mvc display pdf in browser : Add pdf to website Library software class asp.net winforms web page ajax doc-3-pdf-67a5de9fa89738da0c6835ef457b5878-original119-part214

problems 
1155
value of the plate separation d is the transmitted light 
bright?
36. An oil film (n 5 1.45) floating on water is illumi-
nated by white light at normal incidence. The film is  
280nm thick. Find (a) the wavelength and color of the 
light in the visible spectrum most strongly reflected 
and (b) the wavelength and color of the light in the 
spectrum most strongly transmitted. Explain your 
reasoning.
37. An air wedge is formed between two glass plates sepa-
rated at one edge by a very fine wire of circular cross 
section as shown in Figure P37.37. When the wedge is 
illuminated from above by 600-nm light and viewed 
from above, 30 dark fringes are observed. Calculate 
the diameter d of the wire.
d
Figure P37.37 
Problems 37, 41, 49, and 59.
38. Astronomers observe the chromosphere of the Sun 
with a filter that passes the red hydrogen spectral  
line of wavelength 656.3 nm, called the H
a
line. The 
filter consists of a transparent dielectric of thickness  
d held between two partially aluminized glass plates. 
The filter is held at a constant temperature. (a) Find 
the minimum value of d that produces maximum 
transmission of perpendicular H
a
light if the dielec-
tric has an index of refraction of 1.378. (b)What If? 
If the temperature of the filter increases above the 
normal value, increasing its thickness, what happens 
to the transmitted wavelength? (c) The dielectric will 
also pass what near-visible wavelength? One of the 
glass plates is colored red to absorb this light.
39. When a liquid is introduced into the air space between 
the lens and the plate in a Newton’s-rings apparatus, 
the diameter of the tenth ring changes from 1.50 to 
1.31 cm. Find the index of refraction of the liquid.
40. A lens made of glass (n
g
5 1.52) is coated with a thin 
film of MgF
2
(n
s
5 1.38) of thickness t. Visible light 
is incident normally on the coated lens as in Fig-
ure P37.40. (a)For what minimum value of t will the 
M
Q/C
M
Q/C
W
Q/C
this phase difference as a path difference for 486.1-nm 
light.
28. Green light (l 5 546 nm) illuminates a pair of narrow, 
parallel slits separated by 0.250 mm. Make a graph of 
I/I
max
as a function of u for the interference pattern 
observed on a screen 1.20 m away from the plane of 
the parallel slits. Let u range over the interval from 
20.3° to 10.3°.
29. Two narrow, parallel slits separated by 0.850 mm are 
illuminated by 600-nm light, and the viewing screen 
is 2.80m away from the slits. (a) What is the phase dif-
ference between the two interfering waves on a screen 
at a point 2.50 mm from the central bright fringe?  
(b) What is the ratio of the intensity at this point to the 
intensity at the center of a bright fringe?
Section 37.4  Change of Phase Due to Reflection
Section 37.5  Interference in thin Films
30. A soap bubble (n 5 1.33) floating in air has the shape 
of a spherical shell with a wall thickness of 120 nm.  
(a) What is the wavelength of the visible light that is 
most strongly reflected? (b) Explain how a bubble of 
different thickness could also strongly reflect light of 
this same wavelength. (c) Find the two smallest film 
thicknesses larger than 120 nm that can produce 
strongly reflected light of the same wavelength.
31. A thin film of oil (n 5 1.25) is located on smooth, 
wet pavement. When viewed perpendicular to the 
pavement, the film reflects most strongly red light at  
640 nm and reflects no green light at 512 nm. How 
thick is the oil film?
32. A material having an index of refraction of 1.30 is used 
as an antireflective coating on a piece of glass (n 5 
1.50). What should the minimum thickness of this film 
be to minimize reflection of 500-nm light?
33. A possible means for making an airplane invisible to 
radar is to coat the plane with an antireflective poly-
mer. If radar waves have a wavelength of 3.00 cm and 
the index of refraction of the polymer is n 5 1.50, how 
thick would you make the coating?
34. A film of MgF
2
(n 5 1.38) having thickness 1.00 3 
1025 cm is used to coat a camera lens. (a) What are the 
three longest wavelengths that are intensified in the 
reflected light? (b) Are any of these wavelengths in  
the visible spectrum?
35. A beam of 580-nm light passes through two closely 
spaced glass plates at close to normal incidence as 
shown in Figure P37.35. For what minimum nonzero 
W
Q/C
W
M
W
d
Figure P37.35
Glass
MgF
2
Incident
light
t
Figure P37.40
Add pdf to website - Convert PDF to html files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
How to Convert PDF to HTML Webpage with C# PDF Conversion SDK
convert pdf table to html; convert pdf to html email
Add pdf to website - VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
PDF to HTML Webpage Converter SDK for VB.NET PDF to HTML Conversion
convert pdf to html form; convert pdf into webpage
1156
chapter 37 Wave Optics
with index of refraction 1.38, calculate the fringe sepa-
ration for this same arrangement.
48. In the What If? section of Example 37.2, it was claimed 
that overlapping fringes in a two-slit interference pat-
tern for two different wavelengths obey the following 
relationship even for large values of the angle u:
mr
m
5
l
lr
(a) Prove this assertion. (b) Using the data in Example 
37.2, find the nonzero value of y on the screen at which 
the fringes from the two wavelengths first coincide.
49. An investigator finds a fiber at a crime scene that he 
wishes to use as evidence against a suspect. He gives 
the fiber to a technician to test the properties of the 
fiber. To measure the diameter d of the fiber, the tech-
nician places it between two flat glass plates at their 
ends as in Figure P37.37. When the plates, of length 
14.0 cm, are illuminated from above with light of wave-
length 650 nm, she observes interference bands sepa-
rated by 0.580 mm. What is the diameter of the fiber?
50. Raise your hand and hold it flat. Think of the space 
between your index finger and your middle finger as 
one slit and think of the space between middle finger 
and ring finger as a second slit. (a) Consider the inter-
ference resulting from sending coherent visible light 
perpendicularly through this pair of openings. Com-
pute an order-of-magnitude estimate for the angle 
between adjacent zones of constructive interference. 
(b) To make the angles in the interference pattern easy 
to measure with a plastic protractor, you should use an 
electromagnetic wave with frequency of what order of 
magnitude? (c) How is this wave classified on the elec-
tromagnetic spectrum?
51. Two coherent waves, coming from sources at different 
locations, move along the x axis. Their wave functions 
are
E
1
5860 sin c
2px
1
650
2924pt1
p
6
d
and
E
2
5860 sin c
2px
2
650
2924pt1
p
8
d
where E
1
and E
2
are in volts per meter, x
1
and x
2
are 
in nanometers, and t is in picoseconds. When the 
two waves are superposed, determine the relation-
ship between x
1
and x
2
that produces constructive 
interference.
52. In a Young’s interference experiment, the two slits are 
separated by 0.150 mm and the incident light includes 
two wavelengths: l
1
5 540 nm (green) and l
2
5 450 nm  
(blue). The overlapping interference patterns are 
observed on a screen 1.40 m from the slits. Calculate 
the minimum distance from the center of the screen 
to a point where a bright fringe of the green light coin-
cides with a bright fringe of the blue light.
53. In a Young’s double-slit experiment using light of 
wavelength l, a thin piece of Plexiglas having index of 
refraction n covers one of the slits. If the center point 
S
reflected light of wavelength 540 nm (in air) be miss-
ing? (b) Are there other values of t that will minimize 
the reflected light at this wavelength? Explain.
41. Two glass plates 10.0 cm long are in contact at one 
end and separated at the other end by a thread with a 
diameter d 5 0.050 0 mm (Fig. P37.37). Light contain-
ing the two wavelengths 400 nm and 600 nm is inci-
dent perpendicularly and viewed by reflection. At what 
distance from the contact point is the next dark fringe?
Section 37.6  the Michelson Interferometer
42. Mirror M
1
in Figure 37.13 is moved through a displace-
ment DL. During this displacement, 250 fringe rever-
sals (formation of successive dark or bright bands) 
are counted. The light being used has a wavelength of 
632.8nm. Calculate the displacement DL.
43. The Michelson interferometer can be used to mea-
sure the index of refraction of a gas by placing an 
evacuated transparent tube in the light path along 
one arm of the device. Fringe shifts occur as the gas 
is slowly added to the tube. Assume 600-nm light is 
used, the tube is 5.00 cm long, and 160 bright fringes 
pass on the screen as the pressure of the gas in the 
tube increases to atmospheric pressure. What is the 
index of refraction of the gas? Hint: The fringe shifts 
occur because the wavelength of the light changes 
inside the gas-filled tube.
44. One leg of a Michelson interferometer contains an 
evacuated cylinder of length L, having glass plates on 
each end. A gas is slowly leaked into the cylinder until 
a pressure of 1 atm is reached. If N bright fringes pass 
on the screen during this process when light of wave-
length l is used, what is the index of refraction of the 
gas? Hint: The fringe shifts occur because the wave-
length of the light changes inside the gas-filled tube.
additional Problems
45. Radio transmitter A operating at 60.0 MHz is 10.0 m 
from another similar transmitter B that is 180° out of 
phase with A. How far must an observer move from A 
toward B along the line connecting the two transmit-
ters to reach the nearest point where the two beams 
are in phase?
46. A room is 6.0 m long and 3.0 m wide. At the front of 
the room, along one of the 3.0-m-wide walls, two loud-
speakers are set 1.0 m apart, with the center point 
between them coinciding with the center point of the 
wall. The speakers emit a sound wave of a single fre-
quency and a maximum in sound intensity is heard at 
the center of the back wall, 6.0 m from the speakers. 
What is the highest possible frequency of the sound 
from the speakers if no other maxima are heard any-
where along the back wall?
47. In an experiment similar to that of Example 37.1, 
green light with wavelength 560 nm, sent through 
a pair of slits 30.0 mm apart, produces bright fringes  
2.24 cm apart on a screen 1.20 m away. If the apparatus 
is now submerged in a tank containing a sugar solution 
M
M
S
C# PDF: C# Code to Create Mobile PDF Viewer; C#.NET Mobile PDF
the content of created website Default.aspx MapPath("./Demo_Docs/").Replace("\\" Sample.pdf"; this.SessionId In Default.aspx, add a reference to the
convert pdf to web; add pdf to website html
C# HTML5 Viewer: Deployment on DotNetNuke Site
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.HTML5Editor.dll. Add following content into <webServer Set Website: Click Site->Settings, set website running port and .NET Framework Version.
export pdf to html; best website to convert pdf to word online
problems 
1157
scope reveals a difference in index of refraction as a shift 
in interference fringes. The idea is exemplified in the 
following problem. An air wedge is formed between two 
glass plates in contact along one edge and slightly sepa-
rated at the opposite edge as in Figure P37.37. When 
the plates are illuminated with monochromatic light 
from above, the reflected light has 85 dark fringes. Cal-
culate the number of dark fringes that appear if water 
(n 5 1.33) replaces the air between the plates.
60. Consider the double-slit arrangement shown in Figure 
P37.60, where the slit separation is d and the distance 
from the slit to the screen is L. A sheet of transparent 
plastic having an index of refraction n and thickness 
t is placed over the upper slit. As a result, the central 
maximum of the interference pattern moves upward a 
distance y9. Find y9.
m= 0
Viewing screen
Plastic
sheet
L
d
y
u
d
Figure P37.60
61. Figure P37.61 shows a radio-wave transmitter and a 
receiver separated by a distance d 5 50.0 m and both a 
distance h5 35.0 m above the ground. The receiver 
can receive  signals both directly from the transmitter 
and indirectly from signals that reflect from the 
ground. Assume the ground is level between the trans-
mitter and receiver and a 180° phase shift occurs upon 
reflection. Determine the longest wavelengths that 
interfere (a) constructively and (b)destructively.
d
h
Transmitter
Receiver
Figure P37.61 
Problems 61 and 62.
62. Figure P37.61 shows a radio-wave transmitter and a 
receiver separated by a distance d and both a distance 
h above the ground. The receiver can receive signals 
both directly from the transmitter and indirectly from 
signals that reflect from the ground. Assume the 
ground is level between the transmitter and receiver 
and a 180° phase shift occurs upon reflection. Deter-
mine the longest wavelengths that interfere (a) con-
structively and (b) destructively.
63. In a Newton’s-rings experiment, a plano-convex glass 
(n 5 1.52) lens having radius r 5 5.00 cm is placed on a 
flat plate as shown in Figure P37.63 (page 1158). When 
S
W
S
on the screen is a dark spot instead of a bright spot, 
what is the minimum thickness of the Plexiglas?
54. Review. A flat piece of glass is held stationary and 
horizontal above the highly polished, flat top end of a 
10.0-cm-long vertical metal rod that has its lower end 
rigidly fixed. The thin film of air between the rod and 
glass is observed to be bright by reflected light when 
it is illuminated by light of wavelength 500 nm. As the 
temperature is slowly increased by 25.0°C, the film 
changes from bright to dark and back to bright 200 
times. What is the coefficient of linear expansion of 
the metal?
55. A certain grade of crude oil has an index of refrac-
tion of 1.25. A ship accidentally spills 1.00 m3 of this 
oil into the ocean, and the oil spreads into a thin, uni-
form slick. If the film produces a first-order maximum 
of light of wavelength 500 nm normally incident on it, 
how much surface area of the ocean does the oil slick 
cover? Assume the index of refraction of the ocean 
water is 1.34.
56. The waves from a radio station can reach a home 
receiver by two paths. One is a straight-line path from 
transmitter to home, a distance of 30.0 km. The sec-
ond is by reflection from the ionosphere (a layer of 
ionized air molecules high in the atmosphere). Assume 
this reflection takes place at a point midway between 
receiver and transmitter, the wavelength broadcast by 
the radio station is 350 m, and no phase change occurs 
on reflection. Find the minimum height of the iono-
spheric layer that could produce destructive interfer-
ence between the direct and reflected beams.
57. Interference effects are produced at point P on a 
screen as a result of direct rays from a 500-nm source 
and reflected rays from the mirror as shown in Figure 
P37.57. Assume the source is 100 m to the left of the 
screen and 1.00 cm above the mirror. Find the distance 
y to the first dark band above the mirror.
O
Source
P
Viewing screen
Mirror
y
Figure P37.57
58. Measurements are made of the intensity distribution 
within the central bright fringe in a Young’s interfer-
ence pattern (see Fig. 37.6). At a particular value of y, it 
is found that I/I
max
5 0.810 when 600-nm light is used. 
What wavelength of light should be used to reduce the 
relative intensity at the same location to 64.0% of the 
maximum intensity?
59. Many cells are transparent and colorless. Structures of 
great interest in biology and medicine can be practi-
cally invisible to ordinary microscopy. To indicate the 
size and shape of cell structures, an interference micro-
AMT
C#: How to Add HTML5 Document Viewer Control to Your Web Page
Create a new website or open your _viewerTopToolbar.addTab(_tabRedact); //add Tab "Sample var _userCmdDemoPdf = new UserCommand("pdf"); _userCmdDemoPdf.addCSS
convert pdf to html online for; convert pdf into html code
C# Image: How to Integrate Web Document and Image Viewer
RasterEdgeImagingDeveloperGuide8.0.pdf: from this user manual, you can find open your existing one from where the website is ready Add references to assemblies
convert pdf to web page; how to convert pdf into html
1158
chapter 37 Wave Optics
at the center that is surrounded by 50 dark rings, the 
largest of which is at the outer edge of the lens.  
(a) What is the thickness of the air layer at the center 
of the interference pattern? (b) Calculate the radius 
of the outermost dark ring. (c) Find the focal length of 
the lens.
66. A plano-convex lens has index of refraction n. The 
curved side of the lens has radius of curvature R and 
rests on a flat glass surface of the same index of refrac-
tion, with a film of index n
film
between them, as shown 
in Figure 37.66. The lens is illuminated from above 
by light of wavelength l. Show that the dark Newton’s 
rings have radii given approximately by
r<
Å
mlR
n
film
where r ,, R and m is an integer.
R
n
n
film
n
l
r
P
O
Figure P37.66
67. Interference fringes are produced using Lloyd’s mirror 
and a source S of wavelength l 5 606 nm as shown in 
Figure P37.67. Fringes separated by Dy 5 1.20 mm are 
formed on a screen a distance L 5 2.00 m from the 
source. Find the vertical distance h of the source above 
the reflecting surface.
S
Viewing
screen
Mirror
P
h
y
L
Figure P37.67
68. The quantity nt in Equations 37.17 and 37.18 is called 
the optical path length corresponding to the geometrical 
distance t and is analogous to the quantity d in Equa-
tion 37.1, the path difference. The optical path length 
is proportional to n because a larger index of refrac-
tion shortens the wavelength, so more cycles of a wave 
fit into a particular geometrical distance. (a) Assume a 
mixture of corn syrup and water is prepared in a tank, 
with its index of refraction n increasing uniformly 
from 1.33 at y 5 20.0 cm at the top to 1.90 at y 5 0. 
Write the index of refraction n(y) as a function of y.  
S
Q/C
light of wavelength l 5 650 nm is incident normally, 
55 bright rings are observed, with the last one precisely 
on the edge of the lens. (a) What is the radius R of cur-
vature of the convex surface of the lens? (b) What is 
the focal length of the lens?
O
R
r
l
Figure P37.63
64. Why is the following situation impossible? A piece of trans-
parent material having an index of refraction n 5 1.50 
is cut into the shape of a wedge as shown in Figure 
P37.64. Both the top and bottom surfaces of the wedge 
are in contact with air. Monochromatic light of wave-
length l 5 632.8 nm is normally incident from above, 
and the wedge is viewed from above. Let h 5 1.00 mm 
represent the height of the wedge and , 5 0.500 m its 
length. A thin-film interference pattern appears in the 
wedge due to reflection from the top and bottom sur-
faces. You have been given the task of counting the 
number of bright fringes that appear in the entire 
length , of the wedge. You find this task tedious, and 
your concentration is broken by a noisy distraction 
after accurately counting 5 000 bright fringes.
x
h
l
Figure P37.64
65. A plano-concave lens having index of refraction 1.50 is 
placed on a flat glass plate as shown in Figure P37.65. 
Its curved surface, with radius of curvature 8.00m, is 
on the bottom. The lens is illuminated from above 
with yellow sodium light of wavelength 589 nm, and a 
series of concentric bright and dark rings is observed 
by reflection. The interference pattern has a dark spot 
Figure P37.65
C# TIFF: C#.NET Mobile TIFF Viewer, TIFF Reader for Mobile
TIFF Mobile Viewer in C#.NET. As creating PDF and Word Create a website project in Visual Studio 2005 and name it as any related name; Add all RasterEdge
convert pdf to html; pdf to html conversion
VB.NET Word: VB Code to Create Word Mobile Viewer with .NET Doc
Add, reorder and even remove Word document page(s VB.NET prorgam, please link to see: PDF Document Mobile Begin a website project with Visual Basic language and
best website to convert pdf to word; converter pdf to html
problems 
1159
73. Both sides of a uniform film that has index of refraction 
n and thickness d are in contact with air. For normal 
incidence of light, an intensity minimum is observed in 
the reflected light at l
2
and an intensity maximum is 
observed at l
1
, where l
1
. l
2
. (a) Assuming no inten-
sity minima are observed between l
1
and l
2
, find an 
expression for the integer m in Equations 37.17 and 
37.18 in terms of the wavelengths l
1
and l
2
. (b) Assum-
ing n 5 1.40, l
1
5 500nm, and l
2
5 370 nm, determine 
the best estimate for the thickness of the film.
74. Slit 1 of a double slit is wider than slit 2 so that the light 
from slit 1 has an amplitude 3.00 times that of the light 
from slit 2. Show that Equation 37.13 is replaced by the 
equation I 5 I
max
(1 1 3 cos2 f/2) for this situation.
75. Monochromatic light of wavelength 620 nm passes 
through a very narrow slit S and then strikes a screen 
in which are two parallel slits, S
1
and S
2
, as shown in 
Figure P37.75. Slit S
1
is directly in line with S and at a 
distance of L 5 1.20 m away from S, whereas S
2
is dis-
placed a distance d to one side. The light is detected at 
point P on a second screen, equidistant from S
1
and
.
S
2
When either slit S
1
or S
2
is open, equal light intensities 
are measured at point P. When both slits are open, the 
intensity is three times larger. Find the minimum pos-
sible value for the slit separation d.
S
1
S
2
S
d
P
L
Viewing
screen
Figure P37.75
76. A plano-convex lens having a radius of curvature of r 5 
4.00 m is placed on a concave glass surface whose 
radius of curvature is R 5 12.0 m as shown in Figure 
P37.76. Assuming 500-nm light is incident normal to 
the flat surface of the lens, determine the radius of the 
100th bright ring.
R
r
Figure P37.76
(b) Compute the optical path length corresponding to 
the 20.0-cm height of the tank by calculating
3
20 cm
0
n
1
y
2
dy
(c) Suppose a narrow beam of light is directed into  
the mixture at a nonzero angle with respect to the 
normal to the surface of the mixture. Qualitatively 
describe its path.
69. Astronomers observe a 60.0-MHz radio source both 
directly and by reflection from the sea as shown in 
Figure P37.17. If the receiving dish is 20.0 m above sea 
level, what is the angle of the radio source above the 
horizon at first maximum?
70. Figure CQ37.2 shows an unbroken soap film in a cir-
cular frame. The film thickness increases from top to 
bottom, slowly at first and then rapidly. As a simpler 
model, consider a soap film (n 5 1.33) contained 
within a rectangular wire frame. The frame is held ver-
tically so that the film drains downward and forms a 
wedge with flat faces. The thickness of the film at the 
top is essentially zero. The film is viewed in reflected 
white light with near-normal incidence, and the first 
violet (l 5 420 nm) interference band is observed  
3.00 cm from the top edge of the film. (a) Locate the 
first red (l 5 680 nm) interference band. (b) Deter-
mine the film thickness at the positions of the violet 
and red bands. (c) What is the wedge angle of the film?
Challenge Problems
71. Our discussion of the techniques for determining 
constructive and destructive interference by reflec-
tion from a thin film in air has been confined to rays 
striking the film at nearly normal incidence. What If? 
Assume a ray is incident at an angle of 30.0° (relative 
to the normal) on a film with index of refraction 1.38 
surrounded by vacuum. Calculate the minimum thick-
ness for constructive interference of sodium light with 
a wavelength of 590 nm.
72. The condition for constructive interference by reflec-
tion from a thin film in air as developed in Section 
37.5 assumes nearly normal incidence. What If? Sup-
pose the light is incident on the film at a nonzero angle 
u
1
(relative to the normal). The index of refraction of 
the film is n, and the film is surrounded by vacuum. 
Find the condition for constructive interference that 
relates the thickness t of the film, the index of refrac-
tion n of the film, the wavelength l of the light, and 
the angle of incidence u
1
.
M
S
C# Image: Tutorial for Document Viewing & Displaying in ASP.NET
Following are detailed steps for website configuration No-Postback Navigation Controls to Viewer. Add two HTML & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
convert pdf to web link; how to change pdf to html
C# Image: C# Code to Upload TIFF File to Remote Database by Using
Start an upload folder in the website's root to need to save the ImageUploadService file, add a web powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
adding pdf to html; embed pdf into webpage
1160 
When plane light waves pass through a small aperture in an opaque barrier, the aper-
ture acts as if it were a point source of light, with waves entering the shadow region behind 
the barrier. This phenomenon, known as diffraction, was first mentioned in Section 35.3, 
and can be described only with a wave model for light. In this chapter, we investigate the 
features of the diffraction pattern that occurs when the light from the aperture is allowed 
to fall upon a screen.
In Chapter 34, we learned that electromagnetic waves are transverse. That is, the elec-
tric and magnetic field vectors associated with electromagnetic waves are perpendicular to 
the direction of wave propagation. In this chapter, we show that under certain conditions 
these transverse waves with electric field vectors in all possible transverse directions can be 
polarized in various ways. In other words, only certain directions of the electric field vectors 
are present in the polarized wave.
38.1 Introduction to Diffraction Patterns
In Sections 35.3 and 37.1, we discussed that light of wavelength comparable to or 
larger than the width of a slit spreads out in all forward directions upon passing 
through the slit. This phenomenon is called diffraction. When light passes through 
a narrow slit, it spreads beyond the narrow path defined by the slit into regions that 
would be in shadow if light traveled in straight lines. Other waves, such as sound 
waves and water waves, also have this property of spreading when passing through 
apertures or by sharp edges.
38.1 Introduction to Diffraction 
Patterns
38.2 Diffraction Patterns from 
Narrow Slits
38.3 Resolution of Single-Slit 
and Circular Apertures
38.4 The Diffraction Grating
38.5 Diffraction of X-Rays  
by Crystals
38.6 Polarization of Light Waves
c h a p p t t e r 
38
Diffraction patterns  
and polarization
The Hubble Space Telescope does 
its viewing above the atmosphere 
and does not suffer from the 
atmospheric blurring, caused by air 
turbulence, that plagues ground-
based telescopes. Despite this 
advantage, it does have limitations 
due to diffraction effects. In this 
chapter, we show how the wave 
nature of light limits the ability of 
any optical system to distinguish 
between closely spaced objects.
(NASA Hubble Space Telescope Collection)
C# Word: How to Create Word Mobile Viewer in with Imaging SDK
jpeg, png, gif, bmp and tiff); PDF, Microsoft Word Create a Visual C# Website project in Visual Studio 2005 Add all the following assemblies to your project by
convert from pdf to html; how to change pdf to html format
VB.NET Image: VB Tutorial to View Document Online with Imaging Web
including png, jpeg, gif, tiff, bmp, PDF, Microsoft Word How to configure a website in order to use NET imaging web controls; How to add WebThumbnailViewer and
converting pdfs to html; convert pdf to html link
38.2 Diffraction patterns from Narrow Slits 
1161
You might expect that the light passing through a small opening would simply 
result in a broad region of light on a screen due to the spreading of the light as it 
passes through the opening. We find something more interesting, however. A dif-
fraction pattern consisting of light and dark areas is observed, somewhat similar 
to the interference patterns discussed earlier. For example, when a narrow slit is 
placed between a distant light source (or a laser beam) and a screen, the light pro-
duces a diffraction pattern like that shown in Figure 38.1. The pattern consists of 
a broad, intense central band (called the central maximum) flanked by a series of 
narrower, less intense additional bands (called side maxima or secondary maxima
and a series of intervening dark bands (or minima). Figure 38.2 shows a diffraction 
pattern associated with light passing by the edge of an object. Again we see bright 
and dark fringes, which is reminiscent of an interference pattern.
Figure 38.3 shows a diffraction pattern associated with the shadow of a penny. 
A bright spot occurs at the center, and circular fringes extend outward from the 
shadow’s edge. We can explain the central bright spot by using the wave theory of 
light, which predicts constructive interference at this point. From the viewpoint 
of ray optics (in which light is viewed as rays traveling in straight lines), we expect 
the center of the shadow to be dark because that part of the viewing screen is com-
pletely shielded by the penny.
Shortly before the central bright spot was first observed, one of the supporters 
of ray optics, Simeon Poisson, argued that if Augustin Fresnel’s wave theory of light 
were valid, a central bright spot should be observed in the shadow of a circular 
object illuminated by a point source of light. To Poisson’s astonishment, the spot 
was observed by Dominique Arago shortly thereafter. Therefore, Poisson’s predic-
tion reinforced the wave theory rather than disproving it.
38.2 Diffraction Patterns from Narrow Slits
Let’s consider a common situation, that of light passing through a narrow open-
ing modeled as a slit and projected onto a screen. To simplify our analysis, we 
assume the observing screen is far from the slit and the rays reaching the screen 
are approximately parallel. (This situation can also be achieved experimentally by 
using a converging lens to focus the parallel rays on a nearby screen.) In this model, 
the pattern on the screen is called a Fraunhofer diffraction pattern.1
Figure 38.4a (page 1162) shows light entering a single slit from the left and dif-
fracting as it propagates toward a screen. Figure 38.4b shows the fringe structure of 
Figure 38.1 
The diffraction pat-
tern that appears on a screen when 
light passes through a narrow vertical 
slit. The pattern consists of a broad 
central fringe and a series of less 
intense and narrower side fringes.
D
o
u
g
l
a
s
C
.
J
o
h
n
s
o
n
/
C
a
l
i
f
o
r
n
i
a
S
t
a
t
e
P
o
l
y
t
e
c
h
n
i
c
U
n
i
v
e
r
s
i
t
y
,
P
o
m
o
n
a
Figure 38.3 
Diffraction pattern 
created by the illumination of a 
penny, with the penny positioned 
midway between the screen and 
light source.
Notice the bright spot at 
the center.
P
.
M
.
R
i
n
a
r
d
,
A
m
.
J
.
P
h
y
s
.
4
4
:
7
0
1
9
7
6
Source
Opaque object
Viewing
screen
Figure 38.2 
Light from a small source passes by the edge of an 
opaque object and continues on to a screen. A diffraction pattern 
consisting of bright and dark fringes appears on the screen in the 
region above the edge of the object.
1If the screen is brought close to the slit (and no lens is used), the pattern is a Fresnel diffraction pattern. The Fresnel 
pattern is more difficult to analyze, so we shall restrict our discussion to Fraunhofer diffraction.
1162
chapter 38 Diffraction patterns and polarization
a Fraunhofer diffraction pattern. A bright fringe is observed along the axis at u 5 0, 
with alternating dark and bright fringes on each side of the central bright fringe.
Until now, we have assumed slits are point sources of light. In this section, we 
abandon that assumption and see how the finite width of slits is the basis for under-
standing Fraunhofer diffraction. We can explain some important features of this 
phenomenon by examining waves coming from various portions of the slit as shown 
in Figure 38.5. According to Huygens’s principle, each portion of the slit acts as a 
source of light waves. Hence, light from one portion of the slit can interfere with 
light from another portion, and the resultant light intensity on a viewing screen 
depends on the direction u. Based on this analysis, we recognize that a diffraction 
pattern is actually an interference pattern in which the different sources of light are 
different portions of the single slit! Therefore, the diffraction patterns we discuss 
in this chapter are applications of the waves in interference analysis model.
To analyze the diffraction pattern, let’s divide the slit into two halves as shown in 
Figure 38.5. Keeping in mind that all the waves are in phase as they leave the slit, 
consider rays 1 and 3. As these two rays travel toward a viewing screen far to the 
right of the figure, ray 1 travels farther than ray 3 by an amount equal to the path 
difference (a/2) sin u, where a is the width of the slit. Similarly, the path difference 
between rays 2 and 4 is also (a/2) sin u, as is that between rays 3 and 5. If this path 
difference is exactly half a wavelength (corresponding to a phase difference of 180°), 
the pairs of waves cancel each other and destructive interference results. This cancel-
lation occurs for any two rays that originate at points separated by half the slit width 
because the phase difference between two such points is 180°. Therefore, waves from 
the upper half of the slit interfere destructively with waves from the lower half when
a
2
sin u5
l
2
or, if we consider waves at angle u both above the dashed line in Figure 38.5 and 
below,
sin u5 6
l
a
Dividing the slit into four equal parts and using similar reasoning, we find that 
the viewing screen is also dark when
sin u562 
l
a
Likewise, dividing the slit into six equal parts shows that darkness occurs on the 
screen when
sin u563 
l
a
Pitfall Prevention 38.1
Diffraction Versus Diffraction 
Pattern Diffraction refers to the 
general behavior of waves spread-
ing out as they pass through a slit. 
We used diffraction in explaining 
the existence of an interference 
pattern in Chapter 37. A diffraction 
pattern is actually a misnomer, but 
is deeply entrenched in the lan-
guage of physics. The diffraction 
pattern seen on a screen when a 
single slit is illuminated is actually 
another interference pattern. The 
interference is between parts of 
the incident light illuminating dif-
ferent regions of the slit.
Figure 38.4 
(a) Geometry for 
analyzing the Fraunhofer diffrac-
tion pattern of a single slit. (Draw-
ing not to scale.) (b) Simulation  
of a single-slit Fraunhofer diffrac-
tion pattern.
Slit
min
min
min
min
max
max
max
Incoming
wave
Viewing screen
u
The pattern consists of a 
central bright fringe flanked 
by much weaker maxima 
alternating with dark fringes.
a
b
L
Each portion of the slit acts as 
a point source of light waves.
a
a/2
a/2
2
3
2
5
4
1
u
The path difference between 
rays 1 and 3, rays 2 and 4, or 
rays 3 and 5 is (a/2)
sin
u.
sin
u
Figure 38.5 
Paths of light rays 
that encounter a narrow slit of 
width a and diffract toward a 
screen in the direction described 
by angle u (not to scale).
38.2 Diffraction patterns from Narrow Slits 
1163
Therefore, the general condition for destructive interference is
sin u
dark
5m 
l
a
m561, 62, 63,c 
(38.1)
This equation gives the values of u
dark
for which the diffraction pattern has zero 
light intensity, that is, when a dark fringe is formed. It tells us nothing, however, 
about the variation in light intensity along the screen. The general features of the 
intensity distribution are shown in Figure 38.4. A broad, central bright fringe is 
observed; this fringe is flanked by much weaker bright fringes alternating with 
dark fringes. The various dark fringes occur at the values of u
dark
that satisfy Equa-
tion 38.1. Each bright-fringe peak lies approximately halfway between its bordering 
dark-fringe minima. Notice that the central bright maximum is twice as wide as the 
secondary maxima. There is no central dark fringe, represented by the absence of 
m 5 0 in Equation 38.1.
uick Quiz 38.1  Suppose the slit width in Figure 38.4 is made half as wide. Does 
the central bright fringe (a) become wider, (b) remain the same, or (c) become 
narrower?
WW Condition for destructive 
interference for a single slit
Pitfall Prevention 38.2 
Similar Equation Warning! Equa-
tion 38.1 has exactly the same 
form as Equation 37.2, with d
the slit separation, used in Equa-
tion 37.2 and a, the slit width, 
used in Equation 38.1. Equation 
37.2, however, describes the bright 
regions in a two-slit interference 
pattern, whereas Equation 38.1 
describes the dark regions in a 
single-slit diffraction pattern.
Example 38.1   Where Are the Dark Fringes? 
Light of wavelength 580 nm is incident on a slit having a width of 0.300 mm. The viewing screen is 2.00 m from the slit. 
Find the width of the central bright fringe.
Conceptualize  Based on the problem statement, we imagine a single-slit diffraction pattern similar to that in Figure 38.4.
Categorize  We categorize this example as a straightforward application of our discussion of single-slit diffraction pat-
terns, which comes from the waves in interference analysis model.
AM
Solution
Analyze  Evaluate Equation 38.1 for the two dark 
fringes that flank the central bright fringe, which 
correspond to m 5 61:
sin u
dark
5 6
l
a
Let y represent the vertical position along the viewing screen in Figure 38.4a, measured from the point on the screen 
directly behind the slit. Then, tan u
dark
y
1
/L, where the subscript 1 refers to the first dark fringe. Because u
dark
is very 
small, we can use the approximation sinu
dark
< tan u
dark
; therefore, y
1
L sin u
dark
.
The width of the central bright fringe is 
twice the absolute value of y
1
:
2
0
y
1
0
52
0
L sin u
dark
0
52`6L 
l
a
`52L 
l
a
52
1
2.00 m
2
58031029 m
0.30031023 m
5 7.73 3 1023 m 5 
7.73 mm
Finalize  Notice that this value is much greater than the width of the slit. Let’s explore below what happens if we 
change the slit width.
What if the slit width is increased by an order of magnitude to 3.00 mm? What happens to the diffraction 
pattern?
Answer  Based on Equation 38.1, we expect that the angles at which the dark bands appear will decrease as a increases. 
Therefore, the diffraction pattern narrows.
What iF?
Repeat the calculation with 
the larger slit width:
2
0
y
1
0
52L 
l
a
52
1
2.00 m
2
58031029 m
3.0031023 m
57.7331024 m5
0.773 mm
Notice that this result is smaller than the width of the slit. In general, for large values of a, the various maxima and min-
ima are so closely spaced that only a large, central bright area resembling the geometric image of the slit is observed. 
This concept is very important in the performance of optical instruments such as telescopes.
1164
chapter 38 Diffraction patterns and polarization
Intensity of Single-Slit Diffraction Patterns
Analysis of the intensity variation in a diffraction pattern from a single slit of width 
a shows that the intensity is given by
I5I
max
c
sin 
1
pa sin u/l
2
pa sin u/l
d
2
(38.2)
where I
max
is the intensity at u 5 0 (the central maximum) and l is the wavelength 
of light used to illuminate the slit. This expression shows that minima occur when
pa sin u
dark
l
5mp
or
sin u
dark
5m 
l
a
m561, 62, 63,c
in agreement with Equation 38.1.
Figure 38.6a represents a plot of the intensity in the single-slit pattern as given by 
Equation 38.2, and Figure 38.6b is a simulation of a single-slit Fraunhofer diffrac-
tion pattern. Notice that most of the light intensity is concentrated in the central 
bright fringe.
Intensity of Two-Slit Diffraction Patterns
When more than one slit is present, we must consider not only diffraction patterns 
due to the individual slits but also the interference patterns due to the waves com-
ing from different slits. Notice the curved dashed lines in Figure 37.7 in Chapter 
37, which indicate a decrease in intensity of the interference maxima as u increases. 
This decrease is due to a diffraction pattern. The interference patterns in that fig-
ure are located entirely within the central bright fringe of the diffraction pattern, 
so the only hint of the diffraction pattern we see is the falloff in intensity toward 
the outside of the pattern. To determine the effects of both two-slit interference 
and a single-slit diffraction pattern from each slit from a wider viewpoint than that 
in Figure 37.7, we combine Equations 37.14 and 38.2:
I5I
max
cos 
a
pd sin u
l
bc
sin 
1
pa sin u/l
2
pa sin u/l
d
2
(38.3)
Although this expression looks complicated, it merely represents the single-slit dif-
fraction pattern (the factor in square brackets) acting as an “envelope” for a two-slit 
interference pattern (the cosine-squared factor) as shown in Figure 38.7. The broken 
intensity of a single-slit 
Fraunhofer diffraction 
pattern
Condition for intensity 
minima for a single slit
Figure 38.6 
(a) A plot of light 
intensity I versus (p/l)a sin u for 
the single-slit Fraunhofer diffrac-
tion pattern. (b) Simulation of a 
single-slit Fraunhofer diffraction 
pattern.
I
max
-3p-2p -p
2p 3p
I
a
sin
u
p
p
l
a
b
A minimum in the curve in  a  
corresponds to a dark fringe in  b .
a
b
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested