mvc display pdf in browser : Convert pdf to html code for email SDK Library service wpf asp.net windows dnn doc-3-pdf-67a5de9fa89738da0c6835ef457b5878-original121-part217

38.6 polarization of Light Waves 
1175
The arrangement of atoms in a crystal of sodium chloride (NaCl) is shown in 
Figure 38.22. Each unit cell (the geometric solid that repeats throughout the crys-
tal) is a cube having an edge length a. A careful examination of the NaCl structure 
shows that the ions lie in discrete planes (the shaded areas in Fig. 38.22). Now 
suppose an incident x-ray beam makes an angle u with one of the planes as in Fig-
ure 38.23. The beam can be reflected from both the upper plane and the lower 
one, but the beam reflected from the lower plane travels farther than the beam 
reflected from the upper plane. The effective path difference is 2d sin u. The two 
beams reinforce each other (constructive interference) when this path difference 
equals some integer multiple of l. The same is true for reflection from the entire 
family of parallel planes. Hence, the condition for constructive interference (max-
ima in the reflected beam) is
2d sin u 5 ml    m 5 1, 2, 3, . . . 
(38.8)
This condition is known as Bragg’s law, after W. L. Bragg (1890–1971), who first 
derived the relationship. If the wavelength and diffraction angle are measured, 
Equation 38.8 can be used to calculate the spacing between atomic planes.
38.6 Polarization of Light Waves
In Chapter 34, we described the transverse nature of light and all other electromag-
netic waves. Polarization, discussed in this section, is firm evidence of this trans-
verse nature.
An ordinary beam of light consists of a large number of waves emitted by the 
atoms of the light source. Each atom produces a wave having some particular 
orien ta  tion of the electric field vector E
S
, corresponding to the direction of atomic 
vibration. The direction of polarization of each individual wave is defined to be the 
direction in which the electric field is vibrating. In Figure 38.24, this direction hap-
pens to lie along the y axis. All individual electromagnetic waves traveling in the x  
direction have an E
S
vector parallel to the yz plane, but this vector could be at any 
possible angle with respect to the y axis. Because all directions of vibration from 
a wave source are possible, the resultant electromagnetic wave is a superposition 
of waves vibrating in many different directions. The result is an unpolarized light 
beam, represented in Figure 38.25a (page 1176). The direction of wave propaga-
tion in this figure is perpendicular to the page. The arrows show a few possible  
WWBragg’s law
Pitfall Prevention 38.4
Different angles Notice in Figure 
38.23 that the angle u is measured 
from the reflecting surface rather 
than from the normal as in the 
case of the law of reflection in 
Chapter 35. With slits and diffrac-
tion gratings, we also measured 
the angle u from the normal to the 
array of slits. Because of historical 
tradition, the angle is measured 
differently in Bragg diffraction, so 
interpret Equation 38.8 with care.
The blue spheres represent 
Cl
-
ions, and the red spheres 
represent Na
+
ions.
a
The incident beam can 
reflect from different 
planes of atoms.
Incident
beam
Upper
plane
Lower
plane
d
d
sin
u 
u
u
u
Reflected
beam
Figure 38.23 
A two-dimensional description of the 
reflection of an x-ray beam from two parallel crystalline 
planes separated by a distance d. The beam reflected 
from the lower plane travels farther than the beam 
reflected from the upper plane by a distance 2d sin u.
z
y
x
B
S
E
S
c
S
Figure 38.24 
Schematic dia-
gram of an electromagnetic wave 
propagating at velocity c
S
in the 
x direction. The electric field 
vibrates in the xy plane, and the 
magnetic field vibrates in the xz 
plane.
Convert pdf to html code for email - Convert PDF to html files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
How to Convert PDF to HTML Webpage with C# PDF Conversion SDK
convert pdf to html online for; how to convert pdf to html
Convert pdf to html code for email - VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
PDF to HTML Webpage Converter SDK for VB.NET PDF to HTML Conversion
convert pdf to website html; convert pdf to html5 open source
1176
chapter 38 Diffraction patterns and polarization
directions of the electric field vectors for the individual waves making up the resul-
tant beam. At any given point and at some instant of time, all these individual elec-
tric field vectors add to give one resultant electric field vector.
As noted in Section 34.3, a wave is said to be linearly polarized if the resultant 
electric field E
S
vibrates in the same direction at all times at a particular point as 
shown in Figure 38.25b. (Sometimes, such a wave is described as plane-polarized, or 
simply polarized.) The plane formed by E
S
and the direction of propagation is called 
the plane of polarization of the wave. If the wave in Figure 38.24 represents the resul-
tant of all individual waves, the plane of polarization is the xy plane.
A linearly polarized beam can be obtained from an unpolarized beam by remov-
ing all waves from the beam except those whose electric field vectors oscillate in 
a single plane. We now discuss four processes for producing polarized light from 
unpolarized light.
Polarization by Selective Absorption
The most common technique for producing polarized light is to use a material that 
transmits waves whose electric fields vibrate in a plane parallel to a certain direc-
tion and that absorbs waves whose electric fields vibrate in all other directions.
In 1938, E. H. Land (1909–1991) discovered a material, which he called Pola-
roid, that polarizes light through selective absorption. This material is fabricated in 
thin sheets of long-chain hydrocarbons. The sheets are stretched during manufac-
ture so that the long-chain molecules align. After a sheet is dipped into a solution 
containing iodine, the molecules become good electrical conductors. Conduction 
takes place primarily along the hydrocarbon chains because electrons can move 
easily only along the chains. If light whose electric field vector is parallel to the 
chains is incident on the material, the electric field accelerates electrons along the 
chains and energy is absorbed from the radiation. Therefore, the light does not 
pass through the material. Light whose electric field vector is perpendicular to the 
chains passes through the material because electrons cannot move from one mol-
ecule to the next. As a result, when unpolarized light is incident on the material, 
the exiting light is polarized perpendicular to the molecular chains.
It is common to refer to the direction perpendicular to the molecular chains 
as the transmission axis. In an ideal polarizer, all light with E
S
parallel to the trans-
mission axis is transmitted and all light with E
S
perpendicular to the transmission 
axis is absorbed.
Figure 38.26 represents an unpolarized light beam incident on a first polarizing 
sheet, called the polarizer. Because the transmission axis is oriented vertically in the 
figure, the light transmitted through this sheet is polarized vertically. A second 
polarizing sheet, called the analyzer, intercepts the beam. In Figure38.26, the ana-
lyzer transmission axis is set at an angle u to the polarizer axis. We call the electric 
field vector of the first transmitted beam E
S
0
. The component of E
S
0
perpendicular 
to the analyzer axis is completely absorbed. The component of E
S
0
parallel to the 
a
b
The red dot signifies the 
velocity vector for the wave 
coming out of the page.
E
S
E
S
Figure 38.25 
(a) A represen-
tation of an unpolarized light 
beam viewed along the direction 
of propagation. The transverse 
electric field can vibrate in any 
direction in the plane of the page 
with equal probability. (b) A lin-
early polarized light beam with 
the electric field vibrating in the 
vertical direction.
Transmission
axis
u
The polarizer polarizes 
the incident light along 
its transmission axis.
The analyzer allows 
the component of the 
light parallel to its axis 
to pass through.
Unpolarized
light
Polarized
light
E
0
S
Figure 38.26 
Two polarizing 
sheets whose transmission axes 
make an angle u with each other. 
Only a fraction of the polarized 
light incident on the analyzer is 
transmitted through it.
VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
VB.NET class source code for .NET framework. This VB.NET PDF to Word converter control is a and mature .NET solution which aims to convert PDF document to Word
embed pdf into webpage; how to change pdf to html
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
Convert PDF to multiple MS Word formats such as .doc and Password protected PDF file can be printed to Word C# source code is available for copying and using
convert pdf table to html; convert pdf to web page online
38.6 polarization of Light Waves 
1177
analyzer axis, which is transmitted through the analyzer, is E
0
cos u. Because the 
intensity of the transmitted beam varies as the square of its magnitude, we con-
clude that the intensity I of the (polarized) beam transmitted through the analyzer 
varies as
I 5 I
max
cos2 u 
(38.9)
where I
max
is the intensity of the polarized beam incident on the analyzer. This 
expression, known as Malus’s law,2 applies to any two polarizing materials whose 
transmission axes are at an angle u to each other. This expression shows that the 
intensity of the transmitted beam is maximum when the transmission axes are par-
allel (u 5 0 or 180°) and is zero (complete absorption by the analyzer) when the 
transmission axes are perpendicular to each other. This variation in transmitted 
intensity through a pair of polarizing sheets is illustrated in Figure 38.27. Because 
the average value of cos2 u is 
1
2
, the intensity of initially unpolarized light is reduced 
by a factor of one-half as the light passes through a single ideal polarizer.
Polarization by Reflection
When an unpolarized light beam is reflected from a surface, the polarization of the 
reflected light depends on the angle of incidence. If the angle of incidence is 0°, the 
reflected beam is unpolarized. For other angles of incidence, the reflected light is 
polarized to some extent, and for one particular angle of incidence, the reflected 
light is completely polarized. Let’s now investigate reflection at that special angle.
Suppose an unpolarized light beam is incident on a surface as in Figure 38.28a 
(page 1178). Each individual electric field vector can be resolved into two compo-
nents: one parallel to the surface (and perpendicular to the page in Fig. 38.28, 
represented by the dots) and the other (represented by the orange arrows) perpen-
dicular both to the first component and to the direction of propagation. Therefore, 
the polarization of the entire beam can be described by two electric field compo-
nents in these directions. It is found that the parallel component represented by the 
dots reflects more strongly than the other component represented by the arrows, 
resulting in a partially polarized reflected beam. Furthermore, the refracted beam 
is also partially polarized.
Now suppose the angle of incidence u
1
is varied until the angle between the 
reflected and refracted beams is 90° as in Figure 38.28b. At this particular angle 
of incidence, the reflected beam is completely polarized (with its electric field vec-
tor parallel to the surface) and the refracted beam is still only partially polarized. 
The angle of incidence at which this polarization occurs is called the polarizing 
angle u
p
.
WWMalus’s law
2Named after its discoverer, E. L. Malus (1775–1812). Malus discovered that reflected light was polarized by viewing 
it through a calcite (CaCO
3
) crystal.
The transmitted light has 
maximum intensity when 
the transmission axes are 
aligned with each other.
a
b
c
The transmitted light has 
lesser intensity when the 
transmission axes are at an 
angle of 45° with each other.
The transmitted light 
intensity is a minimum when 
the transmission axes are 
perpendicular to each other.
Figure 38.27 
The intensity of 
light transmitted through two 
polarizers depends on the relative 
orientation of their transmission 
axes. The red arrows indicate the 
transmission axes of the polarizers.
H
e
n
r
y
L
e
a
p
a
n
d
J
i
m
L
e
h
m
a
n
C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
Free online Word to PDF converter without email. C#.NET Sample Code: Convert Word to PDF in C#.NET Project. Add necessary references:
convert pdf to url link; attach pdf to html
VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to
NET, VB.NET convert PDF to HTML, VB.NET Convert multiple pages PowerPoint to fillable and editable PDF Create PDF file from PowerPoint free online without email.
convert pdf into web page; convert pdf to html code online
1178
chapter 38 Diffraction patterns and polarization
We can obtain an expression relating the polarizing angle to the index of refrac-
tion of the reflecting substance by using Figure 38.28b. From this figure, we see 
that u
p
1 90° 1 u
2
5 180°; therefore, u
2
5 90° 2 u
p
. Using Snell’s law of refraction 
(Eq. 35.8) gives
n
2
n
1
5
sin u
1
sin u
2
5
sin u
p
sin u
2
Because sin u
2
5 sin (90° 2 u
p
) 5 cos u
p
, we can write this expression as n
2
/n
1
sinu
p
/cos u
p
, which means that
tan u
p
5
n
2
n
1
(38.10)
This expression is called Brewster’s law, and the polarizing angle u
p
is sometimes 
called Brewster’s angle, after its discoverer, David Brewster (1781–1868). Because n 
varies with wavelength for a given substance, Brewster’s angle is also a function of 
wavelength.
We can understand polarization by reflection by imagining that the electric field 
in the incident light sets electrons at the surface of the material in Figure 38.28b 
into oscillation. The component directions of oscillation are (1) parallel to the 
arrows shown on the refracted beam of light and therefore parallel to the reflected 
beam and (2) perpendicular to the page. The oscillating electrons act as dipole 
antennas radiating light with a polarization parallel to the direction of oscillation. 
Consult Figure 34.12, which shows the pattern of radiation from a dipole antenna. 
Notice that there is no radiation at an angle of u 5 0, that is, along the oscillation 
direction of the antenna. Therefore, for the oscillations in direction 1, there is no 
radiation in the direction along the reflected ray. For oscillations in direction 2, 
the electrons radiate light with a polarization perpendicular to the page. There-
fore, the light reflected from the surface at this angle is completely polarized paral-
lel to the surface.
Polarization by reflection is a common phenomenon. Sunlight reflected from 
water, glass, and snow is partially polarized. If the surface is horizontal, the electric 
field vector of the reflected light has a strong horizontal component. Sunglasses 
made of polarizing material reduce the glare of reflected light. The transmission 
axes of such lenses are oriented vertically so that they absorb the strong horizontal 
component of the reflected light. If you rotate sunglasses through 90°, they are not 
as effective at blocking the glare from shiny horizontal surfaces.
Brewster’s law 
a
b
The dots represent electric 
field oscillations parallel to 
the reflecting surface and 
perpendicular to the page.
The arrows represent 
electric field oscillations 
perpendicular to those 
represented by the dots.
u
1
90°
Incident
beam
Reflected
beam
Incident
beam
Reflected
beam
u
1
u
2
n
2
n
1
n
2
n
1
Refracted
beam
Refracted
beam
Electrons at the surface 
oscillating in the direction of 
the reflected ray (perpendicular 
to the dots and parallel to the 
blue arrow) send no energy in 
this direction.
u
2
u
p
u
p
Figure 38.28 
(a) When unpo-
larized light is incident on a 
reflecting surface, the reflected 
and refracted beams are partially 
polarized. (b)The reflected beam 
is completely polarized when the 
angle of incidence equals the 
polarizing angle u
p
, which satisfies 
the equation n
2
/n
1
5 tan u
p
. At 
this incident angle, the reflected 
and refracted rays are perpendic-
ular to each other.
VB.NET Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF
Jpeg images Viewer, C# HTML Document Viewer for Sharepoint, C# HTML Document Viewer for Azure, C# HTML Document Viewer Convert Excel to PDF document free
pdf to html; embed pdf into website
VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
in VB.NET, VB.NET convert PDF to HTML, VB.NET Convert Word to PDF file with embedded fonts or without original Free online Word to PDF converter without email.
change pdf to html format; adding pdf to html page
38.6 polarization of Light Waves 
1179
Polarization by Double Refraction
Solids can be classified on the basis of internal structure. Those in which the atoms 
are arranged in a specific order are called crystalline; the NaCl structure of Figure 
38.22 is one example of a crystalline solid. Those solids in which the atoms are dis-
tributed randomly are called amorphous. When light travels through an amorphous 
material such as glass, it travels with a speed that is the same in all directions. That is, 
glass has a single index of refraction. In certain crystalline materials such as calcite 
and quartz, however, the speed of light is not the same in all directions. In these mate-
rials, the speed of light depends on the direction of propagation and on the plane of 
polarization of the light. Such materials are characterized by two indices of refrac-
tion. Hence, they are often referred to as double-refracting or  birefringent materials.
When unpolarized light enters a birefringent material, it may split into an 
ordinary (O) ray and an extraordinary (E) ray. These two rays have mutually per-
pendicular polarizations and travel at different speeds through the material. The 
two speeds correspond to two indices of refraction, n
O
for the ordinary ray and n
E
for the extraordinary ray.
There is one direction, called the optic axis, along which the ordinary and 
extraordinary rays have the same speed. If light enters a birefringent material at an 
angle to the optic axis, however, the different indices of refraction will cause the two 
polarized rays to split and travel in different directions as shown in Figure38.29.
The index of refraction n
O
for the ordinary ray is the same in all directions. If 
one could place a point source of light inside the crystal as in Figure 38.30, the ordi-
nary waves would spread out from the source as spheres. The index of refraction n
E
varies with the direction of propagation. A point source sends out an extraordinary 
wave having wave fronts that are elliptical in cross section. The difference in speed 
for the two rays is a maximum in the direction perpendicular to the optic axis. For 
example, in calcite, n
O
5 1.658 at a wavelength of 589.3 nm and n
E
varies from 1.658 
along the optic axis to 1.486 perpendicular to the optic axis. Values for n
O
and the 
extreme value of n
E
for various double-refracting crystals are given in Table38.1.
If you place a calcite crystal on a sheet of paper and then look through the crys-
tal at any writing on the paper, you would see two images as shown in Figure 38.31. 
As can be seen from Figure 38.29, these two images correspond to one formed by 
the ordinary ray and one formed by the extraordinary ray. If the two images are 
viewed through a sheet of rotating polarizing glass, they alternately appear and 
disappear because the ordinary and extraordinary rays are plane-polarized along 
mutually perpendicular directions.
Some materials such as glass and plastic become birefringent when stressed. Sup-
pose an unstressed piece of plastic is placed between a polarizer and an analyzer so 
that light passes from polarizer to plastic to analyzer. When the plastic is unstressed 
and the analyzer axis is perpendicular to the polarizer axis, none of the polarized 
light passes through the analyzer. In other words, the unstressed plastic has no effect 
on the light passing through it. If the plastic is stressed, however, regions of great-
est stress become birefringent and the polarization of the light passing through the 
plastic changes. Hence, a series of bright and dark bands is observed in the trans-
mitted light, with the bright bands corresponding to regions of greatest stress.
These two rays are polarized 
in mutually perpendicular 
directions.
Unpolarized
light
E ray
O ray
Calcite
Figure 38.29 
Unpolarized light 
incident at an angle to the optic 
axis in a calcite crystal splits into an 
ordinary (O) ray and an extraordi-
nary (E) ray (not to scale).
The E and O rays propagate 
with the same velocity along 
the optic axis.
E
O
S
Optic axis
Figure 38.30 
A point source S 
inside a double-refracting crystal 
produces a spherical wave front 
corresponding to the ordinary (O) 
ray and an elliptical wave front 
corresponding to the extraordi-
nary (E)ray.
Table 38.1
Indices of Refraction for Some Double-
Refracting Crystals at a Wavelength of 589.3 nm
Crystal 
n
O
n
E
n
O
/n
E
Calcite (CaCO
3
1.658 
1.486 
1.116
Quartz (SiO
2
1.544 
1.553 
0.994
Sodium nitrate (NaNO
3
1.587 
1.336 
1.188
Sodium sulfite (NaSO
3
1.565 
1.515 
1.033
Zinc chloride (ZnCl
2
1.687 
1.713 
0.985
Zinc sulfide (ZnS) 
2.356 
2.378 
0.991
Figure 38.31 
A calcite crystal 
produces a double image because it 
is a birefringent (double-refracting) 
material.
H
e
n
r
y
L
e
a
p
a
n
d
J
i
m
L
e
h
m
a
n
C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF
email. C# source code is provided for .NET WinForms class. Evaluation PDF library and components for .NET framework. C#.NET Demo Code: Convert PowerPoint to PDF
convert pdf into html online; convert pdf to html
.NET RasterEdge XImage.Barcode Generator Purchase Details
QR Code. Micro QR Code. PDF 417. Online Convert PDF to Html. SUPPORT: Customer Support; Comprehensive Online Demos; SDK Class API Reference; PURCHASE; COMPANY.
convert pdf to html with images; convert pdf to website
1180
chapter 38 Diffraction patterns and polarization
Engineers often use this technique, called optical stress analysis, in designing struc-
tures ranging from bridges to small tools. They build a plastic model and analyze it 
under different load conditions to determine regions of potential weakness and fail-
ure under stress. An example of a plastic model under stress is shown in Figure 38.32.
Polarization by Scattering
When light is incident on any material, the electrons in the material can absorb and 
reradiate part of the light. Such absorption and reradiation of light by electrons in 
the gas molecules that make up air is what causes sunlight reaching an observer on 
the Earth to be partially polarized. You can observe this effect—called scattering
by looking directly up at the sky through a pair of sunglasses whose lenses are made 
of polarizing material. Less light passes through at certain orientations of the lenses 
than at others.
Figure 38.33 illustrates how sunlight becomes polarized when it is scattered. The 
phenomenon is similar to that creating completely polarized light upon reflection 
from a surface at Brewster’s angle. An unpolarized beam of sunlight traveling in 
the horizontal direction (parallel to the ground) strikes a molecule of one of the 
gases that make up air, setting the electrons of the molecule into vibration. These 
vibrating charges act like the vibrating charges in an antenna. The horizontal 
component of the electric field vector in the incident wave results in a horizontal 
component of the vibration of the charges, and the vertical component of the vec-
tor results in a vertical component of vibration. If the observer in Figure 38.33 is 
looking straight up (perpendicular to the original direction of propagation of the 
light), the vertical oscillations of the charges send no radiation toward the observer. 
Therefore, the observer sees light that is completely polarized in the horizontal 
direction as indicated by the orange arrows. If the observer looks in other direc-
tions, the light is partially polarized in the horizontal direction.
Variations in the color of scattered light in the atmosphere can be understood as 
follows. When light of various wavelengths l is incident on gas molecules of diameter 
d, where d ,, l, the relative intensity of the scattered light varies as 1/l4. The condi-
tion d ,, l is satisfied for scattering from oxygen (O
2
) and nitrogen (N
2
) molecules 
in the atmosphere, whose diameters are about 0.2 nm. Hence, short wavelengths (vio-
let light) are scattered more efficiently than long wavelengths (red light). Therefore, 
when sunlight is scattered by gas molecules in the air, the short-wavelength radiation 
(violet) is scattered more intensely than the long-wavelength radiation (red).
When you look up into the sky in a direction that is not toward the Sun, you see 
the scattered light, which is predominantly violet. Your eyes, however, are not very 
sensitive to violet light. Light of the next color in the spectrum, blue, is scattered 
with less intensity than violet, but your eyes are far more sensitive to blue light than 
to violet light. Hence, you see a blue sky. If you look toward the west at sunset (or 
toward the east at sunrise), you are looking in a direction toward the Sun and are 
seeing light that has passed through a large distance of air. Most of the blue light 
has been scattered by the air between you and the Sun. The light that survives this 
Figure 38.32 
A plastic model of 
an arch structure under load con-
ditions.  The pattern is produced 
when the plastic model is viewed 
between a polarizer and analyzer 
oriented perpendicular to each 
other. Such patterns are useful 
in the optimal design of architec-
tural components.
P
e
t
e
r
A
p
r
a
h
a
m
i
a
n
/
S
c
i
e
n
c
e
P
h
o
t
o
L
i
b
r
a
r
y
,
P
h
o
t
o
R
e
s
e
a
r
c
h
e
r
s
,
I
n
c
.
Unpolarized
light
Air
molecule
The scattered light traveling 
perpendicular to the incident 
light is plane-polarized because 
the vertical vibrations of the 
charges in the air molecule send 
no light in this direction.
Figure 38.33 
The scattering 
of unpolarized sunlight by air 
molecules.
C# Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF in C#
Free online Excel to PDF converter without email. Quick integrate online C# source code into .NET class. C# Demo Code: Convert Excel to PDF in Visual C# .NET
pdf to html conversion; converting pdf to html
Purchase RasterEdge Product License Online
PDF, Microsoft Word, Excel, PowerPoint, HTML, Open Office NET imaging SDK to view, convert, process, transform from raster images, like jpeg, tiff, scanned pdf.
convert pdf to html link; how to convert pdf to html email
Summary 
1181
trip through the air to you has had much of its blue component scattered and is 
therefore heavily weighted toward the red end of the spectrum; as a result, you see 
the red and orange colors of sunset (or sunrise).
Optical Activity
Many important applications of polarized light involve materials that display opti-
cal activity. A material is said to be optically active if it rotates the plane of polariza-
tion of any light transmitted through the material. The angle through which the 
light is rotated by a specific material depends on the length of the path through the 
material and on concentration if the material is in solution. One optically active 
material is a solution of the common sugar dextrose. A standard method for deter-
mining the concentration of sugar solutions is to measure the rotation produced by 
a fixed length of the solution.
Molecular asymmetry determines whether a material is optically active. For 
example, some proteins are optically active because of their spiral shape.
The liquid crystal displays found in most calculators have their optical activity 
changed by the application of electric potential across different parts of the display. 
Try using a pair of polarizing sunglasses to investigate the polarization used in the 
display of your calculator.
uick Quiz 38.6  A polarizer for microwaves can be made as a grid of parallel metal 
wires approximately 1 cm apart. Is the electric field vector for microwaves trans-
mitted through this polarizer (a) parallel or (b) perpendicular to the metal wires?
uick Quiz 38.7  You are walking down a long hallway that has many light fixtures 
in the ceiling and a very shiny, newly waxed floor. When looking at the floor, you 
see reflections of every light fixture. Now you put on sunglasses that are polar-
ized. Some of the reflections of the light fixtures can no longer be seen. (Try it!) 
Are the reflections that disappear those (a) nearest to you, (b) farthest from you, 
or (c) at an intermediate distance from you?
The Fraunhofer diffraction pattern produced by a single slit of width a on a 
distant screen consists of a central bright fringe and alternating bright and dark 
fringes of much lower intensities. The angles u
dark
at which the diffraction pat-
tern has zero intensity, corresponding to destructive interference, are given by
sin u
dark
5m 
l
a
m561, 62, 63,c 
(38.1)
Diffraction is the deviation 
of light from a straight-line path 
when the light passes through an 
aperture or around an obstacle. 
Diffraction is due to the wave 
nature of light.
Summary
Concepts and Principles
diffraction grating consists of a large number of 
equally spaced, identical slits. The condition for inten-
sity maxima in the interference pattern of a diffraction 
grating for normal incidence is
d sin u
bright
ml    m 5 0, 61, 62, 63, . . . 
(38.7)
where d is the spacing between adjacent slits and m is 
the order number of the intensity maximum.
Rayleigh’s criterion, which is a limiting condition of 
resolution, states that two images formed by an aperture 
are just distinguishable if the central maximum of the 
diffraction pattern for one image falls on the first mini-
mum of the diffraction pattern for the other image. The 
limiting angle of resolution for a slit of width a is u
min
l/a, and the limiting angle of resolution for a circular 
aperture of diameter D is given by u
min
5 1.22l/D.
continued
1182
chapter 38 Diffraction patterns and polarization
In general, reflected light is partially polarized. Reflected light, however, 
is completely polarized when the angle of incidence is such that the angle 
between the reflected and refracted beams is 90°. This angle of incidence, 
called the polarizing angle u
p
, satisfies Brewster’s law:
tan u
p
5
n
2
n
1
(38.10)
where n
1
is the index of refraction of the medium in which the light initially 
travels and n
2
is the index of refraction of the reflecting medium.
When polarized light of 
intensity I
max
is emitted by a 
polarizer and then is incident 
on an analyzer, the light trans-
mitted through the analyzer has 
an intensity equal to I
max
cos2 u,  
where u is the angle between 
the polarizer and analyzer 
transmission axes.
width of the central bright fringe, measured between 
the centers of the dark fringes on both sides of it. Rank 
from largest to smallest the widths of the central fringe 
in the following situations and note any cases of equal-
ity. (a) The experiment is performed as photographed. 
(b) The experiment is performed with light whose 
frequency is increased by 50%. (c)The experiment is 
performed with light whose wavelength is increased by 
50%. (d) The experiment is performed with the origi-
nal light and with a slit of width 2a. (e) The experiment 
is performed with the original light and slit and with 
distance 2L to the screen.
7. If plane polarized light is sent through two polarizers, 
the first at 45° to the original plane of polarization and 
the second at 90° to the original plane of polarization, 
what fraction of the original polarized intensity passes 
through the last polarizer? (a) 0  (b) 1
4
(c) 1
2
(d) 1
8
(e) 1
10
8. Why is it advantageous to use a large-diameter objec-
tive lens in a telescope? (a) It diffracts the light more 
effectively than smaller-diameter objective lenses. 
(b) It increases its magnification. (c) It enables you 
to see more objects in the field of view. (d) It reflects 
unwanted wavelengths. (e) It increases its resolution.
9. What combination of optical phenomena causes the 
bright colored patterns sometimes seen on wet streets 
covered with a layer of oil? Choose the best answer.  
(a) diffraction and polarization (b) interference and 
diffraction (c)polarization and reflection (d) refrac-
tion and diffraction (e)reflection and interference
10. When you receive a chest x-ray at a hospital, the x-rays 
pass through a set of parallel ribs in your chest. Do 
your ribs act as a diffraction grating for x-rays? (a) Yes. 
They produce diffracted beams that can be observed 
separately. (b)Not to a measurable extent. The ribs are 
too far apart. (c)Essentially not. The ribs are too close 
together. (d) Essentially not. The ribs are too few in 
number. (e) Absolutely not. X-rays cannot diffract.
11. When unpolarized light passes through a diffraction 
grating, does it become polarized? (a) No, it does not. 
(b) Yes, it does, with the transmission axis parallel 
to the slits or grooves in the grating. (c) Yes, it does, 
with the transmission axis perpendicular to the slits or 
grooves in the grating. (d) It possibly does because an 
electric field above some threshold is blocked out by 
the grating if the field is perpendicular to the slits.
1. Certain sunglasses use a polarizing material to reduce 
the intensity of light reflected as glare from water or 
automobile windshields. What orientation should the 
polarizing filters have to be most effective? (a) The 
polarizers should absorb light with its electric field 
horizontal. (b) The polarizers should absorb light 
with its electric field vertical. (c)The polarizers should 
absorb both horizontal and vertical electric fields.  
(d) The polarizers should not absorb either horizontal 
or vertical electric fields.
2. What is most likely to happen to a beam of light when 
it reflects from a shiny metallic surface at an arbitrary 
angle? Choose the best answer. (a) It is totally absorbed 
by the surface. (b) It is totally polarized. (c) It is unpo-
larized. (d) It is partially polarized. (e) More informa-
tion is required.
3. In Figure 38.4, assume the slit is in a barrier that is 
opaque to x-rays as well as to visible light. The photo-
graph in Figure 38.4b shows the diffraction pattern 
produced with visible light. What will happen if the 
experiment is repeated with x-rays as the incoming 
wave and with no other changes? (a) The diffraction 
pattern is similar. (b) There is no noticeable diffrac-
tion pattern but rather a projected shadow of high 
intensity on the screen, having the same width as the 
slit. (c) The central maximum is much wider, and the 
minima occur at larger angles than with visible light. 
(d) No x-rays reach the screen.
4. A Fraunhofer diffraction pattern is produced on a 
screen located 1.00 m from a single slit. If a light source 
of wavelength 5.00 3 1027 m is used and the distance 
from the center of the central bright fringe to the first 
dark fringe is 5.00 3 1023 m, what is the slit width?  
(a) 0.010 0 mm (b)0.100 mm (c) 0.200 mm (d) 1.00 mm  
(e) 0.005 00 mm
5. Consider a wave passing through a single slit. What 
happens to the width of the central maximum of its 
diffraction pattern as the slit is made half as wide?  
(a) It becomes one-fourth as wide. (b) It becomes one-
half as wide. (c) Its width does not change. (d) It becomes 
twice as wide. (e) It becomes four times as wide.
6. Assume Figure 38.1 was photographed with red light 
of a single wavelength l
0
. The light passed through 
a single slit of width a and traveled distance L to the 
screen where the photograph was made. Consider the 
Objective Questions
1. 
denotes answer available in Student Solutions Manual/Study Guide
problems 
1183
greater. What then happens to your ability to resolve 
the two light sources? (a) It increases by a factor of 9. 
(b) It increases by a factor of 3. (c) It remains the same.  
(d) It becomes one-third as good. (e) It becomes one-
ninth as good.
12. Off in the distance, you see the headlights of a car, 
but they are indistinguishable from the single head-
light of a motorcycle. Assume the car’s headlights are 
now switched from low beam to high beam so that 
the light intensity you receive becomes three times 
Problems
The problems found in this  
chapter may be assigned 
online in Enhanced WebAssign
1.
 straightforward; 
2. 
intermediate;  
3. 
challenging
1.
full solution available in the Student 
Solutions Manual/Study Guide
AMT
Analysis Model tutorial available in 
Enhanced WebAssign
GP
Guided Problem
M
Master It tutorial available in Enhanced 
WebAssign
W
Watch It video solution available in 
Enhanced WebAssign
BIO
Q/C
S
Conceptual Questions
1. 
denotes answer available in Student Solutions Manual/Study Guide
1. The atoms in a crystal lie in planes separated by a few 
tenths of a nanometer. Can they produce a diffraction 
pattern for visible light as they do for x-rays? Explain 
your answer with reference to Bragg’s law.
2. Holding your hand at arm’s length, you can readily 
block sunlight from reaching your eyes. Why can you 
not block sound from reaching your ears this way?
3. How could the index of refraction of a flat piece of 
opaque obsidian glass be determined?
4. (a) Is light from the sky polarized? (b) Why is it that 
clouds seen through Polaroid glasses stand out in bold 
contrast to the sky?
5. A laser beam is incident at a shallow angle on a hori-
zontal machinist’s ruler that has a finely calibrated 
scale. The engraved rulings on the scale give rise to 
a diffraction pattern on a vertical screen. Discuss how 
you can use this technique to obtain a measure of the 
wavelength of the laser light.
6. If a coin is glued to a glass sheet and this arrangement 
is held in front of a laser beam, the projected shadow 
has diffraction rings around its edge and a bright spot 
in the center. How are these effects possible?
7. Fingerprints left on a piece of glass such as a window-
pane often show colored spectra like that from a dif-
fraction grating. Why?
8. A laser produces a beam a few millimeters wide, with 
uniform intensity across its width. A hair is stretched 
vertically across the front of the laser to cross the beam. 
(a) How is the diffraction pattern it produces on a dis-
tant screen related to that of a vertical slit equal in width 
to the hair? (b) How could you determine the width of 
the hair from measurements of its diffraction pattern?
9. A radio station serves listeners in a city to the north-
east of its broadcast site. It broadcasts from three adja-
cent towers on a mountain ridge, along a line running 
east to west, in what’s called a phased array. Show that 
by introducing time delays among the signals the indi-
vidual towers radiate, the station can maximize net 
intensity in the direction toward the city (and in the 
opposite direction) and minimize the signal transmit-
ted in other directions.
10. John William Strutt, Lord Rayleigh (1842–1919), 
invented an improved foghorn. To warn ships of a coast-
line, a foghorn should radiate sound in a wide horizon-
tal sheet over the ocean’s surface. It should not waste 
energy by broadcasting sound upward or downward. 
Rayleigh’s foghorn trumpet is shown in two possible con-
figurations, horizontal and vertical, in Figure CQ38.10. 
Which is the correct orientation? Decide whether the 
long dimension of the rectangular opening should be 
horizontal or vertical and argue for your decision.
Figure CQ38.12
D
o
u
g
P
e
n
s
i
g
n
e
r
/
G
e
t
t
y
I
m
a
g
e
s
1184
chapter 38 Diffraction patterns and polarization
in Figure P38.10. Show that 
Equation 38.1, the condition 
for destructive interference, 
must be modified to read
sin u
dark
m 
l
a
2 sin b  
m 5 61, 62, 63, . . .
11. A diffraction pattern is 
formed on a screen 120 cm 
away from a 0.400-mm-wide 
slit. Monochromatic 546.1-nm 
light is used. Calculate the 
fractional intensity I/I
max
at a 
point on the screen 4.10 mm 
from the center of the principal maximum.
12. Coherent light of wavelength 501.5 nm is sent through 
two parallel slits in an opaque material. Each slit is 
0.700mm wide. Their centers are 2.80 mm apart. The 
light then falls on a semicylindrical screen, with its 
axis at the midline between the slits. We would like to 
describe the appearance of the pattern of light visible 
on the screen. (a)Find the direction for each two-slit 
interference maximum on the screen as an angle away 
from the bisector of the line joining the slits. (b) How 
many angles are there that represent two-slit interfer-
ence maxima? (c) Find the direction for each single-
slit interference minimum on the screen as an angle 
away from the bisector of the line joining the slits. 
(d) How many angles are there that represent single-
slit interference minima? (e) How many of the angles 
in part (d) are identical to those in part (a)? (f) How 
many bright fringes are visible on the screen? (g) If the 
intensity of the central fringe is I
max
, what is the inten-
sity of the last fringe visible on the screen?
13. A beam of monochromatic light is incident on a single 
slit of width 0.600 mm. A diffraction pattern forms on 
a wall 1.30 m beyond the slit. The distance between the 
positions of zero intensity on both sides of the central 
maximum is 2.00 mm. Calculate the wavelength of the 
light.
Section 38.3  Resolution of Single-Slit and Circular apertures
Note: In Problems 14, 19, 22, 23, and 67, you may use 
the Rayleigh criterion for the limiting angle of resolu-
tion of an eye. The standard may be overly optimistic 
for human vision.
14. The pupil of a cat’s eye narrows to a vertical slit of width 
0.500 mm in daylight. Assume the average wavelength 
of the light is 500 nm. What is the angular resolution 
for horizontally separated mice?
15. The angular resolution of a radio telescope is to be 
0.100° when the incident waves have a wavelength of 
3.00 mm. What minimum diameter is required for the 
telescope’s receiving dish?
16. pinhole camera has a small circular aperture of diam-
eter D. Light from distant objects passes through the 
aperture into an otherwise dark box, falling on a 
screen at the other end of the box. The aperture in 
a pinhole camera has diameter D 5 0.600 mm. Two 
M
GP
Section 38.2  Diffraction Patterns from narrow Slits
1. Light of wavelength 587.5 nm illuminates a slit of width 
0.75 mm. (a) At what distance from the slit should a 
screen be placed if the first minimum in the diffraction 
pattern is to be 0.85 mm from the central maximum? 
(b) Calculate the width of the central maximum.
2. Helium–neon laser light (l 5 632.8 nm) is sent 
through a 0.300-mm-wide single slit. What is the width 
of the central maximum on a screen 1.00 m from the 
slit?
3. Sound with a frequency 650 Hz from a distant source 
passes through a doorway 1.10 m wide in a sound-
absorbing wall. Find (a) the number and (b) the angu-
lar directions of the diffraction minima at listening 
positions along a line parallel to the wall.
4. A horizontal laser beam of wavelength 632.8 nm has 
a circular cross section 2.00 mm in diameter. A rect-
angular aperture is to be placed in the center of the 
beam so that when the light falls perpendicularly on a 
wall 4.50 m away, the central maximum fills a rectangle 
110 mm wide and 6.00 mm high. The dimensions are 
measured between the minima bracketing the central 
maximum. Find the required (a) width and (b) height 
of the aperture. (c) Is the longer dimension of the cen-
tral bright patch in the diffraction pattern horizontal 
or vertical? (d) Is the longer dimension of the aperture 
horizontal or vertical? (e)Explain the relationship 
between these two rectangles, using a diagram.
5. Coherent microwaves of wavelength 5.00 cm enter a 
tall, narrow window in a building otherwise essentially 
opaque to the microwaves. If the window is 36.0 cm 
wide, what is the distance from the central maximum 
to the first-order minimum along a wall 6.50 m from 
the window?
6. Light of wavelength 540 nm passes through a slit of 
width 0.200 mm. (a) The width of the central maxi-
mum on a screen is 8.10 mm. How far is the screen 
from the slit? (b)Determine the width of the first 
bright fringe to the side of the central maximum.
7. A screen is placed 50.0 cm from a single slit, which is 
illuminated with light of wavelength 690nm. If the dis-
tance between the first and third minima in the dif-
fraction pattern is 3.00mm, what is the width of the 
slit?
8. A screen is placed a distance L from a single slit of 
width a, which is illuminated with light of wavelength 
l. Assume L .. a. If the distance between the minima 
for m5 m
1
and m 5 m
2
in the diffraction pattern is Dy, 
what is the width of the slit?
9. Assume light of wavelength 650 nm passes through two 
slits 3.00 mm wide, with their centers 9.00 mm apart. 
Make a sketch of the combined diffraction and inter-
ference pattern in the form of a graph of intensity  
versus f 5 (pa sin u)/l. You may use Figure 38.7 as a 
starting point.
10. What If? Suppose light strikes a single slit of width a at 
an angle b from the perpendicular direction as shown 
M
W
Q/C
M
S
S
a
u
b
Figure P38.10
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested