convert byte array to pdf mvc : Convert pdf to html with images Library software class asp.net windows winforms ajax doc-3-pdf-67a5de9fa89738da0c6835ef457b5878-original106-part200

problems 
1025
(a) What is the total resistance of the circuit? (b) Cal-
culate the reactance of the circuit (X
L
X
C
).
40. Suppose you manage a factory that uses many electric 
motors. The motors create a large inductive load to the 
electric power line as well as a resistive load. The elec-
tric company builds an extra-heavy distribution line to 
supply you with two components of current: one that is 
90° out of phase with the voltage and another that is in 
phase with the voltage. The electric company charges 
you an extra fee for “reactive volt-amps” in addition to 
the amount you pay for the energy you use. You can 
avoid the extra fee by installing a capacitor between 
the power line and your factory. The following prob-
lem models this solution.
 In an RL circuit, a 120-V (rms), 60.0-Hz source is in 
series with a 25.0-mH inductor and a 20.0-V resistor. 
What are (a) the rms current and (b) the power factor? 
(c) What capacitor must be added in series to make the 
power factor equal to 1? (d) To what value can the sup-
ply voltage be reduced if the power supplied is to be 
the same as before the capacitor was installed?
41. A diode is a device that allows current to be carried 
in only one direction (the direction indicated by the 
arrowhead in its circuit symbol). Find the average 
power delivered to the diode circuit of Figure P33.41 in 
terms of DV
rms
and R.
R
R
R
2
V
rms
R
Figure P33.41
Section 33.7  Resonance in a Series 
R
L
C
Circuit
42. A series RLC circuit has components with the follow-
ing values: L 5 20.0 mH, C 5 100 nF, R 5 20.0 V, and 
DV
max
5 100V, with Dv 5 DV
max
sin vt. Find (a) the 
resonant frequency of the circuit, (b) the amplitude of 
the current at the resonant frequency, (c) the Q of the 
circuit, and (d) the amplitude of the voltage across the 
inductor at resonance.
43. An RLC circuit is used in a radio to tune into an FM 
station broadcasting at f 5 99.7 MHz. The resistance 
in the circuit is R 5 12.0 V, and the inductance is L 5 
1.40 mH. What capacitance should be used?
44. The LC circuit of a radar transmitter oscillates at  
9.00 GHz. (a) What inductance is required for the cir-
cuit to resonate at this frequency if its capacitance is 
2.00 pF? (b) What is the inductive reactance of the cir-
cuit at this frequency?
45. A 10.0-V resistor, 10.0-mH inductor, and 100-mF capac-
itor are connected in series to a 50.0-V (rms) source 
W
S
W
AMT
M
angle between the current and the applied voltage?  
(b) Which reaches its maximum earlier, the current or 
the voltage?
30. Draw phasors to scale for the following voltages in SI 
units: (a) 25.0 sin vt at vt 5 90.0°, (b) 30.0 sin vt at vt 5  
60.0°, and (c) 18.0 sin vt at vt 5 300°.
31. An inductor (L 5 400 mH), a capacitor (C 5 4.43mF), 
and a resistor (R 5 500 V) are connected in series. A 
50.0-Hz AC source produces a peak current of 250 mA 
in the circuit. (a) Calculate the required peak voltage 
DV
max
. (b) Determine the phase angle by which the 
current leads or lags the applied voltage.
32. A 60.0-V resistor is connected in series with a 30.0-mF  
capacitor and a source whose maximum voltage is 
120V, operating at 60.0 Hz. Find (a) the capacitive reac-
tance of the circuit, (b) the impedance of the circuit, 
and (c) the maximum current in the circuit. (d) Does 
the voltage lead or lag the current? (e) How will add-
ing an inductor in series with the existing resistor and 
capacitor affect the current? Explain.
33. Review. In an RLC series circuit that includes a source 
of alternating current operating at fixed frequency 
and voltage, the resistance R is equal to the inductive 
reactance. If the plate separation of the parallel-plate 
capacitor is reduced to one-half its original value, the 
current in the circuit doubles. Find the initial capaci-
tive reactance in terms of R.
Section 33.6  Power in an AC Circuit
34. Why is the following situation impossible? A series circuit 
consists of an ideal AC source (no inductance or capac-
itance in the source itself) with an rms voltage of DV at 
a frequency f and a magnetic buzzer with a resistance R 
and an inductance L. By carefully adjusting the induc-
tance L of the circuit, a power factor of exactly 1.00 is 
attained.
35. A series RLC circuit has a resistance of 45.0 V and an 
impedance of 75.0 V. What average power is delivered 
to this circuit when DV
rms
5 210 V?
36. An AC voltage of the form Dv 5 100 sin 1 000t, where 
Dv is in volts and t is in seconds, is applied to a series 
RLC circuit. Assume the resistance is 400 V, the capac-
itance is 5.00 mF, and the inductance is 0.500 H. Find 
the average power delivered to the circuit.
37. A series RLC circuit has a resistance of 22.0 V and an 
impedance of 80.0 V. If the rms voltage applied to the 
circuit is 160 V, what average power is delivered to the 
circuit?
38. An AC voltage of the form Dv 5 90.0 sin 350t, where Dv 
is in volts and t is in seconds, is applied to a series RLC 
circuit. If R 5 50.0 V, C 5 25.0 mF, and L 5 0.200 H, 
find (a)the impedance of the circuit, (b) the rms cur-
rent in the circuit, and (c) the average power delivered 
to the circuit.
39. In a certain series RLC circuit, I
rms
5 9.00 A, DV
rms
 
180 V, and the current leads the voltage by 37.0°.  
M
Q/C
S
W
W
W
Convert pdf to html with images - Convert PDF to html files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
How to Convert PDF to HTML Webpage with C# PDF Conversion SDK
convert pdf to url link; to html
Convert pdf to html with images - VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
PDF to HTML Webpage Converter SDK for VB.NET PDF to HTML Conversion
convert pdf to html format; convert pdf to website html
1026
chapter 33 alternating-current circuits
5 000 V. The capacitance C
s
, which is the stray capaci-
tance between the hand and the secondary winding, 
is 20.0 pF. Assuming the person has a body resistance 
to ground of R
b
5 50.0 kV, determine the rms voltage 
across the body. Suggestion: Model the secondary of the 
transformer as an AC source.
R
b
C
s
5 000 V
Transformer
Figure P33.52
Section 33.9 Rectifiers and Filters
53. The RC high-pass filter shown in Figure P33.53 
has a resistance R 5 0.500 V and a capacitance  
C 5 613 mF. What is 
the ratio of the ampli-
tude of the output 
voltage to that of the 
input voltage for this 
filter for a source fre-
quency of 600 Hz?
54. Consider the RC high-
pass filter circuit shown  
in Figure P33.53.  
(a) Find an expres-
sion for the ratio of the amplitude of the output volt-
age to that of the input voltage in terms of RC, and 
the AC source frequency v. (b) What value does this 
ratio approach as the frequency decreases toward 
zero? (c) What value does this ratio approach as the 
frequency increases without limit?
55. One particular plug-in power supply for a radio looks 
similar to the one shown in Figure 33.20 and is marked 
with the following information: Input 120 V AC 8 W 
Output 9 V DC 300 mA. Assume these values are accu-
rate to two digits. (a)Find the energy efficiency of the 
device when the radio is operating. (b) At what rate is 
energy wasted in the device when the radio is operat-
ing? (c) Suppose the input power to the transformer 
is 8.00 W when the radio is switched off and energy 
costs $0.110/kWh from the electric company. Find the 
cost of having six such transformers around the house, 
each plugged in for 31 days.
56. Consider the filter circuit shown in Figure P33.56. 
(a)Show that the ratio of the amplitude of the output 
voltage to that of the input voltage is
DV
out
DV
in
5
1/vC
Å
R21a
1
vC
b
2
M
S
S
having variable frequency. If the operating frequency 
is twice the resonance frequency, find the energy deliv-
ered to the circuit during one period.
46. A resistor R, inductor L, and capacitor C are connected 
in series to an AC source of rms voltage DV and vari-
able frequency. If the operating frequency is twice the 
resonance frequency, find the energy delivered to the 
circuit during one period.
47. Review. A radar transmitter contains an LC circuit 
oscillating at 1.00 3 1010 Hz. (a) For a one-turn loop 
having an inductance of 400 pH to resonate at this fre-
quency, what capacitance is required in series with the 
loop? (b)The capacitor has square, parallel plates sep-
arated by 1.00mm of air. What should the edge length 
of the plates be? (c)What is the common reactance of 
the loop and capacitor at resonance?
Section 33.8 The Transformer and Power Transmission
48. A step-down transformer is used for recharging the 
batteries of portable electronic devices. The turns 
ratio N
2
/N
1
for a particular transformer used in a 
DVD player is 1:13. When used with 120-V (rms) house-
hold service, the transformer draws an rms current of  
20.0 mA from the house outlet. Find (a) the rms out-
put voltage of the transformer and (b)the power deliv-
ered to the DVD player.
49. The primary coil of a transformer has N
1
5 350 turns, 
and the secondary coil has N
2
5 2 000 turns. If the 
input voltage across the primary coil is Dv 5 170 cos vt
where Dv is in volts and t is in seconds, what rms volt-
age is developed across the secondary coil?
50. A transmission line that has a resistance per unit 
length of 4.50 3 1024 V/m is to be used to transmit 
5.00MW across 400 mi (6.44 3 105 m). The output volt-
age of the source is 4.50 kV. (a) What is the line loss if 
a transformer is used to step up the voltage to 500 kV?  
(b)What fraction of the input power is lost to the line 
under these circumstances? (c) What If? What difficul-
ties would be encountered in attempting to transmit 
the 5.00MW at the source voltage of 4.50 kV?
51. In the transformer shown in Figure P33.51, the load 
resistance R
L
is 50.0 V. The turns ratio N
1
/N
2
is 2.50, 
and the rms source voltage is DV
s
5 80.0 V. If a voltme-
ter across the load resistance measures an rms voltage 
of 25.0 V, what is the source resistance R
s
?
V
s
R
s
N
1
N
2
R
L
Figure P33.51
52. A person is working near the secondary of a trans-
former as shown in Figure P33.52. The primary volt-
age is 120 V at 60.0 Hz. The secondary voltage is  
S
W
M
Q/C
AMT
BIO
C
R
v
in
v
out
Figure P33.53 
Problems 53 and 54.
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
String outputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\output.pdf"; doc.Save(outputFilePath); C# Example: Convert More than Two Type Images to PDF in C#.NET Application.
convert fillable pdf to html; embed pdf into html
VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.
Create PDF from Images. Create PDF from OpenOffice. Create PDF from CSV. Create PDF Export. Convert PDF to Word (.docx). Convert PDF to Tiff. Convert PDF to HTML
convert pdf to html5 open source; convert pdf into web page
problems 
1027
mum voltage DV
L
across the inductor and its phase rela-
tive to the current.
61. Energy is to be transmitted over a pair of copper wires 
in a transmission line at the rate of 20.0 kW with only 
a 1.00% loss over a distance of 18.0 km at potential 
difference DV
rms
5 1.50 3 103 V between the wires. 
Assuming the current density is uniform in the con-
ductors, what is the diameter required for each of the 
two wires?
62. Energy is to be transmitted over a pair of copper wires 
in a transmission line at a rate P with only a fractional 
loss f over a distance , at potential difference DV
rms
between the wires. Assuming the current density is uni-
form in the conductors, what is the diameter required 
for each of the two wires?
63. A 400-V resistor, an inductor, and a capacitor are in 
series with an AC source. The reactance of the induc-
tor is 700 V, and the circuit impedance is 760 V.  
(a) What are the possible values of the reactance of 
the capacitor? (b) If you find that the power delivered 
to the circuit decreases as you raise the frequency, 
what is the capacitive reactance in the original circuit? 
(c) Repeat part (a) assuming the resistance is 200 V 
instead of 400 V and the circuit impedance continues 
to be 760 V.
64. Show that the rms value for the sawtooth voltage shown 
in Figure P33.64 is DV
max
/!3
.
+∆V
max
-∆V
max
t
v
Figure P33.64
65. A transformer may be used to provide maximum power 
transfer between two AC circuits that have different 
impedances Z
1
and Z
2
. This process is called imped-
ance matching. (a) Show that the ratio of turns N
1
/N
2
for this trans formeris
N
1
N
2
5
Å
Z
1
Z
2
(b) Suppose you want to use a transformer as an 
impedance-matching device between an audio ampli-
fier that has an output impedance of 8.00 kV and a 
speaker that has an input impedance of 8.00 V. What 
should your N
1
/N
2
ratio be?
66. A capacitor, a coil, and two resistors of equal resistance 
are arranged in an AC circuit as shown in Figure P33.66 
(page 1028). An AC source provides an emf of DV
rms
 
20.0V at a frequency of 60.0Hz. When the double-
throw switch S is open as shown in the figure, the rms 
current is 183mA. When the switch is closed in position 
a, the rms current is 298 mA. When the switch is closed 
in position b, the rms current is 137 mA. Determine the 
S
Q/C
S
Q/C
(b) What value does this ratio approach as the fre-
quency decreases toward zero? (c) What value does 
this ratio approach as the frequency increases with-
out limit? (d) At what frequency is the ratio equal to 
one-half?
R
C
v
out
v
in
Figure P33.56
Additional Problems
57. A step-up transformer is designed to have an output 
voltage of 2 200 V (rms) when the primary is connected 
across a 110-V (rms) source. (a) If the primary winding 
has exactly 80 turns, how many turns are required on 
the secondary? (b) If a load resistor across the second-
ary draws a current of 1.50 A, what is the current in the 
primary, assuming ideal conditions? (c) What If? If the 
transformer actually has an efficiency of 95.0%, what is 
the current in the primary when the secondary current 
is 1.20 A?
58. Why is the following situation impossible? An RLC circuit 
is used in a radio to tune into a North American AM 
commercial radio station. The values of the circuit 
components are R 5 15.0 V, L 5 2.80 mH, and C 5 
0.910 pF.
59. Review. The voltage phasor diagram for a certain series 
RLC circuit is shown in Figure P33.59. The resistance of 
the circuit is 75.0 V, and the frequency is 60.0Hz. Find 
(a)the maximum voltage DV
max
, (b) the phase angle f, 
(c)the maximum current, (d)the impedance, (e) the 
capacitance and (f) the inductance of the circuit, and 
(g) the average power delivered to the circuit.
V
max
V
= 25.0 V
V
= 15.0 V
V
= 20.0 V
f
v
Figure P33.59
60. Consider a series RLC circuit having the parameters  
R 5 200 V, L 5 663 mH, and C 5 26.5 mF. The applied 
voltage has an amplitude of 50.0 V and a frequency of 
60.0Hz. Find (a) the current I
max
and its phase relative 
to the applied voltage Dv, (b) the maximum voltage 
DV
R
across the resistor and its phase relative to the cur-
rent, (c)the maximum voltage DV
C
across the capacitor 
and its phase relative to the current, and (d) the maxi-
W
M
C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
Following demo code will show how to convert all PDF pages to Jpeg images with C# .NET. // Load a PDF file. String inputFilePath
pdf to html converter online; how to change pdf to html format
VB.NET PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in vb.
images can be stored in a single TIFF file. RasterEdge.Imaging.PDF.dll offers complete APIs for developers to view, compress, annotate, process and convert PDF
convert pdf fillable form to html; embed pdf into web page
1028
chapter 33 alternating-current circuits
the tension T in the cord. (b) Determine one possible 
combination of values for these variables.
70. (a) Sketch a graph of the phase angle for an RLC series 
circuit as a function of angular frequency from zero 
to a frequency much higher than the resonance fre-
quency. (b)Identify the value of f at the resonance 
angular frequency v
0
. (c) Prove that the slope of the 
graph of f versus v at the resonance point is 2Q/v
0
.
71. In Figure P33.71, find the rms current delivered by the 
45.0-V (rms) power supply when (a) the frequency is 
very large and (b) the frequency is very small.
3.00 mH
100 
200 
45.0 V (rms)
200 F
m
Figure P33.71
72. Review. In the circuit shown in Figure P33.72, assume 
all parameters except C are given. Find (a)the current 
in the circuit as a function of time and (b)the power 
delivered to the circuit. (c) Find the current as a func-
tion of time after only switch 1 is opened. (d) After 
switch 2 is also opened, the current and voltage are in 
phase. Find the capacitance C. Find (e) the impedance 
of the circuit when both switches are open, (f) the 
maximum energy stored in the capacitor during oscil-
lations, and (g) the maximum energy stored in the 
inductor during oscillations. (h) Now the frequency 
of the voltage source is doubled. Find the phase differ-
ence between the current and the voltage. (i)Find the 
frequency that makes the inductive reactance one-half 
the capacitive reactance.
R
L
S
1
C
S
2
V
max
cos vt
Figure P33.72
73. A series RLC circuit contains the following compo-
nents: R 5 150 V, L 5 0.250 H, C 5 2.00 mF, and a 
source with DV
max
5 210 V operating at 50.0 Hz. Our 
goal is to find the phase angle, the power factor, and 
the power input for this circuit. (a) Find the inductive 
reactance in the circuit. (b) Find the capacitive reac-
tance in the circuit. (c)Find the impedance in the 
circuit. (d) Calculate the maximum current in the cir-
cuit. (e) Determine the phase angle between the cur-
S
S
GP
values of (a) R, (b)C, and (c) L. (d) Is more than one 
set of values possible? Explain.
R
L
C
R
a
b
S
V
rms
Figure P33.66
67. Marie Cornu, a physicist at the Polytechnic Institute in 
Paris, invented phasors in about 1880. This problem 
helps you see their general utility in representing oscil-
lations. Two mechanical vibrations are represented by 
the expressions
y
1
5 12.0 sin 4.50t
and
y
2
5 12.0 sin (4.50t 1 70.0°)
where y
1
and y
2
are in centimeters and t is in seconds. 
Find the amplitude and phase constant of the sum 
of these functions (a) by using a trigonometric iden-
tity (as from Appendix B) and (b) by representing the 
oscillations as phasors. (c) State the result of compar-
ing the answers to parts (a) and (b). (d) Phasors make 
it equally easy to add traveling waves. Find the ampli-
tude and phase constant of the sum of the three waves 
represented by
y
1
5 12.0 sin (15.0x 2 4.50t 1 70.0°)
y
2
5 15.5 sin (15.0x 2 4.50t 2 80.0°)
y
3
5 17.0 sin (15.0x 2 4.50t 1 160°)
where xy
1
y
2
, and y
3
are in centimeters and t is in 
seconds.
68. A series RLC circuit has resonance angular frequency 
2.00 3 103 rad/s. When it is operating at some input 
frequency, X
L
5 12.0 V and X
C
5 8.00 V. (a) Is this 
input frequency higher than, lower than, or the same 
as the resonance frequency? Explain how you can tell. 
(b) Explain whether it is possible to determine the val-
ues of both L and C. (c) If it is possible, find L and C. 
If it is not possible, give a compact expression for the 
condition that L and C must satisfy.
69. Review. One insulated conductor from a household 
extension cord has a mass per length of 19.0 g/m. A 
section of this conductor is held under tension between 
two clamps. A subsection is located in a magnetic field 
of magnitude 15.3 mT directed perpendicular to the 
length of the cord. When the cord carries an AC cur-
rent of 9.00 A at a frequency of 60.0 Hz, it vibrates 
in resonance in its simplest standing-wave vibration 
mode. (a) Determine the relationship that must be 
satisfied between the separation d of the clamps and 
W
Q/C
Q/C
Q/C
AMT
C# PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images in C#
C#.NET PDF SDK - Convert & Render PDF to Images in C#.NET. Description: Convert all the PDF pages to target format images and output into the directory.
converting pdf into html; adding pdf to html
C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net
Supports for changing image size. Also supports convert PDF files to jpg, jpeg images. C# class source codes and online demos are provided for .NET.
convert pdf to html open source; convert pdf to html code online
problems 
1029
4.00 3 103 Hz. (g) Treating the filter as a resonant cir-
cuit, find its quality factor.
78. An 80.0-V resistor and a 200-mH inductor are con-
nected in parallel across a 100-V (rms), 60.0-Hz source. 
(a) What is the rms current in the resistor? (b) By what 
angle does the total current lead or lag behind the 
voltage?
79. A voltage Dv 5 100 sin vt, where Dv is in volts and t 
is in seconds, is applied across a series combination of 
a 2.00-H inductor, a 10.0-mF capacitor, and a 10.0-V 
resistor. (a)Determine the angular frequency v
0
at 
which the power delivered to the resistor is a maxi-
mum. (b) Calculate the average power delivered at that 
frequency. (c) Determine the two angular frequencies 
v
1
and v
2
at which the power is one-half the maximum 
value. Note: The Q of the circuit is v
0
/(v
2
2 v
1
).
80. Figure P33.80a shows a parallel RLC circuit. The 
instantaneous voltages (and rms voltages) across each 
of the three circuit elements are the same, and each is 
in phase with the current in the resistor. The currents 
in C and L lead or lag the current in the resistor as 
shown in the current phasor diagram, Figure P33.80b. 
(a) Show that the rms current delivered by the source is
I
rms
5DV
rms
c
1
R2
1avC2
1
vL
b
2
d
1/2
(b) Show that the phase angle f between DV
rms
and I
rms
is given by
tan f5Ra
1
X
C
2
1
X
L
b
V
V
rms
I
C
I
R
I
R
L
C
L
v
a
b
Figure P33.80
81. An AC source with DV
rms
5 120 V is connected between 
points a and d in Figure P33.24. At what frequency will 
it deliver a power of 250 W? Explain your answer.
Q/C
rent and source voltage. (f)Find the power factor for 
the circuit. (g) Find the power input to the circuit.
74. A series RLC circuit is operating at 2.00 3 103 Hz. At 
this frequency, X
L
X
C
5 1 884 V. The resistance of 
the circuit is 40.0 V. (a) Prepare a table showing the 
values of X
L
X
C
, and Z for f 5 300, 600, 800, 1.00 3 103, 
1.50 3 103, 2.00 3 103, 3.00 3 103, 4.00 3 103, 6.00 3 
103, and 1.00 3 104 Hz. (b) Plot on the same set of axes 
X
L
X
C
, and Z as a function of ln f.
75. A series RLC circuit consists of an 8.00-V resistor, a 
5.00-mF capacitor, and a 50.0-mH inductor. A variable-
frequency source applies an emf of 400 V (rms) across 
the combination. Assuming the frequency is equal 
to one-half the resonance frequency, determine the 
power delivered to the circuit.
76. A series RLC circuit in which R 5 1.00 V, L 5 1.00 mH, 
and C 5 1.00 nF is connected to an AC source deliver-
ing 1.00V (rms). (a) Make a precise graph of the power 
delivered to the circuit as a function of the frequency 
and (b) verify that the full width of the resonance peak 
at half-maximum is R/2pL.
Challenge Problems
77. The resistor in Figure P33.77 represents the midrange 
speaker in a three-speaker system. Assume its resis-
tance to be constant at 8.00 V. The source represents 
an audio amplifier producing signals of uniform ampli-
tude DV
max 
5 10.0 V at all audio frequencies. The induc-
tor and capacitor are to function as a band-pass filter 
with DV
out
/DV
in
1
2
at 200 Hz and at 4.00 3 103 Hz.  
Determine the required values of (a) L and (b) C. Find 
(c) the maximum value of the ratio DV
out
/DV
in
; (d) the 
frequency f
0
at which the ratio has its maximum value; 
(e) the phase shift between Dv
in
and Dv
out
at 200 Hz, 
at f
0
, and at 4.00 3 103 Hz; and (f) the average power 
transferred to the speaker at 200 Hz, at f
0
, and at  
M
R
L
C
v
in
v
out
Figure P33.77
VB.NET PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images
service, DNN (DotNetNuke), SharePoint. VB.NET components for batch convert high resolution images from PDF. Convert PDF documents to
convert pdf form to html form; how to convert pdf to html code
VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
Why do we need to convert PDF to Word file in VB.NET class Therefore, people usually reuse PDF content by outputting its texts and images to Word
convert pdf to html code for email; pdf to html conversion
1030 
The waves described in Chapters 16, 17, and 18 are mechanical waves. By definition, the 
propagation of mechanical disturbances—such as sound waves, water waves, and waves on 
a string—requires the presence of a medium. This chapter is concerned with the properties of 
electromagnetic waves, which (unlike mechanical waves) can propagate through empty space.
We begin by considering Maxwell’s contributions in modifying Ampère’s law, which we 
studied in Chapter 30. We then discuss Maxwell’s equations, which form the theoretical 
basis of all electromagnetic phenomena. These equations predict the existence of electro-
magnetic waves that propagate through space at the speed of light c according to the  
traveling wave analysis model. Heinrich Hertz confirmed Maxwell’s prediction when he gen-
erated and detected electromagnetic waves in 1887. That discovery has led to many practi-
cal communication systems, including radio, television, cell phone systems, wireless Internet 
connectivity, and optoelectronics.
Next, we learn how electromagnetic waves are generated by oscillating electric charges. 
The waves radiated from the oscillating charges can be detected at great distances. Fur-
thermore, because electromagnetic waves carry energy (T
ER
in Eq. 8.2) and momentum, they 
can exert pressure on a surface. The chapter concludes with a description of the various 
frequency ranges in the electromagnetic spectrum.
34.1 Displacement Current 
and the General Form of 
Ampère’s Law
34.2 Maxwell’s Equations and 
Hertz’s Discoveries
34.3 Plane Electromagnetic 
Waves
34.4 Energy Carried by 
Electromagnetic Waves
34.5 Momentum and Radiation 
Pressure
34.6 Production of 
Electromagnetic Waves by 
an Antenna
34.7 The Spectrum of 
Electromagnetic Waves
c h a p p t t e r 
34
electromagnetic Waves
This image of the Crab Nebula taken 
with visible light shows a variety of 
colors, with each color representing 
a different wavelength of visible 
light. 
(NASA, ESA, J. Hester, A. Loll (ASU))
34.1 Displacement current and the General Form of ampère’s Law 
1031
34.1  Displacement Current and the General Form  
of Ampère’s Law
In Chapter 30, we discussed using Ampère’s law (Eq. 30.13) to analyze the magnetic 
fields created by currents:
C
B
S
?ds
S
5m
0
I 
In this equation, the line integral is over any closed path through which conduc-
tion current passes, where conduction current is defined by the expression I 5  
dq/dt. (In this section, we use the term conduction current to refer to the current car-
ried by charge carriers in the wire to distinguish it from a new type of current we 
shall introduce shortly.) We now show that Ampère’s law in this form is valid only 
if any electric fields present are constant in time. James Clerk Maxwell recognized 
this limitation and modified Ampère’s law to include time-varying electric fields.
Consider a capacitor being charged as illustrated in Figure 34.1. When a conduc-
tion current is present, the charge on the positive plate changes, but no conduction 
current exists in the gap between the plates because there are no charge carriers 
in the gap. Now consider the two surfaces S
1
and S
2
in Figure 34.1, bounded by the 
same path P. Ampère’s law states that rB
S
?ds
S
around this path must equal m
0
I
where I is the total current through any surface bounded by the path P.
When the path P is considered to be the boundary of S
1
, rB
S
?ds
S
5m
0
I because 
the conduction current I passes through S
1
. When the path is considered to be 
the boundary of S
2
, however, rB
S
?ds
S
50 because no conduction current passes 
through S
2
. Therefore, we have a contradictory situation that arises from the dis-
continuity of the current! Maxwell solved this problem by postulating an additional 
term on the right side of Ampère’s law, which includes a factor called the displace-
ment current I
d
defined as1
I
d
;P
0
dF
E
dt
(34.1)
WWDisplacement current
1Displacement in this context does not have the meaning it does in Chapter 2. Despite the inaccurate implications, the 
word is historically entrenched in the language of physics, so we continue to use it.
James Clerk Maxwell
Scottish Theoretical Physicist 
(1831–1879)
Maxwell developed the electromagnetic 
theory of light and the kinetic theory 
of gases, and explained the nature of 
Saturn’s rings and color vision. Max-
well’s successful interpretation of the 
electromagnetic field resulted in the 
field equations that bear his name. For-
midable mathematical ability combined 
with great insight enabled him to lead 
the way in the study of electromag-
netism and kinetic theory. He died of 
cancer before he was 50.
©
N
o
r
t
h
W
i
n
d
/
N
o
r
t
h
W
i
n
d
P
i
c
t
u
r
e
A
r
c
h
i
v
e
s
-
-
A
l
l
r
i
g
h
t
s
r
e
s
e
r
v
e
d
.
Path P 
-q
S
1
S
2
q
I
I
The conduction current I in the 
wire passes only through S
1
, which 
leads to a contradiction in 
Ampère’s law that is resolved only 
if one postulates a displacement 
current through S
2
.
Figure 34.1 
Two surfaces S
1
and 
S
2
near the plate of a capacitor are 
bounded by the same path P.
1032
chapter 34 electromagnetic Waves
where P
0
is the permittivity of free space (see Section 23.3) and F
E
;
e
E
S
?dA
S
is the 
electric flux (see Eq. 24.3) through the surface bounded by the path of integration.
As the capacitor is being charged (or discharged), the changing electric field 
between the plates may be considered equivalent to a current that acts as a continu-
ation of the conduction current in the wire. When the expression for the displace-
ment current given by Equation 34.1 is added to the conduction current on the 
right side of Ampère’s law, the difficulty represented in Figure 34.1 is resolved. No 
matter which surface bounded by the path P is chosen, either a conduction current 
or a displacement current passes through it. With this new term I
d
, we can express 
the general form of Ampère’s law (sometimes called the Ampère–Maxwell law) as
C
B
S
?ds
S
5m
0
1
I1I
d
2
5m
0
I1m
0
P
0
dF
E
dt
(34.2)
We can understand the meaning of this expression by referring to Figure 34.2. The 
electric flux through surface S is F
E
5
e
E
S
?dA
S
5EA, where A is the area of  
the capacitor plates and E is the magnitude of the uniform electric field between  
the plates. If q is the charge on the plates at any instant, then E 5 q/(P
0
A) (see Sec-
tion 26.2). Therefore, the electric flux through S is
F
E
5EA5
q
P
0
Hence, the displacement current through S is
I
d
5P
0
dF
E
dt
5
dq
dt
(34.3)
That is, the displacement current I
d
through S is precisely equal to the conduction 
current I in the wires connected to the capacitor!
By considering surface S, we can identify the displacement current as the source 
of the magnetic field on the surface boundary. The displacement current has its 
physical origin in the time-varying electric field. The central point of this for-
malism is that magnetic fields are produced both by conduction currents and by 
time-varying electric fields. This result was a remarkable example of theoretical 
work by Maxwell, and it contributed to major advances in the understanding of 
electromagnetism.
uick Quiz 34.1  In an RC circuit, the capacitor begins to discharge. (i) During 
the discharge, in the region of space between the plates of the capacitor, is there 
(a) conduction current but no displacement current, (b) displacement current 
but no conduction current, (c) both conduction and displacement current, or 
(d) no current of any type? (ii) In the same region of space, is there (a) an  
electric field but no magnetic field, (b) a magnetic field but no electric field,  
(c) both electric and magnetic fields, or (d) no fields of any type?
Ampère–Maxwell law 
I
-q
I
The electric field lines between 
the plates create an electric flux 
through surface S.
E
S
S
q
Figure 34.2 
When a conduction 
current exists in the wires, a chang-
ing electric field E
S
exists between 
the plates of the capacitor.
Example 34.1   Displacement Current in a Capacitor
A sinusoidally varying voltage is applied across a capacitor as shown in Figure 34.3. The 
capacitance is C 5 8.00 mF, the frequency of the applied voltage is f 5 3.00 kHz, and 
the voltage amplitude is DV
max
5 30.0 V. Find the displacement current in the capacitor.
Conceptualize  Figure 34.3 represents the circuit diagram for this situation. Figure 
34.2 shows a close-up of the capacitor and the electric field between the plates.
Categorize  We determine results using equations discussed in this section, so we cat-
egorize this example as a substitution problem.
SoluTion
C
v
C
V
max 
sin v
Figure 34.3 
(Example 34.1)
34.2 Maxwell’s equations and hertz’s Discoveries 
1033
34.2 Maxwell’s Equations and Hertz’s Discoveries
We now present four equations that are regarded as the basis of all electrical and 
magnetic phenomena. These equations, developed by Maxwell, are as fundamental 
to electromagnetic phenomena as Newton’s laws are to mechanical phenomena. In 
fact, the theory that Maxwell developed was more far-reaching than even he imag-
ined because it turned out to be in agreement with the special theory of relativity, 
as Einstein showed in 1905.
Maxwell’s equations represent the laws of electricity and magnetism that we have 
already discussed, but they have additional important consequences. For simplicity, 
we present Maxwell’s equations as applied to free space, that is, in the absence of 
any dielectric or magnetic material. The four equations are
C
E
S
?dA
S
5
q
P
0
(34.4)
C
B
S
?dA
S
50 
(34.5)
C
E
S
?ds
S
52
dF
B
dt
(34.6)
C
B
S
?ds
S
5m
0
I1P
0
m
0
dF
E
dt
(34.7)
Equation 34.4 is Gauss’s law: the total electric flux through any closed surface 
equals the net charge inside that surface divided by P
0
. This law relates an electric 
field to the charge distribution that creates it.
Equation 34.5 is Gauss’s law in magnetism, and it states that the net magnetic 
flux through a closed surface is zero. That is, the number of magnetic field lines 
that enter a closed volume must equal the number that leave that volume, which 
implies that magnetic field lines cannot begin or end at any point. If they did, it 
would mean that isolated magnetic monopoles existed at those points. That iso-
lated magnetic monopoles have not been observed in nature can be taken as a 
confirmation of Equation 34.5.
Equation 34.6 is Faraday’s law of induction, which describes the creation of an 
electric field by a changing magnetic flux. This law states that the emf, which is the 
WWGauss’s law
WWGauss’s law in magnetism
WWFaraday’s law
WWAmpère–Maxwell law
Evaluate the angular frequency of the source from 
Equation 15.12:
v 5 2pf 5 2p(3.00 3 103 Hz) 5 1.88 3 104 s21
Use Equation 33.20 to express the potential differ-
ence in volts across the capacitor as a function of 
time in seconds:
Dv
C
5 DV
max
sin vt 5 30.0 sin (1.88 3 104 t)
Use Equation 34.3 to find the displacement cur-
rent in amperes as a function of time. Note that 
the charge on the capacitor is q 5 C Dv
C
:
i
d
5
dq
dt
5
d
dt
1
C Dv
C
2
5C 
d
dt
1
DV
max
sin vt
2
5vC DV
max
cos vt
Substitute numerical values: 
i
d
5
1
1.883104 s21
21
8.0031026 C
21
30.0 V
2
cos 
1
1.883104 t
2
4.51 cos 
1
1.883104 t
2
▸ 34.1 
continued
1034
chapter 34 electromagnetic Waves
line integral of the electric field around any closed path, equals the rate of change 
of magnetic flux through any surface bounded by that path. One consequence of 
Faraday’s law is the current induced in a conducting loop placed in a time-varying 
magnetic field.
Equation 34.7 is the Ampère–Maxwell law, discussed in Section 34.1, and it 
describes the creation of a magnetic field by a changing electric field and by elec-
tric current: the line integral of the magnetic field around any closed path is the 
sum of m
multiplied by the net current through that path and P
0
m
0
multiplied by 
the rate of change of electric flux through any surface bounded by that path.
Once the electric and magnetic fields are known at some point in space, the 
force acting on a particle of charge q can be calculated from the electric and mag-
netic versions of the particle in a field model:
F
S
5qE
S
1qv
S
B
S
(34.8)
This relationship is called the Lorentz force law. (We saw this relationship earlier 
as Eq. 29.6.) Maxwell’s equations, together with this force law, completely describe 
all classical electromagnetic interactions in a vacuum.
Notice the symmetry of Maxwell’s equations. Equations 34.4 and 34.5 are sym-
metric, apart from the absence of the term for magnetic monopoles in Equation 
34.5. Furthermore, Equations 34.6 and 34.7 are symmetric in that the line integrals 
of E
S
and B
S
around a closed path are related to the rate of change of magnetic flux 
and electric flux, respectively. Maxwell’s equations are of fundamental importance 
not only to electromagnetism, but to all science. Hertz once wrote, “One cannot 
escape the feeling that these mathematical formulas have an independent exis-
tence and an intelligence of their own, that they are wiser than we are, wiser even 
than their discoverers, that we get more out of them than we put into them.”
In the next section, we show that Equations 34.6 and 34.7 can be combined 
to obtain a wave equation for both the electric field and the magnetic field. In 
empty space, where q 5 0 and I 5 0, the solution to these two equations shows 
that the speed at which electromagnetic waves travel equals the measured speed 
of light. This result led Maxwell to predict that light waves are a form of electro-
magnetic radiation.
Hertz performed experiments that verified Maxwell’s prediction. The 
experimental apparatus Hertz used to generate and detect electromagnetic 
waves is shown schematically in Figure 34.4. An induction coil is connected to a 
transmitter made up of two spherical electrodes separated by a narrow gap. The 
coil provides short voltage surges to the electrodes, making one positive and the 
other negative. A spark is generated between the spheres when the electric field 
near either electrode surpasses the dielectric strength for air (3 3 106 V/m;  
see Table 26.1). Free electrons in a strong electric field are accelerated and gain 
enough energy to ionize any molecules they strike. This ionization provides 
more electrons, which can accelerate and cause further ionizations. As the air 
in the gap is ionized, it becomes a much better conductor and the discharge 
between the electrodes exhibits an oscillatory behavior at a very high frequency. 
From an electric-circuit viewpoint, this experimental apparatus is equivalent to 
an LC circuit in which the inductance is that of the coil and the capacitance is 
due to the spherical electrodes.
Because L and C are small in Hertz’s apparatus, the frequency of oscillation 
is high, on the order of 100 MHz. (Recall from Eq. 32.22 that v51/!LC
for 
an LC circuit.) Electromagnetic waves are radiated at this frequency as a result of 
the oscillation of free charges in the transmitter circuit. Hertz was able to detect 
these waves using a single loop of wire with its own spark gap (the receiver). Such 
a receiver loop, placed several meters from the transmitter, has its own effective 
inductance, capacitance, and natural frequency of oscillation. In Hertz’s experi-
ment, sparks were induced across the gap of the receiving electrodes when the 
receiver’s frequency was adjusted to match that of the transmitter. In this way, 
lorentz force law 
Transmitter
Receiver
Induction
coil
-q
-
q
+
The receiver is a nearby loop 
of wire containing a second 
spark gap.
The transmitter consists of two 
spherical electrodes connected to 
an induction coil, which provides 
short voltage surges to the 
spheres, setting up oscillations in 
the discharge between the 
electrodes. 
Figure 34.4 
Schematic diagram of 
Hertz’s apparatus for generating and 
detecting electromagnetic waves.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested