convert byte array to pdf mvc : Convert pdf to url online SDK Library API .net wpf winforms sharepoint doc-3-pdf-67a5de9fa89738da0c6835ef457b5878-original101-part195

32.2 RL circuits 
975
Example 32.2   Time Constant of an 
R
L
Circuit
Consider the circuit in Figure 32.2 again. Suppose the circuit elements have the following values: 
e
5 12.0 V, R 5  
6.00 V, and L 5 30.0 mH.
(A)  Find the time constant of the circuit.
Conceptualize  You should understand the operation and behavior of the circuit in Figure 32.2 from the discussion in 
this section.
Categorize  We evaluate the results using equations developed in this section, so this example is a substitution problem.
SolutIoN
Evaluate the time constant from Equation 32.8:
t5
L
R
5
30.031023 H
6.00 V
5
5.00 ms
(B)  Switch S
2
is at position a, and switch S
1
is thrown closed at t 5 0. Calculate the current in the circuit at t 5 2.00 ms.
SolutIoN
Evaluate the current at t 5 2.00 ms from 
Equation 32.7:
i5
e
R
1
12e2t/t
2
5
12.0 V
6.00 V
1
12e22.00 ms/5.00 ms
2
52.00 A 
1
12e20.400
2
0.659 A
(C)  Compare the potential difference across the resistor with that across the inductor.
At the instant the switch is closed, there is no current and therefore no potential difference across the resistor. At this 
instant, the battery voltage appears entirely across the inductor in the form of a back emf of 12.0 V as the inductor tries 
to maintain the zero-current condition. (The top end of the inductor in Fig. 32.2 is at a higher electric potential than 
the bottom end.) As time passes, the emf across the inductor decreases and the current in the resistor (and hence the 
voltage across it) increases as shown in Figure 32.6 (page 976). The sum of the two voltages at all times is 12.0 V.
In Figure 32.6, the voltages across the resistor and inductor are equal at 3.4 ms. What if you wanted to 
delay the condition in which the voltages are equal to some later instant, such as t 5 10.0ms? Which parameter, L or R
would require the least adjustment, in terms of a percentage change, to achieve that?
SolutIoN
What IF?
At t = 0, the switch is thrown to 
position b and the current has 
its maximum value 
e
/R.
i
t
R
e
Figure 32.5 
Current versus 
time for the right-hand loop of  
the circuit shown in Figure 32.2. 
For t , 0, switch S
2
is at position a.
It is left as a problem (Problem 22) to show that the solution of this differential 
equation is
5
e
R
e2t/t 5I
i
e2t/t 
(32.10)
where 
e
is the emf of the battery and I
i
e
/R is the initial current at the instant 
the switch is thrown to b.
If the circuit did not contain an inductor, the current would immediately 
decrease to zero when the battery is removed. When the inductor is present, it 
opposes the decrease in the current and causes the current to decrease exponen-
tially. A graph of the current in the circuit versus time (Fig. 32.5) shows that the 
current is continuously decreasing with time.
uick Quiz 32.2  Consider the circuit in Figure 32.2 with S
1
open and S
2
at posi-
tion a. Switch S
1
is now thrown closed. (i) At the instant it is closed, across which 
circuit element is the voltage equal to the emf of the battery? (a) the resistor  
(b) the inductor (c) both the inductor and resistor (ii) After a very long time, 
across which circuit element is the voltage equal to the emf of the battery? 
Choose from among the same answers.
continued
Convert pdf to url online - Convert PDF to html files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
How to Convert PDF to HTML Webpage with C# PDF Conversion SDK
converter pdf to html; pdf to html converters
Convert pdf to url online - VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
PDF to HTML Webpage Converter SDK for VB.NET PDF to HTML Conversion
how to convert pdf to html code; convert fillable pdf to html
976
hapter 
Inductance
32.3 Energy in a Magnetic Field
A battery in a circuit containing an inductor must provide more energy than one 
in a circuit without the inductor. Consider Figure 32.2 with switch S  in position 
When switch S is thrown closed, part of the energy supplied by the battery appears 
as internal energy in the resistance in the circuit, and the remaining energy is 
stored in the magnetic field of the inductor. Multiplying each term in Equation 
32.6 by  and rearranging the expression gives
Li
di
dt
(32.11)
Recognizing  as the rate at which energy is supplied by the battery and  as the 
rate at which energy is delivered to the resistor, we see that di ) must represent 
the rate at which energy is being stored in the inductor. If  is the energy stored 
in the inductor at any time, we can write the rate 
at which energy is stored as
dU
dt
Li
di
dt
To find the total energy stored in the inductor at any instant, let’s rewrite this 
expression as 
Li di  and integrate:
dU
Lidi
di
Li
(32.12)
where  is constant and has been removed from the integral. Equation 32.12 repre
sents the energy stored in the magnetic field of the inductor when the current is 
It is similar in form to Equation 26.11 for the energy stored in the electric field of a 
capacitor, 
. In either case, energy is required to establish a field.
We can also determine the energy density of a magnetic field. For simplicity, con
sider a solenoid whose inductance is given by Equation 32.5:
Energy stored in an inductor
Pitfall Prevention 32.1
Capacitors, Resistors, and Induc
tors Store Energy Differently
Different energy-storage mecha
nisms are at work in capacitors, 
inductors, and resistors. A charged 
capacitor stores energy as electri
cal potential energy. An inductor 
stores energy as what we could call 
magnetic potential energy when it 
carries current. Energy delivered 
to a resistor is transformed to 
internal energy.
Now hold  fixed and find the appropriate value of 
t5
5t
14.4 ms
21
6.00 
86.4
10  H
Hold  fixed and find the value of  that gives this 
time constant:
t5
30.0
10  H
14.4 ms
2.08 
From the desired half-life of 10.0 ms, use the result from 
Example 28.10 to find the time constant of the circuit:
t5
0.693
10.0 ms
0.693
14.4 ms
The change in  corresponds to a 65% decrease compared with the initial resistance. The change in  represents a 
188% increase in inductance! Therefore, a much smaller percentage adjustment in  can achieve the desired effect 
than would an adjustment in 
Answer Figure 32.6 shows that the voltages are equal 
when the voltage across the inductor has fallen to 
half its original value. Therefore, the time interval 
required for the voltages to become equal is the half-
life
1/2
of the decay. We introduced the half-life in 
the What If? section of Example 28.10 to describe the 
exponential decay in  circuits, where 
1/2
0.693
6
4
Figure 32.6
(Example 32.2) 
The time behavior of the 
voltages across the resistor 
and inductor in Figure 32.2 
given the values provided in 
this example.
VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net
PDF editing APIs, VB.NET users will be able to add a url to specified area on PDF page and edit hyperlinks within the document. This online tutorial will give
create html email from pdf; convert pdf to html5 open source
C# PDF url edit Library: insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.
Help to extract and search url in PDF file. By using specific PDF editing APIs, C# users will be able to This online C# tutorial is mainly about how to edit PDF
convert pdf to html5; how to change pdf to html
32.3 energy in a Magnetic Field 
977
Example 32.3   What Happens to the Energy in the Inductor? 
Consider once again the RL circuit shown in Figure 32.2, with switch S
2
at position a and the current having reached 
its steady-state value. When S
2
is thrown to position b, the current in the right-hand loop decays exponentially with 
time according to the expression i 5 I
i
e2t/t, where I
i
e
/R is the initial current in the circuit and t 5 L/R is the time 
constant. Show that all the energy initially stored in the magnetic field of the inductor appears as internal energy in 
the resistor as the current decays to zero.
Conceptualize  Before S
2
is thrown to b, energy is being delivered at a constant rate to the resistor from the battery and 
energy is stored in the magnetic field of the inductor. After t 5 0, when S
2
is thrown to b, the battery can no longer 
provide energy and energy is delivered to the resistor only from the inductor.
Categorize  We model the right-hand loop of the circuit as an isolated system so that energy is transferred between com-
ponents of the system but does not leave the system.
Analyze  We begin by evaluating the energy delivered to the resistor, which appears as internal energy in the resistor.
AM
SolutIoN
The value of the definite integral can be shown to be 
L/2R (see Problem 36). Use this result to evaluate E
int
:
E
int
5I
i
2Ra
L
2R
b5
1
2
LI
i
2
Solve for dE
int
and integrate this expression over the lim-
its t 5 0 to t S `:
E
int
5
3
`
0
I
i
2Re22Rt/L dt 5
I
i
2R 
3
`
0
e22Rt/L dt
Substitute the current given by Equation 32.10 into this 
equation:
dE
int
dt
5i2R5
1
I
i
e2Rt/L
22
5I
i
2Re22Rt/L
Begin with Equation 27.22 and recognize that the rate 
of change of internal energy in the resistor is the power 
delivered to the resistor: 
dE
int
dt
55i2R
continued
The magnetic field of a solenoid is given by Equation 30.17:
B 5 m
0
ni
Substituting the expression for L and i 5 B/m
0
n into Equation 32.12 gives
U
B
5
1
2
Li25
1
2
m
0
n2V
a
B
m
0
n
b
2
5
B2
2m
0
V 
(32.13)
The magnetic energy density, or the energy stored per unit volume in the magnetic 
field of the inductor, is u
B
U
B
/V, or
u
B
5
B
2
2m
0
(32.14)
Although this expression was derived for the special case of a solenoid, it is valid 
for any region of space in which a magnetic field exists. Equation 32.14 is similar  
in form to Equation 26.13 for the energy per unit volume stored in an electric field, 
u
E
5
1
2
P
0
E2. In both cases, the energy density is proportional to the square of the 
field magnitude.
uick Quiz 32.3  You are performing an experiment that requires the  highest- 
possible magnetic energy density in the interior of a very long current-carrying 
solenoid. Which of the following adjustments increases the energy density? 
(More than one choice may be correct.) (a) increasing the number of turns per 
unit length on the solenoid (b) increasing the cross-sectional area of the sole-
noid (c) increasing only the length of the solenoid while keeping the number of 
turns per unit length fixed (d) increasing the current in the solenoid
WWMagnetic energy density
C#: How to Open a File from a URL (HTTP, FTP) in HTML5 Viewer
svg, C#.NET convert PDF to text, C#.NET convert PDF to images VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET How to Open a File from a URL (HTTP, FTP) and Show
convert pdf to html for online; adding pdf to html
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
NET extract PDF pages, VB.NET comment annotate PDF, VB.NET delete PDF pages, VB.NET convert PDF to SVG. Able to load PDF document from file formats and url.
pdf to html converter online; converting pdf into html
978
chapter 32 Inductance
Use Equation 32.2 to find the inductance of the cable:
L5
F
B
i
5
m
0
,
2p
ln a
b
a
b
Substitute for the magnetic field and integrate over the 
entire light gold rectangle:
F
B
5
3
b
a
m
0
i
2pr
dr 5
m
0
i,
2p
3
b
a
dr
r
5
m
0
i,
2p
ln a
b
a
b
Divide the light gold rectangle into strips of width dr 
such as the darker strip in Figure 32.7. Evaluate the mag-
netic flux through such a strip:
dF
B
5B dA5Bdr
Finalize  The inductance depends only on geometric factors related to the cable. It increases if , increases, if b 
increases, or if a decreases. This result is consistent with our conceptualization: any of these changes increases the size 
of the loop represented by our radial slice and through which the magnetic field passes, increasing the inductance.
32.4 Mutual Inductance
Very often, the magnetic flux through the area enclosed by a circuit varies with 
time because of time-varying currents in nearby circuits. This condition induces an 
Example 32.4   The Coaxial Cable
Coaxial cables are often used to connect electrical devices, such as your video 
system, and in receiving signals in television cable systems. Model a long coaxial 
cable as a thin, cylindrical conducting shell of radius b concentric with a solid 
cylinder of radius a as in Figure 32.7. The conductors carry the same current I in 
opposite directions. Calculate the inductance L of a length , of this cable.
Conceptualize  Consider Figure 32.7. Although we do not have a visible coil in 
this geometry, imagine a thin, radial slice of the coaxial cable such as the light 
gold rectangle in Figure 32.7. If the inner and outer conductors are connected at 
the ends of the cable (above and below the figure), this slice represents one large 
conducting loop. The current in the loop sets up a magnetic field between the 
inner and outer conductors that passes through this loop. If the current changes, 
the magnetic field changes and the induced emf opposes the original change in 
the current in the conductors.
Categorize  We categorize this situation as one in which we must return to the 
fundamental definition of inductance, Equation 32.2.
Analyze  We must find the magnetic flux through the light gold rectangle in Figure 32.7. Ampère’s law (see Section 
30.3) tells us that the magnetic field in the region between the conductors is due to the inner conductor alone and that 
its magnitude is B 5 m
0
i/2pr, where r is measured from the common center of the cylinders. A sample circular field 
line is shown in Figure 32.7, along with a field vector tangent to the field line. The magnetic field is zero outside the 
outer shell because the net current passing through the area enclosed by a circular path surrounding the cable is zero; 
hence, from Ampère’s law, r B
S
?ds
S
50.
The magnetic field is perpendicular to the light gold rectangle of length , and width b 2 a, the cross section of 
interest. Because the magnetic field varies with radial position across this rectangle, we must use calculus to find the 
total magnetic flux.
SolutIoN
i
b
dr
r
i
a
B
S
Figure 32.7 
(Example 32.4) Sec-
tion of a long coaxial cable. The inner 
and outer conductors carry equal cur-
rents in opposite directions.
▸ 32.3 
continued
Finalize  This result is equal to the initial energy stored in the magnetic field of the inductor, given by Equation 32.12, 
as we set out to prove.
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
csv to PDF, C#.NET convert PDF to svg, C#.NET convert PDF to text, C#.NET convert PDF to images Able to load PDF document from file formats and url in ASP
pdf to html; embed pdf into webpage
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
PDF to Text. Convert PDF to JPEG. Convert PDF to Png to PDF. Image: Remove Image from PDF Page. Image Link: Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit Bookmark. Metadata: Edit, Delete
embed pdf into html; pdf to html conversion
32.4 Mutual Inductance 
979
emf through a process known as mutual induction, so named because it depends on 
the interaction of two circuits.
Consider the two closely wound coils of wire shown in cross-sectional view in 
Figure 32.8. The current i
1
in coil 1, which has N
1
turns, creates a magnetic field. 
Some of the magnetic field lines pass through coil 2, which has N
2
turns. The mag-
netic flux caused by the current in coil 1 and passing through coil 2 is represented 
by F
12
. In analogy to Equation 32.2, we can identify the mutual inductance M
12
of 
coil 2 with respect to coil 1:
M
12
5
N
2
F
12
i
1
(32.15)
Mutual inductance depends on the geometry of both circuits and on their orien-
tation with respect to each other. As the circuit separation distance increases, the 
mutual inductance decreases because the flux linking the circuits decreases.
If the current i
1
varies with time, we see from Faraday’s law and Equation 32.15 
that the emf induced by coil 1 in coil 2 is
e
2
52N
2
dF
12
dt
52N
2
d
dt
a
M
12
i
1
N
2
b52M
12
di
1
dt
(32.16)
In the preceding discussion, it was assumed the current is in coil 1. Let’s also 
imagine a current i
2
in coil 2. The preceding discussion can be repeated to show 
that there is a mutual inductance M
21
. If the current i
2
varies with time, the emf 
induced by coil 2 in coil 1 is
e
1
52M
21
di
2
dt
(32.17)
In mutual induction, the emf induced in one coil is always proportional to the rate 
at which the current in the other coil is changing. Although the proportionality 
constants M
12
and M
21
have been treated separately, it can be shown that they are 
equal. Therefore, with M
12
M
21
M, Equations 32.16 and 32.17 become
e
2
52M 
di
1
dt
and
e
1
52M 
di
2
dt
These two equations are similar in form to Equation 32.1 for the self-induced emf 
e
5 2L (di/dt). The unit of mutual inductance is the henry.
uick Quiz 32.4  In Figure 32.8, coil 1 is moved closer to coil 2, with the orienta-
tion of both coils remaining fixed. Because of this movement, the mutual induc-
tion of the two coils (a) increases, (b) decreases, or (c) is unaffected.
Example 32.5   “Wireless” Battery Charger
An electric toothbrush has a base designed to hold the 
toothbrush handle when not in use. As shown in Figure 
32.9a, the handle has a cylindrical hole that fits loosely over 
a matching cylinder on the base. When the handle is placed 
on the base, a changing current in a solenoid inside the 
base cylinder induces a current in a coil inside the handle. 
This induced current charges the battery in the handle.
We can model the base as a solenoid of length , with  
N
B
turns (Fig. 32.9b), carrying a current i, and having a 
cross-sectional area A. The handle coil contains N
H
turns 
and completely surrounds the base coil. Find the mutual 
inductance of the system.
b
Coil 1 (base)
Coil 2
(handle)
N
B
N
H
a
.
b
y
B
r
a
u
n
G
m
b
H
,
K
r
o
n
b
e
r
g
Figure 32.9 
(Example 32.5) (a) This electric toothbrush 
uses the mutual induction of solenoids as part of its battery- 
charging system. (b) A coil of N
H
turns wrapped around the 
center of a solenoid of N
B
turns.
A current in coil 1 sets up a 
magnetic field, and some of 
the magnetic field lines pass 
through coil 2.
Coil 1
Coil 2
N
1
i
1
N
2
i
2
Figure 32.8 
A cross-sectional 
view of two adjacent coils.
continued
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
Able to render and convert PDF document to/from supported document package offers robust APIs for editing PDF document hyperlink (url), which provide
best pdf to html converter; how to add pdf to website
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to
Convert PDF to Png, Gif, Bitmap PDF. Image: Insert Image to PDF. Image: Remove Image from PDF Page. Copy, Paste, Cut Image in Page. Link: Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit
best pdf to html converter online; convert pdf to webpage
980
chapter 32 Inductance
32.5 Oscillations in an 
L
C
Circuit
When a capacitor is connected to an inductor as illustrated in Figure 32.10, the 
combination is an LC circuit. If the capacitor is initially charged and the switch is 
then closed, both the current in the circuit and the charge on the capacitor oscil-
late between maximum positive and negative values. If the resistance of the cir-
cuit is zero, no energy is transformed to internal energy. In the following analysis, 
the resistance in the circuit is neglected. We also assume an idealized situation in 
which energy is not radiated away from the circuit. This radiation mechanism is 
discussed in Chapter 34.
Assume the capacitor has an initial charge Q
max
(the maximum charge) and 
the switch is open for t , 0 and then closed at t 5 0. Let’s investigate what happens 
from an energy viewpoint.
When the capacitor is fully charged, the energy U in the circuit is stored in 
the capacitor’s electric field and is equal to Q2
max
/2C (Eq. 26.11). At this time, the 
current in the circuit is zero; therefore, no energy is stored in the inductor. After 
the switch is closed, the rate at which charges leave or enter the capacitor plates 
(which is also the rate at which the charge on the capacitor changes) is equal to 
the current in the circuit. After the switch is closed and the capacitor begins to 
discharge, the energy stored in its electric field decreases. The capacitor’s dis-
charge represents a current in the circuit, and some energy is now stored in the 
magnetic field of the inductor. Therefore, energy is transferred from the electric 
field of the capacitor to the magnetic field of the inductor. When the capacitor 
is fully discharged, it stores no energy. At this time, the current reaches its maxi-
mum value and all the energy in the circuit is stored in the inductor. The cur-
rent continues in the same direction, decreasing in magnitude, with the capacitor 
eventually becoming fully charged again but with the polarity of its plates now 
opposite the initial polarity. This process is followed by another discharge until 
the circuit returns to its original state of maximum charge Q
max
and the plate 
polarity shown in Figure 32.10. The energy continues to oscillate between induc-
tor and capacitor.
The oscillations of the LC circuit are an electromagnetic analog to the mechani-
cal oscillations of the particle in simple harmonic motion studied in Chapter 15. 
Much of what was discussed there is applicable to LC oscillations. For example, we 
investigated the effect of driving a mechanical oscillator with an external force, 
S
L
C
Q
max
+
-
Figure 32.10 
A simple LC cir-
cuit. The capacitor has an initial 
charge Q
max
, and the switch is 
open for t , 0 and then closed at 
t 5 0.
Find the mutual inductance, noting that the magnetic 
flux F
BH
through the handle’s coil caused by the mag-
netic field of the base coil is BA:
M5
N
H
F
BH
i
5
N
H
BA
i
5
m
0
N
B
N
H
,
A
Use Equation 30.17 to express the magnetic field in the 
interior of the base solenoid:
B5m
0
N
B
,
i
Wireless charging is used in a number of other “cordless” devices. One significant example is the inductive charging 
used by some manufacturers of electric cars that avoids direct metal-to-metal contact between the car and the charg-
ing apparatus.
Conceptualize  Be sure you can identify the two coils in the situation and understand that a changing current in one 
coil induces a current in the second coil.
Categorize  We will determine the result using concepts discussed in this section, so we categorize this example as a 
substitution problem.
SolutIoN
▸ 32.5 
continued
XDoc.HTML5 Viewer for .NET, Zero Footprint AJAX Document Image
View, Convert, Edit, Sign Documents and Images. Open file from URL (HTTP.FTP are dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
convert pdf to web page; how to convert pdf into html
VB.NET Image: VB Code to Download and Save Image from Web URL
Apart from image downloading from web URL, RasterEdge .NET Imaging SDK still dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
convert pdf into web page; convert pdf to website html
32.5 Oscillations in an LC circuit 
981
which leads to the phenomenon of resonance. The same phenomenon is observed in 
the LC circuit. (See Section 33.7.)
A representation of the energy transfer in an LC circuit is shown in Figure 
32.11. As mentioned, the behavior of the circuit is analogous to that of the par-
ticle in simple harmonic motion studied in Chapter 15. For example, consider 
the block–spring system shown in Figure 15.10. The oscillations of this system 
are shown at the right of Figure 32.11. The potential energy 
1
2
kx2 stored in the 
stretched spring is analogous to the potential energy Q2
max
/2C stored in the capaci-
tor in Figure 32.11. The kinetic energy 
1
2
mv2 of the moving block is analogous to  
the magnetic energy 
1
2
Li2 stored in the inductor, which requires the presence of 
moving charges. In Figure 32.11a, all the energy is stored as electric potential energy 
in the capacitor at t 5 0 (because i 5 0), just as all the energy in a block–spring sys-
tem is initially stored as potential energy in the spring if it is stretched and released 
at t 5 0. In Figure 32.11b, all the energy is stored as magnetic energy 
1
2
LI2
max
in the 
inductor, where I
max
is the maximum current. Figures 32.11c and 32.11d show sub-
sequent quarter-cycle situations in which the energy is all electric or all magnetic. 
At intermediate points, part of the energy is electric and part is magnetic.
L
i = 0
+Q
max
Q
max
C
L
C
max
+Q
-Q
-q
max
+q
C
L
C
L
I
max
C
L
a
c
d
e
b
Energy in
capacitor
Total
energy
Energy in
inductor
Energy in
capacitor
Total
energy
Energy in
inductor
Energy in
capacitor
Total
energy
Energy in
inductor
Energy in
capacitor
Total
energy
Energy in
inductor
Energy in
capacitor
Total
energy
Energy in
inductor
%
0
50
100
%
0
50
100
%
0
50
100
%
0
50
100
%
0
50
100
0
–A
–A
x
v
max
S
v
max
S
x
k
k
k
k
k
v = 0
m
m
m
m
v
S
v = 0
m
B
S
B
S
i = 
i
q =
0
I
max
i = 
q =
0
B
S
i =
0
E
S
E
S
E
S
+
+
+
-
-
-
+ + + + + + +
- - - - - - -
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
Figure 32.11 
Energy transfer in a resistanceless, nonradiating LC circuit. The capacitor has a 
charge Q
max
at t 5 0, the instant at which the switch in Figure 32.10 is closed. The mechanical analog 
of this circuit is the particle in simple harmonic motion, represented by the block–spring system at 
the right of the figure. (a)–(d)  At these special instants, all of the energy in the circuit resides in one 
of the circuit elements. (e) At an arbitrary instant, the energy is split between the capacitor and the 
inductor.
982
chapter 32 Inductance
Consider some arbitrary time t after the switch is closed so that the capacitor has 
a charge q , Q
max
and the current is i , I
max
. At this time, both circuit elements 
store energy, as shown in Figure 32.11e, but the sum of the two energies must equal 
the total initial energy U stored in the fully charged capacitor at t 5 0:
U5U
E
1U
B
5
q2
2C
1
1
2
Li25
Q
max
2
2C
(32.18)
Because we have assumed the circuit resistance to be zero and we ignore electromag-
netic radiation, no energy is transformed to internal energy and none is transferred 
out of the system of the circuit. Therefore, with these assumptions, the system of the 
circuit is isolated: the total energy of the system must remain constant in time. We describe 
the constant energy of the system mathematically by setting dU/dt 5 0. Therefore, 
by differentiating Equation 32.18 with respect to time while noting that q and i vary 
with time gives
dU
dt
5
d
dt
a
q2
2C
1
1
2
Li2
b
5
q
C
dq
dt
1Li 
di
dt
50 
(32.19)
We can reduce this result to a differential equation in one variable by remembering 
that the current in the circuit is equal to the rate at which the charge on the capaci-
tor changes: i 5 dq/dt. It then follows that di/dt 5 d2q/dt2. Substitution of these 
relationships into Equation 32.19 gives
q
C
1L 
d2q
dt2
50
d2q
dt
2
52
1
LC
q 
(32.20)
Let’s solve for q by noting that this expression is of the same form as the analogous 
Equations 15.3 and 15.5 for a particle in simple harmonic motion:
d
2
x
dt
2
52
k
m
x52v2x
where k is the spring constant, m is the mass of the block, and v5!k/m
. The solu-
tion of this mechanical equation has the general form (Eq. 15.6):
x 5 A cos (vt 1 f)
where A is the amplitude of the simple harmonic motion (the maximum value of x), 
v is the angular frequency of this motion, and f is the phase constant; the values 
of A and f depend on the initial conditions. Because Equation 32.20 is of the same 
mathematical form as the differential equation of the simple harmonic oscillator, 
it has the solution
q 5 Q
max
cos (vt 1 f) 
(32.21)
where Q
max
is the maximum charge of the capacitor and the angular frequency v is
v5
1
"LC
(32.22)
Note that the angular frequency of the oscillations depends solely on the induc-
tance and capacitance of the circuit. Equation 32.22 gives the natural frequency of 
oscillation of the LC circuit.
Because q varies sinusoidally with time, the current in the circuit also varies sinu-
soidally. We can show that by differentiating Equation 32.21 with respect to time:
i5
dq
dt
52vQ
max
sin 1vt1f2 
(32.23)
total energy stored in 
an 
l
C
circuit
Charge as a function of time 
for an ideal 
l
C
circuit
angular frequency of 
oscillation in an 
l
C
circuit
Current as a function of 
time for an ideal 
l
C
current
32.5 Oscillations in an LC circuit 
983
The charge q and the current i 
are 90° out of phase with each 
other.
q
I
max
Q
max
i
t
t
0
T
2T
T
2
3T
2
Figure 32.12 
Graphs of charge 
versus time and current versus 
time for a resistanceless, nonradi-
ating LC circuit.
To determine the value of the phase angle f, let’s examine the initial conditions, 
which in our situation require that at t 5 0, i 5 0, and q 5 Q
max
. Setting i 5 0 at  
t 5 0 in Equation 32.23 gives
052vQ
max
sin f
which shows that f 5 0. This value for f also is consistent with Equation 32.21 and 
the condition that q 5 Q
max
at t 5 0. Therefore, in our case, the expressions for q 
and i are
q 5 Q
max
cos vt 
(32.24)
i 5 2vQ
max
sin vt 5 2I
max
sin vt 
(32.25)
Graphs of q versus t and i versus t are shown in Figure 32.12. The charge on the 
capacitor oscillates between the extreme values Q
max
and 2Q
max
, and the current 
oscillates between I
max
and 2I
max
. Furthermore, the current is 908 out of phase 
with the charge. That is, when the charge is a maximum, the current is zero, and 
when the charge is zero, the current has its maximum value.
Let’s return to the energy discussion of the LC circuit. Substituting Equations 
32.24 and 32.25 in Equation 32.18, we find that the total energy is
U5U
E
1U
B
5
Q
2
max
2C
cos2 vt1
1
2
LI2
max
sin2 vt 
(32.26)
This expression contains all the features described qualitatively at the beginning of 
this section. It shows that the energy of the LC circuit continuously oscillates between 
energy stored in the capacitor’s electric field and energy stored in the inductor’s 
magnetic field. When the energy stored in the capacitor has its maximum value 
Q2
max
/2C, the energy stored in the inductor is zero. When the energy stored in the 
inductor has its maximum value 
1
2
LI2
max
, the energy stored in the capacitor is zero.
Plots of the time variations of U
E
and U
B
are shown in Figure 32.13. The sum  
U
E
U
B
is a constant and is equal to the total energy Q2
max
/2C, or 
1
2
LI2
max
. Analytical 
verification is straightforward. The amplitudes of the two graphs in Figure 32.13 
must be equal because the maximum energy stored in the capacitor (when I 5 0) 
must equal the maximum energy stored in the inductor (when q 5 0). This equality 
is expressed mathematically as
Q
2
max
2C
5
LI2
max
2
The sum of the two curves is a 
constant and is equal to the total 
energy stored in the circuit.
t
t
T
2
T
3T
2
2T
U
B
U
E
Q
2
max
2C
LI
2
max
2
0
0
Figure 32.13 
Plots of U
E
versus t 
and U
B
versus t for a resistanceless, 
nonradiating LC circuit.
984
chapter 32 Inductance
Example 32.6   Oscillations in an 
L
C
Circuit
In Figure 32.14, the battery has an emf of 12.0 V, the inductance is 2.81 mH, 
and the capacitance is 9.00 pF. The switch has been set to position a for a long 
time so that the capacitor is charged. The switch is then thrown to position 
b, removing the battery from the circuit and connecting the capacitor directly 
across the inductor.
(A)  Find the frequency of oscillation of the circuit.
Conceptualize  When the switch is thrown to position b, the active part of the 
circuit is the right-hand loop, which is an LC circuit.
Categorize  We use equations developed in this section, so we categorize this example as a substitution problem.
SolutIoN
L
a
b
S
C
-
+
e
Figure 32.14 
(Example 32.6) First 
the capacitor is fully charged with 
the switch set to position a. Then the 
switch is thrown to position b, and the 
battery is no longer in the circuit.
Substitute numerical values:
f5
1
2p
31
2.81310
23
H
21
9.00310
212
F
241/2
5
1.003106 Hz
Use Equation 32.22 to find the frequency:
f5
v
2p
5
1
2p"LC
(B)  What are the maximum values of charge on the capacitor and current in the circuit?
SolutIoN
Find the initial charge on the capacitor, which equals 
the maximum charge:
Q
max
C DV 5 (9.00 3 10212 F)(12.0 V) 5  1.08 3 10210 C
Use Equation 32.25 to find the maximum current 
from the maximum charge:
I
max
5 vQ
max
5 2pfQ
max
5 (2p 3 106 s21)(1.08 3 10210 C)
6.7931024 A
Using this expression in Equation 32.26 for the total energy gives
U5
Q
2
max
2C
1cos2 vt1sin2 vt25
Q
2
max
2C
(32.27)
because cos2 vt 1 sin2 vt 5 1.
In our idealized situation, the oscillations in the circuit persist indefinitely; the 
total energy U of the circuit, however, remains constant only if energy transfers and 
transformations are neglected. In actual circuits, there is always some resistance 
and some energy is therefore transformed to internal energy. We mentioned at the 
beginning of this section that we are also ignoring radiation from the circuit. In 
reality, radiation is inevitable in this type of circuit, and the total energy in the cir-
cuit continuously decreases as a result of this process.
uick Quiz 32.5  (i) At an instant of time during the oscillations of an LC circuit, 
the current is at its maximum value. At this instant, what happens to the volt-
age across the capacitor? (a) It is different from that across the inductor. (b) It is 
zero. (c) It has its maximum value. (d) It is impossible to determine. (ii) Now con-
sider an instant when the current is momentarily zero. From the same choices, 
describe the magnitude of the voltage across the capacitor at this instant.
32.6 The 
R
L
C
Circuit
Let’s now turn our attention to a more realistic circuit consisting of a resistor, an 
inductor, and a capacitor connected in series as shown in Figure 32.15. We assume 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested