convert byte array to pdf mvc : Convert pdf into html file control SDK system azure wpf html console doc-3-pdf-67a5de9fa89738da0c6835ef457b5878-original104-part198

33.4 capacitors in an ac circuit 
1005
Substituting DV
max
sin vt for Dv and rearranging gives
q5C DV
max
sin vt 
(33.14)
where q is the instantaneous charge on the capacitor. Differentiating Equation 
33.14 with respect to time gives the instantaneous current in the circuit:
i
C
5
dq
dt
5vC DV
max
cos vt 
(33.15)
Using the trigonometric identity
cos vt5sin avt1
p
2
b
we can express Equation 33.15 in the alternative form
i
C
5vC DV
max
sin avt1
p
2
(33.16)
Comparing this expression with Dv 5 DV
max
sin vt shows that the current is p/2 
rad 5 90° out of phase with the voltage across the capacitor. A plot of current and 
voltage versus time (Fig. 33.10a) shows that the current reaches its maximum value 
one-quarter of a cycle sooner than the voltage reaches its maximum value.
Consider a point such as b in Figure 33.10a where the current is zero at this 
instant. That occurs when the capacitor reaches its maximum charge so that the 
voltage across the capacitor is a maximum (point d). At points such as a and e, the 
current is a maximum, which occurs at those instants when the charge on the capac-
itor reaches zero and the capacitor begins to recharge with the opposite polarity. 
When the charge is zero, the voltage across the capacitor is zero (points c and f).
As with inductors, we can represent the current and voltage for a capacitor on a 
phasor diagram. The phasor diagram in Figure 33.10b shows that for a sinusoidally 
applied voltage, the current always leads the voltage across a capacitor by90°.
WWCurrent in a capacitor
a
b
I
max
I
max
a
d
f
b
c
e
t
T
V
max
v
i
C
v
i
C
i
C
v
C
V
max
i
C
v
C
The current and voltage phasors 
are at 90° to each other.
The current leads the voltage 
by one-fourth of a cycle.
vt
Figure 33.10 
(a) Plots of the 
instantaneous current i
C
and 
instantaneous voltage Dv
C
across  
a capacitor as functions of time.  
(b) Phasor diagram for the capaci-
tive circuit.
C
v
C
v = ∆V
max 
sin v
Figure 33.9 
A circuit 
consisting of a capacitor of 
capacitance C connected to 
an AC source.
Convert pdf into html file - Convert PDF to html files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
How to Convert PDF to HTML Webpage with C# PDF Conversion SDK
embed pdf into html; how to convert pdf into html code
Convert pdf into html file - VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
PDF to HTML Webpage Converter SDK for VB.NET PDF to HTML Conversion
online pdf to html converter; to html
1006
chapter 33 alternating-current circuits
Equation 33.15 shows that the current in the circuit reaches its maximum value 
when cos vt 5 61:
I
max
5vC DV
max
5
DV
max
1
1/vC
2
(33.17)
As in the case with inductors, this looks like Equation 27.7, so the denominator 
plays the role of resistance, with units of ohms. We give the combination 1/vC the 
symbol X
C
, and because this function varies with frequency, we define it as the 
capacitive reactance:
X
C
;
1
vC
(33.18)
We can now write Equation 33.17 as
I
max
5
DV
max
X
C
(33.19)
The rms current is given by an expression similar to Equation 33.19, with I
max
replaced by I
rms
and DV
max
replaced by DV
rms
.
Using Equation 33.19, we can express the instantaneous voltage across the capac-
itor as
Dv
C
5DV
max
sin vt5I
max
X
C
sin vt 
(33.20)
Equations 33.18 and 33.19 indicate that as the frequency of the voltage source 
increases, the capacitive reactance decreases and the maximum current therefore 
increases. The frequency of the current is determined by the frequency of the volt-
age source driving the circuit. As the frequency approaches zero, the capacitive 
reactance approaches infinity and the current therefore approaches zero. This con-
clusion makes sense because the circuit approaches direct current conditions as v 
approaches zero and the capacitor represents an open circuit.
uick Quiz 33.3  Consider the AC circuit in Figure 33.11. The frequency of the 
AC source is adjusted while its voltage amplitude is held constant. When does the 
lightbulb glow the brightest? (a) It glows brightest at high frequencies. (b) It glows 
brightest at low frequencies. (c) The brightness is the same at all frequencies.
C
R
Figure 33.11 
(Quick Quiz 33.3)
uick Quiz 33.4  Consider the AC circuit in Figure 33.12. The frequency of the 
AC source is adjusted while its voltage amplitude is held constant. When does the 
lightbulb glow the brightest? (a) It glows brightest at high frequencies. (b) It glows 
brightest at low frequencies. (c) The brightness is the same at all frequencies.
Capacitive reactance 
Maximum current 
in a capacitor
Voltage across a capacitor 
L
R
C
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
C#.NET control for splitting PDF file into two or multiple files online. Support to break a large PDF file into smaller files. Divide PDF File into Two Using C#.
convert pdf to webpage; converting pdf into html
VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
Split PDF file into two or multiple files in ASP.NET webpage online. Support to break a large PDF file into smaller files in .NET WinForms.
convert pdf into html email; pdf to html
33.5 the RLC Series circuit 
1007
Example 33.3   A Purely Capacitive AC Circuit
An 8.00-mF capacitor is connected to the terminals of a 60.0-Hz AC source whose rms voltage is 150 V. Find the capaci-
tive reactance and the rms current in the circuit.
Conceptualize  Figure 33.9 shows the physical situation for this problem. Keep in mind that capacitive reactance 
decreases with increasing frequency of the applied voltage.
Categorize  We determine the reactance and the current from equations developed in this section, so we categorize 
this example as a substitution problem.
SoLuTIon
Use Equation 33.18 to find the capacitive reactance:
X
C
5
1
vC
5
1
2pfC
5
1
2p
1
60.0 Hz
21
8.0031026 F
2
5
332 V
Use an rms version of Equation 33.19 to find the  
rms current:
I
rms
5
DV
rms
X
C
5
150 V
332 V
5
0.452 A
What if the frequency is doubled? What happens to the rms current in the circuit?
Answer  If the frequency increases, the capacitive reactance decreases, which is just the opposite from the case of an 
inductor. The decrease in capacitive reactance results in an increase in the current.
Let’s calculate the new capacitive reactance and the new rms current:
X
C
5
1
vC
5
1
2p
1
120 Hz
21
8.0031026 F
2
5166 V
I
rms
5
150 V
166 V
50.904 A
WhAT IF?
33.5 The 
R
L
C
Series Circuit
In the previous sections, we considered individual circuit elements connected to 
an AC source. Figure 33.13a shows a circuit that contains a combination of circuit 
elements: a resistor, an inductor, and a capacitor connected in series across an 
alternating-voltage source. If the applied voltage varies sinusoidally with time, the 
instantaneous applied voltage is
Dv5DV
max
sin vt
R
L
C
v
R
v
L
v
C
a
v
R
i
t
t
t
t
v
L
v
C
b
Figure 33.13 
(a) A series circuit 
consisting of a resistor, an induc-
tor, and a capacitor connected to 
an AC source. (b)Phase relation-
ships between the current and the 
voltages in the individual circuit 
elements if they were connected 
alone to the AC source.
C# PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.
This part illustrates how to combine three PDF files into a new file in C# application. srcStreams, Source PDF streams to be used to combine into one PDF file.
converting pdfs to html; pdf to html converter
VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
Combine multiple specified PDF pages in into single one file. This part illustrates how to combine three PDF files into a new file in VB.NET application.
convert pdf to html file; export pdf to html
1008
chapter 33 alternating-current circuits
Figure 33.13b shows the voltage versus time across each element in the circuit and 
its phase relationships to the current if it were connected individually to the AC 
source, as discussed in Sections 33.2–33.4.
When the circuit elements are all connected together to the AC source, as in 
Figure 33.13a, the current in the circuit is given by
i5I
max
sin 
1
vt2f
2
where f is some phase angle between the current and the applied voltage. Based 
on our discussions of phase in Sections 33.3 and 33.4, we expect that the current 
will generally not be in phase with the voltage in an RLC circuit. 
Because the circuit elements in Figure 33.13a are in series, the current every-
where in the circuit must be the same at any instant. That is, the current at all points 
in a series AC circuit has the same amplitude and phase. Based on the preceding 
sections, we know that the voltage across each element has a different amplitude 
and phase. In particular, the voltage across the resistor is in phase with the current, 
the voltage across the inductor leads the current by 90°, and the voltage across the 
capacitor lags behind the current by 90°. Using these phase relationships, we can 
express the instantaneous voltages across the three circuit elements as
Dv
R
5I
max
R sin vt5DV
R
sin vt 
(33.21)
Dv
L
5I
max
X
L
sin avt1
p
2
b5DV
L
cos vt 
(33.22)
Dv
C
5I
max
X
C
sin avt2
p
2
b52DV
C
cos vt 
(33.23)
The sum of these three voltages must equal the instantaneous voltage from the AC 
source, but it is important to recognize that because the three voltages have dif-
ferent phase relationships with the current, they cannot be added directly. Figure 
33.14 represents the phasors at an instant at which the current in all three elements 
is momentarily zero. The zero current is represented by the current phasor along 
the horizontal axis in each part of the figure. Next the voltage phasor is drawn at 
the appropriate phase angle to the current for each element.
Because phasors are rotating vectors, the voltage phasors in Figure 33.14 can be 
combined using vector addition as in Figure 33.15. In Figure 33.15a, the voltage 
phasors in Figure 33.14 are combined on the same coordinate axes. Figure 33.15b 
shows the vector addition of the voltage phasors. The voltage phasors DV
L
and DV
C
are in opposite directions along the same line, so we can construct the difference 
phasor DV
L
2 DV
C
, which is perpendicular to the phasor DV
R
. This diagram shows 
that the vector sum of the voltage amplitudes DV
R
, DV
L
, and DV
C
equals a phasor 
whose length is the maximum applied voltage DV
max
and which makes an angle f 
with the current phasor I
max
. From the right triangle in Figure 33.15b, we see that
a
Resistor
v
I
max
V
R
b
Inductor
v
I
max
V
L
Capacitor
v
c
V
C
I
max
Figure 33.14 
Phase relation-
ships between the voltage and  
current phasors for (a) a resistor, 
(b) an inductor, and (c) a capaci-
tor connected in series.
The total voltage ∆V
max
makes an angle f with I
max
.
The phasors of Figure 33.14 
are combined on a single set 
of axes.
V
L
V
R
V
C
V
R
V
L
- ∆V
C
I
max
I
max
V
max
v
f
v
a
b
Figure 33.15 
(a) Phasor diagram 
for the series RLC circuit shown in 
Figure 33.13a. (b) The inductance 
and capacitance phasors are added 
together and then added vectori-
ally to the resistance phasor.
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
If you want to add a text string to PDF file, please try this C# demo. // Open a document. value, The char wil be added into PDF page, 0
convert pdf to web page; convert pdf into html code
C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net
with specified zoom value and save it into stream The magnification of the original PDF page size Description: Convert to DOCX/TIFF with specified resolution and
convert pdf to html with images; convert pdf table to html
33.5 the RLC Series circuit 
1009
DV
max
5"DV
R
21
1
DV
L
2DV
C
22
5"
1
I
max
R
22
1
1
I
max
X
L
2I
max
X
C
22
DV
max
5I
max
"R1
1
X
L
2X
C
22
Therefore, we can express the maximum current as
I
max
5
DV
max
"R1
1
X
L
2X
C
22
(33.24)
Once again, this expression has the same mathematical form as Equation 27.7. 
The denominator of the fraction plays the role of resistance and is called the 
impedance Z of the circuit:
Z ;"R1
1
X
L
2X
C
22
(33.25)
where impedance also has units of ohms. Therefore, Equation 33.24 can be written 
in the form
I
max
5
DV
max
Z
(33.26)
Equation 33.26 is the AC equivalent of Equation 27.7. Note that the impedance 
and therefore the current in an AC circuit depend on the resistance, the induc-
tance, the capacitance, and the frequency (because the reactances are frequency 
dependent).
From the right triangle in the phasor diagram in Figure 33.15b, the phase angle 
f between the current and the voltage is found as follows:
f5tan
21
a
DV
L
2DV
C
DV
R
b5tan
21
a
I
max
X
L
2I
max
X
C
I
max
R
b
f5tan21 
a
X
L
2X
C
R
b
(33.27)
When X
L
X
C
(which occurs at high frequencies), the phase angle is positive, signi-
fying that the current lags the applied voltage as in Figure 33.15b. We describe this 
situation by saying that the circuit is more inductive than capacitive. When X
L
X
C
the phase angle is negative, signifying that the current leads the applied voltage, 
and the circuit is more capacitive than inductive. When X
L
X
C
, the phase angle is 
zero and the circuit is purely resistive.
uick Quiz 33.5  Label each part of Figure 33.16, (a), (b), and (c), as representing 
X
L
X
C
X
L
X
C
, or X
L
X
C
.
WW Maximum current  
in an 
R
L
C
circuit
WWImpedance
WWPhase angle
a
V
max
I
max
V
max
I
max
b
V
max
I
max
c
Figure 33.16 
(Quick Quiz 33.5)  
Match the phasor diagrams to 
the relationships between the 
reactances.
Example 33.4   Analyzing a Series 
R
L
C
Circuit
A series RLC circuit has R 5 425 V, L 5 1.25 H, and C 5 3.50 mF. It is connected to an AC source with f 5 60.0 Hz and 
DV
max
5 150 V.
(A)  Determine the inductive reactance, the capacitive reactance, and the impedance of the circuit.
continued
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
with specified zoom value and save it into stream The magnification of the original PDF page size Description: Convert to DOCX/TIFF with specified resolution and
best pdf to html converter; pdf to html converters
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
of PDF page adding in C# class, we suggest you go to C# Imaging - how to insert a new empty page to PDF file. DLLs for Adding Page into PDF Document in VB.NET
conversion pdf to html; convert pdf to html
1010
chapter 33 alternating-current circuits
Conceptualize  The circuit of interest in this example is shown in Figure 33.13a. The current in the combination of the 
resistor, inductor, and capacitor oscillates at a particular phase angle with respect to the applied voltage.
Categorize  The circuit is a simple series RLC circuit, so we can use the approach discussed in this section.
SoLuTIon
Substitute the given values:
L5
1
1377 s212
c
1
1377 s21213.5031026 F2
1
1
425 V
2
tan 
1
230.08
2
L 5 
1.36 H
Solve for L:
L5
1
v
a
1
vC
1R tan f
b
Substitute Equations 33.10 and 33.18 into this 
expression:
vL5
1
vC
1R tan f
Solve Equation 33.27 for the inductive 
reactance:
X
L
5X
C
1R tan f
▸ 33.4 
continued
Use Equation 33.25 to find the impedance:
Z5"R
2
1
1
X
L
2X
C
22
5"
1
425 V
22
1
1
471 V2758 V
22
5
513 V
Use Equation 33.18 to find the capacitive reactance:
X
C
5
1
vC
5
1
1
377 s21
21
3.5031026 F
2
5
758 V
Use Equation 33.10 to find the inductive reactance:
X
L
5 vL 5 (377 s21)(1.25 H) 5 
471 V
Analyze  Find the angular frequency:
v 5 2pf 5 2p(60.0 Hz) 5 377 s21 
(B)  Find the maximum current in the circuit.
SoLuTIon
Use Equation 33.26 to find the maximum current:
I
max
5
DV
max
Z
5
150 V
513 V
5
0.293 A
(C)  Find the phase angle between the current and voltage.
SoLuTIon
Use Equation 33.27 to calculate the phase angle:
f5tan21 a
X
L
2X
C
R
b5tan21 a
471 V2758 V
425 V
b5
234.08
(D)  Find the maximum voltage across each element.
SoLuTIon
Use Equations 33.2, 33.11, and 33.19 to calculate the 
maximum voltages:
DV
R
5I
max
R5
1
0.293 A
21
425 V
2
5
124 V
DV
L
5I
max
X
L
5
1
0.293 A
21
471 V
2
5
138 V
DV
C
5I
max
X
C
5
1
0.293 A
21
758 V
2
5
222 V
(E)  What replacement value of L should an engineer analyzing the circuit choose such that the current leads the 
applied voltage by 30.0° rather than 34.0°? All other values in the circuit stay the same.
SoLuTIon
Finalize  Because the capacitive reactance is larger than the inductive reactance, the circuit is more capacitive than 
inductive. In this case, the phase angle f is negative, so the current leads the applied voltage.
33.6 power in an ac circuit 
1011
33.6 Power in an AC Circuit
Now let’s take an energy approach to analyzing AC circuits and consider the trans-
fer of energy from the AC source to the circuit. The power delivered by a battery to 
an external DC circuit is equal to the product of the current and the terminal volt-
age of the battery. Likewise, the instantaneous power delivered by an AC source to 
a circuit is the product of the current and the applied voltage. For the RLC circuit 
shown in Figure 33.13a, we can express the instantaneous power P as
P 5 i Dv 5 I
max
sin (vt 2 f) DV
max
sin vt
P 5 I
max
DV
max
sin vt sin (vt 2 f) 
(33.28)
This result is a complicated function of time and is therefore not very useful from 
a practical viewpoint. What is generally of interest is the average power over one 
or more cycles. Such an average can be computed by first using the trigonometric 
identity sin (vt 2 f) 5 sin vt cos f 2 cos vt sin f. Substituting this identity into 
Equation 33.28 gives
P 5 I
max
DV
max
sin2 vt cos f 2 I
max
DV
max
sin vt cos vt sin f 
(33.29)
Let’s now take the time average of P over one or more cycles, noting that I
max
DV
max
, f, and v are all constants. The time average of the first term on the right 
of the equal sign in Equation 33.29 involves the average value of sin2 vt, which 
is 
1
2
. The time average of the second term on the right of the equal sign is identi-
cally zero because sin vt cos vt 5 
1
2
sin 2vt, and the average value of sin 2vt is zero. 
Therefore, we can express the average power P
avg
as
P
avg
5
1
2
I
max
DV
max
cos f 
(33.30)
It is convenient to express the average power in terms of the rms current and rms 
voltage defined by Equations 33.4 and 33.5:
P
avg
I
rms
DV
rms
cos f 
(33.31)
where the quantity cos f is called the power factor. Figure 33.15b shows that the 
maximum voltage across the resistor is given by DV
R
5 DV
max
cos f 5 I
max
R. There-
fore, cos f 5 I
max
R/DV
max
R/Z, and we can express P
avg
as
P
avg
5I
rms
DV
rms
cos f5I
rms 
DV
rms
a
R
Z
b
5I
rms
a
DV
rms
Z
b
R
WW Average power delivered to 
an 
R
L
C
circuit
Using Equations 33.21, 33.22, and 33.23, the instantaneous voltages across the three elements are
Dv
R
5 (124 V) sin 377t
Dv
L
5 (138 V) cos 377t
Dv
C
5 (2222 V) cos 377t
What if you added up the maximum voltages across the three circuit elements? Is that a physically mean-
ingful quantity?
Answer  The sum of the maximum voltages across the elements is DV
R
1 DV
L
1 DV
C
5 484 V. This sum is much greater 
than the maximum voltage of the source, 150 V. The sum of the maximum voltages is a meaningless quantity because 
when sinusoidally varying quantities are added, both their amplitudes and their phases must be taken into account. The 
maximum voltages across the various elements occur at different times. Therefore, the voltages must be added in a way 
that takes account of the different phases as shown in Figure 33.15.
WhAT IF?
▸ 33.4 
continued
1012
chapter 33 alternating-current circuits
Recognizing that DV
rms
/Z 5 I
rms
gives
P
avg
I2
rms
R 
(33.32)
The average power delivered by the source is converted to internal energy in the 
resistor, just as in the case of a DC circuit. When the load is purely resistive, f 5 0, 
cos f 5 1, and, from Equation 33.31, we see that
P
avg
I
rms 
DV
rms
Note that no power losses are associated with pure capacitors and pure inductors 
in an AC circuit. To see why that is true, let’s first analyze the power in an AC circuit 
containing only a source and a capacitor. When the current begins to increase in 
one direction in an AC circuit, charge begins to accumulate on the capacitor and a 
voltage appears across it. When this voltage reaches its maximum value, the energy 
stored in the capacitor as electric potential energy is 
1
2
C(DV
max
)2. This energy stor-
age, however, is only momentary. The capacitor is charged and discharged twice 
during each cycle: charge is delivered to the capacitor during two quarters of the 
cycle and is returned to the voltage source during the remaining two quarters. 
Therefore, the average power supplied by the source is zero. In other words, no 
power losses occur in a capacitor in an AC circuit.
Now consider the case of an inductor. When the current in an inductor reaches 
its maximum value, the energy stored in the inductor is a maximum and is given 
by 
1
2
LI2
max
. When the current begins to decrease in the circuit, this stored energy in 
the inductor returns to the source as the inductor attempts to maintain the current 
in the circuit.
Equation 33.31 shows that the power delivered by an AC source to any circuit 
depends on the phase, a result that has many interesting applications. For exam-
ple, a factory that uses large motors in machines, generators, or transformers has a 
large inductive load (because of all the windings). To deliver greater power to such 
devices in the factory without using excessively high voltages, technicians introduce 
capacitance in the circuits to shift the phase.
uick Quiz 33.6  An AC source drives an RLC circuit with a fixed voltage ampli-
tude. If the driving frequency is v
1
, the circuit is more capacitive than inductive 
and the phase angle is 210°. If the driving frequency is v
2
, the circuit is more 
inductive than capacitive and the phase angle is 110°. At what frequency is the 
largest amount of power delivered to the circuit? (a) It is largest at v
1
(b) It is 
largest at v
2
(c) The same amount of power is delivered at both frequencies.
Example 33.5   Average Power in an 
R
L
C
Series Circuit
Calculate the average power delivered to the series RLC circuit described in Example 33.4.
Conceptualize  Consider the circuit in Figure 33.13a and imagine energy being delivered to the circuit by the AC 
source. Review Example 33.4 for other details about this circuit.
Categorize  We find the result by using equations developed in this section, so we categorize this example as a substitu-
tion problem.
SoLuTIon
Use Equation 33.5 and the maximum voltage from 
Example 33.4 to find the rms voltage from the source:
DV
rms
5
DV
max
"2
5
150 V
"2
5106 V
Similarly, find the rms current in the circuit:
I
rms
5
I
max
"2
5
0.293 A
"2
50.207 A
33.7 resonance in a Series RLC circuit 
1013
33.7 Resonance in a Series 
R
L
C
Circuit
We investigated resonance in mechanical oscillating systems in Chapter 15. As 
shown in Chapter 32, a series RLC circuit is an electrical oscillating system. Such a 
circuit is said to be in  resonance when the driving frequency is such that the rms 
current has its maximum value. In general, the rms current can be written
I
rms
5
DV
rms
Z
(33.33)
where Z is the impedance. Substituting the expression for Z from Equation 33.25 into 
Equation 33.33 gives
I
rms
5
DV
rms
"R
2
1
1
X
L
2X
C
22
(33.34)
Because the impedance depends on the frequency of the source, the current in 
the RLC circuit also depends on the frequency. The angular frequency v
0
at which  
X
L
X
C
5 0 is called the resonance frequency of the circuit. To find v
0
, we set  
X
L
X
C
, which gives v
0
L 5 1/v
0
C, or
v
0
5
1
"LC
(33.35)
This frequency also corresponds to the natural frequency of oscillation of an LC 
circuit (see Section 32.5). Therefore, the rms current in a series RLC circuit has 
its maximum value when the frequency of the applied voltage matches the natural 
oscillator frequency, which depends only on L and C. Furthermore, at the reso-
nance frequency, the current is in phase with the applied voltage.
uick Quiz 33.7  What is the impedance of a series RLC circuit at resonance?  
(a) larger than R (b) less than R (c) equal to R (d) impossible to determine
WWResonance frequency
Use Equation 33.31 to find the power delivered by the 
source:
P
avg
I
rms
V
rms
cos f 5 (0.207 A)(106 V) cos (234.0°)
18.2 W
▸ 33.5 
continued
A plot of rms current versus angular frequency for a series RLC circuit is shown 
in Figure 33.17a on page 1014. The data assume a constant DV
rms
5 5.0 mV, L 5  
5.0 mH, and C 5 2.0nF. The three curves correspond to three values of R. In each 
case, the rms current has its maximum value at the resonance frequency v
0
. Fur-
thermore, the curves become narrower and taller as the resistance decreases.
Equation 33.34 shows that when R 5 0, the current becomes infinite at reso-
nance. Real circuits, however, always have some resistance, which limits the value of 
the current to some finite value.
We can also calculate the average power as a function of frequency for a series 
RLC circuit. Using Equations 33.32, 33.33, and 33.25 gives
P
avg
5I2
rms
R5
1
DV
rms
22
Z2
R5
1
DV
rms
22
R
R1
1
X
L
2X
C
22
(33.36)
Because X
L
5 vLX
C
5 1/vC, and v
0
2 5 1/LC, the term (X
L
X
C
)2 can be expressed 
as
1
X
L
2X
C
22
5
a
vL2
1
vC
b
2
5
L
2
v
2
1
v22v
0
222
1014
chapter 33 alternating-current circuits
Using this result in Equation 33.36 gives
P
avg
5
1
DV
rms
22
Rv
2
R
2
v
2
1L
21
v
2
2v
0
222
(33.37)
Equation 33.37 shows that at resonance, when v 5 v
0
, the average power is a maxi-
mum and has the value (DV
rms
)2/R. Figure 33.17b is a plot of average power versus 
frequency for three values of R in a series RLC circuit. As the resistance is made 
smaller, the curve becomes sharper in the vicinity of the resonance frequency. This 
curve sharpness is usually described by a dimensionless parameter known as the 
quality factor,2 denoted by Q:
Q5
v
0
Dv
where Dv is the width of the curve measured between the two values of v for which 
P
avg
has one-half its maximum value, called the half-power points (see Fig. 33.17b.) It 
is left as a problem (Problem 76) to show that the width at the half-power points has 
the value Dv 5 R/L so that
Q5
v
0
L
R
(33.38)
A radio’s receiving circuit is an important application of a resonant circuit. The 
radio is tuned to a particular station (which transmits an electromagnetic wave or 
signal of a specific frequency) by varying a capacitor, which changes the receiv-
ing circuit’s resonance frequency. When the circuit is driven by the electromag-
netic oscillations a radio signal produces in an antenna, the tuner circuit responds 
with a large amplitude of electrical oscillation only for the station frequency that 
matches the resonance frequency. Therefore, only the signal from one radio sta-
tion is passed on to the amplifier and loudspeakers even though signals from all 
stations are driving the circuit at the same time. Because many signals are often 
present over a range of frequencies, it is important to design a high-Q circuit to 
eliminate unwanted signals. In this manner, stations whose frequencies are near 
but not equal to the resonance frequency have a response at the receiver that is 
negligibly small relative to the signal that matches the resonance frequency.
Average power as  
a function of frequency in 
an 
R
L
C
circuit
Quality factor 
2The quality factor is also defined as the ratio 2pE/DE, where E is the energy stored in the oscillating system and DE 
is the energy decrease per cycle of oscillation due to the resistance.
Figure 33.17 
(a) The rms cur-
rent versus frequency for a series 
RLC circuit for three values of R
(b) Average power delivered to 
the circuit versus frequency for 
the series RLC circuit for three 
values of R.
0.2
0
0.4
0.6
0.8
1
1.2
1.4
1.6
9
8
10
11
12
a
1
0
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
8
10
11
12
b
R = 5.0 
R = 3.5 
R = 10 
R = 5.0 
R = 3.5 
R = 10 
The current reaches 
its maximum value 
at the resonance 
frequency v
0
.
As the resistance 
increases, ∆v
0
at 
the half-power 
point increases.
I
rms
(mA)
P
avg
(mW)
v (Mrad/s)
v (Mrad/s)
v
0
v
0
∆v
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested