convert byte array to pdf mvc : Convert pdf to html Library application API .net html web page sharepoint doc-3-pdf-67a5de9fa89738da0c6835ef457b5878-original115-part210

36.7 the eye 
1115
Solve Equation 36.20 for D and substitute numerical 
values:
D5
f
f-number
5
55 mm
1.8
5
31 mm
(B)  Calculate the correct exposure time if the f-number is changed to f/4 under the same lighting conditions.
The total light energy hitting the CCD is proportional to the product of the intensity and the exposure time. If I is the 
light intensity reaching the CCD, the energy per unit area received by the CCD in a time interval Dt is proportional to  
I Dt. Comparing the two situations, we require that I
1
Dt
1
I
2
Dt
2
, where Dt
1
is the correct exposure time for f/1.8 
and Dt
2
is the correct exposure time for f/4.
SoluTion
Solve for Dt
2
and substitute numerical values:
Dt
2
5
a
f
2
-number
f
1
-number
b
Dt
1
5
a
4
1.8
b
2
1
500
s
2
<
1
100
s
Use this result and substitute for I from Equation 36.21:
I
1
Dt
1
5I
2
Dt
2
S   
Dt
1
1
f
1
-number
22
5
Dt
2
1
f
2
-number
22
As the aperture size is reduced, the exposure time must increase.
36.7 The Eye
Like a camera, a normal eye focuses light and produces a sharp image. The mecha-
nisms by which the eye controls the amount of light admitted and adjusts to produce 
correctly focused images, however, are far more complex, intricate, and effective 
than those in even the most sophisticated camera. In all respects, the eye is a physi-
ological wonder.
Figure 36.34 shows the basic parts of the human eye. Light entering the eye 
passes through a transparent structure called the cornea (Fig. 36.35), behind which 
are a clear liquid (the aqueous humor), a variable aperture (the pupil, which is an 
opening in the iris), and the crystalline lens. Most of the refraction occurs at the 
outer surface of the eye, where the cornea is covered with a film of tears. Relatively 
little refraction occurs in the crystalline lens because the aqueous humor in con-
tact with the lens has an average index of refraction close to that of the lens. The 
iris, which is the colored portion of the eye, is a muscular diaphragm that controls 
pupil size. The iris regulates the amount of light entering the eye by dilating, or 
▸ 36.11 
continued
Categorize  We determine results using equations developed in this section, so we categorize this example as a substi-
tution problem.
Figure 36.34 
Important 
parts of the eye.
Retina
Fovea
Optic disk
(blind spot)
Optic
nerve
Choroid
Iris
Lens
Pupil
Cornea
Aqueous
humor
Ciliary
muscle
Vitreous humor
Sclera
A
r
t
b
y
R
o
b
e
r
t
D
e
m
a
r
e
s
t
f
r
o
m
C
e
c
i
e
S
t
a
r
r
a
n
d
B
e
v
e
r
l
y
M
c
M
i
l
l
a
n
,
H
u
m
a
n
B
i
o
l
o
g
y
,
5
t
h
e
d
.
,
©
2
0
0
3
,
B
r
o
o
k
s
/
C
o
l
e
,
a
D
i
v
i
s
i
o
n
o
f
C
e
n
g
a
g
e
L
e
a
r
n
i
n
g
,
I
n
c
.
Figure 36.35 
Close-up photo-
graph of the cornea of the  
human eye.
L
e
n
n
a
r
t
N
i
l
s
s
o
n
/
S
c
a
n
p
i
x
Convert pdf to html - Convert PDF to html files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
How to Convert PDF to HTML Webpage with C# PDF Conversion SDK
convert fillable pdf to html; add pdf to website
Convert pdf to html - VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
PDF to HTML Webpage Converter SDK for VB.NET PDF to HTML Conversion
changing pdf to html; adding pdf to html page
1116
chapter 36 Image Formation
opening, the pupil in low-light conditions and contracting, or closing, the pupil in 
high-light conditions. The f-number range of the human eye is approximately f/2.8 
to f/16.
The cornea–lens system focuses light onto the back surface of the eye, the retina, 
which consists of millions of sensitive receptors called rods and cones. When stimu-
lated by light, these receptors send impulses via the optic nerve to the brain, where 
an image is perceived. By this process, a distinct image of an object is observed 
when the image falls on the retina.
The eye focuses on an object by varying the shape of the pliable crystalline 
lens through a process called accommodation. The lens adjustments take place 
so swiftly that we are not even aware of the change. Accommodation is limited in 
that objects very close to the eye produce blurred images. The near point is the 
closest distance for which the lens can accommodate to focus light on the retina. 
This distance usually increases with age and has an average value of 25 cm. At 
age 10, the near point of the eye is typically approximately 18 cm. It increases to 
approximately 25 cm at age 20, to 50 cm at age 40, and to 500 cm or greater at 
age 60. The far point of the eye represents the greatest distance for which the lens 
of the relaxed eye can focus light on the retina. A person with normal vision can 
see very distant objects and therefore has a far point that can be approximated as 
infinity.
The retina is covered with two types of light-sensitive cells, called rods and cones. 
The rods are not sensitive to color but are more light sensitive than the cones. The 
rods are responsible for scotopic vision, or dark-adapted vision. Rods are spread 
throughout the retina and allow good peripheral vision for all light levels and 
motion detection in the dark. The cones are concentrated in the fovea. These cells 
are sensitive to different wavelengths of light. The three categories of these cells are 
called red, green, and blue cones because of the peaks of the color ranges to which 
they respond (Fig. 36.36). If the red and green cones are stimulated simultaneously 
(as would be the case if yellow light were shining on them), the brain interprets 
what is seen as yellow. If all three types of cones are stimulated by the separate col-
ors red, blue, and green, white light is seen. If all three types of cones are stimulated 
by light that contains all colors, such as sunlight, again white light is seen.
Televisions and computer monitors take advantage of this visual illusion by hav-
ing only red, green, and blue dots on the screen. With specific combinations of 
brightness in these three primary colors, our eyes can be made to see any color in 
the rainbow. Therefore, the yellow lemon you see in a television commercial is not 
actually yellow, it is red and green! The paper on which this page is printed is made 
of tiny, matted, translucent fibers that scatter light in all directions, and the resul-
tant mixture of colors appears white to the eye. Snow, clouds, and white hair are 
not actually white. In fact, there is no such thing as a white pigment. The appear-
ance of these things is a consequence of the scattering of light containing all colors, 
which we interpret as white.
Conditions of the Eye
When the eye suffers a mismatch between the focusing range of the lens–cornea 
system and the length of the eye, with the result that light rays from a near object 
reach the retina before they converge to form an image as shown in Figure 36.37a, 
the condition is known as farsightedness (or hyperopia). A farsighted person can 
usually see faraway objects clearly but not nearby objects. Although the near point 
of a normal eye is approximately 25 cm, the near point of a farsighted person is 
much farther away. The refracting power in the cornea and lens is insufficient to 
focus the light from all but distant objects satisfactorily. The condition can be cor-
rected by placing a converging lens in front of the eye as shown in Figure 36.37b. 
The lens refracts the incoming rays more toward the principal axis before entering 
the eye, allowing them to converge and focus on the retina.
R
e
l
a
t
i
v
e
s
e
n
s
i
t
i
v
i
t
y
420 nm
534 nm
564 nm
Wavelength
Figure 36.36 
Approximate 
color sensitivity of the three types 
of cones in the retina.
Online Convert PDF to HTML5 files. Best free online PDF html
PDF to HTML converter library control is a 100% clean .NET document image solution, which is designed to help .NET developers convert PDF to HTML webpage using
to html; create html email from pdf
VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.
PDF from RTF. Create PDF from Text. PDF Export. Convert PDF to Word (.docx). Convert PDF to Tiff. Convert PDF to HTML. Convert PDF to
convert pdf to html5; online convert pdf to html
36.7 the eye 
1117
a
b
When a nearsighted eye looks at an object 
located beyond the eye’s far point, the 
image point is in front of the retina, 
resulting in blurred vision.
A diverging lens causes the 
image to focus on the retina, 
correcting the vision.
Diverging
lens
Far point
Far point
Object
Object
Figure 36.38 
(a) An 
uncorrected nearsighted 
eye. (b) A nearsighted 
eye corrected with a 
diverging lens.
A person with nearsightedness (or myopia), another mismatch condition, can 
focus on nearby objects but not on faraway objects. The far point of the nearsighted 
eye is not infinity and may be less than 1 m. The maximum focal length of the near-
sighted eye is insufficient to produce a sharp image on the retina, and rays from a 
distant object converge to a focus in front of the retina. They then continue past 
that point, diverging before they finally reach the retina and causing blurred vision 
(Fig. 36.38a). Nearsightedness can be corrected with a diverging lens as shown in 
Figure 36.38b. The lens refracts the rays away from the principal axis before they 
enter the eye, allowing them to focus on the retina.
Beginning in middle age, most people lose some of their accommodation ability 
as their visual muscles weaken and the lens hardens. Unlike farsightedness, which 
is a mismatch between focusing power and eye length, presbyopia (literally, “old-
age vision”) is due to a reduction in accommodation ability. The cornea and lens do 
not have sufficient focusing power to bring nearby objects into focus on the retina. 
The symptoms are the same as those of farsightedness, and the condition can be 
corrected with converging lenses.
In eyes having a defect known as astigmatism, light from a point source pro-
duces a line image on the retina. This condition arises when the cornea, the lens, 
or both are not perfectly symmetric. Astigmatism can be corrected with lenses that 
have different curvatures in two mutually perpendicular directions.
Optometrists and ophthalmologists usually prescribe lenses1 measured in 
diopters: the power P of a lens in diopters equals the inverse of the focal length 
in meters: P 5 1/f. For example, a converging lens of focal length 120 cm has a 
power of 15.0 diopters, and a diverging lens of focal length 240 cm has a power of 
22.5diopters.
a
b
When a farsighted eye looks at an object 
located between the near point and the eye, 
the image point is behind the retina, 
resulting in blurred vision.
A converging lens causes the 
image to focus on the retina, 
correcting the vision.
Converging lens
Object
Near
point
Near
point
Object
Figure 36.37 
(a) An uncor-
rected farsighted eye. (b) A 
farsighted eye corrected with a 
converging lens.
1The word lens comes from lentil, the name of an Italian legume. (You may have eaten lentil soup.) Early eyeglasses 
were called “glass lentils” because the biconvex shape of their lenses resembled the shape of a lentil. The first lenses 
for farsightedness and presbyopia appeared around 1280; concave eyeglasses for correcting nearsightedness did not 
appear until more than 100 years later.
VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF to MS Office Word in VB.NET. VB.NET Tutorial for How to Convert PDF to Word (.docx) Document in VB.NET. Best
pdf to html converters; change pdf to html format
C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
C# PDF - Convert PDF to JPEG in C#.NET. C#.NET PDF to JPEG Converting & Conversion Control. Convert PDF to JPEG Using C#.NET. Add necessary references:
convert pdf to html online; how to change pdf to html
1118
chapter 36 Image Formation
uick Quiz 36.8  Two campers wish to start a fire during the day. One camper 
is nearsighted, and one is farsighted. Whose glasses should be used to focus 
the Sun’s rays onto some paper to start the fire? (a) either camper (b) the near-
sighted camper (c) the farsighted camper
36.8 The Simple Magnifier
The simple magnifier, or magnifying glass, consists of a single converging lens. 
This device increases the apparent size of an object.
Suppose an object is viewed at some distance p from the eye as illustrated in 
Figure 36.39. The size of the image formed at the retina depends on the angle u 
subtended by the object at the eye. As the object moves closer to the eye, u increases 
and a larger image is observed. An average normal human eye, however, cannot 
focus on an object closer than about 25 cm, the near point (Fig. 36.40a). Therefore, 
u is maximum at the near point.
To further increase the apparent angular size of an object, a converging lens can 
be placed in front of the eye as in Figure 36.40b, with the object located at point 
O, immediately inside the focal point of the lens. At this location, the lens forms a 
virtual, upright, enlarged image. We define angular magnification m as the ratio 
of the angle subtended by an object with a lens in use (angle u in Fig. 36.40b) to the 
angle subtended by the object placed at the near point with no lens in use (angle u
0
in Fig. 36.40a):
m;
u
u
0
(36.22)
The angular magnification is a maximum when the image is at the near point 
of the eye, that is, when q 5 225 cm. The object distance corresponding to 
this image distance can be calculated from the thin lens equation:
1
p
1
1
225 cm
5
1
f
  p5
25f
251f
where f is the focal length of the magnifier in centimeters. If we make the 
small-angle approximations
tan u
0
<u
0
<
h
25
and
tan u<u<
h
p
(36.23)
Equation 36.22 becomes
m
max
5
u
u
0
5
h/p
h/25
5
25
p
5
25
25f/
1
251f
2
m
max
511
25 cm
f
(36.24)
Although the eye can focus on an image formed anywhere between the near 
point and infinity, it is most relaxed when the image is at infinity. For the image 
formed by the magnifying lens to appear at infinity, the object has to be at the focal 
point of the lens. In this case, Equations 36.23 become
u
0
<
h
25
and
u<
h
f
and the magnification is
m
min
5
u
u
0
5
25 cm
f
(36.25)
With a single lens, it is possible to obtain angular magnifications up to about 4 with-
out serious aberrations. Magnifications up to about 20 can be achieved by using 
one or two additional lenses to correct for aberrations.
The size of the image formed 
on the retina depends on the 
angle u subtended at the eye.
p
u
Figure 36.39 
An observer looks 
at an object at distance p.
b
25 cm
h'
I
h
p
F
O
u
u
a
h
u
0
25 cm
Figure 36.40 
(a) An object 
placed at the near point of the eye 
(p 5 25cm) subtends an angle 
u
0
< h/25cm at the eye. (b) An 
object placed near the focal point 
of a converging lens produces a 
magnified image that subtends an 
angle u < h9/25 cm at the eye.
A simple magnifier, also called a 
magnifying glass, is used to view 
an enlarged image of a portion of 
a map.
.
C
e
n
g
a
g
e
L
e
a
r
n
i
n
g
/
G
e
o
r
g
e
S
e
m
p
l
e
VB.NET PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in vb.
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF to TIFF Using VB in VB.NET. Free VB.NET Guide to Render and Convert PDF Document to TIFF in Visual Basic Class.
convert pdf to html for online; convert pdf to website html
C# PDF Convert to SVG SDK: Convert PDF to SVG files in C#.net, ASP
PDFDocument pdf = new PDFDocument(@"C:\input.pdf"); pdf.ConvertToVectorImages( ContextType.SVG, @"C:\demoOutput Description: Convert to html/svg files and
convert pdf to web pages; convert pdf into html file
36.9 the compound Microscope 
1119
Evaluate the maximum magnification from 
Equation36.24:
m
max
511
25 cm
f
511
25 cm
10 cm
5
3.5
Evaluate the minimum magnification, when the eye is 
relaxed, from Equation 36.25:
m
min
5
25 cm
f
5
25 cm
10 cm
5
2.5
Example 36.12   Magnification of a Lens
What is the maximum magnification that is possible with a lens having a focal length of 10 cm, and what is the magni-
fication of this lens when the eye is relaxed?
Conceptualize  Study Figure 36.40b for the situation in which a magnifying glass forms an enlarged image of an object 
placed inside the focal point. The maximum magnification occurs when the image is located at the near point of the 
eye. When the eye is relaxed, the image is at infinity.
Categorize  We determine results using equations developed in this section, so we categorize this example as a substi-
tution problem.
SoluTion
36.9 The Compound Microscope
A simple magnifier provides only limited assistance in inspecting minute details 
of an object. Greater magnification can be achieved by combining two lenses in a 
device called a compound microscope shown in Figure 36.41a. It consists of one 
lens, the objective, that has a very short focal length f
o
, 1 cm and a second lens, 
the eyepiece, that has a focal length f
e
of a few centimeters. The two lenses are sepa-
rated by a distance L that is much greater than either f
o
or f
e
. The object, which is 
placed just outside the focal point of the objective, forms a real, inverted image 
at I
1
, and this image is located at or close to the focal point of the eyepiece. The 
eyepiece, which serves as a simple magnifier, produces at I
2
a virtual, enlarged 
image of I
1
. The lateral magnification M
1
of the first image is 2q
1
/p
1
. Notice from 
Figure 36.41a that q
1
is approximately equal to L and that the object is very close 
Objective
Eyepiece
L
O
F
o
f
o
p
1
q
1
F
e
I
1
I
2
f
e
a
The eyepiece lens forms
an image here.
The objective lens forms
an image here.
b
The three-objective turret 
allows the user to choose 
from several powers of 
magnification.
.
T
o
n
y
F
r
e
e
m
a
n
/
P
h
o
t
o
E
d
i
t
Figure 36.41 
(a) Diagram of a compound microscope, which consists of an objective lens and an 
eyepiece lens. (b)A compound microscope.
C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net
C#.NET PDF SDK - Convert PDF to TIFF in C#.NET. Online C# Tutorial for How to Convert PDF File to Tiff Image File with .NET XDoc.PDF Control in C#.NET Class.
convert pdf form to html; convert pdf to html code
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
C#.NET PDF SDK - Convert PDF to Word in C#.NET. C#.NET DLLs and Demo Code: Convert PDF to Word Document in C#.NET Project. Add necessary references:
converting pdf into html; best website to convert pdf to word online
1120
chapter 36 Image Formation
to the focal point of the objective: p
1
f
o
. Therefore, the lateral magnification by 
the objective is
M
o
<2
L
f
o
The angular magnification by the eyepiece for an object (corresponding to the 
image at I
1
) placed at the focal point of the eyepiece is, from Equation 36.25,
m
e
5
25 cm
f
e
The overall magnification of the image formed by a compound microscope is 
defined as the product of the lateral and angular magnifications:
M5M
o
m
e
52
L
f
o
a
25 cm
f
e
(36.26)
The negative sign indicates that the image is inverted.
The microscope has extended human vision to the point where we can view pre-
viously unknown details of incredibly small objects. The capabilities of this instru-
ment have steadily increased with improved techniques for precision grinding of 
lenses. A question often asked about microscopes is, “If one were extremely patient 
and careful, would it be possible to construct a microscope that would enable the 
human eye to see an atom?” The answer is no, as long as light is used to illuminate 
the object. For an object under an optical microscope (one that uses visible light) 
to be seen, the object must be at least as large as a wavelength of light. Because the 
diameter of any atom is many times smaller than the wavelengths of visible light, 
the mysteries of the atom must be probed using other types of “microscopes.”
36.10 The Telescope
Two fundamentally different types of telescopes exist; both are designed to aid in 
viewing distant objects such as the planets in our solar system. The first type, the 
refracting telescope, uses a combination of lenses to form an image.
Like the compound microscope, the refracting telescope shown in Figure 36.42a 
has an objective and an eyepiece. The two lenses are arranged so that the objective 
Figure 36.42 
(a) Lens arrange-
ment in a refracting telescope, 
with the object at infinity. (b) A 
refracting telescope.
I
2
a
F
e
F
o
I
1
h
u
u
o
u
o
Objective lens
Eyepiece lens
The objective lens forms 
an image here.
The eyepiece lens forms 
an image here.
F
e
f
e
f
o
f
e
b
.
T
o
n
y
F
r
e
e
m
a
n
/
P
h
o
t
o
E
d
i
t
36.10 the telescope 
1121
forms a real, inverted image of a distant object very near the focal point of the eye-
piece. Because the object is essentially at infinity, this point at which I
1
forms is the 
focal point of the objective. The eyepiece then forms, at I
2
, an enlarged, inverted 
image of the image at I
1
. To provide the largest possible magnification, the image 
distance for the eyepiece is infinite. Therefore, the image due to the objective lens, 
which acts as the object for the eyepiece lens, must be located at the focal point of 
the eyepiece. Hence, the two lenses are separated by a distance f
o
f
e
, which cor-
responds to the length of the telescope tube.
The angular magnification of the telescope is given by u/u
o
, where u
o
is the angle 
subtended by the object at the objective and u is the angle subtended by the final 
image at the viewer’s eye. Consider Figure 36.42a, in which the object is a very great 
distance to the left of the figure. The angle u
o
(to the left of the objective) subtended 
by the object at the objective is the same as the angle (to the right of the objective) 
subtended by the first image at the objective. Therefore,
tan u
o
<u
o
<2
hr
f
o
where the negative sign indicates that the image is inverted.
The angle u subtended by the final image at the eye is the same as the angle that 
a ray coming from the tip of I
1
and traveling parallel to the principal axis makes 
with the principal axis after it passes through the lens. Therefore,
tan u<u<
hr
f
e
We have not used a negative sign in this equation because the final image is not 
inverted; the object creating this final image I
2
is I
1
, and both it and I
2
point in 
the same direction. Therefore, the angular magnification of the telescope can be 
expressed as
m5
u
u
o
5
hr/f
e
2hr/f
o
52
f
o
f
e
(36.27)
This result shows that the angular magnification of a telescope equals the ratio of 
the objective focal length to the eyepiece focal length. The negative sign indicates 
that the image is inverted.
When you look through a telescope at such relatively nearby objects as the Moon 
and the planets, magnification is important. Individual stars in our galaxy, how-
ever, are so far away that they always appear as small points of light no matter how 
great the magnification. To gather as much light as possible, large research tele-
scopes used to study very distant objects must have a large diameter. It is difficult 
and expensive to manufacture large lenses for refracting telescopes. Another dif-
ficulty with large lenses is that their weight leads to sagging, which is an additional 
source of aberration.
These problems associated with large lenses can be partially overcome by replac-
ing the objective with a concave mirror, which results in the second type of tele-
scope, the reflecting telescope. Because light is reflected from the mirror and does 
not pass through a lens, the mirror can have rigid supports on the back side. Such 
supports eliminate the problem of sagging.
Figure 36.43a shows the design for a typical reflecting telescope. The incom-
ing light rays are reflected by a parabolic mirror at the base. These reflected rays 
converge toward point A in the figure, where an image would be formed. Before 
this image is formed, however, a small, flat mirror M reflects the light toward an 
opening in the tube’s side and it passes into an eyepiece. This particular design is 
said to have a Newtonian focus because Newton developed it. Figure 36.43b shows 
such a telescope. Notice that the light never passes through glass (except through 
the small eyepiece) in the reflecting telescope. As a result, problems associated 
with chromatic aberration are virtually eliminated. The reflecting telescope can 
be made even shorter by orienting the flat mirror so that it reflects the light back 
a
Eyepiece
M
A
Parabolic
mirror
b
O
r
i
o
n
-
S
k
y
V
i
e
w
P
r
o
Figure 36.43 
(a) A Newtonian-
focus reflecting telescope. (b) A 
reflecting telescope. This type of 
telescope is shorter than that in 
Figure 36.42b.
1122
chapter 36 Image Formation
toward the objective mirror and the light enters an eyepiece in a hole in the 
middle of the mirror.
The largest reflecting telescopes in the world are at the Keck Observatory 
on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. The site includes two telescopes with diameters of 
10 m, each containing 36 hexagonally shaped, computer-controlled mirrors 
that work together to form a large reflecting surface. In addition, the two 
telescopes can work together to provide a telescope with an effective diam-
eter of 85 m. In contrast, the largest refracting telescope in the world, at the 
Yerkes Observatory in Williams Bay, Wisconsin, has a diameter of only 1 m.
Figure 36.44 shows a remarkable optical image from the Keck Observa-
tory of a solar system around the star HR8799, located 129 light-years from 
the Earth. The planets labeled b, c, and d were seen in 2008 and the inner-
most planet, labeled e, was observed in December 2010. This photograph 
represents the first direct image of another solar system and was made pos-
sible by the adaptive optics technology used in the Keck Observatory.
Definitions
The angular magnification m is the ratio of the 
angle subtended by an object with a lens in use (angle 
u in Fig. 36.40b) to the angle subtended by the object 
placed at the near point with no lens in use (angle u
0
in 
Fig. 36.40a):
m;
u
u
0
(36.22)
An image can be formed by refraction from a spher-
ical surface of radius R. The object and image dis-
tances for refraction from such a surface are related by
n
1
p
1
n
2
q
5
n
2
2n
1
R
(36.8)
where the light is incident in the medium for which 
the index of refraction is n
1
and is refracted in the 
medium for which the index of refraction is n
2
.
For a thin lens, and in the paraxial ray approxima-
tion, the object and image distances are related by the 
thin lens equation:
1
p
1
1
q
5
1
f
(36.16)
The lateral magnification M of the image due to a 
mirror or lens is defined as the ratio of the image height 
h9 to the object height h. It is equal to the negative of the 
ratio of the image distance q to the object distance p:
M;
image height
object height
5
hr
h
52
q
p
(36.1, 36.2, 36.17)
In the paraxial ray approximation, the object dis-
tance p and image distance q for a spherical mirror of 
radius R are related by the mirror equation:
1
p
1
1
q
5
2
R
5
1
f
(36.4, 36.6)
where f 5 R/2 is the focal length of the mirror.
The inverse of the focal length f of a thin lens sur-
rounded by air is given by the lens-makers’ equation:
1
f
5
1
n21
2
a
1
R
1
2
1
R
2
b
(36.15)
Converging lenses have positive focal lengths, and 
diverging lenses have negative focal lengths.
The ratio of the focal length of a camera lens to the diameter of the lens is called the f-number of the lens:
f-number;
f
D
(36.20)
Summary
Concepts and Principles
Figure 36.44 
A direct optical image of a 
solar system around the star HR8799, devel-
oped at the Keck Observatory in Hawaii.
N
a
t
i
o
n
a
l
R
e
s
e
a
r
c
h
C
o
u
n
c
i
l
C
a
n
a
d
a
,
C
.
M
a
r
o
i
s
&
K
e
c
k
O
b
s
e
r
v
a
t
o
r
y
Objective Questions 
1123
6. If Josh’s face is 30.0 cm in front of a concave shaving 
mirror creating an upright image 1.50 times as large as 
the object, what is the mirror’s focal length? (a) 12.0 cm  
(b)20.0 cm (c) 70.0 cm (d) 90.0 cm (e) none of those 
answers
7. Two thin lenses of focal lengths f
1
5 15.0 and f
2
10.0cm, respectively, are separated by 35.0 cm along a 
common axis. The f
1
lens is located to the left of the f
2
lens. An object is now placed 50.0 cm to the left of the 
f
1
lens, and a final image due to light passing though 
both lenses forms. By what factor is the final image 
different in size from the object? (a) 0.600 (b) 1.20  
(c) 2.40 (d) 3.60 (e) none of those answers
8. If you increase the aperture diameter of a camera by 
a factor of 3, how is the intensity of the light striking 
the film affected? (a) It increases by factor of 3. (b) It 
decreases by a factor of 3. (c) It increases by a factor of 
9. (d) It decreases by a factor of 9. (e) Increasing the 
aperture size doesn’t affect the intensity.
9. A person spearfishing from a boat sees a stationary 
fish a few meters away in a direction about 30° below 
the horizontal. To spear the fish, and assuming the 
spear does not change direction when it enters the 
water, should the person (a) aim above where he sees 
the fish, (b) aim below the fish, or (c) aim precisely at 
the fish?
10. Model each of the following devices in use as consist-
ing of a single converging lens. Rank the cases accord-
ing to the ratio of the distance from the object to the 
lens to the focal length of the lens, from the largest 
ratio to the smallest. (a)a film-based movie projector 
showing a movie (b) a magnifying glass being used to 
examine a postage stamp (c) an astronomical refract-
ing telescope being used to make a sharp image of 
stars on an electronic detector (d)a searchlight being 
used to produce a beam of parallel rays from a point 
source (e) a camera lens being used to photograph a 
soccer game
11. A converging lens made of crown glass has a focal 
length of 15.0 cm when used in air. If the lens is 
immersed in water, what is its focal length? (a) negative 
1. The faceplate of a diving mask can be ground into a 
corrective lens for a diver who does not have perfect 
vision. The proper design allows the person to see 
clearly both under water and in the air. Normal eye-
glasses have lenses with both the front and back sur-
faces curved. Should the lenses of a diving mask be 
curved (a) on the outer surface only, (b) on the inner 
surface only, or (c) on both surfaces?
2. Lulu looks at her image in a makeup mirror. It is 
enlarged when she is close to the mirror. As she backs 
away, the image becomes larger, then impossible to 
identify when she is 30.0 cm from the mirror, then 
upside down when she is beyond 30.0 cm, and finally 
small, clear, and upside down when she is much farther 
from the mirror. (i) Is the mirror (a) convex, (b) plane, 
or (c) concave? (ii) Is the magnitude of its focal length 
(a) 0, (b) 15.0 cm, (c) 30.0 cm, (d)60.0cm, or (e) `?
3. An object is located 50.0 cm from a converging lens hav-
ing a focal length of 15.0 cm. Which of the following state-
ments is true regarding the image formed by the lens?  
(a) It is virtual, upright, and larger than the object.  
(b) It is real, inverted, and smaller than the object. (c) It  
is virtual, inverted, and smaller than the object. (d) It is 
real, inverted, and larger than the object. (e) It is real, 
upright, and larger than the object.
4. (i) When an image of an object is formed by a converg-
ing lens, which of the following statements is always 
true? More than one statement may be correct. (a) The 
image is virtual. (b) The image is real. (c) The image 
is upright. (d) The image is inverted. (e) None of those 
statements is always true. (ii) When the image of an 
object is formed by a diverging lens, which of the state-
ments is always true?
5. A converging lens in a vertical plane receives light from 
an object and forms an inverted image on a screen. An 
opaque card is then placed next to the lens, covering 
only the upper half of the lens. What happens to the 
image on the screen? (a) The upper half of the image 
disappears. (b) The lower half of the image disap-
pears. (c) The entire image disappears. (d) The entire 
image is still visible, but is dimmer. (e) No change in 
the image occurs.
The angular magnification of a refracting 
telescope can be expressed as
m52
f
o
f
e
(36.27)
where f
o
and f
e
are the focal lengths of the 
objective and eyepiece lenses, respectively. 
The angular magnification of a reflecting tele-
scope is given by the same expression where f
o
is the focal length of the objective mirror.
The maximum magnification of a single lens of focal length f 
used as a simple magnifier is
m
max
511
25 cm
f
(36.24)
The overall magnification of the image formed by a com-
pound microscope is
M52
L
f
o
a
25 cm
f
e
b
(36.26)
where f
o
and f
e
are the focal lengths of the objective and eyepiece 
lenses, respectively, and L is the distance between the lenses.
Objective Questions
1. 
denotes answer available in Student Solutions Manual/Study Guide
1124
chapter 36 Image Formation
14. An object, represented by a gray arrow, is placed in 
front of a plane mirror. Which of the diagrams in 
Figure OQ36.14 correctly describes the image, repre-
sented by the pink arrow?
(b) less than 15.0 cm (c) equal to 15.0 cm (d) greater 
than 15.0 cm (e) none of those answers
12. A converging lens of focal length 8 cm forms a sharp 
image of an object on a screen. What is the smallest 
possible distance between the object and the screen? 
(a) 0 (b) 4 cm (c)8 cm (d) 16 cm (e) 32 cm
13. (i) When an image of an object is formed by a plane 
mirror, which of the following statements is always 
true? More than one statement may be correct. (a) The 
image is virtual. (b)The image is real. (c) The image 
is upright. (d)The image is inverted. (e) None of those 
statements is always true. (ii) When the image of an 
object is formed by a concave mirror, which of the 
preceding statements are always true? (iii) When the 
image of an object is formed by a convex mirror, which 
of the preceding statements are always true?
a
b
c
d
Figure oQ36.14
2x
Image of
near tree
Screen
x
Lens
Near tree
Far tree
Figure CQ36.9
Conceptual Questions
1. 
denotes answer available in Student Solutions Manual/Study Guide
1. A converging lens of short focal length can take light 
diverging from a small source and refract it into a 
beam of parallel rays. A Fresnel lens as shown in  
Figure 36.27 is used in a lighthouse for this purpose. 
A concave mirror can take light diverging from a 
small source and reflect it into a beam of parallel rays.  
(a) Is it possible to make a Fresnel mirror? (b) Is this 
idea original, or has it already been done?
2. Explain this statement: “The focal point of a lens is 
the location of the image of a point object at infinity.”  
(a) Discuss the notion of infinity in real terms as it 
applies to object distances. (b) Based on this state-
ment, can you think of a simple method for determin-
ing the focal length of a converging lens?
3. Why do some emergency vehicles have the symbol 
A
m
b
u
l
A
n
c
e
written on the front?
4. Explain why a mirror cannot give rise to chromatic 
aberration.
5. (a) Can a converging lens be made to diverge light if it 
is placed into a liquid? (b) What If? What about a con-
verging mirror?
6. Explain why a fish in a spherical goldfish bowl appears 
larger than it really is.
7. In Figure 36.26a, assume the gray object arrow is 
replaced by one that is much taller than the lens. 
(a)How many rays from the top of the object will 
strike the lens? (b)How many principal rays can be 
drawn in a ray diagram?
8. Lenses used in eyeglasses, whether converging or 
diverging, are always designed so that the middle of 
the lens curves away from the eye like the center lenses 
of Figures 36.25a and 36.25b. Why?
9. Suppose you want to use a converging lens to project 
the image of two trees onto a screen. As shown in Figure 
CQ36.9, one tree is a distance x from the lens and the 
other is at 2x. You adjust the screen so that the near tree 
is in focus. If you now want the far tree to be in focus, do 
you move the screen toward or away from the lens?
10. Consider a spherical concave mirror with the object 
located to the left of the mirror beyond the focal point. 
Using ray diagrams, show that the image moves to the 
left as the object approaches the focal point.
11. In Figures CQ36.11a and CQ36.11b, which glasses  
correct nearsightedness and which correct far- 
sightedness?
a
Figure CQ36.11 
Conceptual Questions 11 and 12.
b
©
C
e
n
g
a
g
e
L
e
a
r
n
i
n
g
/
G
e
o
r
g
e
S
e
m
p
l
e
12. Bethany tries on either her hyperopic grandfather’s or 
her myopic brother’s glasses and complains, “Every-
thing looks blurry.” Why do the eyes of a person wear-
ing glasses not look blurry? (See Fig. CQ36.11.)
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested