convert byte array to pdf mvc : Convert pdf to html5 open source application SDK utility azure wpf web page visual studio doc-3-pdf-67a5de9fa89738da0c6835ef457b5878-original11-part204

problems 
75
circle of radius 3.70 cm  
that lies in a north–
south vertical plane. Find  
(a) the magnitude of the 
total displacement of the 
object and (b)the angle 
the total displacement 
makes with the vertical.
Additional Problems
48. A fly lands on one wall 
of a room. The lower-
left corner of the wall is 
selected as the origin of a two-dimensional Cartesian 
coordinate system. If the fly is located at the point hav-
ing coordinates (2.00, 1.00) m, (a) how far is it from the 
origin? (b) What is its location in polar coordinates?
49. As she picks up her riders, a bus driver traverses four 
successive displacements represented by the expression
1
26.30 b
2
i
^
2
1
4.00 b cos 408
2
i
^
2
1
4.00 b sin 408
2
j
^
1
1
3.00 b cos 508
2
i
^
2
1
3.00 b sin 508
2
j
^
2
1
5.00 b
2
j
^
Here b represents one city block, a convenient unit of 
distance of uniform size; 
i
^
is east; and 
j
^
is north. The 
displacements at 40° and 50° represent travel on road-
ways in the city that are at these angles to the main 
east–west and north–south streets. (a) Draw a map of 
the successive displacements. (b) What total distance 
did she travel? (c)Compute the magnitude and direc-
tion of her total displacement. The logical structure of 
this problem and of several problems in later chapters 
was suggested by Alan Van Heuvelen and David Malo-
ney, American Journal of Physics 67(3) 252–256, March 
1999.
50. A jet airliner, moving initially at 300 mi/h to the east, 
suddenly enters a region where the wind is blowing 
at 100mi/h toward the direction 30.0° north of east. 
What are the new speed and direction of the aircraft 
relative to the ground?
51. A person going for a walk follows the path shown in 
Figure P3.51. The total trip consists of four straight-
line paths. At the end of the walk, what is the person’s 
resultant displacement measured from the starting 
point?
End
x
y
200 m
60.0
30.0
150 m
300 m
100 m
Start
Figure P3.51
52. Find the horizontal and vertical components of the 
100-m displacement of a superhero who flies from the 
W
M
E
a
s
t
N
o
r
t
h
Figure P3.47
It maintains this velocity for 3.00 h, at which time the 
course of the hurricane suddenly shifts due north, 
and its speed slows to a constant 25.0 km/h. This new 
velocity is maintained for 1.50 h. (b) What is the unit-
vector expression for the new velocity of the hurricane?  
(c) What is the unit-vector expression for the dis-
placement of the hurricane during the first 3.00 h?  
(d) What is the unit-vector expression for the dis-
placement of the hurricane during the latter 1.50 h?  
(e) How far from Grand Bahama is the eye 4.50 h after 
it passes over the island?
44. Why is the following situation impossible? A shopper push-
ing a cart through a market follows directions to the 
canned goods and moves through a displacement  
8.00 i
^
m down one aisle. He then makes a 90.0° turn 
and moves 3.00 m along the y axis. He then makes 
another 90.0° turn and moves 4.00 m along the x axis. 
Every shopper who follows these directions correctly 
ends up 5.00 m from the starting point.
45. Review. You are standing on the ground at the origin 
of a coordinate system. An airplane flies over you with 
constant velocity parallel to the x axis and at a fixed 
height of 7.603 103 m. At time t 5 0, the airplane is 
directly above you so that the vector leading from you 
to it is P
S
0
57.603103
j
^
m. At t 5 30.0 s, the position 
vector leading from you to the airplane is 
P
S
30
5
1
8.043103
i
^
17.603103
j
^
2
m as suggested in 
Figure P3.45. Determine the magnitude and orienta-
tion of the airplane’s position vector at t5 45.0 s.
P
0
S
P
30
S
Figure P3.45
46. In Figure P3.46, the line seg-
ment represents a path from 
the point with position vector 
1
5
i
^
13
j
^
2
m to the point with 
location (16
i
^
112
j
^
) m. Point 
A is along this path, a fraction f  
of the way to the destination.  
(a) Find the position vector of 
point A in terms of f. (b)Evalu-
ate the expression from part  
(a) for f 5 0. (c) Explain whether 
the result in part (b) is reason-
able. (d) Evaluate the expres-
sion for f 5 1. (e)Explain whether the result in part (d) 
is reasonable.
47. In an assembly operation illustrated in Figure P3.47, a 
robot moves an object first straight upward and then 
also to the east, around an arc forming one-quarter 
of a circle of radius 4.80 cm that lies in an east–west 
vertical plane. The robot then moves the object 
upward and to the north, through one-quarter of a 
AMT
(5, 3)
(16, 12)
O
x
y
A
Figure P3.46 
Point 
A is a fraction f of the 
distance from the ini-
tial point (5, 3) to the 
final point (16, 12).
Q/C
Convert pdf to html5 open source - Convert PDF to html files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
How to Convert PDF to HTML Webpage with C# PDF Conversion SDK
convert pdf to html with images; how to convert pdf into html
Convert pdf to html5 open source - VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
PDF to HTML Webpage Converter SDK for VB.NET PDF to HTML Conversion
how to change pdf to html; convert fillable pdf to html
76
Chapter 3 Vectors
57. A vector is given by R
S
52
i
^
1
j
^
13
k
^
. Find (a) the 
magnitudes of the x, y, and z components; (b) the mag-
nitude of R
S
; and (c) the angles between R
S
and  
the x, y, and z axes.
58. A ferry transports tourists between three islands. It 
sails from the first island to the second island, 4.76 km 
away, in a direction 37.0° north of east. It then sails 
from the second island to the third island in a direc-
tion 69.0° west of north. Finally it returns to the first 
island, sailing in a direction 28.0° east of south. Cal-
culate the distance between (a)the second and third 
islands and (b) the first and third islands.
59. Two vectors A
S
and B
S
have precisely equal mag- 
nitudes. For the magnitude of A
S
B
S
to be 100 times 
larger than the magnitude of A
S
B
S
, what must be 
the angle between them?
60. Two vectors A
S
and B
S
have precisely equal magni-
tudes. For the magnitude of A
S
B
S
to be larger than 
the magnitude of A
S
B
S
by the factor n, what must  
be the angle between them?
61. Let A
S
5 60.0 cm at 270° measured from the hori-
zontal. Let B
S
5 80.0 cm at some angle u. (a) Find the 
magnitude of A
S
B
S
as a function of u. (b) From the 
answer to part (a), for what value of u does 0A
S
B
S
take on its maximum value? What is this maximum 
value? (c) From the answer to part (a), for what value 
of u does 0A
S
B
S
0 take on its minimum value? What 
is this minimum value? (d)Without reference to the 
answer to part (a), argue that the answers to each of 
parts (b) and (c) do or do not make sense.
62. After a ball rolls off the edge of a horizontal table at time  
t 5 0, its velocity as a function of time is given by
v
S
51.2
i
^
29.8t
j
^
where v
S
is in meters per second and t is in seconds. 
The ball’s displacement away from the edge of the 
table, during the time interval of 0.380 s for which the 
ball is in flight, is given by
Dr
S
5
3
0.380 s
0
v
S
dt
To perform the integral, you can use the calculus 
theorem
3
3
A1Bf
1
x
24
dx5
3
A dx1B 
3
f
1
x
2
dx
You can think of the units and unit vectors as con-
stants, represented by A and B. Perform the integra-
tion to calculate the displacement of the ball from the 
edge of the table at 0.380 s.
63. Review. The instantaneous position of an object is 
specified by its position vector leading from a fixed 
origin to the location of the object, modeled as a par-
ticle. Suppose for a certain object the position vector is 
a function of time given by r
S
54
i
^
13
j
^
22t
k
^
, where 
r
S
is in meters and t is in seconds. (a) Evaluate d
r
S
/dt 
(b) What physical quantity does d
r
S
/dt represent about 
the object?
S
Q/C
Q/C
W
top of a tall building fol-
lowing the path shown in 
Figure P3.52.
53. Review. The biggest 
stuffed animal in the 
world is a snake 420 m 
long, constructed by Nor-
wegian children. Sup-
pose the snake is laid 
out in a park as shown 
in Figure P3.53, form-
ing two straight sides of a 
105° angle, with one side  
240 m long. Olaf and Inge 
run a race they invent. 
Inge runs directly from 
the tail of the snake to 
its head, and Olaf starts 
from the same place at 
the same moment but 
runs along the snake. 
(a) If both children run 
steadily at 12.0km/h, Inge reaches the head of the 
snake how much earlier than Olaf? (b) If Inge runs the 
race again at a constant speed of 12.0 km/h, at what 
constant speed must Olaf run to reach the end of the 
snake at the same time as Inge?
54. An air-traffic controller observes two aircraft on his 
radar screen. The first is at altitude 800 m, horizontal 
distance 19.2 km, and 25.0° south of west. The second 
aircraft is at altitude 1 100 m, horizontal distance  
17.6 km, and 20.0° south of west. What is the distance 
between the two aircraft? (Place the x axis west, the  
y axis south, and the z axis vertical.)
55. In Figure P3.55, a spider is 
resting after starting to spin 
its web. The gravitational 
force on the spider makes it 
exert a downward force of 
0.150 N on the junction of 
the three strands of silk. The 
junction is supported by dif-
ferent tension forces in the 
two strands above it so that 
the resultant force on the junction is zero. The two 
sloping strands are perpendicular, and we have chosen 
the x and y directions to be along them. The tension  
T
x
is 0.127 N. Find (a) the tension T
y
, (b) the angle the 
x axis makes with the horizontal, and (c) the angle the 
y axis makes with the horizontal.
56. The rectangle shown in Figure 
P3.56 has sides parallel to the x 
and y axes. The position vectors 
of two corners are A
S
5 10.0 m 
at 50.0° and B
S
5 12.0m at 30.0°.  
(a) Find the perimeter of the rect-
angle. (b) Find the magnitude 
and direction of the vector from 
the origin to the upper-right cor-
ner of the rectangle.
Figure P3.55
x
y
A
S
B
S
Figure P3.56
Figure P3.52
x
y
30.0°
100 m
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
it is feasible for users to extract text content from source PDF document file the following C# example code for text extraction from PDF page Open a document
convert pdf into html email; convert pdf to html code c#
VB.NET PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in
Decode source PDF document file into an in-memory object, namely 2.pdf" Dim outputFilePath As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" Annot_8.pdf" ' open a PDF file
best website to convert pdf to word online; embed pdf to website
problems 
77
Challenge Problem
67. A pirate has buried his treasure on an island with five 
trees located at the points (30.0 m, 220.0 m), (60.0m, 
80.0m), (210.0 m, 210.0 m), (40.0 m, 230.0 m), and 
(270.0m, 60.0 m), all measured relative to some ori-
gin, as shown in Figure P3.67. His ship’s log instructs 
you to start at tree A and move toward tree B, but to 
cover only one-half the distance between A and B. 
Then move toward tree C, covering one-third the 
distance between your current location and C. Next 
move toward tree D, covering one-fourth the distance 
between where you are and D. Finally move toward 
tree E, covering one-fifth the distance between you 
and E, stop, and dig. (a) Assume you have correctly 
determined the order in which the pirate labeled the 
trees as A, BC, D, and E as shown in the figure. What 
are the coordinates of the point where his treasure is 
buried? (b) What If? What if you do not really know 
the way the pirate labeled the trees? What would hap-
pen to the answer if you rearranged the order of the 
trees, for instance, to B (30 m, 220 m), A (60 m, 80 m), 
E (210 m, 210 m), C (40m, 230m), and D (270 m,  
60 m)? State reasoning to show that the answer does 
not depend on the order in which the trees are labeled.
Q/C
64. Ecotourists use their global positioning system indica-
tor to determine their location inside a botanical gar-
den as latitude 0.002 43 degree south of the equator, 
longitude 75.642 38 degrees west. They wish to visit 
a tree at latitude 0.001 62 degree north, longitude 
75.644 26 degrees west. (a) Determine the straight-
line distance and the direction in which they can walk 
to reach the tree as follows. First model the Earth 
as a sphere of radius 6.37 3 106 m to determine the 
westward and northward displacement components 
required, in meters. Then model the Earth as a flat 
surface to complete the calculation. (b) Explain why 
it is possible to use these two geometrical models 
together to solve the problem.
65. A rectangular parallelepiped has dimensions ab, and 
c as shown in Figure P3.65. (a) Obtain a vector expres-
sion for the face diagonal vector R
S
1
. (b) What is the 
magnitude of this vector? (c) Notice that R
S
1
c
k
^
, and 
R
S
2
make a right triangle. Obtain a vector expression 
for the body diagonal vector R
S
2
.
y
c
b
z
a
x
O
R
1
S
R
2
S
Figure P3.65
66. Vectors A
S
and B
S
have equal magnitudes of 5.00.  
The sum of A
S
and B
S
is the vector 6.00
j
^
. Determine 
the angle between A
S
and B
S
.
Q/C
S
E
y
x
A
B
C
D
Figure P3.67
C# PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.
Description: Combine the source PDF streams into one PDF file and save it to a new PDF file on the disk. Parameters: Name, Description, Valid Value.
batch convert pdf to html; convert pdf to html online for
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
Online C# source code for extracting, copying and pasting PDF The portable document format, known as PDF document, is of file that allows users to open & read
converting pdfs to html; convert pdf into html online
78 
Fireworks erupt from the Sydney 
Harbour Bridge in New South Wales, 
Australia. Notice the parabolic  
paths of embers projected into 
the air. All projectiles follow a 
parabolic path in the absence 
of air resistance. 
(Graham Monro/
Photolibrary/Jupiter Images)
4.1 The Position, Velocity, and 
Acceleration Vectors
4.2 Two-Dimensional Motion 
with Constant Acceleration
4.3 Projectile Motion
4.4 Analysis Model: Particle in 
Uniform Circular Motion
4.5 Tangential and Radial 
Acceleration
4.6 Relative Velocity and 
Relative Acceleration
c h a p p t t e r 
4
Motion in two 
Dimensions
In this chapter, we explore the kinematics of a particle moving in two dimensions. 
Knowing the basics of two-dimensional motion will allow us—in future chapters—to exam-
ine a variety of situations, ranging from the motion of satellites in orbit to the motion of 
electrons in a uniform electric field. We begin by studying in greater detail the vector nature 
of position, velocity, and acceleration. We then treat projectile motion and uniform circular 
motion as special cases of motion in two dimensions. We also discuss the concept of relative 
motion, which shows why observers in different frames of reference may measure different 
positions and velocities for a given particle.
4.1 The Position, Velocity, and Acceleration Vectors
In Chapter 2, we found that the motion of a particle along a straight line such as 
the x axis is completely known if its position is known as a function of time. Let 
us now extend this idea to two-dimensional motion of a particle in the xy plane. 
We begin by describing the position of the particle. In one dimension, a single 
numerical value describes a particle’s position, but in two dimensions, we indicate 
its position by its position vector r
S
, drawn from the origin of some coordinate sys-
tem to the location of the particle in the xy plane as in Figure 4.1. At time t
i
, the 
particle is at point A, described by position vector r
S
i
. At some later time t
f
, it is at 
point B, described by position vector r
S
f
. The path followed by the particle from 
C# Word - MailMerge Processing in C#.NET
da.Fill(data); //Open the document DOCXDocument document0 = DOCXDocument.Open( docFilePath ); int counter = 1; // Loop though all records in the data source.
convert pdf table to html; convert pdf form to html form
C# Create PDF from OpenOffice to convert odt, odp files to PDF in
Convert OpenOffice Text Document to PDF with embedded fonts. to change ODT, ODS, ODP forms to fillable PDF formats in Visual Online source code for C#.NET class.
convert pdf to website html; convert pdf into html
4.1 the position, Velocity, and acceleration Vectors 
79
A to B is not necessarily a straight line. As the particle moves from A to B in the 
time interval Dt 5 t
f
t
i
, its position vector changes from r
S
i
to r
S
f
. As we learned 
in Chapter 2, displacement is a vector, and the displacement of the particle is the 
difference between its final position and its initial position. We now define the dis-
placement vector Dr
S
for a particle such as the one in Figure 4.1 as being the differ-
ence between its final position vector and its initial position vector:
Dr
S
r
S
f
r
S
i
(4.1)
The direction of Dr
S
is indicated in Figure 4.1. As we see from the figure, the mag-
nitude of Dr
S
is less than the distance traveled along the curved path followed by the 
particle.
As we saw in Chapter 2, it is often useful to quantify motion by looking at the 
displacement divided by the time interval during which that displacement occurs, 
which gives the rate of change of position. Two-dimensional (or three-dimensional) 
kinematics is similar to one-dimensional kinematics, but we must now use full vector 
notation rather than positive and negative signs to indicate the direction of motion.
We define the average velocity v
S
avg
of a particle during the time interval Dt as 
the displacement of the particle divided by the time interval:
v
S
avg
;
Dr
S
Dt
(4.2)
Multiplying or dividing a vector quantity by a positive scalar quantity such as Dt 
changes only the magnitude of the vector, not its direction. Because displacement 
is a vector quantity and the time interval is a positive scalar quantity, we conclude 
that the average velocity is a vector quantity directed along Dr
S
. Compare Equa-
tion4.2 with its one-dimensional counterpart, Equation 2.2.
The average velocity between points is independent of the path taken. That is 
because average velocity is proportional to displacement, which depends only 
on the initial and final position vectors and not on the path taken. As with one- 
dimensional motion, we conclude that if a particle starts its motion at some point and 
returns to this point via any path, its average velocity is zero for this trip because its 
displacement is zero. Consider again our basketball players on the court in Figure 2.2  
(page 23). We previously considered only their one-dimensional motion back and 
forth between the baskets. In reality, however, they move over a two-dimensional sur-
face, running back and forth between the baskets as well as left and right across the 
width of the court. Starting from one basket, a given player may follow a very compli-
cated two-dimensional path. Upon returning to the original basket, however, a play-
er’s average velocity is zero because the player’s displacement for the whole trip is zero.
Consider again the motion of a particle between two points in the xy plane as 
shown in Figure 4.2 (page 80). The dashed curve shows the path of the particle. As 
the time interval over which we observe the motion becomes smaller and smaller—
that is, as B is moved to B9 and then to B0 and so on—the direction of the displace-
ment approaches that of the line tangent to the path at A. The instantaneous velocity  
v
S
is defined as the limit of the average velocity Dr
S
/Dt as Dt approaches zero:
v
S
;lim
DtS0
Dr
S
Dt
5
dr
S
dt
(4.3)
That is, the instantaneous velocity equals the derivative of the position vector with 
respect to time. The direction of the instantaneous velocity vector at any point in 
a particle’s path is along a line tangent to the path at that point and in the direc-
tion of motion. Compare Equation 4.3 with the corresponding one-dimensional 
version, Equation 2.5.
The magnitude of the instantaneous velocity vector v5
0
v
S
0
of a particle is called 
the speed of the particle, which is a scalar quantity.
WW Displacement vector
WWAverage velocity
WWInstantaneous velocity
Path of
particle
x
y
t
i
i
t
f
f
O
r
S
r
S
r
S
r.
S
The displacement of the 
particle is the vector
A
B
Figure 4.1 
A particle moving 
in the xy plane is located with 
the position vector r
S
drawn from 
the origin to the particle. The 
displacement of the particle as it 
moves from A to B in the time 
interval Dt 5 t
f
t
i
is equal to the 
vector Dr
S
r
S
f
r
S
i
.
VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
addition, texts, pictures and font formatting of source PDF file are accurately retained in converted Word document file. Why do we need to convert PDF to Word
convert pdf to web pages; convert pdf link to html
VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
Separate source PDF document file by defined page range in VB.NET class application. Divide PDF file into multiple files by outputting PDF file size.
attach pdf to html; pdf to html converters
80
chapter 4 Motion in two Dimensions
As a particle moves from one point to another along some path, its instanta-
neous velocity vector changes from v
S
i
at time t
i
to v
S
f
at time t
f
. Knowing the velocity 
at these points allows us to determine the average acceleration of the particle. The 
average acceleration a
S
avg
of a particle is defined as the change in its instantaneous 
velocity vector Dv
S
divided by the time interval Dt during which that change occurs:
a
S
avg
;
Dv
S
Dt
5
v
S
f
v
S
i
t
f
2t
i
(4.4)
Because a
S
avg
is the ratio of a vector quantity Dv
S
and a positive scalar quantity Dt, 
we conclude that average acceleration is a vector quantity directed along Dv
S
. As 
indicated in Figure 4.3, the direction of Dv
S
is found by adding the vector 2v
S
i
(the 
negative of v
S
i
) to the vector v
S
f
because, by definition, Dv
S
v
S
f
v
S
i
. Compare 
Equation 4.4 with Equation 2.9.
When the average acceleration of a particle changes during different time inter-
vals, it is useful to define its instantaneous acceleration. The instantaneous accel-
eration a
S
is defined as the limiting value of the ratio Dv
S
/Dt as Dt approaches zero:
a
S
;lim
Dt
S
0
Dv
S
Dt
5
dv
S
dt
(4.5)
In other words, the instantaneous acceleration equals the derivative of the velocity 
vector with respect to time. Compare Equation 4.5 with Equation 2.10.
Various changes can occur when a particle accelerates. First, the magnitude 
of the velocity vector (the speed) may change with time as in straight-line (one- 
Average acceleration 
Instantaneous acceleration 
O
y
x
∆ ∆
r
1
S
r
2
S
r
3
S
Direction of v at 
S
As the end point approaches     , ∆t 
approaches zero and the direction 
of      approaches that of the green 
line tangent to the curve at     .
r
S
As the end point of the path is 
moved from      to      to      , the 
respective displacements and 
corresponding time intervals 
become smaller and smaller.
A
A
A
A
B
B
B
B
B
B
x
y
O
v
f
or
v
i
S
v
i
S
v
f
S
v
f
S
v
i
S
v
S
v
S
r
i
S
r
f
S
A
B
Figure 4.3 
A particle moves from position A to 
position B. Its velocity vector changes from v
S
i
to v
S
f
The vector diagrams at the upper right show two 
ways of determining the vector Dv
S
from the initial 
and final velocities.
Figure 4.2 
As a particle moves 
between two points, its average 
velocity is in the direction of the 
displacement vector Dr
S
. By defini-
tion, the instantaneous velocity at 
A is directed along the line tan-
gent to the curve at A.
Pitfall Prevention 4.1
Vector Addition Although the vec-
tor addition discussed in Chapter 
3 involves displacement vectors, vec-
tor addition can be applied to any 
type of vector quantity. Figure 4.3, 
for example, shows the addition of 
velocity vectors using the graphical 
approach.
C# PDF: PDF Document Viewer & Reader SDK for Windows Forms
page, view PDF file in different display formats, and save source PDF file using C# UpPage: Scroll to previous visible page in the currently open PDF document.
embed pdf into website; how to convert pdf into html code
4.2 two-Dimensional Motion with constant acceleration 
81
dimensional) motion. Second, the direction of the velocity vector may change with 
time even if its magnitude (speed) remains constant as in two-dimensional motion 
along a curved path. Finally, both the magnitude and the direction of the velocity 
vector may change simultaneously.
uick Quiz 4.1  Consider the following controls in an automobile in motion: gas 
pedal, brake, steering wheel. What are the controls in this list that cause an 
acceleration of the car? (a) all three controls (b) the gas pedal and the brake 
(c)only the brake (d) only the gas pedal (e) only the steering wheel
4.2  Two-Dimensional Motion  
with Constant Acceleration
In Section 2.5, we investigated one-dimensional motion of a particle under con-
stant acceleration and developed the particle under constant acceleration model. 
Let us now consider two-dimensional motion during which the acceleration of a 
particle remains constant in both magnitude and direction. As we shall see, this 
approach is useful for analyzing some common types of motion.
Before embarking on this investigation, we need to emphasize an important 
point regarding two-dimensional motion. Imagine an air hockey puck moving in 
a straight line along a perfectly level, friction-free surface of an air hockey table. 
Figure 4.4a shows a motion diagram from an overhead point of view of this puck. 
Recall that in Section 2.4 we related the acceleration of an object to a force on the 
object. Because there are no forces on the puck in the horizontal plane, it moves 
with constant velocity in the x direction. Now suppose you blow a puff of air on 
the puck as it passes your position, with the force from your puff of air exactly in 
the y direction. Because the force from this puff of air has no component in the x 
direction, it causes no acceleration in the x direction. It only causes a momentary 
acceleration in the y direction, causing the puck to have a constant y component 
of velocity once the force from the puff of air is removed. After your puff of air on 
the puck, its velocity component in the x direction is unchanged as shown in Figure 
4.4b. The generalization of this simple experiment is that motion in two dimen-
sions can be modeled as two independent motions in each of the two perpendicular 
directions associated with the x and y axes. That is, any influence in the y direc-
tion does not affect the motion in the x direction and vice versa.
The position vector for a particle moving in the xy plane can be written
r
S
5x i
^
1y j
^
(4.6)
where x, y, and r
S
change with time as the particle moves while the unit vectors i
^
and j
^
remain constant. If the position vector is known, the velocity of the particle 
can be obtained from Equations 4.3 and 4.6, which give
v
S
5
dr
S
dt
5
dx
dt
i
^
1
dy
dt
j
^
5v
x
i
^
1v
y
j
^
(4.7)
The horizontal red vectors, 
representing the x 
component of the velocity, 
are the same length in 
both parts of the figure, 
which demonstrates that 
motion in two dimensions 
can be modeled as two 
independent motions in 
perpendicular directions.
x
y
x
y
a
b
Figure 4.4 
(a) A puck moves 
across a horizontal air hockey 
table at constant velocity in the x 
direction. (b)After a puff of air 
in the y direction is applied to the 
puck, the puck has gained a y com-
ponent of velocity, but the x com-
ponent is unaffected by the force 
in the perpendicular direction.
82
chapter 4 Motion in two Dimensions
Because the acceleration a
S
of the particle is assumed constant in this discussion, 
its components a
x
and a
y
also are constants. Therefore, we can model the particle as 
a particle under constant acceleration independently in each of the two directions 
and apply the equations of kinematics separately to the x and y components of the 
velocity vector. Substituting, from Equation 2.13, v
xf
v
xi
a
x
t and v
yf
v
yi
a
y
t 
into Equation 4.7 to determine the final velocity at any time t, we obtain
v
S
f
5
1
v
xi
1a
x
t
2
i
^
1
1
v
yi
1a
y
t
2
j
^
5
1
v
xi
i
^
1v
yi
j
^
2
1
1
a
x
i
^
1a
y
j
^
2
t
v
S
f
v
S
i
a
S
t 
(4.8)
This result states that the velocity of a particle at some time t equals the vector 
sum of its initial velocity v
S
i
at time t 5 0 and the additional velocity a
S
t acquired 
at time t as a result of constant acceleration. Equation 4.8 is the vector version of 
Equation2.13.
Similarly, from Equation 2.16 we know that the x and y coordinates of a particle 
under constant acceleration are
x
f
5x
i
1v
xi
t1
1
2
a
x
t2
y
f
5y
i
1v
yi
t1
1
2
a
y
t2
Substituting these expressions into Equation 4.6 (and labeling the final position 
vector r
S
f
) gives
r
S
f
5
1
x
i
1v
xi
t1
1
2
a
x
t
22
i
^
1
1
y
i
1v
yi
t1
1
2
a
y
t
22
j
^
5
1
x
i
i
^
1y
i
j
^
2
1
1
v
xi
i
^
1v
yi
j
^
2
t1
1
2
1
a
x
i
^
1a
y
j
^
2
t2
r
S
f
r
S
i
v
S
i
t1
1
2
a
S
t
2
(4.9)
which is the vector version of Equation 2.16. Equation 4.9 tells us that the position 
vector r
S
f
of a particle is the vector sum of the original position r
S
i
, a displacement 
v
S
i
t arising from the initial velocity of the particle, and a displacement 
1
2
a
S
t2 result-
ing from the constant acceleration of the particle.
We can consider Equations 4.8 and 4.9 to be the mathematical representation 
of a two-dimensional version of the particle under constant acceleration model. 
Graphical representations of Equations 4.8 and 4.9 are shown in Figure4.5. The 
components of the position and velocity vectors are also illustrated in the figure. 
Notice from Figure 4.5a that v
S
f
is generally not along the direction of either v
S
i
or 
a
S
because the relationship between these quantities is a vector expression. For the 
same reason, from Figure 4.5b we see that r
S
f
is generally not along the direction of 
r
S
i
v
S
i
, or a
S
. Finally, notice that v
S
f
and r
S
f
are generally not in the same direction.
Velocity vector as W
a function of time for a  
particle under constant 
acceleration in two 
dimensions
Position vector as 
a function of time for a  
particle under constant 
acceleration in two 
dimensions
Figure 4.5 
Vector representa-
tions and components of (a) the 
velocity and (b) the position of a 
particle under constant accelera-
tion in two dimensions.
y
x
a
y
t
v
yf
v
yi
t
v
xi
a
x
t
v
xf
y
x
y
f
y
i
i
t
v
xi
t
x
f
a
y
t
2
1
2
v
yi
t
t
2
1
2
a
x
t
2
1
2
x
i
v
i
S
v
i
S
v
f
S
r
i
S
r
f
S
a
S
a
S
a
b
4.2 two-Dimensional Motion with constant acceleration 
83
Example 4.1   Motion in a Plane 
A particle moves in the xy plane, starting from the origin at t 5 0 with an initial velocity having an x component of  
20 m/s and a y component of 215 m/s. The particle experiences an acceleration in the x direction, given by a
x
 
4.0 m/s2.
(A) Determine the total velocity vector at any time.
Conceptualize The components of the initial velocity tell 
us that the particle starts by moving toward the right and 
downward. The x component of velocity starts at 20 m/s and 
increases by 4.0 m/s every second. The y component of veloc-
ity never changes from its initial value of 215 m/s. We sketch 
a motion diagram of the situation in Figure 4.6. Because the 
particle is accelerating in the 1x direction, its velocity compo-
nent in this direction increases and the path curves as shown 
in the diagram. Notice that the spacing between successive 
images increases as time goes on because the speed is increas-
ing. The placement of the acceleration and velocity vectors in 
Figure 4.6 helps us further conceptualize the situation.
Categorize Because the initial velocity has components in both the x and y directions, we categorize this problem 
as one involving a particle moving in two dimensions. Because the particle only has an x component of accelera-
tion, we model it as a particle under constant acceleration in the x direction and a particle under constant velocity in the  
y direction.
Analyze To begin the mathematical analysis, we set v
xi
5 20 m/s, v
yi
5 215 m/s, a
x
5 4.0 m/s2, and a
y
5 0.
AM
SolutIon
x
y
Figure 4.6 
(Example 4.1) Motion diagram for the particle.
Use Equation 4.8 for the velocity vector:
v
S
f
v
S
i
a
S
t5
1
v
xi
1a
x
t
2
i
^
1
1
v
yi
1a
y
t
2
j
^
Substitute numerical values with the velocity in meters 
per second and the time in seconds:
v
S
f
5
3
20 1
1
4.0
2
t
4
i
^
1
3
2151
1
0
2
t
4
j
^
(1)   v
S
f
5
31
2014.0t
2
i
^
215j
^
4
Finalize Notice that the x component of velocity increases in time while the y component remains constant; this result 
is consistent with our prediction.
(B) Calculate the velocity and speed of the particle at t 5 5.0 s and the angle the velocity vector makes with the x axis.
Analyze
SolutIon
Evaluate the result from Equation (1) at t 5 5.0 s:
v
S
f
5312014.015.022i
^
215j
^
45 140i
^
215j
^
2 m/s
Determine the angle u that v
S
f
makes with the x axis 
at t 5 5.0 s:
u5tan21a
v
yf
v
xf
b5tan21a
215 m/s
40 m/s
b5 2218
Evaluate the speed of the particle as the magnitude  
of v
S
f
:
v
f
5
0
v
S
f
0
5"v
xf
21
v
yf
2
5"
1
40
22
1
1
215
22
m/s5 43 m/s
Finalize The negative sign for the angle u indicates that the velocity vector is directed at an angle of 21° below the posi-
tive x axis. Notice that if we calculate v
i
from the x and y components of v
S
i
, we find that v
f
v
i
. Is that consistent with 
our prediction?
(C) Determine the x and y coordinates of the particle at any time t and its position vector at this time.
continued
84
chapter 4 Motion in two Dimensions
4.3  Projectile Motion
Anyone who has observed a baseball in motion has observed projectile motion. 
The ball moves in a curved path and returns to the ground. Projectile motion of 
an object is simple to analyze if we make two assumptions: (1) the free-fall accelera-
tion is constant over the range of motion and is directed downward,1 and (2) the 
effect of air resistance is negligible.2 With these assumptions, we find that the path 
of a projectile, which we call its trajectory, is always a parabola as shown in Figure4.7.  
We use these assumptions throughout this chapter.
The expression for the position vector of the projectile as a function of time 
follows directly from Equation 4.9, with its acceleration being that due to gravity, 
a
S
g
S
:
r
S
f
5r
S
i
1v
S
i
t1
1
2
g
S
t2 
(4.10)
where the initial x and y components of the velocity of the projectile are
v
xi
5v
i
cos u
i
v
yi
5v
i
sin u
i
(4.11)
The expression in Equation 4.10 is plotted in Figure 4.8 for a projectile launched 
from the origin, so that r
S
i
50. The final position of a particle can be considered to 
be the superposition of its initial position r
S
i
; the term v
S
i
t, which is its displacement 
if no acceleration were present; and the term 
1
2
g
S
t2 that arises from its acceleration 
due to gravity. In other words, if there were no gravitational acceleration, the par-
ticle would continue to move along a straight path in the direction of v
S
i
. Therefore, 
the vertical distance 
1
2
g
S
t2 through which the particle “falls” off the straight-line 
path is the same distance that an object dropped from rest would fall during the 
same time interval.
Finalize Let us now consider a limiting case for very large values of t.
What if we wait a very long time and then observe the motion of the particle? How would we describe the 
motion of the particle for large values of the time?
Answer Looking at Figure 4.6, we see the path of the particle curving toward the x axis. There is no reason to assume 
this tendency will change, which suggests that the path will become more and more parallel to the x axis as time grows 
large. Mathematically, Equation (1) shows that the y component of the velocity remains constant while the x compo-
nent grows linearly with t. Therefore, when t is very large, the x component of the velocity will be much larger than 
the y component, suggesting that the velocity vector becomes more and more parallel to the x axis. The magnitudes of 
both x
f
and y
f
continue to grow with time, although x
f
grows much faster.
WhAt IF?
1This assumption is reasonable as long as the range of motion is small compared with the radius of the Earth  
(6.4 3 106 m). In effect, this assumption is equivalent to assuming the Earth is flat over the range of motion considered.
2This assumption is often not justified, especially at high velocities. In addition, any spin imparted to a projectile, 
such as that applied when a pitcher throws a curve ball, can give rise to some very interesting effects associated with 
aerodynamic forces, which will be discussed in Chapter 14.
Use the components of Equation 4.9 with x
i
y
i
5 0 at  
t 5 0 and with x and y in meters and in seconds:
x
f
5v
xi
t1
1
2
a
x
t5 20t12.0t2
y
f
5v
yi
t5 215t
Express the position vector of the particle at any time t:
r
S
f
5x
f
i
^
1y
f
j
^
1
20t12.0t2
2
i
^
215tj
^
Analyze
SolutIon
▸ 4.1 
continued
A welder cuts holes through a heavy 
metal construction beam with a hot 
torch. The sparks generated in the 
process follow parabolic paths.
L
e
s
t
e
r
L
e
f
k
o
w
i
t
z
/
T
a
x
i
/
G
e
t
t
y
I
m
a
g
e
s
Pitfall Prevention 4.2
Acceleration at the highest Point  
As discussed in Pitfall Prevention 
2.8, many people claim that the 
acceleration of a projectile at the 
topmost point of its trajectory is 
zero. This mistake arises from 
confusion between zero vertical 
velocity and zero acceleration. If 
the projectile were to experience 
zero acceleration at the highest 
point, its velocity at that point 
would not change; rather, the 
projectile would move horizontally 
at constant speed from then on! 
That does not happen, however, 
because the acceleration is not zero 
anywhere along the trajectory.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested