convert byte array to pdf mvc : Convert pdf into html email SDK Library service wpf asp.net azure dnn doc-3-pdf-67a5de9fa89738da0c6835ef457b5878-original112-part207

problems 
1085
and refracted rays and show all three rays on a new 
diagram. (c) For rays incident from the air onto the 
air–glass surface, determine and tabulate the angles of 
reflection and refraction for all the angles of incidence 
at 10.0° intervals from 0° to 90.0°. (d) Do the same for 
light rays coming up to the interface through the glass.
53. A small light fixture on the bottom of a swimming pool 
is 1.00 m below the surface. The light emerging from 
the still water forms a circle on the water surface. What 
is the diameter of this circle?
54. Why is the following situation impossible? While at the bot-
tom of a calm freshwater lake, a scuba diver sees the 
Sun at an apparent angle of 38.0° above the horizontal.
55. A digital video disc (DVD) records information in a 
spiral track approximately 1 mm wide. The track con-
sists of a series of pits in the information layer (Fig. 
P35.55a) that scatter light from a laser beam sharply 
focused on them. The laser shines in from below 
through transparent plastic of thickness t 5 1.20 mm 
and index of refraction 1.55 (Fig. P35.55b). Assume 
the width of the laser beam at the information layer 
must be a 5 1.00 mm to read from only one track and 
not from its neighbors. Assume the width of the beam 
as it enters the transparent plastic is w 5 0.700mm. A 
lens makes the beam converge into a cone with an apex 
angle 2u
1
before it enters the DVD. Find the incidence 
angle u
1
of the light at the edge of the conical beam. 
This design is relatively immune to small dust particles 
degrading the video quality.
a
b
b
Information
layer
Plastic
n = 1.55
Air
t
w
u
2
u
2
u
1
u
1
b
a
Figure P35.55
A
n
d
r
e
w
S
y
r
e
d
/
P
h
o
t
o
R
e
s
e
a
r
c
h
e
r
s
,
I
n
c
.
56. How many times will the incident beam shown in Fig-
ure P35.56 be reflected by each of the parallel mirrors?
M
AMT
57. When light is incident normally on the interface 
between two transparent optical media, the intensity 
of the reflected light is given by the expression 
S
1
r5a
n
2
2n
1
n
2
1n
1
b
2
S
1
In this equation, S
1
represents the average magni-
tude of the Poynting vector in the incident light (the 
incident intensity), S
1
9 is the reflected intensity, and  
n
1
and n
2
are the refractive indices of the two media.  
(a) What fraction of the incident intensity is reflected  
for 589-nm light normally incident on an interface 
between air and crown glass? (b) Does it matter in part 
(a) whether the light is in the air or in the glass as it 
strikes the interface?
58. Refer to Problem 57 for its description of the  
reflected intensity of light normally incident on an 
interface between two transparent media. (a) For 
light normally incident on an interface between 
vacuum and a transparent medium of index n, show 
that the intensity S
2
of the transmitted light is given 
by S
2
/S
1
= 4n/(n 1 1)2. (b) Light travels perpendicu-
larly through a diamond slab, surrounded by air, with 
parallel surfaces of entry and exit. Apply the trans-
mission fraction in part (a) to find the approximate 
overall transmission through the slab of diamond, as 
a percentage. Ignore light reflected back and forth 
within the slab.
59. A light ray enters the atmosphere of the Earth and 
descends vertically to the surface a distance h 5  
100 km below. The index of refraction where the light 
enters the atmosphere is 1.00, and it increases lin-
early with distance to have the value n 5 1.000 293 at 
the Earth’s surface. (a)Over what time interval does  
the light traverse this path? (b) By what percentage 
is the time interval larger than that required in the 
absence of the Earth’s atmosphere?
60. A light ray enters the atmosphere of a planet and 
descends vertically to the surface a distance h below. 
The index of refraction where the light enters the 
atmosphere is 1.00, and it increases linearly with dis-
tance to have the value n at the planet surface. (a) Over  
what time interval does the light traverse this path?  
(b) By what fraction is the time interval larger than 
that required in the absence of an atmosphere?
61. A narrow beam of light is incident from air onto the 
surface of glass with index of refraction 1.56. Find  
M
S
Mirror
Mirror
1.00 m
1.00 m
5.00°
Incident beam
Figure P35.56
Convert pdf into html email - Convert PDF to html files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
How to Convert PDF to HTML Webpage with C# PDF Conversion SDK
convert pdf to html with; convert pdf into html code
Convert pdf into html email - VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
PDF to HTML Webpage Converter SDK for VB.NET PDF to HTML Conversion
online pdf to html converter; convert pdf fillable form to html
1086
chapter 35 the Nature of Light and the principles of ray Optics
67. A 4.00-m-long pole stands vertically in a freshwater 
lake having a depth of 2.00m. The Sun is 40.0° above 
the horizontal. Determine the length of the pole’s 
shadow on the bottom of the lake.
68. A light ray of wavelength 589 nm  
is incident at an angle u on 
the top surface of a block of 
polystyrene as shown in Fig-
ure P35.68. (a) Find the maxi-
mum value of u for which the 
refracted ray undergoes total 
internal reflection at the point 
P located at the left vertical face 
of the block. What If? Repeat 
the calculation for the case in which the polystyrene 
block is immersed in (b) water and (c) carbon disul-
fide. Explain your answers.
69. A light ray traveling in air is incident on one face of a 
right-angle prism with index of refraction n 5 1.50 as 
shown in Figure P35.69, and the ray follows the path 
shown in the figure. Assuming u 5 60.0° and the base 
of the prism is mirrored, determine the angle f made 
by the outgoing ray with the normal to the right face of 
the prism.
Incoming ray
Outgoing ray
Mirror base
n
φ
u
u
Figure P35.69
70. As sunlight enters the Earth’s atmosphere, it changes 
direction due to the small difference between the 
speeds of light in vacuum and in air. The duration of 
an optical day is defined as the time interval between 
the instant when the top of the rising Sun is just visi-
ble above the horizon and the instant when the top of 
the Sun just disappears below the horizontal plane. 
The duration of the geometric day is defined as the 
time interval between the instant a mathematically 
straight line between an observer and the top of the 
Sun just clears the horizon and the instant this line 
just dips below the horizon. (a) Explain which is lon-
ger, an optical day or a geometric day. (b) Find the 
difference between these two time intervals. Model 
the Earth’s atmosphere as uniform, with index of 
refraction 1.000 293, a sharply defined upper surface, 
and depth 8 614 m. Assume the observer is at the 
W
Q/C
AMT
Q/C
the angle of incidence for which the corresponding 
angle of refraction is half the angle of incidence. Sug-
gestion: You might want to use the trigonometric iden-
tity sin 2u 5 2 sin u cos u.
62. One technique for mea-
suring the apex angle 
of a prism is shown in 
Figure P35.62. Two 
parallel rays of light 
are directed onto the 
apex of the prism so 
that the rays reflect 
from opposite faces of 
the prism. The angular 
separation g of the two 
reflected rays can be measured. Show that f51
2
g.
63. A thief hides a precious jewel by placing it on the bot-
tom of a public swimming pool. He places a circular 
raft on the surface of the water directly above and cen-
tered over the jewel as shown in Figure P35.63. The sur-
face of the water is calm. 
The raft, of diameter d 5 
4.54 m, prevents the jewel 
from being seen by any 
observer above the water, 
either on the raft or on 
the side of the pool. What 
is the maximum depth h 
of the pool for the jewel 
to remain unseen?
64. Review. A mirror is often “silvered” with aluminum. 
By adjusting the thickness of the metallic film, one 
can make a sheet of glass into a mirror that reflects 
anything between 3% and 98% of the incident light, 
transmitting the rest. Prove that it is impossible to con-
struct a “one-way mirror” that would reflect 90% of 
the electromagnetic waves incident from one side and 
reflect 10% of those incident from the other side. Sug-
gestion: Use Clausius’s statement of the second law of 
thermodynamics.
65. The light beam in Fig-
ure P35.65 strikes sur-
face 2 at the critical 
angle. Determine the 
angle of incidence u
1
.
66. Why is the following situ-
ation impossible? A laser 
beam strikes one end 
of a slab of material of 
length L 5 42.0 cm and 
thickness t 5 3.10 mm  
as shown in Figure 
P35.66 (not to scale). 
It enters the material 
at the center of the left end, striking it at an angle of  
incidence of u 5 50.0°. The index of refraction of the 
slab is n5 1.48. The light makes 85 internal reflec-
tions from the top and bottom of the slab before exit-
ing at the other end.
M
f
g
Figure P35.62
d
Raft
J
e
w
e
l
h
Figure P35.63
Surface 
Surface 2
1
42.0°
60.0°
1
42.0°
u
Figure P35.65
L
u
t
n
Figure P35.66
u
P
Figure P35.68
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
with specified zoom value and save it into stream The magnification of the original PDF page size Description: Convert to DOCX/TIFF with specified resolution and
convert pdf to web page; convert pdf to html for online
VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
Create editable Word file online without email. In order to convert PDF document to Word file using VB you have to integrate following assemblies into your VB
convert pdf into webpage; change pdf to html format
problems 
1087
(b) What must the incident angle u
1
be to have total 
internal reflection at the surface between the medium 
with n 5 1.20 and the medium with n 5 1.00?
= 1.60
= 1.40
= 1.20
= 1.00
1
2
θ
θ
Figure P35.75
76. A. H. Pfund’s method for measuring the index of 
refraction of glass is illustrated in Figure P35.76. One 
face of a slab of thickness t is painted white, and a 
small hole scraped clear at point P serves as a source 
of diverging rays when the slab is illuminated from 
below. Ray PBB9 strikes the clear surface at the critical 
angle and is totally reflected, as are rays such as PCC9. 
Rays such as PAA9 emerge from the clear surface. On 
the painted surface, there appears a dark circle of 
diameter d surrounded by an illuminated region, or 
halo. (a) Derive an equation for n in terms of the mea-
sured quantities d and t. (b) What is the diameter of 
the dark circle if n 5 1.52 for a slab 0.600 cm thick? 
(c)If white light is used, dispersion causes the critical 
angle to depend on color. Is the inner edge of the 
white halo tinged with red light or with violet light? 
Explain.
A
t
C B B A
P
d
Clear
surface
Painted
surface
Figure P35.76
77. A light ray enters a rect-
angular block of plastic 
at an angle u
1
5 45.0° 
and emerges at an angle 
u
2
5 76.0° as shown in 
Figure P35.77. (a) Deter-
mine the index of 
refraction of the plastic. 
(b) If the light ray enters 
the plastic at a point L 5 50.0 cm from the bottom edge, 
what time interval is required for the light ray to travel 
through the plastic?
78. Students allow a narrow beam of laser light to strike 
a water surface. They measure the angle of refraction 
for selected angles of incidence and record the data 
shown in the accompanying table. (a) Use the data to 
Q/C
n
2
L
1
u
u
Figure P35.77
W
Q/C
Earth’s equator so that the apparent path of the rising 
and setting Sun is perpendicular to the horizon.
71. A material having an index of refraction n is sur-
rounded by vacuum and is in the shape of a quarter 
circle of radius R (Fig. P35.71). A light ray parallel to 
the base of the material is incident from the left at a 
distance L above the base and emerges from the mate-
rial at the angle u. Determine an expression for u in 
terms of nR, and L.
Outgoing ray
n
R
Incoming ray
L
u
Figure P35.71
72. A ray of light passes from air into water. For its devia-
tion angle d 5 uu
1
2 u
2
u to be 10.0°, what must its angle 
of incidence be?
73. As shown in Figure P35.73, a light ray is incident normal 
to one face of a 30°–60°–90° block of flint glass (a prism) 
that is immersed in water. (a) Determine the exit angle 
u
3
of the ray. (b) A substance is dissolved in the water to 
increase the index of refraction n
2
. At what value of n
2
does total internal reflection cease at point P?
60.0°
30.0°
P
n
1
n
2
2
3
1
θ
θ
θ
Figure P35.73
74. A transparent cylinder of radius R 5 2.00 m has a mir-
rored surface on its right half as shown in Figure 
P35.74. A light ray traveling in air is incident on the left 
side of the cylinder. The incident light ray and exiting 
light ray are parallel, and d 5 2.00 m. Determine the 
index of refraction of the material.
Mirrored
surface
Incoming ray
Outgoing ray
R
d
C
n
Figure P35.74
75. Figure P35.75 shows the path of a light beam through 
several slabs with different indices of refraction. (a) If 
u
1
5 30.0°, what is the angle u
2
of the emerging beam? 
S
RasterEdge.com General FAQs for Products
or need additional assistance, please contact us via email (support@rasteredge dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
add pdf to website; convert pdf to html format
.NET RasterEdge XDoc.PDF Purchase Details
View, Convert, Edit, Process, Protect, SignPDF Files. PDF Print. Support Plans Each RasterEdge license comes with 1-year dedicated support (email, online chat
convert pdf to web link; pdf to html converter online
1088
chapter 35 the Nature of Light and the principles of ray Optics
two paths: (1) it travels to the mirror and reflects from 
the mirror to the person, and (2) it travels directly to the 
person without reflecting off the mirror. The total dis-
tance traveled by the light in the first case is 3.10 times 
the distance traveled by the light in the second case.
83. Figure P35.83 shows an 
overhead view of a room 
of square floor area and 
side L. At the center of 
the room is a mirror set in 
a vertical plane and rotat-
ing on a vertical shaft at 
angular speed v about 
an axis coming out of the 
page. A bright red laser 
beam enters from the cen-
ter point on one wall of the 
room and strikes the mirror. As the mirror rotates, the 
reflected laser beam creates a red spot sweeping across 
the walls of the room. (a) When the spot of light on 
the wall is at distance x from point O, what is its speed? 
(b) What value of x corresponds to the minimum value 
for the speed? (c) What is the minimum value for the 
speed? (d) What is the maximum speed of the spot on 
the wall? (e) In what time interval does the spot change 
from its minimum to its maximum speed?
84. Pierre de Fermat (1601–1665) showed that whenever 
light travels from one point to another, its actual path 
is the path that requires the smallest time interval. This 
statement is known as Fermat’s principle. The simplest 
example is for light propagating in a homogeneous 
medium. It moves in a straight line because a straight 
line is the shortest distance between two points. Derive 
Snell’s law of refraction from Fermat’s principle. Pro-
ceed as follows. In Figure P35.84, a light ray travels 
from point P in medium 1 to point Q in medium 2. The 
two points are, respectively, at perpendicular distances 
a and b from the interface. The displacement from P to 
Q has the component d parallel to the interface, and 
we let x represent the coordinate of the point where 
the ray enters the second medium. Let t 5 0 be the 
instant the light starts from P. (a) Show that the time at 
which the light arrives at Q is
t5
r
1
v
1
1
r
2
v
2
5
n
1
"a1x2
c
1
n
2
"b1
1
d2x
22
c
L
L
x
v
O
Figure P35.83
S
S
verify Snell’s law of refraction by plotting the sine of 
the angle of incidence versus the sine of the angle of 
refraction. (b) Explain what the shape of the graph 
demonstrates. (c) Use the resulting plot to deduce the 
index of refraction of water, explaining how you do so.
Angle of Incidence 
Angle of Refraction
(degrees) 
(degrees)
10.0 
7.5
20.0 
15.1
30.0 
22.3
40.0 
28.7
50.0 
35.2
60.0 
40.3
70.0 
45.3
80.0 
47.7
79. The walls of an ancient shrine are perpendicular to 
the four cardinal compass directions. On the first day 
of spring, light from the rising Sun enters a rectangu-
lar window in the eastern wall. The light traverses  
2.37 m horizontally to shine perpendicularly on the 
wall opposite the window. A tourist observes the patch 
of light moving across this western wall. (a) With what 
speed does the illuminated rectangle move? (b) The 
tourist holds a small, square mirror flat against the 
western wall at one corner of the rectangle of light. 
The mirror reflects light back to a spot on the eastern 
wall close beside the window. With what speed does the 
smaller square of light move across that wall? (c)Seen 
from a latitude of 40.0° north, the rising Sun moves 
through the sky along a line making a 50.0° angle with 
the southeastern horizon. In what direction does the 
rectangular patch of light on the western wall of the 
shrine move? (d) In what direction does the smaller 
square of light on the eastern wall move?
80. Figure P35.80 shows a top view of a 
square enclosure. The inner surfaces 
are plane mirrors. A ray of light enters 
a small hole in the center of one mir-
ror. (a) At what angle u must the ray 
enter if it exits through the hole after 
being reflected once by each of the 
other three mirrors? (b)What If? 
Are there other values of u for which 
the ray can exit after multiple reflections? If so, sketch 
one of the ray’s paths.
Challenge Problems
81. A hiker stands on an isolated mountain peak near sun-
set and observes a rainbow caused by water droplets in 
the air at a distance of 8.00 km along her line of sight 
to the most intense light from the rainbow. The valley 
is 2.00 km below the mountain peak and entirely flat. 
What fraction of the complete circular arc of the rain-
bow is visible to the hiker?
82. Why is the following situation impossible? The perpendicu-
lar distance of a lightbulb from a large plane mirror is 
twice the perpendicular distance of a person from the 
mirror. Light from the lightbulb reaches the person by 
u
Figure P35.80
S
P
n
1
n
2
d
x
b
- x 
r
1
r
2
Q
a
1
2
1
2
u
u
u
u
Figure P35.84 
Problems 84 and 85.
About RasterEdge.com - A Professional Image Solution Provider
Email to: support@rasteredge.com. We are dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image to pdf files and components for
convert pdf to html form; how to convert pdf file to html document
C# Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF in C#
Free online Excel to PDF converter without email. Quick integrate online C# source code into .NET class. C# Demo Code: Convert Excel to PDF in Visual C# .NET
convert pdf to html link; pdf to html conversion
problems 
1089
86. Suppose a luminous sphere of radius R
1
(such as the 
Sun) is surrounded by a uniform atmosphere of radius 
R
2
. R
1
and index of refraction n. When the sphere 
is viewed from a location far away in vacuum, what is 
its apparent radius (a) when R
2
nR
1
and (b) when  
R
2
nR
1
?
87. This problem builds upon the results of Problems 57 
and 58. Light travels perpendicularly through a dia-
mond slab, surrounded by air, with parallel surfaces of 
entry and exit. The intensity of the transmitted light 
is what fraction of the incident intensity? Include the 
effects of light reflected back and forth inside the slab.
S
(b) To obtain the value of x for which t has its mini-
mum value, differentiate t with respect to x and set the 
derivative equal to zero. Show that the result implies
n
1
x
"a21x2
5
n
2
1
d2x
2
"b211d2x22
(c) Show that this expression in turn gives Snell’s law,
n
1
sin u
1
n
2
sin u
2
85. Refer to Problem 84 for the statement of Fermat’s prin-
ciple of least time. Derive the law of reflection (Eq. 
35.2) from Fermat’s principle.
S
C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF
public override void ConvertToDocument(DocumentType targetType, Stream stream). Description: Convert to PDF/TIFF and save it into stream. Parameters:
convert pdf form to html; convert pdf to html code
C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
public override void ConvertToDocument(DocumentType targetType, Stream stream). Description: Convert to PDF/TIFF and save it into stream. Parameters:
how to convert pdf to html email; convert fillable pdf to html form
1090 
This chapter is concerned with the images that result when light rays encounter flat 
or curved surfaces between two media. Images can be formed by either reflection or 
refraction due to these surfaces. We can design mirrors and lenses to form images with 
desired characteristics. In this chapter, we continue to use the ray approximation and 
assume light travels in straight lines. We first study the formation of images by mirrors and 
lenses and techniques for locating an image and determining its size. Then we investigate 
how to combine these elements into several useful optical instruments such as microscopes 
and telescopes.
36.1 Images Formed by Flat Mirrors
Image formation by mirrors can be understood through the behavior of light 
rays as described by the wave under reflection analysis model. We begin by con-
sidering the simplest possible mirror, the flat mirror. Consider a point source 
of light placed at O in Figure 36.1, a distance p in front of a flat mirror. The 
distance p is called the object distance. Diverging light rays leave the source and 
are reflected from the mirror. Upon reflection, the rays continue to diverge. The 
dashed lines in Figure 36.1 are extensions of the diverging rays back to a point of 
36.1 Images Formed by  
Flat Mirrors
36.2 Images Formed by Spherical 
Mirrors
36.3 Images Formed by 
Refraction
36.4 Images Formed by  
Thin Lenses
36.5 Lens Aberrations
36.6 The Camera
36.7 The Eye
36.8 The Simple Magnifier
36.9 The Compound Microscope
36.10 The Telescope
c h a p p t t e r 
36
Image Formation
The light rays coming from the 
leaves in the background of this 
scene did not form a focused image 
in the camera that took this photo-
graph. Consequently, the background 
appears very blurry. Light rays pass-
ing though the raindrop, however, 
have been altered so as to form a 
focused image of the background 
leaves for the camera. In this chap-
ter, we investigate the formation 
of images as light rays reflect from 
mirrors and refract through lenses. 
(Don Hammond Photography Ltd. RF)
XDoc.Converter for .NET Purchase information
VB.NET Read: PDF Image Extract; VB.NET Write: Insert text into PDF; Convert to HTML. Online PDF Editor (beta); Online Document Viewer; Online Convert PDF to Word;
pdf to html conversion; convert pdf to html email
RasterEdge Product Refund Policy
send back RasterEdge Software Refund Agreement that we will email to you We are dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
embed pdf into web page; convert pdf to html
36.1 Images Formed by Flat Mirrors 
1091
intersection at I. The diverging rays appear to the viewer to originate at the point 
I behind the mirror. Point I, which is a distance q behind the mirror, is called the 
image of the object at O. The distance q is called the image distance. Regardless 
of the system under study, images can always be located by extending diverging 
rays back to a point at which they intersect. Images are located either at a point 
from which rays of light actually diverge or at a point from which they appear to 
diverge.
Images are classified as real or virtual. A real image is formed when all light rays 
pass through and diverge from the image point; a virtual image is formed when 
most if not all of the light rays do not pass through the image point but only appear 
to diverge from that point. The image formed by the mirror in Figure 36.1 is vir-
tual. No light rays from the object exist behind the mirror, at the location of the 
image, so the light rays in front of the mirror only seem to be diverging from I. 
The image of an object seen in a flat mirror is always virtual. Real images can be 
displayed on a screen (as at a movie theater), but virtual images cannot be displayed 
on a screen. We shall see an example of a real image in Section 36.2.
We can use the simple geometry in Figure 36.2 to examine the properties of the 
images of extended objects formed by flat mirrors. Even though there are an infi-
nite number of choices of direction in which light rays could leave each point on 
the object (represented by a gray arrow), we need to choose only two rays to deter-
mine where an image is formed. One of those rays starts at P, follows a path perpen-
dicular to the mirror to Q, and reflects back on itself. The second ray follows the 
oblique path PR and reflects as shown in Figure 36.2 according to the law of reflec-
tion. An observer in front of the mirror would extend the two reflected rays back 
to the point at which they appear to have originated, which is point P9 behind the 
mirror. A continuation of this process for points other than P on the object would 
result in a virtual image (represented by a pink arrow) of the entire object behind 
the mirror. Because triangles PQR and P9QR are congruent, PQ 5 P9Q, so |p| 5 |q|. 
Therefore, the image formed of an object placed in front of a flat mirror is as far 
behind the mirror as the object is in front of the mirror.
The geometry in Figure 36.2 also reveals that the object height h equals the 
image height h9. Let us define lateral magnification M of an image as follows:
M5
image height
object height
5
hr
h
(36.1)
This general definition of the lateral magnification for an image from any 
type of mirror is also valid for images formed by lenses, which we study in Sec-
tion 36.4. For a flat mirror, M 5 11 for any image because h9 5 h. The posi-
tive value of the magnification signifies that the image is upright. (By upright 
we mean that if the object arrow points upward as in Figure 36.2, so does the 
image arrow.)
A flat mirror produces an image that has an apparent left–right reversal. You 
can see this reversal by standing in front of a mirror and raising your right 
hand as shown in Figure 36.3. The image you see raises its left hand. Likewise, 
your hair appears to be parted on the side opposite your real part, and a mole 
on your right cheek appears to be on your left cheek.
This reversal is not actually a left–right reversal. Imagine, for example, lying 
on your left side on the floor with your body parallel to the mirror surface. 
Now your head is on the left and your feet are on the right. If you shake your 
feet, the image does not shake its head! If you raise your right hand, however, 
the image again raises its left hand. Therefore, the mirror again appears to 
produce a left–right reversal but in the up–down direction!
The reversal is actually a front–back reversal, caused by the light rays going 
forward toward the mirror and then reflecting back from it. An interesting 
The image point I is located 
behind the mirror a distance 
q from the mirror. The image 
is virtual.
Mirror
p
q
O
I
Figure 36.1 
An image formed 
by reflection from a flat mirror.
Because the triangles PQR 
and P'QR are congruent, 
| = | | and h = h′.                     
Object
h
h'
P
P'
Q
p
q
R
Image
u
u
Figure 36.2 
A geometric con-
struction that is used to locate the 
image of an object placed in front 
of a flat mirror.
The thumb is on the left side of 
both real hands and on the left 
side of the image. That the thumb 
is not on the right side of the 
image indicates that there is no 
left-to-right reversal.
Figure 36.3 
The image in the mir-
ror of a person’s right hand is reversed 
front to back, which makes the right 
hand appear to be a left hand. 
.
C
e
n
g
a
g
e
L
e
a
r
n
i
n
g
/
G
e
o
r
g
e
S
e
m
p
l
e
1092
chapter 36 Image Formation
exercise is to stand in front of a mirror while holding an overhead transparency in 
front of you so that you can read the writing on the transparency. You will also be 
able to read the writing on the image of the transparency. You may have had a simi-
lar experience if you have attached a transparent decal with words on it to the rear 
window of your car. If the decal can be read from outside the car, you can also read 
it when looking into your rearview mirror from inside the car.
uick Quiz 36.1  You are standing approximately 2 m away from a mirror. The 
mirror has water spots on its surface. True or False: It is possible for you to see 
the water spots and your image both in focus at the same time.
Conceptual Example 36.1   Multiple Images Formed by Two Mirrors
Two flat mirrors are perpendicular to each other as in Figure 36.4, and an object 
is placed at point O. In this situation, multiple images are formed. Locate the posi-
tions of these images.
The image of the object is at I
1
in mirror 1 
(green rays) and at I
2
in mirror 2 (red rays). 
In addition, a third image is formed at I
3
(blue rays). This third image is the image of 
I
1
in mirror 2 or, equivalently, the image of 
I
2
in mirror 1. That is, the image at I
1
(or 
I
2
) serves as the object for I
3
. To form this 
image at I
3
, the rays reflect twice after leav-
ing the object at O.
SoluTion
Conceptual Example 36.2   The Tilting Rearview Mirror
Most rearview mirrors in cars have a day setting and a 
night setting. The night setting greatly diminishes the 
intensity of the image so that lights from trailing vehicles 
do not temporarily blind the driver. How does such a mir-
ror work?
Figure 36.5 shows a cross-sectional view of a rearview mir-
ror for each setting. The unit consists of a reflective coat-
ing on the back of a wedge of glass. In the day setting (Fig. 
36.5a), the light from an object behind the car strikes the 
glass wedge at point 1. Most of the light enters the wedge, 
refracting as it crosses the front surface, and reflects from 
the back surface to return to the front surface, where it is 
refracted again as it re-enters the air as ray B (for bright). 
In addition, a small portion of the light is reflected at the 
front surface of the glass as indicated by ray D (for dim).
This dim reflected light is responsible for the image observed when the mirror is in the night setting (Fig. 36.5b). 
In that case, the wedge is rotated so that the path followed by the bright light (ray B) does not lead to the eye. Instead, 
the dim light reflected from the front surface of the wedge travels to the eye, and the brightness of trailing headlights 
does not become a hazard.
SoluTion
B
D
Incident
light
B
D
1
Incident
light
Reflecting
side of mirror
a
b
Day setting
Night setting
Figure 36.5 
(Conceptual Example 36.2) Cross-sectional 
views of a rearview mirror.
Mirror 2 
Mirror 1 
I
1
I
3
O
I
2
Figure 36.4 
(Conceptual Example 36.1) 
When an object is placed in front of two 
mutually perpendicular mirrors as shown, 
three images are formed. Follow the 
different-colored light rays to understand 
the formation of each image.
36.2 Images Formed by Spherical Mirrors 
1093
36.2 Images Formed by Spherical Mirrors
In the preceding section, we considered images formed by flat mirrors. Now we 
study images formed by curved mirrors. Although a variety of curvatures are pos-
sible, we will restrict our investigation to spherical mirrors. As its name implies, a 
spherical mirror has the shape of a section of a sphere.
Concave Mirrors
We first consider reflection of light from the inner, concave surface of a spherical 
mirror as shown in Figure 36.6. This type of reflecting surface is called a concave 
mirror. Figure 36.6a shows that the mirror has a radius of curvature R, and its 
center of curvature is point C. Point V is the center of the spherical section, and a 
line through C and V is called the principal axis of the mirror. Figure 36.6a shows a 
cross section of a spherical mirror, with its surface represented by the solid, curved 
dark blue line. (The lighter blue band represents the structural support for the 
mirrored surface, such as a curved piece of glass on which a silvered reflecting sur-
face is deposited.) This type of mirror focuses incoming parallel rays to a point as 
demonstrated by the yellow light rays in Figure 36.7.
Now consider a point source of light placed at point O in Figure 36.6b, where 
O is any point on the principal axis to the left of C. Two diverging light rays that 
originate at O are shown. After reflecting from the mirror, these rays converge and 
cross at the image point I. They then continue to diverge from I as if an object were 
there. As a result, the image at point I is real.
In this section, we shall consider only rays that diverge from the object and make 
a small angle with the principal axis. Such rays are called paraxial rays. All paraxial 
rays reflect through the image point as shown in Figure 36.6b. Rays that are far from 
the principal axis such as those shown in Figure 36.8 converge to other points on 
the principal axis, producing a blurred image. This effect, called spherical aberration, 
is present to some extent for any spherical mirror and is discussed in Section36.5.
If the object distance p and radius of curvature R are known, we can use Figure 
36.9 (page 1094) to calculate the image distance q. By convention, these distances 
are measured from point V. Figure 36.9 shows two rays leaving the tip of the object. 
The red ray passes through the center of curvature C of the mirror, hitting the 
mirror perpendicular to the mirror surface and reflecting back on itself. The blue 
ray strikes the mirror at its center (point V) and reflects as shown, obeying the law  
of reflection. The image of the tip of the arrow is located at the point where these 
two rays intersect. From the large, red right triangle in Figure 36.9, we see that 
tan u 5 h/p, and from the yellow right triangle, we see that tan u 5 2h9/q. The  
Mirror
C
V
Center of
curvature
R
Principal
axis
Mirror
I
C
O
a
b
If the rays diverge from 
O at small angles, they 
all reflect through the 
same image point I.
Figure 36.6 
(a) A concave mirror of radius R. The center of curvature C is located on the principal 
axis. (b) A point object placed at O in front of a concave spherical mirror of radius R, where O is any 
point on the principal axis farther than R from the mirror surface, forms a real image at I.
Figure 36.7 
Reflection of paral-
lel rays from a concave mirror.
H
e
n
r
y
L
e
a
p
a
n
d
J
i
m
L
e
h
m
a
n
The reflected rays intersect 
at different points on the 
principal axis.
Figure 36.8 
A spherical concave 
mirror exhibits spherical aberra-
tion when light rays make large 
angles with the principal axis.
1094
chapter 36 Image Formation
negative sign is introduced because the image is inverted, so h9 is taken to be nega-
tive. Therefore, from Equation 36.1 and these results, we find that the magnifica-
tion of the image is
M5
hr
h
52
q
p
(36.2)
Also notice from the green right triangle in Figure 36.9 and the smaller red right 
triangle that
tan a5
2hr
R2q
and
tan a5
h
p2R
from which it follows that
hr
h
52
R2q
p2R
(36.3)
Comparing Equations 36.2 and 36.3 gives
R2q
p2R
5
q
p
Simple algebra reduces this expression to
1
p
1
1
q
5
2
R
(36.4)
which is called the mirror equation. We present a modified version of this equation 
shortly.
If the object is very far from the mirror—that is, if p is so much greater than R 
that p can be said to approach infinity—then 1/p < 0, and Equation 36.4 shows 
that q < R/2. That is, when the object is very far from the mirror, the image point 
is halfway between the center of curvature and the center point on the mirror as 
shown in Figure 36.10. The incoming rays from the object are essentially parallel in 
this figure because the source is assumed to be very far from the mirror. The image 
point in this special case is called the focal point F, and the image distance is called 
the focal length f, where
f5
R
2
(36.5)
The focal point is a distance f  from the mirror, as noted in Figure 36.10. In Figure 
36.7, the beams are traveling parallel to the principal axis and the mirror reflects 
all beams to the focal point. 
Mirror equation in terms of 
radius of curvature
Focal length 
h
R
C
p
V
I
h'
Principal
axis
O
u
u
a
a
q
The real image lies at the 
location at which the 
reflected rays cross.
Figure 36.9 
The image formed by a spherical concave mirror when the object O lies outside the cen-
ter of curvature C. This geometric construction is used to derive Equation 36.4.
A satellite-dish antenna is a con-
cave reflector for television signals 
from a satellite in orbit around 
the Earth. Because the satellite is 
so far away, the signals are carried 
by microwaves that are paral-
lel when they arrive at the dish. 
These waves reflect from the dish 
and are focused on the receiver.
©
i
S
t
o
c
k
p
h
o
t
o
.
c
o
m
/
M
a
r
i
a
B
a
r
s
k
i
Pitfall Prevention 36.1
Magnification Does not necessar-
ily imply Enlargement For optical 
elements other than flat mirrors, 
the magnification defined in Equa-
tion 36.2 can result in a number 
with a magnitude larger or smaller 
than 1. Therefore, despite the cul-
tural usage of the word magnifica-
tion to mean enlargement, the image 
could be smaller than the object.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested