mvc display pdf in browser : Converting pdf into html SDK control project winforms web page .net UWP doc-3-pdf-67a5de9fa89738da0c6835ef457b5878-original12-part215

4.3 projectile Motion 
85
Figure 4.7 
The parabolic path 
of a projectile that leaves the ori-
gin with a velocity v
S
i
. The velocity 
vector v
S
changes with time in 
both magnitude and direction. 
This change is the result of accel-
eration a
S
5g
S
in the negative  
y direction.
f
x
(x,y)
i
t
O
y
t
2
1
2
g
S
r
S
v
S
Figure 4.8 
The position vector 
r
S
f
of a projectile launched from 
the origin whose initial velocity 
at the origin is v
S
i
. The vector v
S
i
t 
would be the displacement of the 
projectile if gravity were absent, 
and the vector 
1
2
g
S
t2 is its vertical 
displacement from a straight-line 
path due to its downward gravita-
tional acceleration.
R
x
y
h
i
v
y
= 0
i
O
u
v
S
A
B
A
Figure 4.9 
A projectile launched 
over a flat surface from the origin 
at t
i
5 0 with an initial velocity 
v
S
i
. The maximum height of the 
projectile is h, and the horizontal 
range is R. At A, the peak of the 
trajectory, the particle has coordi-
nates (R/2, h).
In Section 4.2, we stated that two-dimensional motion with constant accelera-
tion can be analyzed as a combination of two independent motions in the x and y 
directions, with accelerations a
x
and a
y
. Projectile motion can also be handled in 
this way, with acceleration a
x
5 0 in the x direction and a constant acceleration a
y
2in the y direction. Therefore, when solving projectile motion problems, use two 
analysis models: (1) the particle under constant velocity in the horizontal direction 
(Eq. 2.7):
x
f
5x
i
1v
xi
t
and (2) the particle under constant acceleration in the vertical direction (Eqs. 
2.13–2.17 with x changed to y and a
y
= –g):
v
yf
5v
yi
2gt
v
y,avg
5
v
yi
1v
yf
2
y
f
5y
i
1
1
2
1
v
yi
1v
yf
2
t 
y
f
5y
i
1v
yi
t2
1
2
gt
2
v
yf
2
5v
yi
2
22g
1
y
f
2y
i
2
The horizontal and vertical components of a projectile’s motion are completely 
independent of each other and can be handled separately, with time t as the com-
mon variable for both components.
uick Quiz 4.2  (i) As a projectile thrown upward moves in its parabolic path 
(such as in Fig. 4.8), at what point along its path are the velocity and accelera-
tion vectors for the projectile perpendicular to each other? (a) nowhere (b)the 
highest point (c) the launch point (ii) From the same choices, at what point are 
the velocity and acceleration vectors for the projectile parallel to each other?
Horizontal Range and Maximum Height of a Projectile
Before embarking on some examples, let us consider a special case of projectile 
motion that occurs often. Assume a projectile is launched from the origin at t
i
0 with a positive v
yi
component as shown in Figure 4.9 and returns to the same hori-
zontal level. This situation is common in sports, where baseballs, footballs, and golf 
balls often land at the same level from which they were launched.
Two points in this motion are especially interesting to analyze: the peak point A, 
which has Cartesian coordinates (R/2, h), and the point B, which has coordinates  
(R, 0). The distance R is called the horizontal range of the projectile, and the distance 
h is its maximum height. Let us find h and R mathematically in terms of v
i
, u
i
, and g.
x
v
xi
v
xi
v
y
v
y
= 0
v
xi
v
y
i
v
y
v
y
i
v
xi
y
i
i
u
u
u
u
The y component of 
velocity is zero at the 
peak of the path.
The x component of 
velocity remains 
constant because 
there is no 
acceleration in the x 
direction.
v
S
The projectile is launched 
with initial velocity v
i
.
S
v
S
v
S
v
S
v
S
g
S
A
B
C
B
C
Converting pdf into html - Convert PDF to html files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
How to Convert PDF to HTML Webpage with C# PDF Conversion SDK
embed pdf into web page; convert pdf form to html form
Converting pdf into html - VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
PDF to HTML Webpage Converter SDK for VB.NET PDF to HTML Conversion
convert pdf to website; convert pdf form to html
86
chapter 4 Motion in two Dimensions
We can determine h by noting that at the peak v
yA
5 0. Therefore, from the 
particle under constant acceleration model, we can use the y direction version of 
Equation 2.13 to determine the time t
A
at which the projectile reaches the peak:
v
yf
5v
yi
2gt    S   05v
i
sin u
i
2gt
A
t
A
5
v
i
sin u
i
g
Substituting this expression for t
A
into the y direction version of Equation 2.16 
and replacing y
f
y
A
with h, we obtain an expression for h in terms of the magni-
tude and direction of the initial velocity vector:
y
f
y
i
v
yi
t 2 
1
2
gt2   S    h5
1
v
i
sin u
i
2
v
i
sin u
i
g
2
1
2
g
a
v
i
sin u
i
g
b
2
h5
v
i
2 sin2 u
i
2g
(4.12)
The range R is the horizontal position of the projectile at a time that is twice the 
time at which it reaches its peak, that is, at time t
B
5 2t
A
. Using the particle under 
constant velocity model, noting that v
xi
v
xB
v
i
cos u
i
, and setting x
B
R at t 5 
2t
A
, we find that
x
f
x
i
v
xi
t   S    R5v
xi
t
B
5
1
v
i
cos u
i
2
2t
A
5
1
v
i
cos u
i
2
2v
i
sin u
i
g
5
2v
i
2
sin u
i
cos u
i
g
Using the identity sin 2u 5 2 sin u cos u (see Appendix B.4), we can write R in the 
more compact form
R5
v
i
2 sin 2u
i
g
(4.13)
The maximum value of R from Equation 4.13 is R
max
5v
i
2
/g. This result makes 
sense because the maximum value of sin 2u
i
is 1, which occurs when 2u
i
5 90°. 
Therefore, R is a maximum when u
i
5 45°.
Figure 4.10 illustrates various trajectories for a projectile having a given initial 
speed but launched at different angles. As you can see, the range is a maximum 
for u
i
5 45°. In addition, for any u
i
other than 45°, a point having Cartesian coordi-
nates (R, 0) can be reached by using either one of two complementary values of u
i
such as 75° and 15°. Of course, the maximum height and time of flight for one of 
these values of u
i
are different from the maximum height and time of flight for the 
complementary value.
uick Quiz 4.3 Rank the launch angles for the five paths in Figure 4.10 with 
respect to time of flight from the shortest time of flight to the longest.
50
100
150
(m)
(m)
75°
60°
45°
30°
15°
v
i
= 50 m/s
50
100
150
200
250
Complementary 
values of the initial 
angle u
i
result in the 
same value of R.
Figure 4.10 
A projectile 
launched over a flat surface from 
the origin with an initial speed 
of 50 m/s at various angles of 
projection.
Pitfall Prevention 4.3
the Range Equation Equation 
4.13 is useful for calculating R only 
for a symmetric path as shown in 
Figure 4.10. If the path is not sym-
metric, do not use this equation. The 
particle under constant velocity 
and particle under constant accel-
eration models are the important 
starting points because they give 
the position and velocity compo-
nents of any projectile moving  
with constant acceleration in two 
dimensions at any time t.
VB.NET PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file
You may directly copy and paste it into your vb.net testing Conversion of MS Office to PDF. give a series of demo code directly for converting MicroSoft Office
pdf to html; convert url pdf to word
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
a C# programming example for converting PDF to Word String inputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.pdf"; PDFDocument doc DOCX/TIFF and save it into stream
convert pdf into html file; online pdf to html converter
4.3 Projectile Motion 
87
Problem-Solving Strategy   Projectile Motion
We suggest you use the following approach when solving projectile motion problems.
1. Conceptualize. Think about what is going on physically in the problem. Establish 
the mental representation by imagining the projectile moving along its trajectory.
2. Categorize. Confirm that the problem involves a particle in free fall and that air 
resistance is neglected. Select a coordinate system with x in the horizontal direction 
and y in the vertical direction. Use the particle under constant velocity model for the 
x component of the motion. Use the particle under constant acceleration model for 
the y direction. In the special case of the projectile returning to the same level from 
which it was launched, use Equations 4.12 and 4.13.
3. Analyze. If the initial velocity vector is given, resolve it into x and y components. 
Select the appropriate equation(s) from the particle under constant acceleration 
model for the vertical motion and use these along with Equation 2.7 for the horizontal 
motion to solve for the unknown(s). 
4. Finalize. Once you have determined your result, check to see if your answers are 
consistent with the mental and pictorial representations and your results are realistic.
Example 4.2   The Long Jump
A long jumper (Fig. 4.11) leaves the ground at an angle of 20.0° above the hori-
zontal and at a speed of 11.0 m/s.
(A) How far does he jump in the horizontal direction?
Conceptualize The arms and legs of a long jumper move in a complicated way, 
but we will ignore this motion. We conceptualize the motion of the long jumper 
as equivalent to that of a simple projectile.
Categorize We categorize this example as a projectile motion problem. 
Because the initial speed and launch angle are given and because the final 
height is the same as the initial height, we further categorize this problem as 
satisfying the conditions for which Equations 4.12 and 4.13 can be used. This 
approach is the most direct way to analyze this problem, although the general methods that have been described will 
always give the correct answer.
Analyze
Solution
Use Equation 4.13 to find the range of the jumper:
R5
v2
i
sin 2u
i
g
5
1
11.0 m/s
22
sin 2
1
20.08
2
9.80 m/s2
5 7.94 m
(B) What is the maximum height reached?
Analyze
Solution
Find the maximum height reached by using 
Equation4.12:
h5
v2
i
sin2u
i
2g
5
111.0 m/s221sin 20.0822
2
1
9.80 m/s2
2
5 0.722 m
Finalize Find the answers to parts (A) and (B) using the general method. The results should agree. Treating the 
long jumper as a particle is an oversimplification. Nevertheless, the values obtained are consistent with experience in 
sports. We can model a complicated system such as a long jumper as a particle and still obtain reasonable results.
Figure 4.11 
(Example 4.2) 
Romain Barras of France competes 
in the men’s decathlon long jump at 
the 2008 Beijing Olympic Games.
S
i
p
a
v
i
a
A
P
I
m
a
g
e
s
C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
This PDF document converting library component offers reliable C#.NET PDF You may directly copy and paste it into your C# testing C#.NET PDF to HTML Conversion.
convert pdf to url online; how to convert pdf to html
C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net
programming sample for PDF to Tiff image converting. String inputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.pdf"; PDFDocument doc DOCX/TIFF and save it into stream
converting pdf to html code; converting pdf to html
88
chapter 4 Motion in two Dimensions
©
C
e
n
g
a
g
e
L
e
a
r
n
i
n
g
/
C
h
a
r
l
e
s
D
.
W
i
n
t
e
r
s
The velocity of the projectile (red 
arrows) changes in direction and 
magnitude, but its acceleration 
(purple arrows) remains constant.
a
Target
L
i
n
e
o
f
s
i
g
h
t
y
x
Point of
collision
Gun
0
u
i
x
T
tan u
i
gt
2
y
T
x
T
b
1
2
Figure 4.12 
(Example 4.3) (a) Multiflash photograph of the projectile–target demonstration. If the gun 
is aimed directly at the target and is fired at the same instant the target begins to fall, the projectile will 
hit the target. (b) Schematic diagram of the projectile–target demonstration.
Example 4.3   A Bull’s-Eye Every Time 
In a popular lecture demonstration, a projectile is fired at a target in such a way that the projectile leaves the gun at 
the same time the target is dropped from rest. Show that if the gun is initially aimed at the stationary target, the pro-
jectile hits the falling target as shown in Figure 4.12a.
Conceptualize We conceptualize the problem by studying Figure 4.12a. Notice that the problem does not ask for 
numerical values. The expected result must involve an algebraic argument.
AM
SolutIon
Write an expression for the y coordinate 
of the target at any moment after release, 
noting that its initial velocity is zero:
(1)   y
T
5y
iT
1
1
0
2
t21
2
gt5x
T
tan u
i
21
2
gt2
Write an expression for the y coordinate 
of the projectile at any moment:
(2)   y
P
5y
iP
1v
yiP
t2
1
2
gt501
1
v
iP
sin
u
i
2
t2
1
2
gt5
1
v
iP
sin
u
i
2
t2
1
2
gt2
Write an expression for the x coordinate 
of the projectile at any moment:
x
P
5x
iP
1v
xiP
t501
1
v
iP
cos u
i
2
t5
1
v
iP
cos u
i
2
t 
Solve this expression for time as a function 
of the horizontal position of the projectile:
t5
x
P
v
iP
cos u
i
Substitute this expression into Equation (2):
(3)   y
P
5
1
v
iP
sin u
i
2
a
x
P
v
iP
cos u
i
b
21
2
gt5x
P
tan u
i
21
2
gt2
Finalize Compare Equations (1) and (3). We see that when the x coordinates of the projectile and target are the 
same—that is, when x
T
x
P
—their y coordinates given by Equations (1) and (3) are the same and a collision results.
Categorize Because both objects are subject only to gravity, we categorize this problem as one involving two objects 
in free fall, the target moving in one dimension and the projectile moving in two. The target T is modeled as a particle 
under constant acceleration in one dimension. The projectile P is modeled as a particle under constant acceleration in the  
y direction and a particle under constant velocity in the x direction.
Analyze Figure 4.12b shows that the initial y coordinate y
iT
of the target is x
T
tan u
i
and its initial velocity is zero. It falls 
with acceleration a
y
5 2g. 
C# PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images in C#
Free .NET DLLs for converting PDF to images in both .NET WinForms and ASP.NET application. Turn multipage PDF file into single image files respectively in
convert pdf to html code; convert pdf to html for online
C# PDF Convert to SVG SDK: Convert PDF to SVG files in C#.net, ASP
Support converting PDF document to SVG image within C# to convert PDF document into SVG image PDFDocument(@"C:\input.pdf"); pdf.ConvertToVectorImages(ContextType
convert pdf fillable form to html; how to convert pdf to html email
4.3 projectile Motion 
89
Example 4.4   That’s Quite an Arm! 
A stone is thrown from the top of a building upward at an angle of 30.0° to the horizontal with an initial speed of 
20.0m/s as shown in Figure 4.13. The height from which the stone is thrown is 45.0 m above the ground.
(A) How long does it take the stone to reach the ground?
Conceptualize Study Figure 4.13, in which we have indi-
cated the trajectory and various parameters of the motion 
of the stone.
Categorize We categorize this problem as a projectile 
motion problem. The stone is modeled as a particle under con-
stant acceleration in the y direction and a particle under constant 
velocity in the x direction.
Analyze We have the information x
i
y
i
5 0, y
f
5 245.0m, 
a
y
5 2g, and v
i
5 20.0 m/s (the numerical value of y
f
is 
negative because we have chosen the point of the throw as  
the origin).
AM
SolutIon
Find the initial x and y components of the stone’s 
velocity:
v
xi
5v
i
cos u
i
5
1
20.0 m/s
2
cos 30.08517.3 m/s
v
yi
5v
i
sin u
i
5
1
20.0 m/s
2
sin 30.08510.0 m/s
Express the vertical position of the stone from the particle 
under constant acceleration model:
y
f
5y
i
1v
yi
t2
1
2
gt2
Substitute numerical values:
245.0 m501
1
10.0 m/s
2
t1
1
2
1
29.80 m/s2
2
t2
Solve the quadratic equation for t:
t 5 4.22 s
(B) What is the speed of the stone just before it strikes the ground?
SolutIon
Analyze Use the velocity equation in the particle 
under constant acceleration model to obtain the y 
component of the velocity of the stone just before 
it strikes the ground:
v
yf
5v
yi
2gt
Use this component with the horizontal compo-
nent v
xf
v
xi
5 17.3 m/s to find the speed of the 
stone at t 5 4.22 s:
v
f
5"2
xf
12
yf
5"
1
17.3 m/s
22
1
1
231.3 m/s
22
5 35.8 m/s
v
yf
510.0 m/s1
1
29.80 m/s
221
4.22 s
2
5231.3 m/s
Substitute numerical values, using t 5 4.22 s:
Finalize Is it reasonable that the y component of the final velocity is negative? Is it reasonable that the final speed is 
larger than the initial speed of 20.0 m/s?
What if a horizontal wind is blowing in the same direction as the stone is thrown and it causes the stone 
to have a horizontal acceleration component a
x
5 0.500 m/s2? Which part of this example, (A) or (B), will have a dif-
ferent answer?
Answer Recall that the motions in the x and y directions are independent. Therefore, the horizontal wind cannot 
affect the vertical motion. The vertical motion determines the time of the projectile in the air, so the answer to part 
(A) does not change. The wind causes the horizontal velocity component to increase with time, so the final speed will 
be larger in part (B). Taking a
x
5 0.500 m/s2, we find v
xf
5 19.4 m/s and v
f
5 36.9 m/s.
WhAt IF?
45.0 m
v
i
= 20.0 m/s
i
= 30.0°
u
y
x
O
Figure 4.13  
(Example 4.4) A 
stone is thrown from 
the top of a building.
VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net
using RasterEdge.XDoc.Converter; Displayed in the code tab below is the Visual Basic .NET method for converting a PDF document into a text file.
how to add pdf to website; create html email from pdf
VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
Converting DLLs for PDF-to-Word. In order to convert PDF document to Word file using VB.NET programming code, you have to integrate following assemblies into
convert pdf form to web form; add pdf to website
90
chapter 4 Motion in two Dimensions
Express the coordinates of the jumper as a function of 
time, using the particle under constant velocity model 
for x and the position equation from the particle under 
constant acceleration model for y:
(1)   x
f
5v
xi
t 
(2)   y
f
5v
yi
t2
1
2
gt2
(3)   d cos f 5 v
xi
t
(4)   2d sin f52
1
2
gt
2
Solve Equation (3) for t and substitute the result into 
Equation (4):
2d sin f52
1
2
ga
d cos f
v
xi
b
2
Solve for d and substitute numerical values:
d5
2v
xi
2 sin f
g cos2 f
5
2
1
25.0 m/s
22
sin 35.08
1
9.80 m/s2
2
cos2 35.08
5109 m
Evaluate the x and y coordinates of the point at which 
the skier lands:
x
f
5d cos f5
1
109 m
2
cos 35.085 89.3 m
y
f
52d sin f521109 m2 sin 35.085 262.5 m
Finalize Let us compare these results with our expectations. We expected the horizontal distance to be on the order of 
100 m, and our result of 89.3 m is indeed on this order of magnitude. It might be useful to calculate the time interval 
that the jumper is in the air and compare it with our estimate of about 4 s.
Suppose everything in this example is the same except the ski jump is curved so that the jumper is pro-
jected upward at an angle from the end of the track. Is this design better in terms of maximizing the length of the 
jump?
Answer If the initial velocity has an upward component, the skier will be in the air longer and should therefore travel 
farther. Tilting the initial velocity vector upward, however, will reduce the horizontal component of the initial veloc-
ity. Therefore, angling the end of the ski track upward at a large angle may actually reduce the distance. Consider the 
extreme case: the skier is projected at 90° to the horizontal and simply goes up and comes back down at the end of the 
ski track! This argument suggests that there must be an optimal angle between 0° and 90° that represents a balance 
between making the flight time longer and the horizontal velocity component smaller.
Let us find this optimal angle mathematically. We modify Equations (1) through (4) in the following way, assum-
ing the skier is projected at an angle u with respect to the horizontal over a landing incline sloped with an arbitrary 
angle f:
(1) and (3) S x
f
5 (v
i
cos u)t 5 d cos f
(2) and (4) S y
f
5 (v
i
sin u)t 2 
1
2
gt2 5 2d sin f
WhAt IF?
Example 4.5   The End of the Ski Jump 
A ski jumper leaves the ski track moving in the horizontal direction with a speed of 25.0 m/s as shown in Figure 4.14. 
The landing incline below her falls off with a slope of 35.0°. Where does she land on the incline?
Conceptualize We can conceptualize this problem based on memories 
of observing winter Olympic ski competitions. We estimate the skier to 
be airborne for perhaps 4 s and to travel a distance of about 100 m hori-
zontally. We should expect the value of d, the distance traveled along 
the incline, to be of the same order of magnitude.
Categorize We categorize the problem as one of a particle in projectile 
motion. As with other projectile motion problems, we use the particle 
under constant velocity model for the horizontal motion and the particle 
under constant acceleration model for the vertical motion.
Analyze It is convenient to select the beginning of the jump as the ori-
gin. The initial velocity components are v
xi
5 25.0 m/s and v
yi
50. From 
the right triangle in Figure 4.14, we see that the jumper’s x and y coordi-
nates at the landing point are given by x
f
d cos f and y
f
5 2d sin f.
AM
SolutIon
y
d
25.0 m/s
O
x
f = 35.0°
Figure 4.14 
(Example 4.5) A ski jumper leaves 
the track moving in a horizontal direction.
4.4 analysis Model: particle In Uniform circular Motion 
91
▸ 4.5 
continued
By eliminating the time t between these equations and using differentiation to maximize d in terms of u, we arrive 
(after several steps; see Problem 88) at the following equation for the angle u that gives the maximum value of d:
u54582
f
2
For the slope angle in Figure 4.14, f 5 35.0°; this equation results in an optimal launch angle of u 5 27.5°. For a slope 
angle of f 5 0°, which represents a horizontal plane, this equation gives an optimal launch angle of u 5 45°, as we 
would expect (see Figure 4.10).
Pitfall Prevention 4.4
Acceleration of a Particle  
in uniform Circular Motion  
Remember that acceleration in 
physics is defined as a change 
in the velocity, not a change in 
the speed (contrary to the every-
day interpretation). In circular 
motion, the velocity vector is 
always changing in direction, so 
there is indeed an acceleration.
4.4   Analysis Model: Particle  
in Uniform Circular Motion
Figure 4.15a shows a car moving in a circular path; we describe this motion by call-
ing it circular motion. If the car is moving on this path with constant speed v, we 
call it uniform circular motion. Because it occurs so often, this type of motion is 
recognized as an analysis model called the particle in uniform circular motion. We 
discuss this model in this section.
It is often surprising to students to find that even though an object moves at a 
constant speed in a circular path, it still has an acceleration. To see why, consider the 
defining equation for acceleration, a
S
5dv
S
/dt (Eq. 4.5). Notice that the accelera-
tion depends on the change in the velocity. Because velocity is a vector quantity, an 
acceleration can occur in two ways as mentioned in Section 4.1: by a change in the 
magnitude of the velocity and by a change in the direction of the velocity. The latter 
situation occurs for an object moving with constant speed in a circular path. The 
constant-magnitude velocity vector is always tangent to the path of the object and 
perpendicular to the radius of the circular path. Therefore, the direction of the 
velocity vector is always changing.
Let us first argue that the acceleration vector in uniform circular motion is 
always perpendicular to the path and always points toward the center of the circle. 
If that were not true, there would be a component of the acceleration parallel to 
the path and therefore parallel to the velocity vector. Such an acceleration compo-
nent would lead to a change in the speed of the particle along the path. This situa-
tion, however, is inconsistent with our setup of the situation: the particle moves with 
constant speed along the path. Therefore, for uniform circular motion, the accelera-
tion vector can only have a component perpendicular to the path, which is toward 
the center of the circle.
Let us now find the magnitude of the acceleration of the particle. Consider the 
diagram of the position and velocity vectors in Figure 4.15b. The figure also shows 
the vector representing the change in position Dr
S
for an arbitrary time interval. 
The particle follows a circular path of radius r, part of which is shown by the dashed 
Figure 4.15 
(a) A car moving along a circular path at con-
stant speed experiences uniform circular motion. (b) As a 
particle moves along a portion of a circular path from A to 
B, its velocity vector changes from v
S
i
to v
S
f
. (c) The construc-
tion for determining the direction of the change in velocity 
Dv
S
, which is toward the center of the circle for small Dr
S
.
O
v
v
f
v
i
r
v
i
v
f
r
i
r
f
q
u
u
Top view
v
S
r
a
b
c
B
A
S
S
S
S
S
S
S
S
92
chapter 4 Motion in two Dimensions
curve. The particle is at A at time t
i
, and its velocity at that time is v
S
i
; it is at B at 
some later time t
f
, and its velocity at that time is v
S
f
. Let us also assume v
S
i
and v
S
f
differ only in direction; their magnitudes are the same (that is, v
i
v
f
v because 
it is uniform circular motion).
In Figure 4.15c, the velocity vectors in Figure 4.15b have been redrawn tail to 
tail. The vector Dv
S
connects the tips of the vectors, representing the vector addition 
v
S
f
v
S
i
1Dv
S
. In both Figures 4.15b and 4.15c, we can identify triangles that help 
us analyze the motion. The angle Du between the two position vectors in Figure 
4.15b is the same as the angle between the velocity vectors in Figure 4.15c because 
the velocity vector v
S
is always perpendicular to the position vector r
S
. Therefore, 
the two triangles are similar. (Two triangles are similar if the angle between any two 
sides is the same for both triangles and if the ratio of the lengths of these sides is 
the same.) We can now write a relationship between the lengths of the sides for the 
two triangles in Figures 4.15b and 4.15c:
0
Dv
S
0
v
5
0
Dr
S
0
r
where v 5 v
i
v
f
and r 5 r
i
r
f
. This equation can be solved for 
0
Dv
S
0
, and the 
expression obtained can be substituted into Equation 4.4, a
S
avg
5Dv
S
/Dt, to give 
the magnitude of the average acceleration over the time interval for the particle to 
move from A to B:
0
a
S
avg
0
5
0Dv
S
0
0
Dt
0
5
v0Dr
S
0
rDt
Now imagine that points A and B in Figure 4.15b become extremely close 
together. As A and B approach each other, Dt approaches zero, 
0
Dr
S
0
approaches 
the distance traveled by the particle along the circular path, and the ratio 
0
Dr
S
0
/Dt 
approaches the speed v. In addition, the average acceleration becomes the instan-
taneous acceleration at point A. Hence, in the limit Dt S 0, the magnitude of the 
acceleration is
a
c
5
v2
r
(4.14)
An acceleration of this nature is called a centripetal acceleration (centripetal means 
center-seeking). The subscript on the acceleration symbol reminds us that the accel-
eration is centripetal.
In many situations, it is convenient to describe the motion of a particle moving 
with constant speed in a circle of radius r in terms of the period T, which is defined 
as the time interval required for one complete revolution of the particle. In the time 
interval T, the particle moves a distance of 2pr, which is equal to the circumference 
of the particle’s circular path. Therefore, because its speed is equal to the circum-
ference of the circular path divided by the period, or v 5 2pr/T, it follows that
T5
2pr
v
(4.15)
The period of a particle in uniform circular motion is a measure of the num-
ber of seconds for one revolution of the particle around the circle. The inverse of 
the period is the rotation rate and is measured in revolutions per second. Because 
one full revolution of the particle around the circle corresponds to an angle of 2p 
radians, the product of 2p and the rotation rate gives the angular speed v of the 
particle, measured in radians/s or s21:
v5
2p
T
(4.16)
Centripetal acceleration 
for a particle in uniform  
circular motion
Period of circular motion 
for a particle in uniform  
circular motion
4.4 analysis Model: particle In Uniform circular Motion 
93
continued
Combining this equation with Equation 4.15, we find a relationship between angular 
speed and the translational speed with which the particle travels in the circular path:
v52pa
v
2pr
b5
v
r
S
v5rv 
(4.17)
Equation 4.17 demonstrates that, for a fixed angular speed, the translational speed 
becomes larger as the radial position becomes larger. Therefore, for example, if a 
merry-go-round rotates at a fixed angular speed v, a rider at an outer position at 
large r will be traveling through space faster than a rider at an inner position at 
smaller r. We will investigate Equations 4.16 and 4.17 more deeply in Chapter 10.
We can express the centripetal acceleration of a particle in uniform circular 
motion in terms of angular speed by combining Equations 4.14 and 4.17:
a
c
5
1
rv
22
r
a
c
5rv2 
(4.18)
Equations 4.14–4.18 are to be used when the particle in uniform circular motion 
model is identified as appropriate for a given situation.
uick Quiz 4.4  A particle moves in a circular path of radius r with speed v. It then 
increases its speed to 2v while traveling along the same circular path. (i) The cen-
tripetal acceleration of the particle has changed by what factor? Choose one:  
(a) 0.25 (b) 0.5 (c) 2 (d) 4 (e) impossible to determine (ii) From the same choices,  
by what factor has the period of the particle changed?
Analysis Model   Particle in Uniform Circular Motion
Imagine a moving object that can be modeled as a particle. If it moves 
in a circular path of radius r at a constant speed v, the magnitude of its 
centripetal acceleration is 
a
c
5
v2
r
(4.14)
and the period of the particle’s motion is given by 
T5
2pr
v
(4.15)
The angular speed of the particle is
v5
2p
T
(4.16)
Examples: 
• a rock twirled in a circle on a string 
of constant length 
• a planet traveling around a per-
fectly circular orbit (Chapter 13)
• a charged particle moving in a uni-
form magnetic field (Chapter 29)
• an electron in orbit around a 
nucleus in the Bohr model of the 
hydrogen atom (Chapter 42)
r
v
S
a
c
S
Example 4.6   The Centripetal Acceleration of the Earth 
(A) What is the centripetal acceleration of the Earth as it moves in its orbit around the Sun?
Conceptualize Think about a mental image of the Earth in a circular orbit around the Sun. We will model the Earth 
as a particle and approximate the Earth’s orbit as circular (it’s actually slightly elliptical, as we discuss in Chapter 13).
Categorize The Conceptualize step allows us to categorize this problem as one of a particle in uniform circular motion.
Analyze We do not know the orbital speed of the Earth to substitute into Equation 4.14. With the help of Equation 
4.15, however, we can recast Equation 4.14 in terms of the period of the Earth’s orbit, which we know is one year, and 
the radius of the Earth’s orbit around the Sun, which is 1.496 3 1011 m.
AM
SolutIon
Pitfall Prevention 4.5
Centripetal Acceleration  
Is not Constant We derived the 
magnitude of the centripetal 
acceleration vector and found it to 
be constant for uniform circular 
motion, but the centripetal accelera-
tion vector is not constant. It always 
points toward the center of the 
circle, but it continuously changes 
direction as the object moves 
around the circular path.
94
chapter 4 Motion in two Dimensions
Path of
particle
a
t
a
r
a
t
a
r
a
t
a
r
a
S
a
S
a
S
A
B
C
Figure 4.16 
The motion of a 
particle along an arbitrary curved 
path lying in the xy plane. If the 
velocity vector v
S
(always tangent 
to the path) changes in direction 
and magnitude, the components 
of the acceleration a
S
are a tan-
gential component a
t
and a radial 
component a
r
.
(B) What is the angular speed of the Earth in its orbit around the Sun?
Analyze 
SolutIon
Substitute numerical values:
a
c
5
4p2
1
1.49631011 m
2
1
1 yr
22
a
1 yr
3.1563107 s
b
2
5 5.9331023 m/s2
Finalize The acceleration in part (A) is much smaller than the free-fall acceleration on the surface of the Earth. An 
important technique we learned here is replacing the speed v in Equation 4.14 in terms of the period T of the motion. 
In many problems, it is more likely that is known rather than v. In part (B), we see that the angular speed of the 
Earth is very small, which is to be expected because the Earth takes an entire year to go around the circular path once.
4.5 Tangential and Radial Acceleration
Let us consider a more general motion than that presented in Section 4.4. A parti-
cle moves to the right along a curved path, and its velocity changes both in direction 
and in magnitude as described in Figure 4.16. In this situation, the velocity vector 
is always tangent to the path; the acceleration vector a
S
, however, is at some angle 
to the path. At each of three points A, B, and C in Figure 4.16, the dashed blue 
circles represent the curvature of the actual path at each point. The radius of each 
circle is equal to the path’s radius of curvature at each point.
As the particle moves along the curved path in Figure 4.16, the direction of the 
total acceleration vector a
S
changes from point to point. At any instant, this vec-
tor can be resolved into two components based on an origin at the center of the 
dashed circle corresponding to that instant: a radial component a
r
along the radius 
of the circle and a tangential component a
t
perpendicular to this radius. The total 
acceleration vector a
S
can be written as the vector sum of the component vectors:
a
S
a
S
r
1a
S
t
(4.19)
The tangential acceleration component causes a change in the speed v of the particle. 
This component is parallel to the instantaneous velocity, and its magnitude is given by
a
t
5
`
dv
dt
`
(4.20)
total acceleration 
tangential acceleration 
▸ 4.6 
continued
Combine Equations 4.14 and 4.15:
a
c
5
v2
r
5
a
2pr
T
b
2
r
5
4p2r
T2
Substitute numerical values into Equation 4.16:
v5
2p
1
yr
a
1
yr
3.156
3
107
s
b
5 1.99
3
1027
s21
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested