convert byte array to pdf mvc : How to change pdf to html Library application class asp.net windows .net ajax doc-3-pdf-67a5de9fa89738da0c6835ef457b5878-original114-part209

36.4 Images Formed by thin Lenses 
1105
Pitfall Prevention 36.5
a lens has Two Focal Points  
but only one Focal length A lens 
has a focal point on each side, 
front and back. There is only one 
focal length, however; each of the 
two focal points is located the same 
distance from the lens (Fig. 36.23). 
As a result, the lens forms an image 
of an object at the same point if it 
is turned around. In practice, that 
might not happen because real 
lenses are not infinitesimally thin.
convention. For a thin lens (one whose thickness is small compared with the radii 
of curvature), we can neglect t. In this approximation, p
2
5 2q
1
for either type of 
image from surface 1. Hence, Equation 36.11 becomes
2
n
q
1
1
1
q
2
5
12n
R
2
(36.12)
Adding Equations 36.10 and 36.12 gives
1
p
1
1
1
q
2
5
1
n21
2
a
1
R
1
2
1
R
2
(36.13)
For a thin lens, we can omit the subscripts on p
1
and q
2
in Equation 36.13 and call 
the object distance p and the image distance q as in Figure 36.22. Hence, we can 
write Equation 36.13 as
1
p
1
1
q
5
1
n21
2
a
1
R
1
2
1
R
2
b
(36.14)
This expression relates the image distance q of the image formed by a thin lens 
to the object distance p and to the lens properties (index of refraction and radii 
of curvature). It is valid only for paraxial rays and only when the lens thickness is 
much less than R
1
and R
2
.
The focal length f of a thin lens is the image distance that corresponds to an 
infinite object distance, just as with mirrors. Letting p approach ` and q approach f 
in Equation 36.14, we see that the inverse of the focal length for a thin lens is
1
f
5
1
n21
2
a
1
R
1
2
1
R
2
(36.15)
This relationship is called the lens-makers’ equation because it can be used to deter-
mine the values of R
1
and R
2
needed for a given index of refraction and a desired focal 
length f. Conversely, if the index of refraction and the radii of curvature of a lens are 
given, this equation can be used to find the focal length. If the lens is immersed in 
something other than air, this same equation can be used, with n interpreted as the 
ratio of the index of refraction of the lens material to that of the surrounding fluid.
Using Equation 36.15, we can write Equation 36.14 in a form identical to Equa-
tion 36.6 for mirrors:
1
p
1
1
q
5
1
f
(36.16)
This equation, called the thin lens equation, can be used to relate the image dis-
tance and object distance for a thin lens.
Because light can travel in either direction through a lens, each lens has two 
focal points, one for light rays passing through in one direction and one for rays 
passing through in the other direction. These two focal points are illustrated in 
Figure 36.23 for a plano-convex lens (a converging lens) and a plano-concave lens 
(a diverging lens).
WWlens-makers’ equation
O
I
R
1
R
2
C
1
C
2
q
p
Figure 36.22 
Simplified geom-
etry for a thin lens.
a
b
f
f
f
f
F
1
F
2
F
2
F
1
F
2
F
2
F
1
F
1
Figure 36.23 
Parallel light rays 
pass through (a) a converging lens 
and (b) a diverging lens. The focal 
length is the same for light rays 
passing through a given lens in 
either direction. Both focal points 
F
1
and F
2
are the same distance 
from the lens.
How to change pdf to html - Convert PDF to html files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
How to Convert PDF to HTML Webpage with C# PDF Conversion SDK
convert pdf to url link; convert pdf link to html
How to change pdf to html - VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
PDF to HTML Webpage Converter SDK for VB.NET PDF to HTML Conversion
export pdf to html; best pdf to html converter online
1106
chapter 36 Image Formation
Figure 36.24 is useful for obtaining the signs of p and q, and Table 36.3 gives the 
sign conventions for thin lenses. These sign conventions are the same as those for 
refracting surfaces (see Table 36.2).
Various lens shapes are shown in Figure 36.25. Notice that a converging lens is 
thicker at the center than at the edge, whereas a diverging lens is thinner at the 
center than at the edge.
Magnification of Images
Consider a thin lens through which light rays from an object pass. As with mirrors 
(Eq. 36.2), a geometric construction shows that the lateral magnification of the 
image is
M5
hr
h
52
q
p
(36.17)
From this expression, it follows that when M is positive, the image is upright and on 
the same side of the lens as the object. When M is negative, the image is inverted 
and on the side of the lens opposite the object.
Ray Diagrams for Thin Lenses
Ray diagrams are convenient for locating the images formed by thin lenses or sys-
tems of lenses. They also help clarify our sign conventions. Figure 36.26  shows such 
diagrams for three single-lens situations.
To locate the image of a converging lens (Figs. 36.26a and 36.26b), the following 
three rays are drawn from the top of the object:
Front, or 
virtual, side
Incident light
Back, or
real, side
negative
positive
positive
negative
Refracted light
Converging or 
diverging lens
Figure 36.24 
A diagram for 
obtaining the signs of p and q for 
a thin lens. (This diagram also 
applies to a refracting surface.)
Table 36.3
Sign Conventions for Thin Lenses
Quantity 
Positive When . . . 
Negative When . . .
Object location (p
object is in front of lens 
object is in back of lens
(real object). 
(virtual object).
Image location (q
image is in back of lens 
image is in front of lens
(real image). 
(virtual image).
Image height (h9) 
image is upright. 
image is inverted.
R
1
and R
2
center of curvature is in back 
center of curvature is in front
of lens. 
of lens.
Focal length (f
a converging lens. 
a diverging lens.
Plano-
convex
Convex-
concave
Biconvex
Biconcave
Convex-
concave
Plano-
concave
a
b
Figure 36.25 
Various lens 
shapes. (a) Converging lenses 
have a positive focal length and 
are thickest at the middle.  
(b) Diverging lenses have a  
negative focal length and are 
thickest at the edges.
a
c
b
O
F
1
Front
I
1
2
3
I
Front
Back
Back
O
1
3
2
O
Front
Back
I
1
3
2
F
2
F
1
F
2
F
2
F
1
When the object is in front of and outside 
the focal point of a converging lens, the 
image is real, inverted, and on the back side 
of the lens.
When the object is between the 
focal point and a converging lens, 
the image is virtual, upright, larger 
than the object, and on the front 
side of the lens.
When an object is anywhere in 
front of a diverging lens, the image 
is virtual, upright, smaller than the 
object, and on the front side of the 
lens.
Figure 36.26 
Ray diagrams for locating the image formed by a thin lens.
Online Convert PDF to HTML5 files. Best free online PDF html
Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF file to HTML. Then just wait until the conversion from PDF to HTML is complete and download the file.
pdf to html; convert pdf into html online
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
Add password to PDF. Change PDF original password. Remove password from PDF. Set PDF security level. VB: Change and Update PDF Document Password.
convert pdf to url; how to convert pdf into html
36.4 Images Formed by thin Lenses 
1107
• Ray 1 is drawn parallel to the principal axis. After being refracted by the 
lens, this ray passes through the focal point on the back side of the lens.
• Ray 2 is drawn through the focal point on the front side of the lens (or as if 
coming from the focal point if p , f) and emerges from the lens parallel to 
the principal axis.
• Ray 3 is drawn through the center of the lens and continues in a straight line.
To locate the image of a diverging lens (Fig. 36.26c), the following three rays are 
drawn from the top of the object:
• Ray 1 is drawn parallel to the principal axis. After being refracted by the 
lens, this ray emerges directed away from the focal point on the front side of 
the lens.
• Ray 2 is drawn in the direction toward the focal point on the back side of the 
lens and emerges from the lens parallel to the principal axis.
• Ray 3 is drawn through the center of the lens and continues in a straight line.
For the converging lens in Figure 36.26a, where the object is to the left of the 
focal point (p . f), the image is real and inverted. When the object is between 
the focal point and the lens (p , f) as in Figure 36.26b, the image is virtual and 
upright. In that case, the lens acts as a magnifying glass, which we study in more 
detail in Section 36.8. For a diverging lens (Fig. 36.26c), the image is always virtual 
and upright, regardless of where the object is placed. These geometric construc-
tions are reasonably accurate only if the distance between the rays and the princi-
pal axis is much less than the radii of the lens surfaces.
Refraction occurs only at the surfaces of the lens. A certain lens design takes 
advantage of this behavior to produce the Fresnel lens, a powerful lens without great 
thickness. Because only the surface curvature is important in the refracting quali-
ties of the lens, material in the middle of a Fresnel lens is removed as shown in the 
cross sections of lenses in Figure 36.27. Because the edges of the curved segments 
cause some distortion, Fresnel lenses are generally used only in situations in which 
image quality is less important than reduction of weight. A classroom overhead pro-
jector often uses a Fresnel lens; the circular edges between segments of the lens can 
be seen by looking closely at the light projected onto a screen.
uick Quiz 36.6  What is the focal length of a pane of window glass? (a) zero  
(b) infinity (c) the thickness of the glass (d) impossible to determine
Figure 36.27 
A side view of the construction of a Fresnel lens. (a)The thick lens refracts a light ray 
as shown. (b) Lens material in the bulk of the lens is cut away, leaving only the material close to the 
curved surface. (c) The small pieces of remaining material are moved to the left to form a flat surface 
on the left of the Fresnel lens with ridges on the right surface. From a front view, these ridges would 
be circular in shape. This new lens refracts light in the same way as the lens in (a). (d)A Fresnel lens 
used in a lighthouse shows several segments with the ridges discussed in (c).
a
c
d
b
©
O
w
e
n
F
r
a
n
k
e
n
/
C
o
r
b
i
s
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
Able to change password on adobe PDF document in C#.NET. To C# Sample Code: Change and Update PDF Document Password in C#.NET. In
batch convert pdf to html; convert pdf form to html form
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
3.pdf"; String outputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" 3_optimized.pdf"; 'create optimizing options TargetResolution = 150.0F 'to change image compression
converter pdf to html; convert pdf table to html
1108
chapter 36 Image Formation
Example 36.8   Images Formed by a Converging Lens
A converging lens has a focal length of 10.0 cm.
(A)  An object is placed 30.0 cm from the lens. Con-
struct a ray diagram, find the image distance, and 
describe the image.
Conceptualize  Because the lens is converging, the focal 
length is positive (see Table 36.3). We expect the pos-
sibilities of both real and virtual images.
Categorize  Because the object 
distance is larger than the focal 
length, we expect the image to be 
real. The ray diagram for this situa-
tion is shown in Figure 36.28a.
SoluTion
a
b
O
F
1
F
2
I
15.0 cm
30.0 cm
10.0 cm
O
F
2
I, F
1
10.0 cm
5.00 cm
10.0 cm
The object is farther from the 
lens than the focal point.
The object is closer to 
the lens than the focal 
point.
Figure 36.28 
(Example 36.8) An 
image is formed by a 
converging lens.
Analyze  Find the image distance by using Equation36.16:
1
q
5
1
f
2
1
p
1
q
5
1
10.0 cm
2
1
30.0 cm
q 5 
115.0 cm
Finalize  The positive sign for the image distance tells us that the image is indeed real and on the back side of the lens. 
The magnification of the image tells us that the image is reduced in height by one half, and the negative sign for M 
tells us that the image is inverted.
(B)  An object is placed 10.0 cm from the lens. Find the image distance and describe the image.
Categorize  Because the object is at the focal point, we expect the image to be infinitely far away.
SoluTion
Find the magnification of the image from Equation 36.17:
M52
q
p
52
15.0 cm
30.0 cm
5
20.500
Analyze  Find the image distance by using Equation36.16:
1
q
5
1
f
2
1
p
1
q
5
1
10.0 cm
2
1
10.0 cm
q 5 
`
Finalize  This result means that rays originating from an object positioned at the focal point of a lens are refracted 
so that the image is formed at an infinite distance from the lens; that is, the rays travel parallel to one another after 
refraction.
(C)  An object is placed 5.00 cm from the lens. Construct a ray diagram, find the image distance, and describe the 
image.
Categorize  Because the object distance is smaller than the focal length, we expect the image to be virtual. The ray 
diagram for this situation is shown in Figure 36.28b.
SoluTion
C# PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in C#.
Able to edit and change PDF annotation properties such as font size or color. Abilities to draw markups on PDF document or stamp on PDF file.
convert pdf into webpage; pdf to html converter online
C# HTML5 Viewer: Deployment on DotNetNuke Site
RasterEdge.XDoc.Office.Inner.Office03.dll. RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. RasterEdge.XDoc. PDF.HTML5Editor.dll. RasterEdge.XDoc.PowerPoint.dll. RasterEdge.XDoc.TIFF.dll
conversion pdf to html; convert from pdf to html
36.4 Images Formed by thin Lenses 
1109
▸ 36.8 
continued
Analyze  Find the image distance by using Equation36.16:
1
q
5
1
f
2
1
p
1
q
5
1
10.0 cm
2
1
5.00 cm
q 5 
210.0 cm
Find the magnification of the image from Equation 36.17:
M52
q
p
52a
210.0  cm
5.00 cm
b5
12.00
Finalize  The negative image distance tells us that the image is virtual and formed on the side of the lens from which 
the light is incident, the front side. The image is enlarged, and the positive sign for M tells us that the image is upright.
What if the object moves right up to the lens surface so that p S 0? Where is the image?
Answer  In this case, because p ,, R, where R is either of the radii of the surfaces of the lens, the curvature of the lens 
can be ignored. The lens should appear to have the same effect as a flat piece of material, which suggests that the image 
is just on the front side of the lens, at q 5 0. This conclusion can be verified mathematically by rearranging the thin lens 
equation:
1
q
5
1
f
2
1
p
If we let p S 0, the second term on the right becomes very large compared with the first and we can neglect 1/f. The 
equation becomes
1
q
52
1
p
  q52p50
Therefore, q is on the front side of the lens (because it has the opposite sign as p) and right at the lens surface.
WhaT iF?
Example 36.9   Images Formed by a Diverging Lens
A diverging lens has a focal length of 10.0 cm.
(A)  An object is placed 30.0 cm from the lens. Construct a ray diagram, find the image distance, and describe the image.
Conceptualize  Because the lens is diverging, the focal length is negative (see Table 36.3). The ray diagram for this 
situation is shown in Figure 36.29a.
SoluTion
a
c
b
OI
F
1
5.00 cm
3.33 cm
F
2
I
O
F
1
30.0 cm
10.0 cm
7.50 cm
F
2
I
OF
1
5.00 cm
10.0 cm
10.0 cm
F
2
The object is farther from the 
lens than the focal point.
The object is farther from the 
lens than the focal point.
The object is closer to the lens 
than the focal point.
The object is at 
the focal point.
Figure 36.29 
(Example 36.9) An image is formed by a diverging lens. 
continued
C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
3.pdf"; String outputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" 3_optimized.pdf"; // create optimizing TargetResolution = 150F; // to change image compression mode
how to convert pdf file to html document; how to convert pdf to html
VB.NET Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF
PDF to Word; Convert PDF to Tiff; Convert PDF to HTML; Convert PDF Merge PDF Files; Split PDF Document; Remove Password from PDF; Change PDF Permission Settings.
convert pdf to html open source; pdf to web converter
1110
chapter 36 Image Formation
Find the magnification of the image from Equation36.17:
M52
q
p
52a
27.50 cm
30.0 cm
b5
10.250
Analyze  Find the image distance by using Equation36.16:
1
q
5
1
f
2
1
p
1
q
5
1
210.0 cm
2
1
30.0 cm
q 5 
27.50 cm
Finalize  This result confirms that the image is virtual, smaller than the object, and upright. Look through the diverg-
ing lens in a door peephole to see this type of image.
(B)  An object is placed 10.0 cm from the lens. Construct a ray diagram, find the image distance, and describe the image.
The ray diagram for this situation is shown in Figure 36.29b.
SoluTion
Analyze  Find the image distance by using Equation36.16:
1
q
5
1
f
2
1
p
1
q
5
1
210.0 cm
2
1
10.0 cm
q 5 
25.00 cm
▸ 36.9 
continued
Find the magnification of the image from Equation36.17:
M52
q
p
52a
25.00 cm
10.0 cm
b5
10.500
Finalize  Notice the difference between this situation and that for a converging lens. For a diverging lens, an object at 
the focal point does not produce an image infinitely far away.
(C)  An object is placed 5.00 cm from the lens. Construct a ray diagram, find the image distance, and describe the image.
The ray diagram for this situation is shown in Figure 36.29c.
SoluTion
Find the magnification of the image from Equation36.17:
M52a
23.33 cm
5.00 cm
b5
10.667
Analyze  Find the image distance by using Equation36.16:
1
q
5
1
f
2
1
p
1
q
5
1
210.0 cm
2
1
5.0 cm
q 5 
23.33 cm
Finalize  For all three object positions, the image position is negative and the magnification is a positive number 
smaller than 1, which confirms that the image is virtual, smaller than the object, and upright.
Categorize  Because the lens is diverging, we expect it to form an upright, reduced, virtual image for any object position.
Combinations of Thin Lenses
If two thin lenses are used to form an image, the system can be treated in the fol-
lowing manner. First, the image formed by the first lens is located as if the second 
lens were not present. Then a ray diagram is drawn for the second lens, with the 
36.4 Images Formed by thin Lenses 
1111
image formed by the first lens now serving as the object for the second lens. The 
second image formed is the final image of the system. If the image formed by the 
first lens lies on the back side of the second lens, that image is treated as a virtual 
object for the second lens (that is, in the thin lens equation, p is negative). The 
same procedure can be extended to a system of three or more lenses. Because the 
magnification due to the second lens is performed on the magnified image due to 
the first lens, the overall magnification of the image due to the combination of 
lenses is the product of the individual magnifications:
M 5 M
1
M
2
(36.18)
This equation can be used for combinations of any optical elements such as a lens 
and a mirror. For more than two optical elements, the magnifications due to all ele-
ments are multiplied together.
Let’s consider the special case of a system of two lenses of focal lengths f
1
and 
f
2
in contact with each other. If p
1
p is the object distance for the combination, 
application of the thin lens equation (Eq. 36.16) to the first lens gives
1
p
1
1
q
1
5
1
f
1
where q
1
is the image distance for the first lens. Treating this image as the object 
for the second lens, we see that the object distance for the second lens must be p
2
5 
2q
1
. (The distances are the same because the lenses are in contact and assumed 
to be infinitesimally thin. The object distance is negative because the object is vir-
tual if the image from the first lens is real.) Therefore, for the second lens,
1
p
2
1
1
q
2
5
1
f
2
  2
1
q
1
1
1
q
5
1
f
2
where q 5 q
2
is the final image distance from the second lens, which is the image 
distance for the combination. Adding the equations for the two lenses eliminates q
1
and gives
1
p
1
1
q
5
1
f
1
1
1
f
2
If the combination is replaced with a single lens that forms an image at the same loca-
tion, its focal length must be related to the individual focal lengths by the expression
1
f
5
1
f
1
1
1
f
2
(36.19)
Therefore, two thin lenses in contact with each other are equivalent to a single thin 
lens having a focal length given by Equation 36.19.
WW Focal length for a  
combination of two thin 
lenses in contact
Example 36.10   Where Is the Final Image?
Two thin converging lenses of focal lengths f
1
5 10.0 cm 
and f
2
5 20.0 cm are separated by 20.0 cm as illustrated 
in Figure 36.30. An object is placed 30.0 cm to the left 
of lens 1. Find the position and the magnification of the 
final image.
Conceptualize  Imagine light rays passing through the 
first lens and forming a real image (because p . f) in 
the absence of a second lens. Figure 36.30 shows these 
light rays forming the inverted image I
1
. Once the light 
rays converge to the image point, they do not stop. They 
continue through the image point and interact with the 
SoluTion
O
1
Lens 1
Lens 2
20.0 cm
6.67 cm
15.0 cm
10.0 cm
30.0 cm
I
1
I
2
Figure 36.30 
(Example 36.10) A combination of two converg-
ing lenses. The ray diagram shows the location of the final image 
(I
2
) due to the combination of lenses. The black dots are the focal 
points of lens 1, and the red dots are the focal points of lens 2.
continued
1112
chapter 36 Image Formation
Find the magnification of the image from 
Equation36.17:
M
1
52
q
1
p
1
52
15.0 cm
30.0 cm
520.500
Analyze  Find the location of the image formed by lens 1 
from the thin lens equation:
1
q
1
5
1
f
2
1
p
1
1
q
1
5
1
10.0 cm
2
1
30.0 cm
q
1
5 115.0 cm
The image formed by this lens acts as the object for the second lens. Therefore, the object distance for the second lens 
is 20.0 cm 2 15.0 cm 5 5.00 cm.
Find the location of the image formed by lens 2 from the 
thin lens equation:
1
q
2
5
1
20.0 cm
2
1
5.00 cm
q
2
26.67 cm
Find the magnification of the image from 
Equation36.17:
M
2
52
q
2
p
2
52
1
26.67 cm
2
5.00 cm
511.33
Find the overall magnification of the system from 
Equation36.18:
M 5 M
1
M
2
5 (20.500)(1.33) 5 
20.667
Finalize  The negative sign on the overall magnification indicates that the final image is inverted with respect to the 
initial object. Because the absolute value of the magnification is less than 1, the final image is smaller than the object. 
Suppose you want to create an upright 
image with this system of two lenses. How must the sec-
ond lens be moved?
Answer  Because the object is farther from the first 
lens than the focal length of that lens, the first image is 
inverted. Consequently, the second lens must invert the 
image once again so that the final image is upright. An 
WhaT iF?
inverted image is only formed by a converging lens if the 
object is outside the focal point. Therefore, the image 
formed by the first lens must be to the left of the focal 
point of the second lens in Figure 36.30. To make that 
happen, you must move the second lens at least as far 
away from the first lens as the sum q
1
f
2
5 15.0 cm 1 
20.0 cm 5 35.0 cm.
Because q
2
is negative, the final image is on the front, or left, side of lens 2. These conclusions are consistent with the 
ray diagram in Figure 36.30.
▸ 36.10 
continued
second lens. The rays leaving the image point behave in the same way as the rays leaving an object. Therefore, the 
image of the first lens serves as the object of the second lens.
Categorize  We categorize this problem as one in which the thin lens equation is applied in a stepwise fashion to the 
two lenses.
36.5 Lens Aberrations
Our analysis of mirrors and lenses assumes rays make small angles with the prin-
cipal axis and the lenses are thin. In this simple model, all rays leaving a point 
source focus at a single point, producing a sharp image. Clearly, that is not always 
true. When the approximations used in this analysis do not hold, imperfect images 
are formed.
A precise analysis of image formation requires tracing each ray, using Snell’s law 
at each refracting surface and the law of reflection at each reflecting surface. This 
procedure shows that the rays from a point object do not focus at a single point, 
with the result that the image is blurred. The departures of actual images from the 
ideal predicted by our simplified model are called aberrations.
36.6 the camera 
1113
Rays of different wavelengths 
focus at different points.
Violet
Red
Red
Violet
F
V
F
R
Figure 36.32 
Chromatic aberra-
tion caused by a converging lens. 
Spherical Aberration
Spherical aberration occurs because the focal points of rays far from the principal 
axis of a spherical lens (or mirror) are different from the focal points of rays of 
the same wavelength passing near the axis. Figure 36.31 illustrates spherical aber-
ration for parallel rays passing through a converging lens. Rays passing through 
points near the center of the lens are imaged farther from the lens than rays pass-
ing through points near the edges. Figure 36.8 earlier in the chapter shows spheri-
cal aberration for light rays leaving a point object and striking a spherical mirror.
Many cameras have an adjustable aperture to control light intensity and reduce 
spherical aberration. (An aperture is an opening that controls the amount of light 
passing through the lens.) Sharper images are produced as the aperture size is 
reduced; with a small aperture, only the central portion of the lens is exposed to 
the light and therefore a greater percentage of the rays are paraxial. At the same 
time, however, less light passes through the lens. To compensate for this lower light 
intensity, a longer exposure time is used.
In the case of mirrors, spherical aberration can be minimized through the use 
of a parabolic reflecting surface rather than a spherical surface. Parabolic surfaces 
are not used often, however, because those with high-quality optics are very expen-
sive to make. Parallel light rays incident on a parabolic surface focus at a common 
point, regardless of their distance from the principal axis. Parabolic reflecting sur-
faces are used in many astronomical telescopes to enhance image quality.
Chromatic Aberration
In Chapter 35, we described dispersion, whereby a material’s index of refraction 
varies with wavelength. Because of this phenomenon, violet rays are refracted more 
than red rays when white light passes through a lens (Fig. 36.32). The figure shows 
that the focal length of a lens is greater for red light than for violet light. Other 
wavelengths (not shown in Fig. 36.32) have focal points intermediate between those 
of red and violet, which causes a blurred image and is called chromatic aberration.
Chromatic aberration for a diverging lens also results in a shorter focal length 
for violet light than for red light, but on the front side of the lens. Chromatic aber-
ration can be greatly reduced by combining a converging lens made of one type of 
glass and a diverging lens made of another type of glass.
36.6 The Camera
The photographic camera is a simple optical instrument whose essential features 
are shown in Figure 36.33. It consists of a light-tight chamber, a converging lens 
that produces a real image, and a light-sensitive component behind the lens on 
which the image is formed.
The image in a digital camera is formed on a charge-coupled device (CCD), which 
digitizes the image, turning it into binary code. (A CCD is described in Section 
40.2.) The digital information is then stored on a memory chip for playback on the 
camera’s display screen, or it can be downloaded to a computer. Film cameras are 
similar to digital cameras except that the light forms an image on light-sensitive 
film rather than on a CCD. The film must then be chemically processed to produce 
the image on paper. In the discussion that follows, we assume the camera is digital.
A camera is focused by varying the distance between the lens and the CCD. For 
proper focusing—which is necessary for the formation of sharp images—the lens-to-
CCD distance depends on the object distance as well as the focal length of the lens.
The shutter, positioned behind the lens, is a mechanical device that is opened for 
selected time intervals, called exposure times. You can photograph moving objects by 
using short exposure times or photograph dark scenes (with low light levels) by using 
long exposure times. If this adjustment were not available, it would be impossible  
The refracted rays intersect 
at different points on the 
principal axis.
Figure 36.31 
Spherical aber-
ration caused by a converging 
lens. Does a diverging lens cause 
spherical aberration?
CCD
q
Image
Lens
Shutter
Aperture
p
Figure 36.33 
Cross-sectional 
view of a simple digital camera. 
The CCD is the light-sensitive 
component of the camera. In a 
nondigital camera, the light from 
the lens falls onto photographic 
film. In reality, p .. q.
1114
chapter 36 Image Formation
to take stop-action photographs. For example, a rapidly moving vehicle could move 
enough in the time interval during which the shutter is open to produce a blurred 
image. Another major cause of blurred images is the movement of the camera 
while the shutter is open. To prevent such movement, either short exposure times 
or a tripod should be used, even for stationary objects. Typical shutter speeds (that 
is, exposure times) are 
1
30
s, 
1
60
s, 
1
125
s, and 
1
250
s. In practice, stationary objects are 
normally shot with an intermediate shutter speed of 
1
60
s.
The intensity I of the light reaching the CCD is proportional to the area of the 
lens. Because this area is proportional to the square of the diameter D, it follows that 
I is also proportional to D2. Light intensity is a measure of the rate at which energy 
is received by the CCD per unit area of the image. Because the area of the image is 
proportional to q2 and q < f (when p .. f, so p can be approximated as infinite), we 
conclude that the intensity is also proportional to 1/f2 and therefore that I ~ D2/f2.
The ratio f/D is called the f-number of a lens:
f-number;
f
D
(36.20)
Hence, the intensity of light incident on the CCD varies according to the following 
proportionality:
I~
1
1
f/D
22
~
1
1
f-number
22
(36.21)
The f-number is often given as a description of the lens’s “speed.” The lower the 
f-number, the wider the aperture and the higher the rate at which energy from the 
light exposes the CCD; therefore, a lens with a low f-number is a “fast” lens. The con-
ventional notation for an f-number is “f/” followed by the actual number. For exam-
ple, “f/4” means an f-number of 4; it does not mean to divide f by 4! Extremely fast 
lenses, which have f-numbers as low as approximately f/1.2, are expensive because it 
is very difficult to keep aberrations acceptably small with light rays passing through 
a large area of the lens. Camera lens systems (that is, combinations of lenses with 
adjustable apertures) are often marked with multiple f-numbers, usually f/2.8, f/4, 
f/5.6, f/8, f/11, and f/16. Any one of these settings can be selected by adjusting the 
aperture, which changes the value of D. Increasing the setting from one f-number 
to the next higher value (for example, from f/2.8 to f/4) decreases the area of the 
aperture by a factor of 2. The lowest f-number setting on a camera lens corresponds 
to a wide-open aperture and the use of the maximum possible lens area.
Simple cameras usually have a fixed focal length and a fixed aperture size, with 
an f-number of about f/11. This high value for the f-number allows for a large 
depth of field, meaning that objects at a wide range of distances from the lens 
form reasonably sharp images on the CCD. In other words, the camera does not 
have to be focused.
uick Quiz 36.7  A camera can be modeled as a simple converging lens that focuses 
an image on the CCD, acting as the screen. A camera is initially focused on a dis-
tant object. To focus the image of an object close to the camera, must the lens be 
(a) moved away from the CCD, (b) left where it is, or (c)moved toward the CCD?
Example 36.11   Finding the Correct Exposure Time
The lens of a digital camera has a focal length of 55 mm and a speed (an f-number) of f/1.8. The correct exposure 
time for this speed under certain conditions is known to be 1
500
s.
(A)  Determine the diameter of the lens.
Conceptualize  Remember that the f-number for a lens relates its focal length to its diameter.
SoluTion
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested