problems 
965
52. Suppose you wrap wire onto the core from a roll of cel-
lophane tape to make a coil. Describe how you can use 
a bar magnet to produce an induced voltage in the 
coil. What is the order of magnitude of the emf you 
generate? State the quantities you take as data and 
their values.
53. A circular coil enclosing 
an area of 100 cm2 is made 
of 200 turns of copper 
wire (Figure P31.53). The 
wire making up the coil 
has no resistance; the ends 
of the wire are connected 
across a 5.00-V resistor to 
form a closed circuit. Ini-
tially, a 1.10-T uniform magnetic field points perpendic-
ularly upward through the plane of the coil. The direc-
tion of the field then reverses so that the final magnetic 
field has a magnitude of 1.10 T and points downward 
through the coil. If the time interval required for the 
field to reverse directions is 0.100 s, what is the average 
current in the coil during that time?
54. A circular loop of wire of resistance R 5 0.500 V and 
radius r 5 8.00 cm is in a uniform magnetic field 
directed out of the page as in Figure P31.54. If a clock-
wise current of I 5 2.50 mA is induced in the loop,  
(a) is the magnetic field increasing or decreasing in 
time? (b) Find the rate at which the field is changing 
with time.
B
out
S
r
I
Figure P31.54
55. A rectangular loop of area A 5 0.160 m2 is placed in 
a region where the magnetic field is perpendicular to 
the plane of the loop. The magnitude of the field is 
allowed to vary in time according to B 5 0.350 e2t/2.00, 
where B is in teslas and t is in seconds. The field has the 
constant value 0.350 T for t , 0. What is the value for 
e
at t 5 4.00 s?
56. A rectangular loop of area A is placed in a region 
where the magnetic field is perpendicular to the plane 
of the loop. The magnitude of the field is allowed to 
vary in time according to B 5 B
max
e2t/t, where B
max
and 
t are constants. The field has the constant value B
max
for t , 0. Find the emf induced in the loop as a func-
tion of time.
57. Strong magnetic fields are used in such medical proce-
dures as magnetic resonance imaging, or MRI. A techni-
cian wearing a brass bracelet enclosing area 0.005 00 m2  
R
B
S
Figure P31.53
M
S
BIO
places her hand in a solenoid whose magnetic field 
is 5.00T directed perpendicular to the plane of the 
bracelet. The electrical resistance around the bracelet’s 
circumference is 0.020 0 V. An unexpected power fail-
ure causes the field to drop to 1.50 T in a time interval 
of 20.0 ms. Find (a) the current induced in the bracelet 
and (b) the power delivered to the bracelet. Note: As this 
problem implies, you should not wear any metal objects 
when working in regions of strong magnetic fields.
58. Consider the apparatus shown in Figure P31.58 in which 
a conducting bar can be moved along two rails con-
nected to a lightbulb. The whole system is immersed in a 
magnetic field of magnitude B 5 0.400 T perpendicular 
and into the page. The distance between the horizontal 
rails is , 5 0.800 m. The resistance of the lightbulb is 
R5 48.0 V, assumed to be constant. The bar and rails 
have negligible resistance. The bar is moved toward the 
right by a constant force of magnitude F 5 0.600 N. We 
wish to find the maximum power delivered to the light-
bulb. (a)Find an expression for the current in the light-
bulb as a function of B, ,, R, and v, the speed of the bar.  
(b) When the maximum power is delivered to the light-
bulb, what analysis model properly describes the mov-
ing bar? (c) Use the analysis model in part (b) to find 
a numerical value for the speed v of the bar when the 
maximum power is being delivered to the lightbulb.  
(d) Find the current in the lightbulb when maximum 
power is being delivered to it. (e) Using P5 I2R, what 
is the maximum power delivered to the lightbulb?  
(f) What is the maximum mechanical input power deliv-
ered to the bar by the force F? (g) We have assumed the 
resistance of the lightbulb is constant. In reality, as the 
power delivered to the lightbulb increases, the filament 
temperature increases and the resistance increases. 
Does the speed found in part (c) change if the resistance 
increases and all other quantities are held constant? 
(h) If so, does the speed found in part (c) increase or 
decrease? If not, explain. (i) With the assumption that 
the resistance of the lightbulb increases as the current 
increases, does the power found in part (f) change?  
(j) If so, is the power found in part (f) larger or smaller? 
If not, explain.
F
S
,
Figure P31.58
59. A guitar’s steel string vibrates (see Fig. 31.5). The com-
ponent of magnetic field perpendicular to the area of 
a pickup coil nearby is given by
B 5 50.0 1 3.20 sin 1 046pt
where B is in milliteslas and t is in seconds. The circu-
lar pickup coil has 30 turns and radius 2.70 mm. Find 
the emf induced in the coil as a function of time.
GP
Pdf to html converters - Convert PDF to html files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
How to Convert PDF to HTML Webpage with C# PDF Conversion SDK
pdf to html converter online; convert pdf to html code for email
Pdf to html converters - VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
PDF to HTML Webpage Converter SDK for VB.NET PDF to HTML Conversion
convert pdf to html code c#; add pdf to website
966
chapter 31 Faraday’s Law
Find (a) the currents in both resistors, (b) the total 
power delivered to the resistance of the circuit, and  
(c) the magnitude of the applied force that is needed 
to move the rod with this constant velocity.
R
1
R
2
B
in
S
v
S
Figure P31.63
64. Review. A particle with a mass of 2.00 3 10216 kg and 
a charge of 30.0 nC starts from rest, is accelerated 
through a potential difference DV, and is fired from 
a small source in a region containing a uniform, con-
stant magnetic field of magnitude 0.600 T. The par-
ticle’s velocity is perpendicular to the magnetic field 
lines. The circular orbit of the particle as it returns to 
the location of the source encloses a magnetic flux of 
15.0 mWb. (a) Calculate the particle’s speed. (b) Cal-
culate the potential difference through which the par-
ticle was accelerated inside the source.
65. The plane of a square loop of wire with edge length  
a 5 0.200 m is oriented vertically and along an east–
west axis. The Earth’s magnetic field at this point is of 
magnitude B 5 35.0 mT and is directed northward at 
35.08 below the horizontal. The total resistance of the 
loop and the wires connecting it to a sensitive ammeter 
is 0.500 V. If the loop is suddenly collapsed by horizon-
tal forces as shown in Figure P31.65, what total charge 
enters one terminal of the ammeter?
Ammeter
a
a
F
S
F
S
Figure P31.65
66. In Figure P31.66, the rolling axle, 1.50 m long, is 
pushed along horizontal rails at a constant speed v5 
3.00 m/s. A resistor R 5 0.400 V is connected to the 
rails at points a and b, directly opposite each other. 
M
Q/C
60. Why is the following situation impossible? A conducting 
rectangular loop of mass M 5 0.100 kg, resistance R 5 
1.00 V, and dimensions w 5 50.0 cm by , 5 90.0 cm is 
held with its lower edge just above a region with a uni-
form magnetic field of magnitude B 5 1.00 T as shown 
in Figure P31.60. The loop is released from rest. Just as 
the top edge of the loop reaches the region containing 
the field, the loop moves with a speed 4.00 m/s.
w
v
= 0
B
out
S
Figure P31.60
61. The circuit in Figure P31.61 is located in a magnetic 
field whose magnitude varies with time according to 
the expression B 5 1.00 3 1023 t, where B is in teslas 
and t is in seconds. Assume the resistance per length of 
the wire is 0.100V/m. Find the current in section PQ 
of length a 5 65.0 cm.
a
a
Q
2a
P
B
in
S
Figure P31.61
62. Magnetic field values are often determined by using a 
device known as a search coil. This technique depends 
on the measurement of the total charge passing 
through a coil in a time interval during which the mag-
netic flux linking the windings changes either because 
of the coil’s motion or because of a change in the value 
of B. (a) Show that as the flux through the coil changes 
from F
1
to F
2
, the charge transferred through the coil 
is given by Q 5 N(F
2
2 F
1
)/R, where R is the resis-
tance of the coil and N is the number of turns. (b) As 
a specific example, calculate B when a total charge of 
5.00 3 1024 C passes through a 100-turn coil of resis-
tance 200 V and cross-sectional area 40.0 cm2 as it is 
rotated in a uniform field from a position where the 
plane of the coil is perpendicular to the field to a posi-
tion where it is parallel to the field.
63. A conducting rod of length , 5 35.0 cm is free to slide 
on two parallel conducting bars as shown in Figure 
P31.63. Two resistors R
1
5 2.00 V and R
2
5 5.00 V are 
connected across the ends of the bars to form a loop.  
A constant magnetic field B 5 2.50 T is directed per-
pendicularly into the page. An external agent pulls the 
rod to the left with a constant speed of v 5 8.00 m/s. 
AMT
W
S
B
S
R
a
b
v
S
Figure P31.66
Image Converter | Convert Image, Document Formats
PDF, HTML, MS- Word, PDF/A Most-common used codec support, including JPEG 2000, JBIG2, CCITT G3, CCITT G4 Want to Try It at Once? Find image converters
best website to convert pdf to word online; converting pdf into html
VB.NET TIFF: Convert TIFF to HTML Web Page Using VB.NET TIFF
Apart from this VB.NET TIFF to HTML conversion add-on, RasterEdge .NET Imaging SDK also provides other document to HTML converters, like VB.NET PDF to HTML
converting pdf to html format; convert pdf to web page
problems 
967
69. A small, circular washer of radius a 5 0.500 cm is held 
directly below a long, straight wire carrying a current 
of I5 10.0 A. The washer is located h 5 0.500 m above 
the top of a table (Fig. P31.69). Assume the magnetic 
field is nearly constant over the area of the washer and 
equal to the magnetic field at the center of the washer. 
(a) If the washer is dropped from rest, what is the mag-
nitude of the average induced emf in the washer over 
the time interval between its release and the moment 
it hits the tabletop? (b) What is the direction of the 
induced current in the washer?
h
I
Figure P31.69
70. Figure P31.70 shows a compact, circular coil with  
220 turns and radius 12.0 cm immersed in a uniform 
magnetic field parallel to the axis of the coil. The rate 
of change of the field has the constant magnitude  
20.0 mT/s. (a)What additional information is neces-
sary to determine whether the coil is carrying clock-
wise or counterclockwise current? 
(b) The coil overheats if more than 
160 W of power is delivered to it. 
What resistance would the coil have 
at this critical point? (c) To run 
cooler, should it have lower resis-
tance or higher resistance?
71. A rectangular coil of 60 turns, dimensions 0.100 m by 
0.200 m, and total resistance 10.0 V rotates with angu-
lar speed 30.0 rad/s about the y axis in a region where 
a 1.00-T magnetic field is directed along the x axis. 
The time t 5 0 is chosen to be at an instant when the 
plane of the coil is perpendicular to the direction of B
S
. 
Calculate (a)the maximum induced emf in the coil,  
(b) the maximum rate of change of magnetic flux 
through the coil, (c) the induced emf at t 5 0.050 0 s,  
and (d) the torque exerted by the magnetic field on 
the coil at the instant when the emf is a maximum.
72. Review. In Figure P31.72, a uniform magnetic field 
decreases at a constant rate dB/dt 5 2K, where K is a 
positive constant. A circular loop of wire of radius a 
containing a resistance R and a capacitance C is placed 
AMT
Q/C
Q/C
S
The wheels make good electrical contact with the 
rails, so the axle, rails, and R form a closed-loop cir-
cuit. The only significant resistance in the circuit is R. 
A uniform magnetic field B 5 0.080 0 T is vertically 
downward. (a) Find the induced current I in the resis-
tor. (b) What horizontal force F is required to keep 
the axle rolling at constant speed? (c)Which end  
of the resistor, a or b, is at the higher electric poten-
tial? (d)What If? After the axle rolls past the resistor, 
does the current in R reverse direction? Explain your 
answer.
67. Figure P31.67 shows a stationary conductor whose 
shape is similar to the letter e. The radius of its circu-
lar portion is a 5 50.0 cm. It is placed in a constant 
magnetic field of 0.500 T directed out of the page.  
A straight conducting rod, 50.0 cm long, is pivoted 
about point O and rotates with a constant angular 
speed of 2.00 rad/s. (a) Determine the induced emf in 
the loop POQ. Note that the area of the loop is ua2/2. 
(b) If all the conducting material has a resistance per 
length of 5.00 V/m, what is the induced current in the 
loop POQ at the instant 0.250 s after point P passes 
point Q
This rod rotates
about O.
P
Q
O
out
θ
a
B
S
Figure P31.67
68. A conducting rod moves with a constant velocity in a 
direction perpendicular to a long, straight wire carry-
ing a current I as shown in Figure P31.68. Show that 
the magnitude of the emf generated between the ends 
of the rod is
0
e
0
5
m
0
vI,
2pr
In this case, note that the emf decreases with increas-
ing r as you might expect.
S
R
C
B
in
S
Figure P31.72
r
I
v
S
Figure P31.68
B
S
Figure P31.70
PNG to JPEG2000 Converter | Convert PNG to JPEG2000, Convert
Converting images between PNG & JPEG 2000 can be easily achieved if you use RasterEdge PNG to JPEG2000 Converters. More PNG Related Converters.
convert pdf to html code; change pdf to html format
TIFF to GIF Converter | Convert TIFF to GIF, Convert GIF to TIFF
". TIFF to GIF Converters is a converting tool which is designed for image conversion between TIFF files to GIF files. More TIFF Related Converters.
how to convert pdf file to html document; best pdf to html converter
968
chapter 31 Faraday’s Law
rent I in the plane of the loop (Fig. P31.76). The total 
resistance of the loop is R. Derive an expression that 
gives the current in the loop at the instant the near 
side is a distance r from the wire.
77. A long, straight wire carries a current given by I 5  
I
max
sin (vt1 f). The wire lies in the plane of a rectan-
gular coil of N turns of wire as shown in Figure P31.77.  
The quantities I
max
, v, and f are all constants. Assume 
I
max
5 50.0 A, v 5 200p s21N 5 100, h 5 w 5 5.00 cm, 
and L5 20.0 cm. Determine the emf induced in the 
coil by the magnetic field created by the current in the 
straight wire.
w
h
L
I
Figure P31.77
78. A thin wire , 5 30.0 cm long is held parallel to and 
d5 80.0 cm above a long, thin wire carrying I 5 200 A  
and fixed in position (Fig. P31.78). The 30.0-cm wire 
is released at the instant t 5 0 and falls, remaining 
parallel to the current-carrying 
wire as it falls. Assume the fall-
ing wire accelerates at 9.80 m/s2.  
(a) Derive an equation for the emf 
induced in it as a function of time. 
(b) What is the minimum value of 
the emf? (c) What is the maximum 
value? (d) What is the induced emf 
0.300 s after the wire is released?
Challenge Problems
79. Two infinitely long solenoids (seen in cross section) 
pass through a circuit as shown in Figure P31.79. The 
magnitude of B
S
inside each is the same and is increas-
ing at the rate of 100 T/s. What is the current in each 
resistor?
B
out
S
B
in
S
0.500 m
0.500 m
0.500 m
6.00 
5.00 
3.00 
r
2
= 0.150 m
r
1
= 0.100 m
Figure P31.79
80. An induction furnace uses electromagnetic induction 
to produce eddy currents in a conductor, thereby rais-
ing the conductor’s temperature. Commercial units 
M
d
,
I
Figure P31.78
S
S
with its plane normal to the field. (a)Find the charge 
Q on the capacitor when it is fully charged. (b) Which 
plate, upper or lower, is at the higher potential? (c) Dis-
cuss the force that causes the separation of charges.
73. An N-turn square coil with side , and resistance R is 
pulled to the right at constant speed v in the presence 
of a uniform magnetic field B acting perpendicular to 
the coil as shown in Figure P31.73. At t 5 0, the right 
side of the coil has just departed the right edge of the 
field. At time t, the left side of the coil enters the region 
where B 5 0. In terms of the quantities NB, ,, v, and 
R, find symbolic expressions for (a) the magnitude of 
the induced emf in the loop during the time interval 
from t 5 0 to t, (b) the magnitude of the induced cur-
rent in the coil, (c) the power delivered to the coil, and 
(d) the force required to remove the coil from the field. 
(e) What is the direction of the induced current in the 
loop? (f) What is the direction of the magnetic force on 
the loop while it is being pulled out of the field?
F
app
S
= 0
S
B
in
S
Figure P31.73
74. A conducting rod of length , moves with velocity v
S
parallel to a long wire carrying a steady current I. The 
axis of the rod is maintained perpendicular to the wire 
with the near end a distance r away (Fig. P31.74). Show 
that the magnitude of the emf induced in the rod is
0
e
0
5
m
0
Iv
2p
ln a11
,
r
b
r
I
v
S
Figure P31.74
75. The magnetic flux through a metal ring varies with 
time t according to F
B
at3 2 bt2, where F
B
is in 
webers, a5 6.00 s23b 5 18.0 s22, and t is in seconds. 
The resistance of the ring is 
3.00 V. For the interval from 
t 5 0 to t 5 2.00s, deter-
mine the maximum current 
induced in the ring.
76. A rectangular loop of dimen-
sions , and w moves with a 
constant velocity v
S
away from 
a long wire that carries a cur-
S
S
M
S
I
R
r
w
v
S
Figure P31.76
DICOM to PDF Converter | Convert DICOM to PDF, Convert PDF to
Different from other image converters, users do not need to load Adobe Acrobat or any other print drivers when they use DICOM to PDF Converter.
convert pdf to url link; how to change pdf to html
BMP to PDF Converter | Convert Bitmap to PDF, Convert PDF to BMP
the users to set a new name for the created PDF files; Password Royalty-free image converters used worldwide. Start Image Bitmap PDF Converting. Before image
convert fillable pdf to html; convert pdf to html with images
problems 
969
82. betatron is a device that accelerates electrons to ener-
gies in the MeV range by means of electromagnetic 
induction. Electrons in a vacuum chamber are held in a 
circular orbit by a magnetic field perpendicular to the 
orbital plane. The magnetic field is gradually increased 
to induce an electric field around the orbit. (a) Show 
that the electric field is in the correct direction to make 
the electrons speed up. (b)Assume the radius of the 
orbit remains constant. Show that the average mag-
netic field over the area enclosed by the orbit must 
be twice as large as the magnetic field at the circle’s 
circumference.
83. Review. The bar of mass m in Figure P31.83 is pulled 
horizontally across parallel, frictionless rails by a mass-
less string that passes over a light, frictionless pulley 
and is attached to a suspended object of mass M. The 
uniform upward magnetic field has a magnitude B, 
and the distance between the rails is ,. The only sig-
nificant electrical resistance is the load resistor R 
shown connecting the rails at one end. Assuming the 
suspended object is released with the bar at rest at t 5 
0, derive an expression that gives the bar’s horizontal 
speed as a function of time.
S
operate at frequencies ranging from 60 Hz to about  
1 MHz and deliver powers from a few watts to several 
megawatts. Induction heating can be used for warm-
ing a metal pan on a kitchen stove. It can be used to 
avoid oxidation and contamination of the metal when 
welding in a vacuum enclosure. To explore induction 
heating, consider a flat conducting disk of radius R, 
thickness b, and resistivity r. A sinusoidal magnetic 
field B
max
cos vt is applied perpendicular to the disk. 
Assume the eddy currents occur in circles concentric 
with the disk. (a) Calculate the average power deliv-
ered to the disk. (b) What If? By what factor does the 
power change when the amplitude of the field dou-
bles? (c) When the frequency doubles? (d) When the 
radius of the disk doubles?
81. A bar of mass m and resistance R slides without fric-
tion in a horizontal plane, moving on parallel rails as 
shown in Figure P31.81. The rails are separated by a 
distance d. A battery that maintains a constant emf 
e
is 
connected between the rails, and a constant magnetic 
field B
S
is directed perpendicularly out of the page. 
Assuming the bar starts from rest at time t 5 0, show 
that at time t it moves with a speed
5
e
Bd
1
12e2B
2d2t/mR
2
S
B
S
g
S
M
m
R
Figure P31.83
e
d
B
out
S
Figure P31.81
DICOM to WORD Converter | Convert DICOM to Word, Convert Word to
Royalty-free image converters with free download & perpetual update. Start Image DICOM Word Converting. More DICOM Related Converters.
converting pdf to html; convert pdf into html online
BMP to DICOM Converter | Convert Bitmap to DICOM, Convert DICOM to
Unlike other image converters, Bitmap to DICOM Converter also support view, print, capture, and edits images. More Bitmap Related Converters.
convert pdf into html code; converting pdf to html email
970 
In Chapter 31, we saw that an emf and a current are induced in a loop of wire when the 
magnetic flux through the area enclosed by the loop changes with time. This phenomenon of 
electromagnetic induction has some practical consequences. In this chapter, we first describe 
an effect known as self-induction, in which a time-varying current in a circuit produces an 
induced emf opposing the emf that initially set up the time-varying current. Self-induction 
is the basis of the inductor, an electrical circuit element. We discuss the energy stored in the 
magnetic field of an inductor and the energy density associated with the magnetic field.
Next, we study how an emf is induced in a coil as a result of a changing magnetic flux 
produced by a second coil, which is the basic principle of mutual induction. Finally, we 
examine the characteristics of circuits that contain inductors, resistors, and capacitors in 
various combinations.
32.1 Self-Induction and Inductance
In this chapter, we need to distinguish carefully between emfs and currents that are 
caused by physical sources such as batteries and those that are induced by changing 
magnetic fields. When we use a term (such as emf or current) without an adjective, we 
are describing the parameters associated with a physical source. We use the adjective 
induced to describe those emfs and currents caused by a changing magnetic field.
32.1 Self-Induction and 
Inductance
32.2 RL Circuits
32.3 Energy in a Magnetic Field
32.4 Mutual Inductance
32.5 Oscillations in an LC Circuit
32.6 The RLC Circuit
c h a p p t t e r 
32
Inductance
A treasure hunter uses a metal 
detector to search for buried objects 
at a beach. At the end of the metal 
detector is a coil of wire that is part 
of a circuit. When the coil comes 
near a metal object, the inductance 
of the coil is affected and the current 
in the circuit changes. This change 
triggers a signal in the earphones 
worn by the treasure hunter. We 
investigate inductance in this 
chapter. 
(Andy Ryan/Stone/Getty Images)
TIFF to BMP Converter | Convert TIFF to Bitmap, Convert Bitmap to
Unlike other image converters, TIFF to Bitmap Converter also support view, print, capture, and edits images. More TIFF Related Converters.
create html email from pdf; convert pdf to url online
GIF to DICOM Converter | Convert GIF to DICOM, Convert DICOM to
Select "Start" to start conversion procedure; Select "Save" to save to GIF image lists your computer. More GIF Related Converters.
convert pdf into html file; convert url pdf to word
32.1 Self-Induction and Inductance 
971
Consider a circuit consisting of a switch, a resistor, and a source of emf as shown 
in Figure 32.1. The circuit diagram is represented in perspective to show the orien-
tations of some of the magnetic field lines due to the current in the circuit. When 
the switch is thrown to its closed position, the current does not immediately jump 
from zero to its maximum value 
e
/R. Faraday’s law of electromagnetic induction 
(Eq. 31.1) can be used to describe this effect as follows. As the current increases 
with time, the magnetic field lines surrounding the wires pass through the loop 
represented by the circuit itself. This magnetic field passing through the loop 
causes a magnetic flux through the loop. This increasing flux creates an induced 
emf in the circuit. The direction of the induced emf is such that it would cause an 
induced current in the loop (if the loop did not already carry a current), which 
would establish a magnetic field opposing the change in the original magnetic 
field. Therefore, the direction of the induced emf is opposite the direction of the 
emf of the battery, which results in a gradual rather than instantaneous increase in 
the current to its final equilibrium value. Because of the direction of the induced 
emf, it is also called a back emf, similar to that in a motor as discussed in Chapter 31. 
This effect is called self-induction because the changing flux through the circuit 
and the resultant induced emf arise from the circuit itself. The emf 
e
L
set up in this 
case is called a self-induced emf.
To obtain a quantitative description of self-induction, recall from Faraday’s law 
that the induced emf is equal to the negative of the time rate of change of the mag-
netic flux. The magnetic flux is proportional to the magnetic field, which in turn 
is proportional to the current in the circuit. Therefore, a self-induced emf is always 
proportional to the time rate of change of the current. For any loop of wire, we can 
write this proportionality as
e
L
52L 
di
dt
(32.1)
where L is a proportionality constant—called the inductance of the loop—that 
depends on the geometry of the loop and other physical characteristics. If we  
consider a closely spaced coil of N turns (a toroid or an ideal solenoid) carrying a 
current i and containing N turns, Faraday’s law tells us that 
e
L
5 2N dF
B
/dt. Com-
bining this expression with Equation 32.1 gives
L5
NF
B
i
(32.2)
where it is assumed the same magnetic flux passes through each turn and L is the 
inductance of the entire coil.
From Equation 32.1, we can also write the inductance as the ratio
L52
e
L
di/dt
(32.3)
Recall that resistance is a measure of the opposition to current as given by Equa-
tion 27.7, R 5 DV/I; in comparison, Equation 32.3, being of the same mathematical 
form as Equation 27.7, shows us that inductance is a measure of the opposition to a 
change in current.
The SI unit of inductance is the henry (H), which as we can see from Equation 
32.3 is 1 volt-second per ampere: 1 H 5 1 V ? s/A.
As shown in Example 32.1, the inductance of a coil depends on its geometry. This 
dependence is analogous to the capacitance of a capacitor depending on the geome-
try of its plates as we found in Equation 26.3 and the resistance of a resistor depend-
ing on the length and area of the conducting material in Equation 27.10. Inductance 
calculations can be quite difficult to perform for complicated geometries, but the 
examples below involve simple situations for which inductances are easily evaluated.
WWInductance of an 
N
-turn coil
Joseph Henry
American Physicist (1797–1878)
Henry became the first director of 
the Smithsonian Institution and first 
president of the Academy of Natural 
Science. He improved the design of the 
electromagnet and constructed one of 
the first motors. He also discovered the 
phenomenon of self-induction, but he 
failed to publish his findings. The unit 
of inductance, the henry, is named in 
his honor.
B
r
a
d
y
-
H
a
n
d
y
C
o
l
l
e
c
t
i
o
n
,
L
i
b
r
a
r
y
o
f
C
o
n
g
r
e
s
s
P
r
i
n
t
s
a
n
d
P
h
o
t
o
g
r
a
p
h
s
D
i
v
i
s
i
o
n
[
L
C
-
B
H
8
3
-
9
9
7
]
R
S
i
i
After the switch is closed, the 
current produces a magnetic flux 
through the area enclosed by the 
loop. As the current increases 
toward its equilibrium value, this 
magnetic flux changes in time
and induces an emf in the loop.
e
B
S
-
+
Figure 32.1 
Self-induction in a 
simple circuit.
972
chapter 32 Inductance
Example 32.1   Inductance of a Solenoid
Consider a uniformly wound solenoid having N turns and length ,. Assume , is much longer than the radius of the 
windings and the core of the solenoid is air.
(A)  Find the inductance of the solenoid.
Conceptualize  The magnetic field lines from each turn of the solenoid pass through all the turns, so an induced emf 
in each coil opposes changes in the current.
Categorize  We categorize this example as a substitution problem. Because the solenoid is long, we can use the results 
for an ideal solenoid obtained in Chapter 30.
SolutIoN
Substitute this expression into Equation 32.2:
L5
NF
B
i
5
m
0
N2
,
A  (32.4)
Find the magnetic flux through each turn of area A in 
the solenoid, using the expression for the magnetic field 
from Equation 30.17:
F
B
5BA5m
0
niA5m
0
N
,
iA
(B)  Calculate the inductance of the solenoid if it contains 300 turns, its length is 25.0 cm, and its cross-sectional area 
is 4.00 cm2.
SolutIoN
Substitute numerical values into Equation 32.4:
L5
1
4p31027 T
#
m/A
2
3002
25.031022 m
1
4.0031024 m2
2
5 1.81 3 1024 T ? m2/A 5 
0.181 mH
(C)  Calculate the self-induced emf in the solenoid if the current it carries decreases at the rate of 50.0 A/s.
SolutIoN
Substitute di/dt 5 250.0 A/s and the answer to part (B) 
into Equation 32.1:
e
L
52L 
di
dt
52
1
1.8131024 H
21
250.0 A/s
2
9.05 mV
The result for part (A) shows that L depends on geometry and is proportional to the square of the number of turns. 
Because N 5 n,, we can also express the result in the form
L5m
0
1
n,
22
,
A5m
0
n2A,5m
0
n2V 
(32.5)
where V 5 A, is the interior volume of the solenoid.
uick Quiz 32.1  A coil with zero resistance has its ends labeled a and b. The 
potential at a is higher than at b. Which of the following could be consistent 
with this situation? (a) The current is constant and is directed from a to b. 
(b)The current is constant and is directed from b to a. (c) The current is 
increasing and is directed from a to b. (d) The current is decreasing and is 
directed from a to b. (e) The current is increasing and is directed from b to a.  
(f) The current is decreasing and is directed from b to a.
32.2 
R
L
Circuits
If a circuit contains a coil such as a solenoid, the inductance of the coil prevents 
the current in the circuit from increasing or decreasing instantaneously. A circuit 
32.2 RL circuits 
973
element that has a large inductance is called an inductor and has the circuit symbol 
. We always assume the inductance of the remainder of a circuit is negligi-
ble compared with that of the inductor. Keep in mind, however, that even a circuit 
without a coil has some inductance that can affect the circuit’s behavior.
Because the inductance of an inductor results in a back emf, an inductor in a cir-
cuit opposes changes in the current in that circuit. The inductor attempts to keep 
the current the same as it was before the change occurred. If the battery voltage in 
the circuit is increased so that the current rises, the inductor opposes this change 
and the rise is not instantaneous. If the battery voltage is decreased, the inductor 
causes a slow drop in the current rather than an immediate drop. Therefore, the 
inductor causes the circuit to be “sluggish” as it reacts to changes in the voltage.
Consider the circuit shown in Figure 32.2, which contains a battery of negligible 
internal resistance. This circuit is an RL circuit because the elements connected to 
the battery are a resistor and an inductor. The curved lines on switch S
2
suggest this 
switch can never be open; it is always set to either a or b. (If the switch is connected 
to neither a nor b, any current in the circuit suddenly stops.) Suppose S
2
is set to a 
and switch S
1
is open for t , 0 and then thrown closed at t 5 0. The current in the 
circuit begins to increase, and a back emf (Eq. 32.1) that opposes the increasing 
current is induced in the inductor.
With this point in mind, let’s apply Kirchhoff’s loop rule to this circuit, travers-
ing the circuit in the clockwise direction:
e
2iR2L 
di
dt
50 
(32.6)
where iR is the voltage drop across the resistor. (Kirchhoff’s rules were developed 
for circuits with steady currents, but they can also be applied to a circuit in which 
the current is changing if we imagine them to represent the circuit at one instant of 
time.) Now let’s find a solution to this differential equation, which is similar to that 
for the RC circuit (see Section 28.4).
A mathematical solution of Equation 32.6 represents the current in the circuit as 
a function of time. To find this solution, we change variables for convenience, let-
ting x 5 (
e
/R) 2 i, so dx 5 2di. With these substitutions, Equation 32.6 becomes
x1
L
R
dx
dt
50
Rearranging and integrating this last expression gives
3
x
x
0
dx
x
52
R
L
3
t
0
dt 
ln 
x
x
0
52
R
L
t
where x
0
is the value of x at time t 5 0. Taking the antilogarithm of this result gives
x 5 x
0
e2Rt/L
Because i 5 0 at t 5 0, note from the definition of x that x
0
e
/R. Hence, this last 
expression is equivalent to
e
R
2i5
e
R
e2Rt/L
i5
e
R
1
12e
2Rt/L2
This expression shows how the inductor affects the current. The current does not 
increase instantly to its final equilibrium value when the switch is closed, but instead 
increases according to an exponential function. If the inductance is removed from 
the circuit, which corresponds to letting L approach zero, the exponential term 
S
1
S
2
L
R
a
b
-
+
e
When the switch S
2
is thrown 
to position b, the battery is no
longer part of the circuit and
the current decreases.
When switch S
1
is thrown
closed, the current increases
and an emf that opposes the 
increasing current is induced
in the inductor.
Figure 32.2 
An RL circuit. 
When switch S
2
is in position a
the battery is in the circuit.
974
chapter 32 Inductance
After switch S
1
is thrown closed 
at t = 0,  the current increases 
toward its maximum value 
e
/R.
t =
L
t
R
R
0.632
i
e
t
R
e
Figure 32.3 
Plot of the current 
versus time for the RL circuit 
shown in Figure 32.2. The time 
constant t is the time interval 
required for i to reach 63.2% of its 
maximum value.
becomes zero and there is no time dependence of the current in this case; the cur-
rent increases instantaneously to its final equilibrium value in the absence of the 
inductance.
We can also write this expression as
i5
e
R
1
12e2t/t
2
(32.7)
where the constant t is the time constant of the RL circuit:
t5
L
R
(32.8)
Physically, t is the time interval required for the current in the circuit to reach  
(1 2 e21) 5 0.632 5 63.2% of its final value 
e
/R. The time constant is a useful 
parameter for comparing the time responses of various circuits.
Figure 32.3 shows a graph of the current versus time in the RL circuit. Notice 
that the equilibrium value of the current, which occurs as t approaches infinity, is 
e
/R. That can be seen by setting di/dt equal to zero in Equation 32.6 and solving 
for the current i. (At equilibrium, the change in the current is zero.) Therefore, the 
current initially increases very rapidly and then gradually approaches the equilib-
rium value 
e
/R as t approaches infinity.
Let’s also investigate the time rate of change of the current. Taking the first time 
derivative of Equation 32.7 gives
di
dt
5
e
L
e2t/t 
(32.9)
This result shows that the time rate of change of the current is a maximum (equal to 
e
/L) at t 5 0 and falls off exponentially to zero as t approaches infinity (Fig. 32.4).
Now consider the RL circuit in Figure 32.2 again. Suppose switch S
2
has been 
set at position a long enough (and switch S
1
remains closed) to allow the current 
to reach its equilibrium value 
e
/R. In this situation, the circuit is described by the 
outer loop in Figure 32.2. If S
2
is thrown from a to b, the circuit is now described by 
only the right-hand loop in Figure 32.2. Therefore, the battery has been eliminated 
from the circuit. Setting 
e
5 0 in Equation 32.6 gives
iR1L 
di
dt
50
The time rate of change of 
current is a maximum at t = 0, 
which is the instant at which  
switch S
1
is thrown closed.
di
dt
t
L
e
Figure 32.4 
Plot of di/dt versus 
time for the RL circuit shown in Fig-
ure 32.2. The rate decreases exponen-
tially with time as i increases toward 
its maximum value.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested