoodchoices.When
someonehaslesstodowithchoosingsomething,however,then
whether that thing is good or bad signals less about them.
Consequently, people may be more willing to share negative
wordofmouthtoshow theyhavediscriminatingtaste.
Consistentwiththisperspective,researchfinds thatwhether
people are talking about themselves versus others moderates
wordof mouthvalence (Kamins,Folkes,&Perner,1997;De
Angelis, Bonezzi, Peluso, Rucker, & Costabile, in press).
People generate positive word of mouth when talking about
their ownexperiences (becauseitmakes themlookgood),but
transmit negative word of mouth when talking about others'
experiences (becauseitmakes themlookrelativelybetter).
(h) Incidental arousal
Impression management may also lead incidental arousal to
increasesharing.Incidentalarousal(e.g.,runninginplace)canspill
over to increase the sharing of even unrelated content (Berger,
2011).Similarly,earlyworkonrumortransmissionsuggeststhat
rumors flourishintimes of conflict,crisis,and catastrophe (e.g.,
naturaldisasters),duetothegeneralizedanxiety(i.e.,arousal)those
situations induce (Koenig, 1985, see Heathet al., 2001). One
reason may be self-enhancement. If people misattribute their
generalfeelingof arousaltoastoryorrumor theyareconsidering
sharing,theymaycometoinfer thatthispieceofcontentismore
interesting, entertaining, or engaging. Impression management
motivationsshouldthenincreasetransmission.
(i) Accessibility
As notedearlier,impressionmanagement shouldencourage
smalltalk,and,asaresult,leadmoreaccessibleproducts tobe
discussed.
Consistent with this perspective, products that are cued or
triggeredmorefrequentlybytheenvironmentgetmorewordof
mouth (Berger&Schwartz,2011). Eighty percent of wordof
mouth about coffee, for example, was driven by related cues
(e.g.,seeinganadortalkingaboutfood,Belk,1971).Similarly,
word of mouth referrals often occur when related topics are
beingdiscussed(Brown&Reingen,1987). Accessibility also
helps explains why more advertised products receive more
word of mouth (Onishi&Manchanda,2012). More frequent
advertising should make the product more top-of-mind, and
thus morelikelyto beshared.
Accessibilitymayalsoexplainwhypubliclyvisibleproducts
(e.g.,shirtsrather thansocks) getmore wordofmouth(Berger
& Schwartz, 2011; Lovett et al., 2013). Increased d visibility
shouldincrease the chancethataproductor ideaisaccessible,
whichinturn,shouldmakeitmorelikelytobediscussedwhen
peoplearelookingfor somethingtotalkabout.
Taken together, impression management should encourage
people to talk about (1) entertaining content, (2) useful
information, (3) self-concept relevant things, (4) things that
591
J.Berger/JournalofConsumerPsychology24,4(2014)586–607
control SDK platform:C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
Convert multiple pages Word to fillable and editable PDF documents in both .NET WinForms and ASP.NET. Convert both DOC and DOCX formats to PDF files.
www.rasteredge.com
control SDK platform:C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF
Convert multiple pages PowerPoint to fillable and editable PDF documents. Easy to create searchable and scanned PDF files from PowerPoint.
www.rasteredge.com
Author's personal copy
convey status, (5) unique and special things, (6) common
ground,and(7) accessibleor publiclyvisible thingswhilealso
(8)leadingincidentalarousaltoboostsharingand(9) affecting
thevalenceof thecontentshared.
Emotion regulation
Asecond function of word of mouth is to help consumers
regulate their emotions. Emotion regulation refers to the ways
peoplemanagewhichemotionstheyhave,whentheyhavethem,
andhowtheyexperienceandexpressthem (Gross,1998,2008).
Externalfactors(e.g.,aterribleflight)impacttheemotionspeople
experience, but emotion regulation describes the processes
throughwhichconsumersmanagetheiremotions.If theflightis
terriblydelayed,forexample,peoplemaytrytoreducetheiranger
byremindingthemselvesthatitwillbeoversoon.
Whileprevailingemotionregulationapproaches(e.g.,Park&
Folkman,1997)considertheselfinisolation,otherresearchers
havenotedthatcommunalaspectsaidcoping(Dunahoo,Hobfoll,
Monnier, Hulsizer,& Johnson,1998).Theseapproachesargue
thatthesocialsharingof emotion(seeRimé,2009for areview)
provides an important channel for sharers to regulate their
emotion.Ifthedelayedflightissittingonthetarmac,forexample,
peopledon'tjusttrytoreappraisethesituation,theymayalsocall
their friendtocomplainandcommiserate.
Sharingwithothers should facilitateemotionregulationina
number of ways including (1) generating social support,
(2) venting, (3) facilitating sense making, (4) reducing disso-
nance, (5) taking vengeance, and(6) encouraging rehearsal. I
review eachcomponent individuallyand then discusshow they
affectwhatpeopleshare.
(1)Generatingsocialsupport
One way interpersonal communication should facilitate
emotionregulationis bygeneratinghelpandsocialsupport.
Particularly when people have had a negative experience,
talkingto others can provide comfort and consolation (Rimé,
2007, 2009).This,inturn,mayhelpbuffernegativefeelings
thatarise fromnegativeemotional experiences.Indeed,classic
workbySchachter(1959)foundthatpeoplewhowereanxious
aboutreceivinganelectric shockpreferredtowaitwithothers.
While many explanations have been suggested for this effect,
one possibilityis that others provideemotional support. More
recently,researchfindsthatsharingwithothersafteranegative
emotional experience boosted well-being because it increased
perceivedsocialsupport(Buechel&Berger,2012).
(2)Venting
Interpersonal communication should also foster emotion
regulationisbyallowingpeopletovent(Hennig-Thurauetal.,
2004; Sundaram etal.,1998;thoughsee Rimé,2009).
Flights get canceled and customer services representatives
can be rude. Talking with others can help people deal with
these negativeconsumption experiences andprovidecatharsis
that helps reduce the emotional impact (Pennebaker, 1999;
Pennebaker, Zech, & Rimé, 2001). Compared to keeping g it
bottledinside,expressinganger mayhelppeoplefeelbetter.
Consistent withthis theorizing, 90% of people believe that
sharinganemotionalexperiencewillberelieving(Zech,1999).
In interpersonal interactions, the desire for catharsis is one
reason people share negative personal experiences (Alickeet
al., 1992; Berkowitz, 1970).In the consumer context, work
suggests thatangryconsumers (Wetzer,Zeelenberg,&Pieters,
2007)ordissatisfiedcustomers(Anderson,1998)sharewordof
mouthtovent.
(3) Sensemaking
Interpersonal communication shouldalsofacilitate emotion
regulationthrough helpingpeopleattainabetter senseof what
is happeningandwhy(Rimé,2009).
Emotional stimulioftenelicitambiguous sensations.Some-
onewhoisfiredfromtheir jobmayfeelnegatively,butmaybe
uncertain about whether they feel angry, sad, or both.
Alternatively, people may feel a particular emotion (e.g.,
anxiety) but not be sure why. Talking with others can help
people understand what they feel and why (Rimé,Mesquita,
Philippot,&Boca,1991;Rosnow,1980).Puttingemotioninto
words requires clear and thoughtful articulation, which can
fostercognitivereappraisalandsensemakingofthedistressing
experience (i.e. cognitive emotion regulation;Gross& John,
2003). This insight t can lead to o recovery y from the e negative
experience and increased long-term well-being (Frattaroli,
1996; Lyubomirsky,Sousa,& Dickerhoof, 2006;Pennebaker,
1999;Pennebaker et al.,2001;Smyth,1998).
(4) Reducingdissonance
Sharing should also aid emotion regulation by allowing
peopletoreducedissonance.
Inextremesituations whereexperiences challengepeople's
way of seeing the world, sharing may help people cope
(Festinger, Riecken, & & Schachter, 1956). On a daily basis,
however, consumers are more likely to share with others to
confirm their own judgment (Dichter,1966). Even after they
have made a decision, consumers are often uncertain about
whether they made the right choice, so talking to others can
helpbolster thedecisionandreducefeelingsofdoubt(Engelet
al.,1993;Rosnow,1980).
(5) Taking vengeance
Though not as common as some of the other functions,
sharingshouldalsoallowconsumers toregulatetheir emotions
through punishing a company or individual for a negative
consumptionexperience(Curren&Folkes,1987;Folkes,1984;
Grégoire & Fisher, 2008; Grégoire, Tripp, & Legoux, 2009;
Hennig-Thurau et al., 2004; Richins, 1983; Sundaram et al.,
1998;Ward&Ostrom,2006).Whilesimilartoventinginsome
ways (i.e., it may provide catharsis), taking vengeance is
slightlydifferent inthat the consumer's goalis notjusttofeel
better but topunishthecompany.
592
J.Berger/JournalofConsumerPsychology24,4(2014)586–607
Author's personal copy
Consistent withthissuggestion,angry,frustrated,or dissatis-
fiedconsumersaremorelikelytosharenegativewordofmouthto
takerevenge(Anderson,1998;Wetzeretal.,2007).
(6) Encouragingrehearsal
Finally, sharing should also foster emotion regulation by
allowing people to rehearse and relive positive emotional
experiences (Hennig-Thurauetal.,2004;Rimé,2009).
Re-accessing past emotional experiences should revive
relatedfeelings,andasaresult,people maytalkaboutpositive
experiences because it elicits pleasurable feelings. Dichter
(1966), for example, talks about t word d of mouth as “verbal
consumption” allowing people to “relive the pleasure the
speaker hasobtained,”(p.149).Sharingwordofmouthabouta
delicious5-courseFrenchdinneroramazingBrazilianvacation
may encourage rumination and savoring of these positive
events. Indeed, Langston (1994) found that communicating
positive events toothers enhanced positive affect,evenabove
and beyond the affect associated with the experiences itself
(alsoseeGable,Reis,Impett,&Asher,2004).
Howemotionregulationdrives what peopleshare
Takentogether,thesevariousunderlyingcomponentsprovide
some suggestion about how emotion regulation shapes what
people share. In particular, I suggest that emotion regulation
should (a) drive people to share more emotional content,
(b) influence the valence of the content shared, and (c) lead
peopletosharemoreemotionallyarousingcontent.
(a) Emotionality
Emotionregulationshouldleadmoreemotionalthingstobe
shared.Psychologicalresearchonthesocialsharingofemotion
(seeRimé,2009for a review) argues that people share up to
90% of their emotional experiences with others (Mesquita,
1993; Vergara, 1993; Rimé, Finkenauer, Luminet, Zech, &
Philippot,1992;alsosee Walker,Skowronski,Gibbons,Vogl,
&Ritchie,2009).
Experimental work is consistent with this perspective.
Movies are morelikely to be discussed, andnews articles are
more likely to be shared, if they are higher in emotional
intensity (Berger & & Milkman, , 2012; Luminet, Bouts, Delie,
Manstead,&Rime,2000).Peoplearemorewillingtoforward
emails with higher hedonic value (Chiu et al., 2007), share
more emotional social anecdotes (Peters, Kashima,& & Clark,
2009), and retell urban legends that evoked more e disgust,
interest,surprise,joy,or contempt (Heathetal.,2001).Highly
satisfiedandhighlydissatisfiedcustomersarealsomore likely
to share word of mouth (Anderson, 1998; also see Richins,
1983).
Some emotions, however, may decrease sharing. There is
some suggestion that shame and guilt decrease transmission
(Finkenauer&Rime,1998), potentially because sharing such
thingsmakespeoplelookbad.Extremelystrongemotions(e.g.,
highlevels of fear) may also stunt sharingas they generate a
stateofshockthatdecreasesthechancepeopletakeanyaction.
(b) Valence
Beyondemotioningeneral,emotionregulationshould also
impactthevalence,or positivityandnegativity,ofwhatpeople
share.
Emotion regulation tends to focus on the management of
negative emotions. Further, when considering interpersonal
communication, it's clear that people often share negative
emotions with others to make themselves feel better. Indeed,
manyof the functions of social sharing reviewed above skew
towardsreducingnegativeemotion(e.g.,anxietyor feelingsof
dissonance). Thus one could argue that emotion regulation
shouldleadpeopletosharenegativeemotionalexperiencesasa
waytoimprovetheir mood.
Other aspects of emotion regulation, however, may lead
people tosharepositivethings.As discussedinthesectionon
rehearsal,consumers sharepositiveemotionstore-consumeor
extend the positive affect.Whensomethinggoodhappens,we
want to tell others. An exciting date, big promotion, or
delicious dinners are all wonderful experiences, and they are
more enjoyable whenshared.
Consequently, whether emotional regulation encourages
positive or negative things to be shared may depend on the
particularcomponent beingserved.
Further, while social sharing is a fruitful way to deal with
negative emotions, other concerns may inhibit sharing nega-
tivity. As discussed in the impression management section,
people may avoid sharing negative stories or information to
avoidcomingoffasanegativeperson.Postingnegativecontent
can lead people to be liked less (Forest & & Wood, 2012).
Sharing negative things can also be uncomfortable, and
discomfort has been shown to decrease willingness to share
(Chen& Berger, 2013). Thus even though sharing negative
emotions can be beneficial, impression managementconcerns
maydeter peoplefrom doingso.
2
(c) Emotionalarousal
Emotion regulation should also lead more emotionally
arousing things to be shared. In addition to valence, another
key way that emotions differ is their level of physiological
arousal,oractivation(i.e.,increasedheartrate,Heilman,1997).
Anxiety and sadness are both negative emotional states, for
example, but they differ in the level of arousal they induce
(Christie&Friedman,2004).
On the negative side, compared to low arousal emotions
(e.g.,sadness),experiencinghigharousalemotions(e.g.,anger
or anxiety) should increase the need to vent. On the positive
side, compared to low arousal emotions (e.g., contentment),
feeling high arousalemotions (e.g.,excitementor amusement)
should increase desires for rehearsal.Dichter(1966),suggests
2
Notethatcultureplaysanimportantroleinemotionexpression.Researchon
idealaffect,forexample,shows thatwhileEuropean Americansvalue being
excited, East Asians value being calm (seeTsai, 2007for areview). These
differencesalsoimpactcommunication.Whentalkingabouttheirrelationships,
EuropeanAmericancouplesexpresshigharousalpositiveemotionsmorethan
ChineseAmericans(Tsai,Levenson,& McCoy,2006).Thus whichemotions
peoplefeel comfortable expressing, and which require regulation, may vary
cross-culturally.
593
J.Berger/JournalofConsumerPsychology24,4(2014)586–607
Author's personal copy
that sharing word of mouth allows people to “dispose of the
excitement aroused by use of the product,” (p. 149; also see
Sundaram et al., 1998). High arousal emotions s are also
associated with greater levels of activation, which should
encouragesharing more generally(Berger,2011).
Anumberofresearchfindingsareconsistentwiththenotion
that arousal increases social transmission. News articles that
evoke high arousal emotions,like awe, anger,or anxiety, are
more likely to be highly shared,whilearticles that evoke low
arousal emotion, like sadness, are less likely to be highly
shared,andarousalmediatestheseeffects (Berger&Milkman,
2012).SuperBowladsthatelicitmoreemotionalengagement
(i.e.,biometric responses likeskin conductance) receive more
buzz (Siefert et al., , 2009). Further, the fact that surprising,
novel, or outrageousness content is more likely to be shared
may also be consistent with the notion that arousal boosts
transmission.
Takentogether, emotion regulationmay (1) drive people to
share more emotional content, (2) influence the valence of the
contenttheyshare,and(3)leadpeopletosharemoreemotionally
arousingcontent.
Information acquisition
Athirdfunctionofwordofmouthistoacquireinformation.
Consumers are often uncertain about what to buy or how to
solveaparticularproblem,sotheyturntoothersforassistance.
Theyusewordofmouthtoactivelyseekinformation.Toobtain
theinformationtheyneed,theytalkabout thatproduct or idea
themselves(i.e.,bringitup).
Sharing should enable information acquisition via (1)
seeking advice and (2) resolving problems. I review each
individuallyandthendiscusshow theyaffectwhatgetsshared.
(1)Seekingadvice
One way word of mouth seems to facilitate information
acquisitionisbyhelpingconsumersseekadvice(Dichter,1966;
Hennig-Thurauetal.,2004; Rimé,2009).
People are often uncertain about what they should do in a
particularsituation.ShouldIadoptthisnewtechnologyorwaita
couplemonths?WhichmovieshouldIsee,theromanticcomedy
ortheactionflick?Peopleusewordofmouthto getassistance:
Forsuggestionsaboutwhattodo,recommendations,orevenjust
anoutsideperspective(Fitzsimons&Lehmann,2004;Tost,Gino,
&Larrick,2012;Zhao&Xie,2011).
Research on gossip is consistent with this perspective,
arguing that one of gossip's key functions is helping people
learn about the world around them (Baumeister, Zhang, &
Vohs,2004).Ratherthantryingtoacquireinformationthrough
trial and error, or direct observation of others (which may be
difficult), gossip serves as a form of observational learning,
allowing people to acquire relevant information quickly and
easily.HearingastoryabouthowVerizonhasterriblecustomer
service, for example, may help other consumers avoid that
brand. Related research (Dunbar,1998; Dunbaretal.,1997)
suggests that interpersonal communication allows people to
acquirerelevantinformationaboutothers' behavior.
(2) Resolvingproblems
Theotherwaywordofmouthseemstofacilitateinformation
acquisition is through helping people resolve problems
(Sundarametal.,1998).
Choices may not work out as planned, preferences may
change,andproductsmaybreak.Bytalkingtoothers,consumers
can get advice on how to deal with these issues and fix the
problem. Telling a friend about faultyshoes, for example,may
helppeoplelearnaboutacompany's 30-daynoquestions asked
returnpolicy.
Consistent with this suggestion, people who reported using
word of mouth to help solving problems commented more on
onlineopinionplatforms(Hennig-Thurauetal.,2004).Similarly,
people often use interpersonal communication to solve health
problems(Knapp&Daly,2002).
Howinformationacquisitiondrives whatpeopletalkabout
The underlying components (i.e., seeking advice and
resolving problems) provide some suggestion about how
information acquisition shapes what people talk about and
share. In particular, I suggest that information acquisition
shoulddrivepeopletotalkabout(a) risky,important,complex,
or uncertainty-ridden decisions and (b) decisions where
(trustworthy) informationislacking.
(a) Risky,important,complex,or uncertainty-riddendecisions
Consumersshouldbeparticularlylikelytousewordofmouth
to acquire information when decisions are risky, important,
complex,or riddenwithuncertainty.Ifsomeoneisconsideringa
newtypeofopenheartsurgery,theywilllikelytrytotalktoothers
whohaveundergonesimilarprocedurestomakethemfeelbetter
aboutthedecision.Consistentwiththissuggestion,thereissome
evidencethat brands that involve morerisk are discussedmore
(Lovettetal.,2013).Talkingtoothers canreducerisk,simplify
complexity, and increase consumers' confidence that they are
doingtherightthing(Engeletal.,1993;Gatignon&Robertson,
1986;Hennig-Thurau&Walsh,2004).
(b) Lackof (trustworthy) information
Peopleshouldalsousewordofmouthtoacquireinformation
whenothertypes ofinformationarelacking.Iflittleinformation
exists about a particular travel destination, for example,
consumerswillbemorelikelytotalktootherstofindoutmore.
If company generatedcontent (e.g., website or advertisements)
is all the information that exists about a particular product,
consumers should use word of mouth to acquire additional
information.
Insum,informationacquisitionmotives mayleadpeople to
talkmorewhen(1) decisions arerisky,important,complex,or
uncertainty-riddenor(2)alternativesourcesof informationare
unavailableor nottrustworthy.
594
J.Berger/JournalofConsumerPsychology24,4(2014)586–607
Author's personal copy
Socialbonding
Afourthfunctionofwordofmouthistoconnectwithothers
(Rimé, 2009). Dunbar's social bonding hypothesis (1998,
2004)arguesthatlanguageevolvedasacheapmethodofsocial
grooming.Rather thanactuallyhavingtopick nitsoutof each
other's hair, language allows humans to quickly and easily
reinforcebonds andkeeptabsonalargesetof socialothers.
Whether or notlanguageoriginallyevolvedforthisreason,it
is clear that talking and sharing with others serves a bonding
function. People have a fundamental desire for social relation-
ships(Baumeister&Leary,1995)andinterpersonalcommunica-
tionhelpsfillthatneed(Hennig-Thurauetal.,2004).Itconnects
uswithothersandreinforcesthatwecareaboutthemandwhatis
going on in their lives (Wetzer et al., 2007). Interpersonal
communicationcanactlike“socialglue”bringingpeopletogether
andstrengtheningsocialties.
3
Indeed,onereasonpeopleengage
in brand communities is to connect with like-minded' others
(Muniz&O'Guinn,2001).
Alongthese lines,researchers use the term phatic commu-
nication (Malinowski,1923) to describe conversations whose
function is to “create social rapport rather than to convey
information,”(Rettie,2009,p.1135).Someworksuggeststhat
59% of text messages are phatic in nature,conveying simply
thatthesender is thinkingof therecipient(Rettie,2009).
Sharingseems tofacilitatesocialbondingthrough(1)rein-
forcing shared views and (2) reducing loneliness and social
exclusion. I review each component individually and then
discusshowtheyaffectwhatpeopleshare.
(1) Reinforce sharedviews
One way sharing should deepen social bonds is through
reinforcing shared views, group membership, andone's place
inthesocialhierarchy.
What people buy or consume acts as a communication
system,delineatinggroupmembershipsandallowingpeopleto
connectwithsimilar others(Berger&Heath,2007;DiMaggio,
1987; Douglas & Isherwood, 1978).Wordofmouthservesa
similarfunction.Talkingtoafriendaboutabandyoubothlike,
or a political issue you feel similarly about, should reinforce
that you have things in common. Talking about popular
advertisements, for example, gives teenagers common ground
andatypeofsocialcurrencythatallowsthemtofitinwiththeir
peers andshow theyarein-the-know (Ritson&Elliott,1999).
(2) Reducingloneliness andsocialexclusion
Sharing should also deepen social bonds throughreducing
feelings of lonelinessor socialexclusion.
Loneliness is an undesirable feeling of social isolation
driven by how one feels about their frequency of interaction
(Wang,Zhu,& Shiv,2012). Social exclusion refers to when
people feel ostracized or rejected. Loneliness and social
exclusionshouldincreasepeople'sdesirefor socialconnection
(Lakin,Chartrand,&Arkin,2008;Maner,DeWall,Baumeister,
&Schaller, 2007),whichshould,inturn,leadpeopletoreach
out and communicate with others. Sharing should decrease
interpersonaldistanceandhelppeoplefeelclosertoothers.
While it is not the same as loneliness, boredom may have
similar effects.Boredomisastateoflackofinterestorthingsto
do.Whileitisnotasocialdeficitper se,itmayleadpeopleto
reach out to others for entertainment or just something to fill
time.
Howsocialbondingdrives whatpeopleshare
Thedesiretoreinforcesharedviews,reduceloneliness,and
decreasesocialexclusionprovidessomesuggestionabouthow
socialbondingmotivesshapewhatpeopleshare.Inparticular,I
suggest that social bonding should drive people to talk about
things that are (a) common ground or (b) more emotional in
nature.
(a) Commonground
Socialbondingshoulddrivepeopletotalkaboutthingsthey
have in common with others (Clark,1996;Stalnaker,1978).
Peopleoftentalkabouttheweather or whattheyaredoingthis
weekend not because these subjects are the most interesting,
but because they are common ground(Grice,1989),or topics
thateveryonecanrelatetoandcommenton.
Peopleprefertalkingaboutcommongroundtopicsbecauseit
makes them feel more socially connected (Clark& Kashima,
2007).Talkingaboutsuchcommunaltopicsincreasesthechance
that others can weigh in, increasing the bond between
conversation partners. Consistent with this suggestion, more
familiarbaseballplayersgetmorementionsinonlinediscussion
groups(evencontrollingfor actualperformance;Fast,Heath,&
Wu,2009).
(b) Emotionality
Social bonding motives should also encourage people to
share more emotional items. Sharing an emotional story or
narrative increases the chance that others will feel similarly.
Tellinga funny story,for example,makes boththesharer and
recipient laugh. This emotional similarity increases group
cohesiveness (Barsade & Gibson, , 2007) and helps people
synchronize attention, cognition, and behavior to coordinate
action.
Note that social bonding may be both a driver and a
consequence of emotion sharing. While some research finds
thatemotionsharingbondspeopletogether(Peters&Kashima,
2007),otherworksuggeststhatfeelinghigharousalemotions
may increase social bonding needs (Chan & & Berger, 2013).
Thus experiencing high arousal emotions may increase the
desiretoconnectwithothers,which,inturn,mayleadpeopleto
communicatetosatisfythatneed.
3
Whilesocialbondingisrelatedtothesocialsupportmotivediscussedinthe
emotion regulation section, itis different in some fundamental ways.Social
supportrefersto gettinghelp when needed,usually helping peoplefeel better
after anegativeeventoccurs.Social bonding,incontrast,refers to the more
general desire forsocial connection and to keep up with others, even when
nothingiswrong.
595
J.Berger/JournalofConsumerPsychology24,4(2014)586–607
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested