mvc display pdf in browser : Convert pdf to html software control dll winforms web page asp.net web forms doc-3-pdf-67a5de9fa89738da0c6835ef457b5878-original118-part213

37.5 Interference in thin Films 
1145
Newton’s Rings
Another method for observing interference in light waves is to place a plano-convex 
lens on top of a flat glass surface as shown in Figure 37.11a. With this arrangement, 
the air film between the glass surfaces varies in thickness from zero at the point of 
contact to some nonzero value at point P. If the radius of curvature R of the lens is 
much greater than the distance r and the system is viewed from above, a pattern of 
light and dark rings is observed as shown in Figure 37.11b. These circular fringes, 
discovered by Newton, are called Newton’s rings.
The interference effect is due to the combination of ray 1, reflected from the flat 
plate, with ray 2, reflected from the curved surface of the lens. Ray 1 undergoes a 
phase change of 180° upon reflection (because it is reflected from a medium of 
higher index of refraction), whereas ray 2 undergoes no phase change (because it 
is reflected from a medium of lower index of refraction). Hence, the conditions for 
constructive and destructive interference are given by Equations 37.17 and 37.18, 
respectively, with n 5 1 because the film is air. Because there is no path difference 
and the total phase change is due only to the 180° phase change upon reflection, 
the contact point at O is dark as seen in Figure 37.11b.
Using the geometry shown in Figure 37.11a, we can obtain expressions for the radii 
of the bright and dark bands in terms of the radius of curvature R and wavelength 
l. For example, the dark rings have radii given by the expression r< !mlR/n
. The 
details are left as a problem (see Problem 66). We can obtain the wavelength of the 
light causing the interference pattern by measuring the radii of the rings, provided 
R is known. Conversely, we can use a known wavelength to obtain R.
One important use of Newton’s rings is in the testing of optical lenses. A circular 
pattern like that pictured in Figure 37.11b is obtained only when the lens is ground 
to a perfectly symmetric curvature. Variations from such symmetry produce a pat-
tern with fringes that vary from a smooth, circular shape. These variations indicate 
how the lens must be reground and repolished to remove imperfections.
a
r
2
1
P
O
R
b
C
o
u
r
t
e
s
y
o
f
B
a
u
s
c
h
a
n
d
L
o
m
b
Figure 37.11 
(a) The combina-
tion of rays reflected from the 
flat plate and the curved lens sur-
face gives rise to an interference 
pattern known as Newton’s rings.  
(b) Photograph of Newton’s rings.
(a) A thin film of oil floating 
on water displays interference, 
shown by the pattern of colors 
when white light is incident on 
the film. Variations in film thick-
ness produce the interesting color 
pattern. The razor blade gives you 
an idea of the size of the colored 
bands. (b) Interference in soap 
bubbles. The colors are due to 
interference between light rays 
reflected from the inner and 
outer surfaces of the thin film of 
soap making up the bubble. The 
color depends on the thickness 
of the film, ranging from black, 
where the film is thinnest, to 
magenta, where it is thickest.
a
P
e
t
e
r
A
p
r
a
h
a
m
i
a
n
/
P
h
o
t
o
R
e
s
e
a
r
c
h
e
r
s
,
I
n
c
.
b
D
r
.
J
e
r
e
m
y
B
u
r
g
e
s
s
/
S
c
i
e
n
c
e
P
h
o
t
o
L
i
b
r
a
r
y
/
P
h
o
t
o
R
e
s
e
a
r
c
h
e
r
s
,
I
n
c
.
Convert pdf to html - Convert PDF to html files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
How to Convert PDF to HTML Webpage with C# PDF Conversion SDK
convert pdf to html code c#; convert pdf to html5
Convert pdf to html - VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
PDF to HTML Webpage Converter SDK for VB.NET PDF to HTML Conversion
adding pdf to html page; convert pdf into html
1146
chapter 37 Wave Optics
The minimum film thickness for constructive interfer-
ence in the reflected light corresponds to m 5 0 in 
Equation 37.17. Solve this equation for t and substitute 
numerical values:
t5
1
01
1
2
2
l
2n
5
l
4n
5
1
600 nm
2
4
1
1.33
2
113 nm
What if the film is twice as thick? Does this situation produce constructive interference?
Answer  Using Equation 37.17, we can solve for the thicknesses at which constructive interference occurs:
t5
1
m1
1
2
2
l
2n
5
1
2m11
2
l
4n
m50, 1, 2,c
The allowed values of m show that constructive interference occurs for odd multiples of the thickness corresponding to  
m 5 0, t 5 113 nm. Therefore, constructive interference does not occur for a film that is twice as thick.
What IF?
Example 37.4   Nonreflective Coatings for Solar Cells
Solar cells—devices that generate electricity when exposed to sunlight—are often coated with a transparent, thin film 
of silicon monoxide (SiO, n 5 1.45) to minimize reflective losses from the surface. Suppose a silicon solar cell (n 5 3.5) 
is coated with a thin film of silicon monoxide for this purpose (Fig. 37.12a). Determine the minimum film thickness 
that produces the least reflection at a wavelength of 550 nm, near the center of the visible spectrum.
Example 37.3   Interference in a Soap Film
Calculate the minimum thickness of a soap-bubble film that results in constructive interference in the reflected light 
if the film is illuminated with light whose wavelength in free space is l 5 600 nm. The index of refraction of the soap 
film is 1.33.
Conceptualize  Imagine that the film in Figure 37.10 is soap, with air on both sides.
Categorize  We determine the result using an equation from this section, so we categorize this example as a substitu-
tion problem.
SolutIon
Problem-Solving Strategy  Thin-Film Interference
The following features should be kept in mind when working thin-film interference 
problems.
1. Conceptualize. Think about what is going on physically in the problem. Identify 
the light source and the location of the observer.
2. Categorize. Confirm that you should use the techniques for thin-film interference 
by identifying the thin film causing the interference.
3. Analyze. The type of interference that occurs is determined by the phase relation-
ship between the portion of the wave reflected at the upper surface of the film and 
the portion reflected at the lower surface. Phase differences between the two por-
tions of the wave have two causes: differences in the distances traveled by the two 
portions and phase changes occurring on reflection. Both causes must be considered 
when determining which type of interference occurs. If the media above and below 
the film both have index of refraction larger than that of the film or if both indices 
are smaller, use Equation 37.17 for constructive interference and Equation 37.18 for 
destructive interference. If the film is located between two different media, one with 
n , n
film
and the other with n . n
film
, reverse these two equations for constructive 
and destructive interference.
4. Finalize. Inspect your final results to see if they make sense physically and are of 
an appropriate size.
Online Convert PDF to HTML5 files. Best free online PDF html
PDF to HTML converter library control is a 100% clean .NET document image solution, which is designed to help .NET developers convert PDF to HTML webpage using
convert pdf into html email; best pdf to html converter
VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.
PDF from RTF. Create PDF from Text. PDF Export. Convert PDF to Word (.docx). Convert PDF to Tiff. Convert PDF to HTML. Convert PDF to
conversion pdf to html; changing pdf to html
37.6 the Michelson Interferometer  
1147
a
Si
= 3.5
180° phase
change
180° phase
change
1
2
SiO
= 1.45
Air
= 1
b
C
h
i
s
t
o
p
r
u
d
o
v
D
m
i
t
r
i
y
G
e
n
n
a
d
i
e
v
i
c
h
/
S
h
u
t
t
e
r
s
t
o
c
k
.
c
o
m
Figure 37.12 
(Example 37.4) (a) Reflective losses from a silicon solar 
cell are minimized by coating the surface of the cell with a thin film of 
silicon monoxide. (b) The reflected light from a coated camera lens often 
has a reddish-violet appearance.
Solve the equation 2nt 5 l/2 for t and substitute numeri-
cal values:
t5
l
4n
5
550 nm
4
1
1.45
2
5
94.8 nm
Finalize  A typical uncoated solar cell has reflective losses as high as 30%, but a coating of SiO can reduce this value to 
about 10%. This significant decrease in reflective losses increases the cell’s efficiency because less reflection means that 
more sunlight enters the silicon to create charge carriers in the cell. No coating can ever be made perfectly nonreflect-
ing because the required thickness is wavelength-dependent and the incident light covers a wide range of wavelengths.
Glass lenses used in cameras and other optical instruments are usually coated with a transparent thin film to reduce 
or eliminate unwanted reflection and to enhance the transmission of light through the lenses. The camera lens in 
Figure 37.12b has several coatings (of different thicknesses) to minimize reflection of light waves having wavelengths 
near the center of the visible spectrum. As a result, the small amount of light that is reflected by the lens has a greater 
proportion of the far ends of the spectrum and often appears reddish violet.
▸ 37.4 
continued
Conceptualize  Figure 37.12a helps us visualize 
the path of the rays in the SiO film that result in 
interference in the reflected light.
Categorize  Based on the geometry of the SiO 
layer, we categorize this example as a thin-film 
interference problem.
Analyze  The reflected light is a minimum when 
rays 1 and 2 in Figure 37.12a meet the condition 
of destructive interference. In this situation, both 
rays undergo a 180° phase change upon reflec-
tion: ray 1 from the upper SiO surface and ray 
2 from the lower SiO surface. The net change 
in phase due to reflection is therefore zero, and 
the condition for a reflection minimum requires 
a path difference of l
n
/2, where l
n
is the wave-
length of the light in SiO. Hence, 2nt 5 l/2, 
where l is the wavelength in air and n is the index of refraction of SiO.
SolutIon
37.6 The Michelson Interferometer
The interferometer, invented by American physicist A. A. Michelson (1852–1931), 
splits a light beam into two parts and then recombines the parts to form an interfer-
ence pattern. The device can be used to measure wavelengths or other lengths with 
great precision because a large and precisely measurable displacement of one of 
the mirrors is related to an exactly countable number of wavelengths of light.
A schematic diagram of the interferometer is shown in Figure 37.13 (page 1148). 
A ray of light from a monochromatic source is split into two rays by mirror M
0
which is inclined at 45° to the incident light beam. Mirror M
0
, called a beam split-
ter, transmits half the light incident on it and reflects the rest. One ray is reflected 
from M
0
to the right toward mirror M
1
, and the second ray is transmitted vertically 
through M
0
toward mirror M
2
. Hence, the two rays travel separate paths L
1
and L
2
After reflecting from M
1
and M
2
, the two rays eventually recombine at M
0
to pro-
duce an interference pattern, which can be viewed through a telescope.
The interference condition for the two rays is determined by the difference in 
their path length. When the two mirrors are exactly perpendicular to each other, 
the interference pattern is a target pattern of bright and dark circular fringes. As 
M
1
is moved, the fringe pattern collapses or expands, depending on the direction 
in which M
1
is moved. For example, if a dark circle appears at the center of the 
VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF to MS Office Word in VB.NET. VB.NET Tutorial for How to Convert PDF to Word (.docx) Document in VB.NET. Best
convert pdf to url link; pdf to web converter
C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
C# PDF - Convert PDF to JPEG in C#.NET. C#.NET PDF to JPEG Converting & Conversion Control. Convert PDF to JPEG Using C#.NET. Add necessary references:
online convert pdf to html; to html
1148
chapter 37 Wave Optics
target pattern (corresponding to destructive interference) and M
1
is then moved 
a distance l/4 toward M
0
, the path difference changes by l/2. What was a dark 
circle at the center now becomes a bright circle. As M
1
is moved an additional dis-
tance l/4 toward M
0
, the bright circle becomes a dark circle again. Therefore, the 
fringe pattern shifts by one-half fringe each time M
1
is moved a distance l/4. The 
wavelength of light is then measured by counting the number of fringe shifts for a 
given displacement of M
1
. If the wavelength is accurately known, mirror displace-
ments can be measured to within a fraction of the wavelength.
We will see an important historical use of the Michelson interferometer in our 
discussion of relativity in Chapter 39. Modern uses include the following two appli-
cations, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and the laser interferometer 
gravitational-wave observatory.
Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy
Spectroscopy is the study of the wavelength distribution of radiation from a sample 
that can be used to identify the characteristics of atoms or molecules in the sample. 
Infrared spectroscopy is particularly important to organic chemists when analyzing 
organic molecules. Traditional spectroscopy involves the use of an optical element, 
such as a prism (Section 35.5) or a diffraction grating (Section 38.4), which spreads 
out various wavelengths in a complex optical signal from the sample into different 
angles. In this way, the various wavelengths of radiation and their intensities in the 
signal can be determined. These types of devices are limited in their resolution and 
effectiveness because they must be scanned through the various angular deviations 
of the radiation.
The technique of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy is used to create a 
higher-resolution spectrum in a time interval of 1 second that may have required 
30 minutes with a standard spectrometer. In this technique, the radiation from a 
sample enters a Michelson interferometer. The movable mirror is swept through 
the zero-path-difference condition, and the intensity of radiation at the viewing 
position is recorded. The result is a complex set of data relating light intensity as a 
function of mirror position, called an interferogram. Because there is a relationship 
between mirror position and light intensity for a given wavelength, the interfero-
gram contains information about all wavelengths in the signal.
In Section 18.8, we discussed Fourier analysis of a waveform. The waveform is a 
function that contains information about all the individual frequency components 
that make up the waveform.3 Equation 18.13 shows how the waveform is generated 
from the individual frequency components. Similarly, the interferogram can be 
3In acoustics, it is common to talk about the components of a complex signal in terms of frequency. In optics, it is 
more common to identify the components by wavelength.
Figure 37.13 
Diagram of the 
Michelson interferometer.
The path difference between 
the two rays is varied with the 
adjustable mirror M
1
.
A single ray of light is 
split into two rays by 
mirror M
0
, which is 
called a beam splitter.
called a beam sp
p
M
0
M
2
M
1
Light
source
Telescope
As M
1
is moved, an 
interference 
pattern changes in 
the field of view.
L
2
L
1
VB.NET PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in vb.
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF to TIFF Using VB in VB.NET. Free VB.NET Guide to Render and Convert PDF Document to TIFF in Visual Basic Class.
convert pdf to web pages; convert pdf to html5 open source
C# PDF Convert to SVG SDK: Convert PDF to SVG files in C#.net, ASP
PDFDocument pdf = new PDFDocument(@"C:\input.pdf"); pdf.ConvertToVectorImages( ContextType.SVG, @"C:\demoOutput Description: Convert to html/svg files and
pdf to html converter online; embed pdf to website
Summary 
1149
analyzed by computer, in a process called a Fourier transform, to provide all the wave-
length components. This information is the same as that generated by traditional 
spectroscopy, but the resolution of FTIR spectroscopy is much higher.
Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory
Einstein’s general theory of relativity (Section 39.9) predicts the existence of gravi-
tational waves. These waves propagate from the site of any gravitational disturbance, 
which could be periodic and predictable, such as the rotation of a double star around 
a center of mass, or unpredictable, such as the supernova explosion of a massive star.
In Einstein’s theory, gravitation is equivalent to a distortion of space. Therefore, 
a gravitational disturbance causes an additional distortion that propagates through 
space in a manner similar to mechanical or electromagnetic waves. When gravita-
tional waves from a disturbance pass by the Earth, they create a distortion of the local 
space. The laser interferometer gravitational-wave observatory (LIGO) apparatus is 
designed to detect this distortion. The apparatus employs a Michelson interferom-
eter that uses laser beams with an effective path length of several kilometers. At the 
end of an arm of the interferometer, a mirror is mounted on a massive pendulum. 
When a gravitational wave passes by, the pendulum and the attached mirror move 
and the interference pattern due to the laser beams from the two arms changes.
Two sites for interferometers have been developed in the United States—in 
Richland, Washington, and in Livingston, Louisiana—to allow coincidence stud-
ies of gravitational waves. Figure 37.14 shows the Washington site. The two arms of 
the Michelson interferometer are evident in the photograph. Six data runs have 
been performed as of 2010. These runs have been coordinated with other grav-
itational wave detectors, such as GEO in Hannover, Germany, TAMA in Mitaka, 
Japan, and VIRGO in Cascina, Italy. So far, gravitational waves have not yet been 
detected, but the data runs have provided critical information for modifications 
and design features for the next generation of detectors. The original detectors are 
currently being dismantled, in preparation for the installation of Advanced LIGO, 
an upgrade that should increase the sensitivity of the observatory by a factor of 10. 
The target date for the beginning of scientific operation of Advanced LIGO is 2014.
L
I
G
O
H
a
n
f
o
r
d
O
b
s
e
r
v
a
t
o
r
y
Figure 37.14 
The Laser Inter-
ferometer Gravitational-Wave 
Observatory (LIGO) near Rich-
land, Washington. Notice the two 
perpendicular arms of the Michel-
son interferometer.
The intensity at a point in a double-slit interference pattern is
I5I
max
cos2 a
pd sin u
l
(37.14)
where I
max
is the maximum intensity on the screen and the 
expression represents the time average.
Summary
Concepts and Principles
Interference in light waves occurs when-
ever two or more waves overlap at a given 
point. An interference pattern is observed 
if (1)the sources are coherent and (2) the 
sources have identical wavelengths.
continued
C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net
C#.NET PDF SDK - Convert PDF to TIFF in C#.NET. Online C# Tutorial for How to Convert PDF File to Tiff Image File with .NET XDoc.PDF Control in C#.NET Class.
convert pdf to url; convert pdf to html online
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
C#.NET PDF SDK - Convert PDF to Word in C#.NET. C#.NET DLLs and Demo Code: Convert PDF to Word Document in C#.NET Project. Add necessary references:
convert pdf into web page; convert pdf to web page online
1150
hapter 
Wave Optics
While using a Michelson interferometer (shown in Fig. 
37.13), you see a dark circle at the center of the inter
ference pattern. (i) As you gradually move the light 
source toward the central mirror M M , through a dis
tance /2, what do you see? (a) There is no change in 
the pattern. (b) The dark circle changes into a bright 
circle. (c) The dark circle changes into a bright circle 
and then back into a dark circle. (d) The dark circle 
changes into a bright circle, then into a dark circle, and 
then into a bright circle. (ii) As you gradually move the 
moving mirror toward the central mirror M M , through 
a distance /2, what do you see? Choose from the same 
possibilities.
2. Four trials of Young’s double-slit experiment are con
ducted. (a) In the first trial, blue light passes through 
two fine slits 400 m apart and forms an interference 
pattern on a screen 4 m away. (b) In a second trial, 
red light passes through the same slits and falls on 
the same screen. (c) A third trial is performed with 
red light and the same screen, but with slits 800 
apart. (d) A final trial is performed with red light, slits 
800 m apart, and a screen 8 m away. (i)  Rank the 
trials (a) through (d) from the largest to the smallest 
value of the angle between the central maximum and 
the first-order side maximum. In your ranking, note 
any cases of equality. (ii) Rank the same trials accord
ing to the distance between the central maximum and 
the first-order side maximum on the screen.
3.Suppose Young’s double-slit experiment is performed in 
air using red light and then the apparatus is immersed 
in water. What happens to the interference pattern on 
the screen? (a) It disappears. (b) The bright and dark 
fringes stay in the same locations, but the contrast is 
reduced. (c) The bright fringes are closer together. 
(d) The bright fringes are farther apart. (e) No change 
happens in the interference pattern.
4.Green light has a wavelength of 500 nm in air. 
(i) Assume green light is reflected from a mirror with 
angle of incidence 0°. The incident and reflected waves 
together constitute a standing wave with what distance 
from one node to the next node? (a) 1000 nm (b) 500 nm 
(c) 250 nm (d) 125nm (e) 62.5 nm (ii). The green light 
is sent into a Michelson interferometer that is adjusted 
to produce a central bright circle. How far must the 
interferometer’s moving mirror be shifted to change 
the center of the pattern into a dark circle? Choose 
from the same possibilities as in part (i). (iii). The 
green light is reflected perpendicularly from a thin film 
of a plastic with an index of refraction 2.00. The film 
appears bright in the reflected light. How much addi
tional thickness would make the film appear dark?
5.A thin layer of oil (
1.25) is floating on water (
1.33). What is the minimum nonzero thickness of the 
oil in the region that strongly reflects green light (
530 nm)? (a)500 nm (b) 313 nm (c) 404 nm (d) 212 nm 
(e) 285 nm
The condition for constructive interference in a film of thickness  and 
index of refraction  surrounded by air is
nt
0, 1, 2,
(37.17)
where  is the wavelength of the light in free space.
Similarly, the condition for destructive interference in a thin film sur-
rounded by air is
0, 1, 2,
(37.18)
A wave traveling from a medium 
of index of refraction  toward a 
medium of index of refraction 
undergoes a 180° phase change 
upon reflection when 
and 
undergoes no phase change when 
Analysis Models for Problem Solving
Waves in Interference. Young’s double-slit experiment serves as a pro
totype for interference phenomena involving electromagnetic radiation. 
In this experiment, two slits separated by a distance  are illuminated by a 
single-wavelength light source. The condition for bright fringes (constructive 
interference)
sin 
bright
0, 
1, 2,
(37.2)
The condition for dark fringes (destructive interference)
sin 
dark
0, 1, 2,
(37.3)
The number  is called the order number  of the fringe.
Objective Questions
conceptual Questions
1151
6. A monochromatic beam of light of wavelength 500 nm 
illuminates a double slit having a slit separation 
of 2.00
m. What is the angle of the second-
order bright fringe? (a) 0.050 0 rad (b) 0.025 0 rad 
(c) 0.100 rad (d) 0.250 rad (e) 0.010 0 rad
7. According to Table 35.1, the index of refraction of flint 
glass is 1.66 and the index of refraction of crown glass 
is 1.52. (i) A film formed by one drop of sassafras oil, on 
a horizontal surface of a flint glass block, is viewed by 
reflected light. The film appears brightest at its outer 
margin, where it is thinnest. A film of the same oil on 
crown glass appears dark at its outer margin. What can 
you say about the index of refraction of the oil? (a) It 
must be less than 1.52. (b) It must be between 1.52 and 
1.66. (c) It must be greater than 1.66. (d) None of those 
statements is necessarily true. (ii)Could a very thin 
film of some other liquid appear bright by reflected 
light on both of the glass blocks? (iii) Could it appear 
dark on both? (iv) Could it appear dark on crown glass 
and bright on flint glass? Experiments described by 
Thomas Young suggested this question.
8. Suppose you perform Young’s double-slit experiment 
with the slit separation slightly smaller than the wave
length of the light. As a screen, you use a large half-
cylinder with its axis along the midline between the 
slits. What interference pattern will you see on the inte
rior surface of the cylinder? (a) bright and dark fringes 
so closely spaced as to be indistinguishable (b) one 
central bright fringe and two dark fringes only (c) a 
completely bright screen with no dark fringes (d) one 
central dark fringe and two bright fringes only (e) a 
completely dark screen with no bright fringes
A plane monochromatic light wave is incident on a dou
ble slit as illustrated in Figure 37.1. (i) As the viewing 
screen is moved away from the double slit, what happens 
to the separation between the interference fringes on 
the screen? (a) It increases. (b) It decreases. (c) It remains 
the same. (d) It may increase or decrease, depending 
on the wavelength of the light. (e) More information is 
required. (ii) As the slit separation increases, what hap
pens to the separation between the interference fringes 
on the screen? Select from the same choices.
10.A film of oil on a puddle in a parking lot shows a vari
ety of bright colors in swirled patches. What can you 
say about the thickness of the oil film? (a) It is much 
less than the wavelength of visible light. (b) It is on 
the same order of magnitude as the wavelength of vis
ible light. (c) It is much greater than the wavelength of 
visible light. (d) It might have any relationship to the 
wavelength of visible light.
Figure CQ37.9
8. In a laboratory accident, you spill two liquids onto dif
ferent parts of a water surface. Neither of the liquids 
mixes with the water. Both liquids form thin films on 
the water surface. As the films spread and become very 
thin, you notice that one film becomes brighter and 
the other darker in reflected light. Why?
9.A theatrical smoke machine fills the space between the 
barrier and the viewing screen in the Young’s double-slit 
experiment shown in Figure CQ37.9. Would the smoke 
show evidence of interference within this space? Explain 
your answer.
Why is the lens on a good-quality camera coated with a 
thin film?
2. A soap film is held vertically in 
air and is viewed in reflected 
light as in Figure CQ37.2. 
Explain why the film appears to 
be dark at the top.
3. Explain why two flashlights 
held close together do not pro
duce an interference pattern 
on a distant screen.
4. A lens with outer radius of cur
vature  and index of refrac
tion  rests on a flat glass plate. 
The combination is illuminated with white light from 
above and observed from above. (a) Is there a dark 
spot or a light spot at the center of the lens? (b) What 
does it mean if the observed rings are noncircular?
5. Consider a dark fringe in a double-slit interference pat
tern at which almost no light energy is arriving. Light 
from both slits is arriving at the location of the dark 
fringe, but the waves cancel. Where does the energy at 
the positions of dark fringes go?
6. (a) In Young’s double-slit experiment, why do we use 
monochromatic light? (b) If white light is used, how 
would the pattern change?
7. What is the necessary condition on the path length dif
ference between two waves that interfere (a) construc
tively and (b) destructively?
Figure CQ37.2
Conceptual Question 
2 and Problem 70.
©
R
i
c
h
a
r
d
M
e
g
n
a
/
F
u
n
d
a
m
e
n
t
a
l
P
h
o
t
o
g
r
a
p
h
s
,
N
Y
C
Conceptual Questions
1152
chapter 37 Wave Optics
Problems
The problems found in this  
chapter may be assigned 
online in Enhanced WebAssign
1.
 straightforward; 
2. 
intermediate;  
3. 
challenging
1.
full solution available in the Student 
Solutions Manual/Study Guide
AMT
Analysis Model tutorial available in 
Enhanced WebAssign
GP
Guided Problem
M
Master It tutorial available in Enhanced 
WebAssign
W
Watch It video solution available in 
Enhanced WebAssign
BIO
Q/C
S
Section 37.1  Young’s Double-Slit Experiment
Section 37.2  analysis Model: Waves in Interference
Problems 3, 5, 8, 10, and 13 in Chapter 18 can be assigned 
with this section.
1. Two slits are separated by 0.320 mm. A beam of 500-nm  
light strikes the slits, producing an interference pat-
tern. Determine the number of maxima observed in 
the angular range 230.0° , u , 30.0°.
2. Light of wavelength 530 nm illuminates a pair of slits 
separated by 0.300 mm. If a screen is placed 2.00 m 
from the slits, determine the distance between the first 
and second dark fringes.
3. A laser beam is incident on two slits with a separation 
of 0.200 mm, and a screen is placed 5.00 m from the 
slits. An interference pattern appears on the screen. 
If the angle from the center fringe to the first bright 
fringe to the side is 0.181°, what is the wavelength of 
the laser light?
4. A Young’s interference experiment is performed with 
blue-green argon laser light. The separation between 
the slits is 0.500 mm, and the screen is located 3.30 m 
from the slits. The first bright fringe is located 3.40 mm  
from the center of the interference pattern. What is 
the wavelength of the argon laser light?
5. Young’s double-slit experiment is performed with  
589-nm light and a distance of 2.00 m between the slits 
and the screen. The tenth interference minimum is 
observed 7.26mm from the central maximum. Deter-
mine the spacing of the slits.
6. Why is the following situation impossible? Two narrow slits 
are separated by 8.00 mm in a piece of metal. A beam 
of microwaves strikes the metal perpendicularly, passes 
through the two slits, and then proceeds toward a wall 
some distance away. You know that the wavelength of 
the radiation is 1.00 cm 65%, but you wish to measure 
it more precisely. Moving a microwave detector along 
the wall to study the interference pattern, you measure 
the position of the m 5 1 bright fringe, which leads 
to a successful measurement of the wavelength of the 
radiation.
7. Light of wavelength 620 nm falls on a double slit, and 
the first bright fringe of the interference pattern is 
seen at an angle of 15.0° with the horizontal. Find the 
separation between the slits.
W
W
8. In a Young’s double-slit experiment, two parallel slits 
with a slit separation of 0.100 mm are illuminated by 
light of wavelength 589 nm, and the interference pat-
tern is observed on a screen located 4.00 m from the 
slits. (a) What is the difference in path lengths from 
each of the slits to the location of the center of a third-
order bright fringe on the screen? (b) What is the dif-
ference in path lengths from the two slits to the loca-
tion of the center of the third dark fringe away from 
the center of the pattern?
9. A pair of narrow, parallel slits separated by 0.250 mm 
is illuminated by green light (l 5 546.1 nm). The inter-
ference pattern is observed on a screen 1.20 m away 
from the plane of the parallel slits. Calculate the dis-
tance (a)from the central maximum to the first bright 
region on either side of the central maximum and  
(b) between the first and second dark bands in the 
interference pattern.
10. Light with wavelength 442 nm passes through a double- 
slit system that has a slit separation d 5 0.400 mm. 
Determine how far away a screen must be placed so 
that dark fringes appear directly opposite both slits, 
with only one bright fringe between them.
11. The two speakers of a boom box are 35.0 cm apart. A 
single oscillator makes the speakers vibrate in phase 
at a frequency of 2.00 kHz. At what angles, measured 
from the perpendicular bisector of the line joining 
the speakers, would a distant observer hear maximum 
sound intensity? Minimum sound intensity? (Take the 
speed of sound as 340 m/s.)
12. In a location where the speed of sound is 343 m/s, a  
2 000-Hz sound wave impinges on two slits 30.0 cm  
apart. (a) At what angle is the first maximum of sound  
intensity located? (b) What If? If the sound wave is 
replaced by 3.00-cm microwaves, what slit separation 
gives the same angle for the first maximum of micro-
wave intensity? (c)What If? If the slit separation is  
1.00 mm, what frequency of light gives the same angle to 
the first maximum of light intensity?
13. Two radio antennas separated by d 5 300 m as shown 
in Figure P37.13 simultaneously broadcast identical sig-
nals at the same wavelength. A car travels due north 
along a straight line at position x 5 1 000 m from 
the center point between the antennas, and its radio 
receives the signals. (a)If the car is at the position of 
the second maximum after that at point O when it has 
M
AMT
M
AMT
AMT
M
problems 
1153
tionary. Find the speed of the mth-order maxima on 
the screen, where m can be very large.
17. Radio waves of wavelength 125 m from a galaxy reach a 
radio telescope by two separate paths as shown in Fig-
ure P37.17. One is a direct path to the receiver, which 
is situated on the edge of a tall cliff by the ocean, and 
the second is by reflection off the water. As the galaxy 
rises in the east over the water, the first minimum of 
destructive interference occurs when the galaxy is u5 
25.0° above the horizon. Find the height of the radio 
telescope dish above the water.
u
Direct
path
Radio
telescope
Reflected
path
Figure P37.17 
Problems 17 and 69.
18. In Figure P37.18 (not to scale), let L 5 1.20 m and d 5 
0.120mm and assume the slit system is illuminated with 
monochromatic 500-nm light. Calculate the phase dif-
ference between the two wave fronts arriving at P when 
(a)u5 0.500° and (b) y 5 5.00 mm. (c) What is the 
value of u for which the phase difference is 0.333 rad? 
(d) What is the value of u for which the path difference 
is l/4?
d
S
1
S
2
L
Viewing screen
P
O
y
r
1
r
2
u
Figure P37.18 
Problems 18 and 25.
19. Coherent light rays of wavelength l strike a pair of slits 
separated by distance d at an angle u
1
with respect to 
the normal to the plane containing the slits as shown 
in Figure P37.19. The rays leaving the slits make an 
M
traveled a distance y 5 400m northward, what is the 
wavelength of the signals? (b)How much farther must 
the car travel from this position to encounter the next 
minimum in reception? Note: Do not use the small-
angle approximation in this problem.
y
x
O
d
Figure P37.13
14. A riverside warehouse has several small doors facing 
the river. Two of these doors are open as shown in Fig-
ure P37.14. The walls of the warehouse are lined with 
sound-absorbing material. Two people stand at a dis-
tance L 5 150 m from the wall with the open doors. 
Person A stands along a line passing through the mid-
point between the open doors, and person B stands a 
distance y 5 20 m to his side. A boat on the river sounds 
its horn. To person A, the sound is loud and clear. To 
person B, the sound is barely audible. The principal 
wavelength of the sound waves is 3.00 m. Assuming per-
son B is at the position of the first minimum, determine 
the distance d between the doors, center to center.
d
L
A
B
Open door 
Closed door 
Open door 
y
Figure P37.14
15. A student holds a laser that emits light of wavelength 
632.8nm. The laser beam passes though a pair of slits 
separated by 0.300 mm, in a glass plate attached to the 
front of the laser. The beam then falls perpendicularly 
on a screen, creating an interference pattern on it. The 
student begins to walk directly toward the screen at 
3.00 m/s. The central maximum on the screen is sta-
tionary. Find the speed of the 50th-order maxima on 
the screen.
16. A student holds a laser that emits light of wavelength l. 
The laser beam passes though a pair of slits separated 
by a distance d, in a glass plate attached to the front 
of the laser. The beam then falls perpendicularly on 
a screen, creating an interference pattern on it. The 
student begins to walk directly toward the screen at 
speed v. The central maximum on the screen is sta-
W
S
1
d
2
u
1
u
u
2
u
Figure P37.19
1154
chapter 37 Wave Optics
The red lines in Figure 
P37.22 represent paths 
along which maxima in 
the interference pattern 
of the radio waves exist. 
(a) Find the wavelength 
of the waves. The pilot 
“locks onto” the strong 
signal radiated along an 
interference maximum 
and steers the plane to 
keep the received signal 
strong. If she has found 
the central maximum, 
the plane will have precisely the correct heading to land 
when it reaches the runway as exhibited by plane A.  
(b) What If? Suppose the plane is flying along the first 
side maximum instead as is the case for plane B. How 
far to the side of the runway centerline will the plane be 
when it is 2.00 km from the antennas, measured along 
its direction of travel? (c) It is possible to tell the pilot 
that she is on the wrong maximum by sending out two 
signals from each antenna and equipping the aircraft 
with a two-channel receiver. The ratio of the two fre-
quencies must not be the ratio of small integers (such as 
3
4
). Explain how this two-frequency system would work 
and why it would not necessarily work if the frequencies 
were related by an integer ratio.
Section 37.3  Intensity Distribution of the Double-Slit 
Interference Pattern
23. Two slits are separated by 0.180 mm. An interference 
pattern is formed on a screen 80.0 cm away by 656.3-nm  
light. Calculate the fraction of the maximum intensity a 
distance y 5 0.600 cm away from the central maximum.
24. Show that the two waves with wave functions given by 
E
1
5 6.00 sin (100pt) and E
2
5 8.00 sin (100pt 1 p/2)  
add to give a wave with the wave function  
E
R
sin (100pt 1 f). Find the required values for E
R
and f.
25. In Figure P37.18, let L 5 120 cm and d 5 0.250 cm. 
The slits are illuminated with coherent 600-nm light. 
Calculate the distance y from the central maximum for 
which the average intensity on the screen is 75.0% of 
the maximum.
26. Monochromatic coherent light of amplitude E
0
and 
angular frequency v passes through three parallel 
slits, each separated by a distance d from its neighbor.  
(a) Show that the time-averaged intensity as a function 
of the angle uis
I
1
u
2
5I
max
c112 cos a
2pd sin u
l
bd
2
(b) Explain how this expression describes both the pri-
mary and the secondary maxima. (c) Determine the 
ratio of the intensities of the primary and secondary 
maxima.
27. The intensity on the screen at a certain point in a double- 
slit interference pattern is 64.0% of the maximum 
value. (a) What minimum phase difference (in radi-
ans) between sources produces this result? (b) Express 
M
Q/C
angle u
2
with respect to the normal, and an interfer-
ence maximum is formed by those rays on a screen 
that is a great distance from the slits. Show that the 
angle u
2
is given by
u
2
5sin
21
asin u
1
2
ml
d
b
where m is an integer.
20. Monochromatic light of wavelength l is incident on a 
pair of slits separated by 2.40 3 1024 m and forms an 
interference pattern on a screen placed 1.80 m from 
the slits. The first-order bright fringe is at a position 
y
bright
5 4.52mm measured from the center of the 
central maximum. From this information, we wish to 
predict where the fringe for n 5 50 would be located.  
(a) Assuming the fringes are laid out linearly along 
the screen, find the position of the n 5 50 fringe by 
multiplying the position of the n 5 1 fringe by 50.0. 
(b) Find the tangent of the angle the first-order bright 
fringe makes with respect to the line extending from 
the point midway between the slits to the center of the 
central maximum. (c) Using the result of part (b) and 
Equation 37.2, calculate the wavelength of the light. 
(d) Compute the angle for the 50th-order bright fringe 
from Equation 37.2. (e) Find the position of the 50th-
order bright fringe on the screen from Equation 37.5. 
(f) Comment on the agreement between the answers 
to parts (a) and (e).
21. In the double-slit arrangement of Figure P37.21, d5 
0.150 mm, L 5 140 cm, l 5 643 nm, and y 5 1.80 cm. 
(a)What is the path difference d for the rays from the 
two slits arriving at P? (b) Express this path difference 
in terms of l. (c) Does P correspond to a maximum, 
a minimum, or an intermediate condition? Give evi-
dence for your answer.
d
S
1
S
2
d
L
Viewing screen
P
O
y
r
1
r
2
u
u
Figure P37.21
22. Young’s double-slit experiment underlies the instrument 
landing system used to guide aircraft to safe landings at 
some airports when the visibility is poor. Although real 
systems are more complicated than the example 
described here, they operate on the same principles. A 
pilot is trying to align her plane with a runway as sug-
gested in Figure P37.22. Two radio antennas (the black 
dots in the figure) are positioned adjacent to the run-
way, separated by d 5 40.0 m. The antennas broadcast 
unmodulated coherent radio waves at 30.0 MHz.  
GP
Q/C
W
Q/C
B
d
Figure P37.22
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested