problems 
1185
24. A circular radar antenna on a Coast Guard ship has 
a diameter of 2.10 m and radiates at a frequency of  
15.0 GHz. Two small boats are located 9.00 km away 
from the ship. How close together could the boats be 
and still be detected as two objects?
Section 38.4  the Diffraction Grating
Note: In the following problems, assume the light is 
incident normally on the gratings.
25. A helium–neon laser (l 5 632.8 nm) is used to cali-
brate a diffraction grating. If the first-order maximum 
occurs at 20.5°, what is the spacing between adjacent 
grooves in the grating?
26. White light is spread out into its spectral components 
by a diffraction grating. If the grating has 2 000 grooves  
per centimeter, at what angle does red light of wave-
length 640nm appear in first order?
27. Consider an array of parallel wires with uniform spac-
ing of 1.30 cm between centers. In air at 20.0°C, ultra-
sound with a frequency of 37.2 kHz from a distant 
source is incident perpendicular to the array. (a) Find 
the number of directions on the other side of the array 
in which there is a maximum of intensity. (b) Find the 
angle for each of these directions relative to the direc-
tion of the incident beam.
28. Three discrete spectral lines occur at angles of 10.1°, 
13.7°, and 14.8° in the first-order spectrum of a grating 
spectrometer. (a) If the grating has 3 660 slits/cm, what 
are the wavelengths of the light? (b) At what angles are 
these lines found in the second-order spectrum?
29. The laser in a compact disc player must precisely follow 
the spiral track on the CD, along which the distance 
between one loop of the spiral and the next is only about 
1.25 mm. Figure P38.29 (page 1186) shows how a diffrac-
tion grating is used to provide information to keep the 
beam on track. The laser light passes through a diffrac-
tion grating before it reaches the CD. The strong central 
maximum of the diffraction pattern is used to read the 
information in the track of pits. The two first-order side 
maxima are designed to fall on the flat surfaces on both 
sides of the information track and are used for steer-
ing. As long as both beams are reflecting from smooth, 
W
M
W
point sources of light of wavelength 550 nm are at a 
distance L from the hole. The separation between the 
sources is 2.80 cm, and they are just resolved by the 
camera. What is L?
17. The objective lens of a certain refracting telescope has 
a diameter of 58.0 cm. The telescope is mounted in a 
satellite that orbits the Earth at an altitude of 270 km to 
view objects on the Earth’s surface. Assuming an aver-
age wavelength of 500 nm, find the minimum distance 
between two objects on the ground if their images are 
to be resolved by this lens.
18. Yellow light of wavelength 589 nm is used to view an 
object under a microscope. The objective lens diam-
eter is 9.00 mm. (a) What is the limiting angle of reso-
lution? (b)Suppose it is possible to use visible light of 
any wavelength. What color should you choose to give 
the smallest possible angle of resolution, and what is 
this angle? (c) Suppose water fills the space between 
the object and the objective. What effect does this 
change have on the resolving power when 589-nm light 
is used?
19. What is the approximate size of the smallest object 
on the Earth that astronauts can resolve by eye when 
they are orbiting 250 km above the Earth? Assume l 5  
500 nm and a pupil diameter of 5.00 mm.
20. A helium–neon laser emits light that has a wavelength 
of 632.8 nm. The circular aperture through which the 
beam emerges has a diameter of 0.500 cm. Estimate 
the diameter of the beam 10.0 km from the laser.
21. To increase the resolving power of a microscope, the 
object and the objective are immersed in oil (n 5 1.5). 
If the limiting angle of resolution without the oil is  
0.60 mrad, what is the limiting angle of resolution with 
the oil? Hint: The oil changes the wavelength of the 
light.
22. Narrow, parallel, glowing gas-filled tubes in a vari-
ety of colors form block letters to spell out the name 
of a nightclub. Adjacent tubes are all 2.80 cm apart. 
The tubes forming one letter are filled with neon and 
radiate predominantly red light with a wavelength of  
640 nm. For another letter, the tubes emit pre-
dominantly blue light at 440 nm. The pupil of a 
dark-adapted viewer’s eye is 5.20mm in diameter.  
(a) Which color is easier to resolve? State how you 
decide. (b) If she is in a certain range of distances 
away, the viewer can resolve the separate tubes of one 
color but not the other. The viewer’s distance must be 
in what range for her to resolve the tubes of only one 
of these two colors?
23. Impressionist painter Georges Seurat created paint-
ings with an enormous number of dots of pure pig-
ment, each of which was approximately 2.00 mm in 
diameter. The idea was to have colors such as red and 
green next to each other to form a scintillating can-
vas, such as in his masterpiece, A Sunday Afternoon on 
the Island of La Grande Jatte (Fig. P38.23). Assume l 5  
500 nm and a pupil diameter of 5.00mm. Beyond what 
distance would a viewer be unable to discern individ-
ual dots on the canvas?
Q/C
M
M
Q/C
M
Figure P38.23
©
S
u
p
e
r
S
t
o
c
k
/
S
u
p
e
r
S
t
o
c
k
Convert pdf into web page - Convert PDF to html files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
How to Convert PDF to HTML Webpage with C# PDF Conversion SDK
convert pdf to html code c#; convert pdf to webpage
Convert pdf into web page - VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
PDF to HTML Webpage Converter SDK for VB.NET PDF to HTML Conversion
best website to convert pdf to word online; best pdf to html converter
1186
chapter 38 Diffraction patterns and polarization
slits, separated by 1.20 mm, and falls on a sheet of pho-
tographic film 1.40 m away. The exposure time is cho-
sen so that the film stays unexposed everywhere except 
at the central region of each bright fringe. (a) Find the 
distance between these interference maxima. The film 
is printed as a transparency; it is opaque everywhere 
except at the exposed lines. Next, the same beam of 
laser light is directed through the transparency and 
allowed to fall on a screen 1.40 m beyond. (b) Argue 
that several narrow, parallel, bright regions, separated 
by 1.20 mm, appear on the screen as real images of the 
original slits. (A similar train of thought, at a soccer 
game, led Dennis Gabor to invent holography.)
37. A beam of bright red light of wavelength 654 nm passes 
through a diffraction grating. Enclosing the space 
beyond the grating is a large semicylindrical screen cen-
tered on the grating, with its axis parallel to the slits in 
the grating. Fifteen bright spots appear on the screen. 
Find (a) the maximum and (b) the minimum possible 
values for the slit separation in the diffraction grating.
Section 38.5  Diffraction of X-Rays by Crystals
38. If the spacing between planes of atoms in a NaCl crys-
tal is 0.281 nm, what is the predicted angle at which  
0.140-nm x-rays are diffracted in a first-order maximum?
39. Potassium iodide (KI) has the same crystalline struc-
ture as NaCl, with atomic planes separated by 0.353 nm.  
A monochromatic x-ray beam shows a first-order dif-
fraction maximum when the grazing angle is 7.60°. 
Calculate the x-ray wavelength.
40. Monochromatic x-rays (l 5 0.166 nm) from a nickel 
target are incident on a potassium chloride (KCl) crys-
tal surface. The spacing between planes of atoms in 
KCl is 0.314 nm. At what angle (relative to the surface) 
should the beam be directed for a second-order maxi-
mum to be observed?
41. The first-order diffraction maximum is observed at 
12.6° for a crystal having a spacing between planes of 
atoms of 0.250 nm. (a) What wavelength x-ray is used to 
observe this first-order pattern? (b) How many orders 
can be observed for this crystal at this wavelength?
Section 38.6  Polarization of light Waves
Problem 62 in Chapter 34 can be assigned with this 
section.
42. Why is the following situation impossible? A technician is 
measuring the index of refraction of a solid material 
by observing the polarization of light reflected from 
its surface. She notices that when a light beam is pro-
jected from air onto the material surface, the reflected 
light is totally polarized parallel to the surface when 
the incident angle is 41.0°.
43. Plane-polarized light is incident on a single polarizing 
disk with the direction of E
S
0
parallel to the direction 
of the transmission axis. Through what angle should 
the disk be rotated so that the intensity in the transmit-
ted beam is reduced by a factor of (a) 3.00, (b) 5.00, 
and (c) 10.0?
M
M
AMT
M
nonpitted surfaces, they are detected with constant high 
intensity. If the main beam wanders off the track, how-
ever, one of the side beams begins to strike pits on the 
information track and the reflected light diminishes. 
This change is used with an electronic circuit to guide 
the beam back to the desired location. Assume the laser 
light has a wavelength of 780 nm and the diffraction 
grating is positioned 6.90 mm from the disk. Assume 
the first-order beams are to fall on the CD 0.400 mm on 
either side of the information track. What should be the 
number of grooves per millimeter in the grating?
Central
Compact disc
Figure P38.29
30. A grating with 250 grooves/mm is used with an incan-
descent light source. Assume the visible spectrum to 
range in wavelength from 400 nm to 700 nm. In how 
many orders can one see (a) the entire visible spec-
trum and (b) the short-wavelength region of the visible 
spectrum?
31. A diffraction grating has 4 200 rulings/cm. On a screen 
2.00 m from the grating, it is found that for a particu-
lar order m, the maxima corresponding to two closely 
spaced wavelengths of sodium (589.0 nm and 589.6 nm) 
are separated by 1.54 mm. Determine the value of m.
32. The hydrogen spectrum includes a red line at 656nm 
and a blue-violet line at 434 nm. What are the angu-
lar separations between these two spectral lines for 
all visible orders obtained with a diffraction grating 
that has 4 500 grooves/cm?
33. Light from an argon laser strikes a diffraction grating 
that has 5 310 grooves per centimeter. The central and 
first-order principal maxima are separated by 0.488 m 
on a wall 1.72 m from the grating. Determine the wave-
length of the laser light.
34. Show that whenever white light is passed through a dif-
fraction grating of any spacing size, the violet end of 
the spectrum in the third order on a screen always over-
laps the red end of the spectrum in the second order.
35. Light of wavelength 500 nm is incident normally on 
a diffraction grating. If the third-order maximum of 
the diffraction pattern is observed at 32.0°, (a) what is 
the number of rulings per centimeter for the grating?  
(b) Determine the total number of primary maxima 
that can be observed in this situation.
36. A wide beam of laser light with a wavelength of 
632.8nm is directed through several narrow parallel 
M
W
Q/C
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
in both web server-side application and Windows Forms project using a few lines of simple C# code. Apart from the ability to inserting a new PDF page into
add pdf to website html; convert pdf to web
C# PDF: How to Create PDF Document Viewer in C#.NET with
& reading library control can be easily and successfully integrated into HTML 5 document to images or svg file; Free to convert viewing PDF document to
online pdf to html converter; export pdf to html
problems 
1187
(arbitrary). Calculate the transmitted intensity I
f
when 
u
1
5 20.0°,  u
2
5 40.0°, and  u
3
5 60.0°. Hint: Make 
repeated use of Malus’s law.
52. Two polarizing sheets are placed together with their 
transmission axes crossed so that no light is trans-
mitted. A third sheet is inserted between them with 
its transmission axis at an angle of 45.0° with respect 
to each of the other axes. Find the fraction of inci-
dent unpolarized light intensity transmitted by the  
three-sheet combination. (Assume each polarizing 
sheet is ideal.) 
additional Problems
53. In a single-slit diffraction pattern, assuming each side 
maximum is halfway between the adjacent minima, 
find the ratio of the intensity of (a) the first-order side 
maximum and (b) the second-order side maximum to 
the intensity of the central maximum.
54. Laser light with a wavelength of 632.8 nm is directed 
through one slit or two slits and allowed to fall on a 
screen 2.60 m beyond. Figure P38.54 shows the pat-
tern on the screen, with a centimeter ruler below it.  
(a) Did the light pass through one slit or two slits? 
Explain how you can determine the answer. (b) If one 
slit, find its width. If two slits, find the distance between 
their centers.
5
6
7
8
9
10 11 12 13
Figure P38.54
55. In water of uniform depth, a wide pier is supported on 
pilings in several parallel rows 2.80 m apart. Ocean 
waves of uniform wavelength roll in, moving in a direc-
tion that makes an angle of 80.0° with the rows of pil-
ings. Find the three longest wavelengths of waves that 
are strongly reflected by the pilings.
56. The second-order dark fringe in a single-slit diffrac-
tion pattern is 1.40 mm from the center of the central 
maximum. Assuming the screen is 85.0 cm from a slit 
of width 0.800 mm and assuming monochromatic  
incident light, calculate the wavelength of the incident 
light.
57. Light from a helium–neon laser (l 5 632.8 nm) is inci-
dent on a single slit. What is the maximum width of the 
slit for which no diffraction minima are observed?
58. Two motorcycles separated laterally by 2.30 m are 
approaching an observer wearing night-vision gog-
gles sensitive to infrared light of wavelength 885 nm.  
(a) Assume the light propagates through perfectly 
steady and uniform air. What aperture diameter 
is required if the motorcycles’ headlights are to be 
resolved at a distance of 12.0km? (b)Comment on 
how realistic the assumption in part (a)is.
Q/C
W
Q/C
44. The angle of incidence of a light beam onto a reflect-
ing surface is continuously variable. The reflected ray 
in air is completely polarized when the angle of inci-
dence is 48.0°. What is the index of refraction of the 
reflecting material?
45. Unpolarized light passes through two ideal Polaroid 
sheets. The axis of the first is vertical, and the axis of 
the second is at 30.0° to the vertical. What fraction of 
the incident light is transmitted?
46. Two handheld radio transceivers with dipole antennas 
are separated by a large fixed distance. If the transmit-
ting antenna is vertical, what fraction of the maximum 
received power will appear in the receiving antenna 
when it is inclined from the vertical by (a) 15.0°,  
(b) 45.0°, and (c) 90.0°?
47. You use a sequence of ideal polarizing filters, each 
with its axis making the same angle with the axis of 
the previous filter, to rotate the plane of polarization 
of a polarized light beam by a total of 45.0°. You wish 
to have an intensity reduction no larger than 10.0%. 
(a) How many polarizers do you need to achieve 
your goal? (b) What is the angle between adjacent 
polarizers?
48. An unpolarized beam of light is incident on a stack of 
ideal polarizing filters. The axis of the first filter is per-
pendicular to the axis of the last filter in the stack. Find 
the fraction by which the transmitted beam’s intensity 
is reduced in the three following cases. (a) Three filters 
are in the stack, each with its transmission axis at 45.0° 
relative to the preceding filter. (b) Four filters are in 
the stack, each with its transmission axis at 30.0° rela-
tive to the preceding filter. (c) Seven filters are in the 
stack, each with its transmission axis at 15.0° relative to 
the preceding filter. (d) Comment on comparing the 
answers to parts (a), (b), and (c).
49. The critical angle for total internal reflection for sap-
phire surrounded by air is 34.4°. Calculate the polar-
izing angle for sapphire.
50. For a particular transparent medium surrounded by 
air, find the polarizing angle u
p
in terms of the critical 
angle for total internal reflection u
c
.
51. Three polarizing plates whose planes are parallel are 
centered on a common axis. The directions of the 
transmission axes relative to the common vertical 
direction are shown in Figure P38.51. A linearly polar-
ized beam of light with plane of polarization parallel 
to the vertical reference direction is incident from 
the left onto the first disk with intensity I
i
5 10.0 units 
AMT
Q/C
S
M
I
i
I
f
u
1
u
2
u
3
Figure P38.51
XDoc.HTML5 Viewer, Create Web Doc & Image Viewer in C#.NET
VB.NET comment annotate PDF, VB.NET delete PDF pages, VB.NET convert PDF to SVG. C# Demo Codes for PDF Conversions. 2. Deploy web document viewer into IIS server.
how to change pdf to html format; convert pdf form to web form
C#: How to Add HTML5 Document Viewer Control to Your Web Page
web document viewer into your own addCommand(new RECommand("convert")); _tabFile.addCommand var _userCmdDemoPdf = new UserCommand("pdf"); _userCmdDemoPdf.
pdf to html converters; changing pdf to html
1188
chapter 38 Diffraction patterns and polarization
polarized when it is at 36.0° with respect to the surface, 
what is the wavelength of the refracted ray?
64. Iridescent peacock feathers are shown in Figure 
P38.64a. The surface of one microscopic barbule is 
composed of transparent keratin that supports rods 
of dark brown melanin in a regular lattice, repre-
sented in Figure P38.64b. (Your fingernails are made 
of keratin, and melanin is the dark pigment giving 
color to human skin.) In a portion of the feather that 
can appear turquoise (blue-green), assume the mela-
nin rods are uniformly separated by 0.25 mm, with 
air between them. (a) Explain how this structure can 
appear turquoise when it contains no blue or green 
pigment. (b) Explain how it can also appear violet if 
light falls on it in a different direction. (c) Explain 
how it can present different colors to your two eyes 
simultaneously, which is a characteristic of iridescence.  
(d) A compact disc can appear to be any color of the 
rainbow. Explain why the portion of the feather in 
Figure P38.64b cannot appear yellow or red. (e) What 
could be different about the array of melanin rods in a 
portion of the feather that does appear to be red?
a
Figure P38.64
M
y
k
h
a
y
l
o
P
a
l
i
n
c
h
a
k
/
S
h
u
t
t
e
r
s
t
o
c
k
.
c
o
m
Figure P38.59
©
i
S
t
o
c
k
p
h
o
t
o
.
c
o
m
/
c
b
p
i
x
60. Two wavelengths l and l 1 Dl (with Dl ,, l) are inci-
dent on a diffraction grating. Show that the angular 
separation between the spectral lines in the mth-order 
spectrum is
Du5
Dl
"
1
d/m
22
2l2
where d is the slit spacing and m is the order number.
61. Review. A beam of 541-nm light is incident on a dif-
fraction grating that has 400 grooves/mm. (a) Deter-
mine the angle of the second-order ray. (b) What If? If 
the entire apparatus is immersed in water, what is the 
new second-order angle of diffraction? (c) Show that 
the two diffracted rays of parts (a) and (b) are related 
through the law of refraction.
62. Why is the following situation impossible? A technician is 
sending laser light of wavelength 632.8 nm through a 
pair of slits separated by 30.0 mm. Each slit is of width 
2.00 mm. The screen on which he projects the pattern 
is not wide enough, so light from the m 5 15 inter-
ference maximum misses the edge of the screen and 
passes into the next lab station, startling a coworker.
63. A 750-nm light beam in air hits the flat surface of a 
certain liquid, and the beam is split into a reflected ray 
and a refracted ray. If the reflected ray is completely 
BIO
S
p
Air
Water
u
p
u
u
Figure P38.65 
Problems 65 and 66.
C# PDF Convert to SVG SDK: Convert PDF to SVG files in C#.net, ASP
high-fidelity PDF to SVG conversion in both ASP.NET web and WinForms In some situations, it is quite necessary to convert PDF document into SVG image
convert from pdf to html; convert pdf fillable form to html
C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
Turn multiple pages PDF into single jpg files respectively online. Using this C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion C# developers can easily and quickly convert a large
converting pdf to html email; convert pdf to html format
problems 
1189
graph of intensity versus f has a horizontal tangent at 
maxima and also at minima.
72. How much diffraction spreading does a light beam 
undergo? One quantitative answer is the full width at 
half maximum of the central maximum of the single-slit 
Fraunhofer diffraction pattern. You can evaluate this 
angle of spreading in this problem. (a) In Equation 
38.2, define f5 pa sin u/l and show that at the point 
where I 5 0.5I
max
we must have f5!2
sin f. (b) Let 
y
1
5 sin f and y
2
5f/!2
. Plot y
1
and y
2
on the same 
set of axes over a range from f 5 1 rad to f 5 p/2 rad.  
Determine f from the point of intersection of the 
two curves. (c) Then show that if the fraction l/a is 
not large, the angular full width at half maximum of  
the central diffraction maximum is u 5 0.885l/a.  
(d) What If? Another method to solve the transcen-
dental equation f5 !2
sin f in part (a) is to guess 
a first value of f, use a computer or calculator to see 
how nearly it fits, and continue to update your estimate 
until the equation balances. How many steps (itera-
tions) does this process take?
73. Two closely spaced wavelengths of light are incident on a 
diffraction grating. (a) Starting with Equation 38.7, show 
that the angular dispersion of the grating is given by
du
dl
5
m
d cos u
(b) A square grating 2.00 cm on each side containing 
8 000 equally spaced slits is used to analyze the spec-
trum of mercury. Two closely spaced lines emitted 
by this element have wavelengths of 579.065 nm and 
576.959 nm. What is the angular separation of these 
two wavelengths in the second-order spectrum?
74. Light of wavelength 632.8 nm illuminates a single slit, 
and a diffraction pattern is formed on a screen 1.00 m 
from the slit. (a) Using the data in the following table, 
plot relative intensity versus position. Choose an appro-
priate value for the slit width a and, on the same graph 
used for the experimental data, plot the theoretical 
expression for the relative intensity
I
I
max
5
sin2 f
f2
where f 5 (pa sin u)/l. (b) What value of a gives the 
best fit of theory and experiment?
Position Relative to
Central Maximum (mm) 
Relative Intensity
1.00
0.8 
0.95
1.6 
0.80
3.2 
0.39
4.8 
0.079
6.5 
0.003
8.1 
0.036
9.7 
0.043
11.3 
0.013
12.9 
0.000 3
14.5 
0.012
16.1 
0.015
17.7 
0.004 4
19.3 
0.000 3
your eyes are 5.00mm in diameter, and the average 
wavelength of the light coming from the screen is  
550 nm. Calculate the ratio of the minimum viewing 
distance to the vertical dimension of the picture such 
that you will not be able to resolve the lines.
68. A pinhole camera has a small circular aperture of 
diameter D. Light from distant objects passes through 
the aperture into an otherwise dark box, falling on a 
screen located a distance L away. If D is too large, the 
display on the screen will be fuzzy because a bright 
point in the field of view will send light onto a circle of 
diameter slightly larger than D. On the other hand, if 
D is too small, diffraction will blur the display on the 
screen. The screen shows a reasonably sharp image 
if the diameter of the central disk of the diffraction 
pattern, specified by Equation 38.6, is equal to D at 
the screen. (a) Show that for monochromatic light 
with plane wave fronts and L .. D, the condition for 
a sharp view is fulfilled if D2 5 2.44lL. (b) Find the 
optimum pinhole diameter for 500-nm light projected 
onto a screen 15.0 cm away.
69. The scale of a map is a number of kilometers per centi-
meter specifying the distance on the ground that any 
distance on the map represents. The scale of a spectrum 
is its dispersion, a number of nanometers per centime-
ter, specifying the change in wavelength that a distance 
across the spectrum represents. You must know the 
dispersion if you want to compare one spectrum with 
another or make a measurement of, for example, a Dop-
pler shift. Let y represent the position relative to the  
center of a diffraction pattern projected onto a flat 
screen at distance L by a diffraction grating with slit 
spacing d. The dispersion is dl/dy. (a) Prove that the 
dispersion is given by
dl
dy
5
L2d
m
1
L1y2
23/2
(b) A light with a mean wavelength of 550 nm is ana-
lyzed with a grating having 8 000 rulings/cm and pro-
jected onto a screen 2.40 m away. Calculate the disper-
sion in first order.
70. (a) Light traveling in a medium of index of refraction 
n
1
is incident at an angle u on the surface of a medium 
of index n
2
. The angle between reflected and refracted 
rays is b. Show that
tan u5
n
2
sin b
n
1
2n
2
cos b
(b) What If? Show that this expression for tan u reduces 
to Brewster’s law when b 5 90°.
71. The intensity of light in a diffraction pattern of a single 
slit is described by the equation
I5I
max
sin2 f
f2
where f 5 (pa sin u)/l. The central maximum is at 
f 5 0, and the side maxima are approximately at f 5 
1m11
2
2p for m 5 1, 2, 3, . . . . Determine more pre-
cisely (a) the location of the first side maximum, 
where m 5 1, and (b) the location of the second side 
maximum. Suggestion: Observe in Figure 38.6a that the 
S
XDoc.HTML5 Viewer for .NET, Zero Footprint AJAX Document Image
View, Convert, Edit, Sign Documents and Images. viewer library can be easily integrated into your ASP powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
to html; converter pdf to html
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Create new page to PDF document in both ASP.NET web server-side application and .NET Windows Forms. DLLs for Adding Page into PDF Document in VB.NET Class.
convert pdf into html code; create html email from pdf
1190
chapter 38 Diffraction patterns and polarization
sources, separated laterally by 20.0 cm, are behind the 
slit. What must be the maximum distance between the 
plane of the sources and the slit if the diffraction pat-
terns are to be resolved? In this case, the approxima-
tion sin u < tan u is not valid because of the relatively 
small value of a/l.
78. In Figure P38.78, suppose the transmission axes of 
the left and right polarizing disks are perpendicular 
to each other. Also, let the center disk be rotated on 
the common axis with an angular speed v. Show that 
if unpolarized light is incident on the left disk with an 
intensity I
max
, the intensity of the beam emerging from 
the right disk is
I5
1
16
I
max
1
12cos 4vt
2
This result means that the intensity of the emerging 
beam is modulated at a rate four times the rate of 
rotation of the center disk. Suggestion: Use the trigo- 
nometric identities cos2 u5
1
2
1
11cos 2u
2
and sin2 u5 
1
2
1
12cos 2u
2
.
Transmission axis
Transmission
axis
I
I
max
u = vt
Figure P38.78
79. Consider a light wave passing through a slit and propa-
gating toward a distant screen. Figure P38.79 shows the 
intensity variation for the pattern on the screen. Give a 
mathematical argument that more than 90% of the 
transmitted energy is in the central maximum of the 
diffraction pattern. Suggestion: You are not expected to 
calculate the precise percentage, but explain the steps 
of your reasoning. You may use the identification
1
12
1
1
32
1
1
52
1
c
5
p2
8
S
Challenge Problems
75. Figure P38.75a is a three-dimensional sketch of a bire-
fringent crystal. The dotted lines illustrate how a thin, 
parallel-faced slab of material could be cut from the 
larger specimen with the crystal’s optic axis parallel to 
the faces of the plate. A section cut from the crystal 
in this manner is known as a retardation plate. When a 
beam of light is incident on the plate perpendicular 
to the direction of the optic axis as shown in Figure 
P38.75b, the O ray and the E ray travel along a single 
straight line, but with different speeds. The figure 
shows the wave fronts for the two rays. (a) Let the thick-
ness of the plate be d. Show that the phase difference 
between the O ray and the E ray after traveling the 
thickness of the plate is
u5
2pd
l
0
n
O
2n
E
0
where l is the wavelength in air. (b) In a particular 
case, the incident light has a wavelength of 550 nm. 
Find the minimum value of d for a quartz plate for 
which u 5 p/2. Such a plate is called a quarter-wave 
plate. Use values of n
O
and n
from Table 38.1.
Optic
axis
Optic
axis
E ray
O ray
d
d
a
b
Figure P38.75
76. A spy satellite can consist of a large-diameter concave 
mirror forming an image on a digital-camera detec-
tor and sending the picture to a ground receiver by 
radio waves. In effect, it is an astronomical telescope 
in orbit, looking down instead of up. (a) Can a spy sat-
ellite read a license plate? (b) Can it read the date on 
a dime? Argue for your answers by making an order-
of-magnitude calculation, specifying the data you 
estimate.
77. Suppose the single slit in Figure 38.4 is 6.00 cm wide 
and in front of a microwave source operating at  
7.50 GHz. (a) Calculate the angle for the first mini-
mum in the diffraction pattern. (b) What is the rela-
tive intensity I/I
max
at u 5 15.0°? (c) Assume two such 
I
max
-3p-2p
-p
2p 3p
I
a
sin
u
p
p
l
Figure P38.79
C# Image: How to Integrate Web Document and Image Viewer
RasterEdgeImagingDeveloperGuide8.0.pdf: from this user manual, you can find the want to insert the web document viewer into your own web page, but for
convert pdf link to html; convert pdf to html code for email
1191
Modern Physics
The Compact Muon Solenoid 
(CMS) Detector is part of 
the Large Hadron Collider 
at the European Laboratory 
for Particle Physics operated 
by CERN. It is one of several 
detectors that search for 
elementary particles. For a  
sense of scale, the green 
structure to the left of the 
detector and extending to the 
top is five stories high. 
(CERN)
At the end of the 19th century, many scientists believed they had learned most of 
what there was to know about physics. Newton’s laws of motion and theory of universal 
gravitation, Maxwell’s theoretical work in unifying electricity and magnetism, the laws of ther-
modynamics and kinetic theory, and the principles of optics were highly successful in explaining a 
variety of phenomena.
At the turn of the 20th century, however, a major revolution shook the world of physics. In 1900, 
Max Planck provided the basic ideas that led to the formulation of the quantum theory, and in 1905, 
Albert Einstein formulated his special theory of relativity. The excitement of the times is captured in 
Einstein’s own words: “It was a marvelous time to be alive.” Both theories were to have a profound 
effect on our understanding of nature. Within a few decades, they inspired new developments in the 
fields of atomic physics, nuclear physics, and condensed-matter physics.
In Chapter 39, we shall introduce the special theory of relativity. The theory provides us with a 
new and deeper view of physical laws. Although the predictions of this theory often violate our com-
mon sense, the theory correctly describes the results of experiments involving speeds near the speed 
of light. The extended version of this textbook, Physics for Scientists and Engineers with Modern Phys-
ics, covers the basic concepts of quantum mechanics and their application to atomic and molecular 
physics. In addition, we introduce condensed matter physics, nuclear physics, particle physics, and 
cosmology in the extended version.
Even though the physics that was developed during the 20th century has led to a multitude of 
important technological achievements, the story is still incomplete. Discoveries will continue to 
evolve during our lifetimes, and many of these discoveries will deepen or refine our understand-
ing of nature and the Universe around us. It is still a “marvelous time to be alive.” 
P A A R R T  
6
Our everyday experiences and observations involve objects that move at speeds much 
less than the speed of light. Newtonian mechanics was formulated by observing and 
describing the motion of such objects, and this formalism is very successful in describing a 
wide range of phenomena that occur at low speeds. Nonetheless, it fails to describe properly 
the motion of objects whose speeds approach that of light.
Experimentally, the predictions of Newtonian theory can be tested at high speeds by 
accelerating electrons or other charged particles through a large electric potential dif-
ference. For example, it is possible to accelerate an electron to a speed of 0.99c (where c 
is the speed of light) by using a potential difference of several million volts. According to 
Newtonian mechanics, if the potential difference is increased by a factor of 4, the electron’s 
kinetic energy is four times greater and its speed should double to 1.98c. Experiments show, 
however, that the speed of the electron—as well as the speed of any other object in the Uni-
verse—always remains less than the speed of light, regardless of the size of the accelerating 
voltage. Because it places no upper limit on speed, Newtonian mechanics is contrary to 
modern experimental results and is clearly a limited theory.
In 1905, at the age of only 26, Einstein published his special theory of relativity. Regard-
ing the theory, Einstein wrote:
39.1 The Principle of Galilean 
Relativity
39.2 The Michelson–Morley 
Experiment
39.3 Einstein’s Principle of 
Relativity
39.4 Consequences of the 
Special Theory of Relativity
39.5 The Lorentz Transformation 
Equations
39.6 The Lorentz Velocity 
Transformation Equations
39.7 Relativistic Linear 
Momentum
39.8 Relativistic Energy
39.9 The General Theory of 
Relativity
c h a p p t t e r 
39
relativity
Standing on the shoulders of a giant
David Serway, son of one of the 
authors, watches over two of his 
children, Nathan and Kaitlyn, as they 
frolic in the arms of Albert Einstein’s 
statue at the Einstein memorial in 
Washington, D.C. It is well known 
that Einstein, the principal architect 
of relativity, was very fond of 
children. 
(Emily Serway)
1192 
39.1 the principle of Galilean relativity 
1193
The relativity theory arose from necessity, from serious and deep contradictions in the 
old theory from which there seemed no escape. The strength of the new theory lies in 
the consistency and simplicity with which it solves all these difficulties.1
Although Einstein made many other important contributions to science, the special the-
ory of relativity alone represents one of the greatest intellectual achievements of all time. 
With this theory, experimental observations can be correctly predicted over the range of 
speeds from v 5 0 to speeds approaching the speed of light. At low speeds, Einstein’s theory 
reduces to Newtonian mechanics as a limiting situation. It is important to recognize that 
Einstein was working on electromagnetism when he developed the special theory of relativ-
ity. He was convinced that Maxwell’s equations were correct, and to reconcile them with 
one of his postulates, he was forced into the revolutionary notion of assuming that space 
and time are not absolute.
This chapter gives an introduction to the special theory of relativity, with emphasis on 
some of its predictions. In addition to its well-known and essential role in theoretical phys-
ics, the special theory of relativity has practical applications, including the design of nuclear 
power plants and modern global positioning system (GPS) units. These devices depend on 
relativistic principles for proper design and operation.
39.1 The Principle of Galilean Relativity
To describe a physical event, we must establish a frame of reference. You should 
recall from Chapter 5 that an inertial frame of reference is one in which an object is 
observed to have no acceleration when no forces act on it. Furthermore, any frame 
moving with constant velocity with respect to an inertial frame must also be an 
inertial frame.
There is no absolute inertial reference frame. Therefore, the results of an exper-
iment performed in a vehicle moving with uniform velocity must be identical to the 
results of the same experiment performed in a stationary vehicle. The formal state-
ment of this result is called the principle of Galilean relativity:
The laws of mechanics must be the same in all inertial frames of reference.
Let’s consider an observation that illustrates the equivalence of the laws of mechan-
ics in different inertial frames. The pickup truck in Figure 39.1a moves with a  
WWPrinciple of Galilean relativity
1A. Einstein and L. Infield, The Evolution of Physics (New York: Simon and Schuster, 1961).
Figure 39.1 
Two observers 
watch the path of a thrown ball 
and obtain different results.
a
b
The observer in the moving truck 
sees the ball travel in a vertical 
path when thrown upward.
The Earth-based observer sees
the ball’s path as a parabola.
y
O
y
x
x
vt
(event)
S′
S
x
O
x
v
S
Figure 39.2 
An event occurs at 
a point P. The event is seen by two 
observers in inertial frames S and 
S9, where S9 moves with a velocity 
v
S
relative to S.
Suppose some physical phenomenon, which we call an event, occurs and is 
observed by an observer at rest in an inertial reference frame. The wording “in a 
frame” means that the observer is at rest with respect to the origin of that frame. 
The event’s location and time of occurrence can be specified by the four coordi-
nates (x, yzt). We would like to be able to transform these coordinates from those 
of an observer in one inertial frame to those of another observer in a frame moving 
with uniform relative velocity compared with the first frame.
Consider two inertial frames S and S9 (Fig. 39.2). The S9 frame moves with a con-
stant velocity v
S
along the common x and x9 axes, where v
S
is measured relative to S. 
We assume the origins of S and S9 coincide at t 5 0 and an event occurs at point P in 
space at some instant of time. For simplicity, we show the observer O in the S frame 
and the observer O9 in the S9 frame as blue dots at the origins of their coordinate 
frames in Figure 39.2, but that is not necessary: either observer could be at any 
fixed location in his or her frame. Observer O describes the event with space–time 
coordinates (xyzt), whereas observer O9 in S9 uses the coordinates (x9, y9, z9, 
t9) to describe the same event. Model the origin of S9 as a particle under constant 
velocity relative to the origin of S. As we see from the geometry in Figure 39.2, the 
relationships among these various coordinates can be written
x9 5 x 2 vt   y9 5 y   z9 5 z   t9 5 t 
(39.1)
These equations are the Galilean space–time transformation equations. Note that 
time is assumed to be the same in both inertial frames. That is, within the frame-
work of classical mechanics, all clocks run at the same rate, regardless of their 
velocity, so the time at which an event occurs for an observer in S is the same as the 
time for the same event in S9. Consequently, the time interval between two succes-
sive events should be the same for both observers. Although this assumption may 
seem obvious, it turns out to be incorrect in situations where v is comparable to the 
speed of light.
Now suppose a particle moves through a displacement of magnitude dx along 
the x axis in a time interval dt as measured by an observer in S. It follows from Equa-
tions 39.1 that the corresponding displacement dx9 measured by an observer in S9 is 
Galilean transformation 
equations
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested