mvc display pdf in browser : Convert pdf to web link SDK Library API .net asp.net windows sharepoint doc-3-pdf-67a5de9fa89738da0c6835ef457b5878-original138-part235

43.2 energy States and Spectra of Molecules 
1345
where m
1
and m
2
are the masses of the atoms that form the molecule, r is the atomic 
separation, and m is the reduced mass of the molecule (see Example 41.5 and Prob-
lem 40 in Chapter 41):
m5
m
1
m
2
m
1
1m
2
(43.4)
The magnitude of the molecule’s angular momentum about its center of mass 
is given by Equation 11.14, L 5 Iv, which classically can have any value. Quantum 
mechanics, however, restricts the molecule to certain quantized rotational frequen-
cies such that the angular momentum of the molecule has the values2
L5"J
1
J11
2
U
J50, 1, 2,c 
(43.5)
where J is an integer called the rotational quantum number. Combining Equa-
tions 43.5 and 43.2, we obtain an expression for the allowed values of the rotational 
kinetic energy of the molecule:
E
rot
5
1
2
Iv
2
5
1
2I
1
Iv
22
5
L2
2I
5
1
"J
1
J11
2
U
22
2I
E
rot
5E
J
5
U
2
2I
J
1
J11
2
J50, 1, 2,c 
(43.6)
The allowed rotational energies of a diatomic molecule are plotted in Figure 43.5b. 
As the quantum number J goes up, the states become farther apart as displayed 
earlier for rotational energy levels in Figure 21.7.
For most molecules, transitions between adjacent rotational energy levels result 
in radiation that lies in the microwave range of frequencies (f , 1011 Hz). When a 
molecule absorbs a microwave photon, the molecule jumps from a lower rotational 
energy level to a higher one. The allowed rotational transitions of linear molecules 
are regulated by the selection rule DJ 5 61. Given this selection rule, all absorption 
lines in the spectrum of a linear molecule correspond to energy separations equal 
to E
J
E
J21
, where J 5 1, 2, 3, . . . . From Equation 43.6, we see that the energies of 
the absorbed photons are given by
E
photon
5DE
rot
5E
J
2E
J21
5
U
2
2I
3
J
1
J11
2
2
1
J21
2
J
4
E
photon
5
U2
I
J5
h2
4p2I
J
J51, 2, 3,c 
(43.7)
WW Reduced mass of a diatomic 
molecule
WW Allowed values of rotational 
angular momentum
WW Allowed values of rotational 
energy
WW Energy of a photon absorbed 
in a transition between adja-
cent rotational levels
2Equation 43.5 is similar to Equation 42.27 for orbital angular momentum in an atom. The relationship between the 
magnitude of the angular momentum of a system and the associated quantum number is the same as it is in these 
equations for any system that exhibits rotation as long as the potential energy function for the system is spherically 
symmetric.
E
1
E
1
E
1
E
1
E
1
6
5
4
3
21
15
10
6
2
3
1
0
E
1
Rotational
energy
J
r
CM
E
N
E
R
G
Y
y
x
z
a
b
The diatomic molecule 
can rotate about the x 
and z axes.
m
1
m
2
E
= 0
The energies of 
allowed states can 
be calculated using 
Equation 43.6.
Figure 43.5 
Rotation of a 
diatomic molecule around its cen-
ter of mass. (a) A diatomic mol-
ecule oriented along the y axis. 
(b) Allowed rotational energies of 
a diatomic molecule expressed as 
multiples of E
1
5 "2/I.
Convert pdf to web link - Convert PDF to html files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
How to Convert PDF to HTML Webpage with C# PDF Conversion SDK
convert pdf to html5 open source; embed pdf to website
Convert pdf to web link - VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
PDF to HTML Webpage Converter SDK for VB.NET PDF to HTML Conversion
convert pdf to web link; convert pdf link to html
1346
chapter 43 Molecules and Solids
where J is the rotational quantum number of the higher energy state. Because  
E
photon
hf, where f is the frequency of the absorbed photon, we see that the 
allowed frequency for the transition J 5 0 to J 5 1 is f
1
h/4p2I. The frequency cor-
responding to the J 5 1 to J 5 2 transition is 2f
1
, and so on. These predictions are in 
excellent agreement with the observed frequencies.
uick Quiz 43.2  A gas of identical diatomic molecules absorbs electro magnetic 
radiation over a wide range of frequencies. Molecule 1 is in the J 5 0 rotation 
state and makes a transition to the J 5 1 state. Molecule 2 is in the J 5 2 state 
and makes a transition to the J 5 3 state. Is the ratio of the frequency of the 
photon that excited molecule 2 to that of the photon that excited molecule 1 
equal to (a) 1, (b) 2, (c) 3, (d) 4, or (e) impossible to determine?
Example 43.1   Rotation of the CO Molecule
The J 5 0 to J 5 1 rotational transition of the CO molecule occurs at a frequency of 1.15 3 1011 Hz.
(A)  Use this information to calculate the moment of inertia of the molecule.
Conceptualize  Imagine that the two atoms in Figure 43.5a are carbon and oxygen. The center of mass of the molecule 
is not midway between the atoms because of the difference in masses of the C and O atoms.
Categorize  The statement of the problem tells us to categorize this example as one involving a quantum-mechanical 
treatment and to restrict our investigation to the rotational motion of a diatomic molecule.
SoluTIon
Analyze  Use Equation 43.7 to find the energy of a pho-
ton that excites the molecule from the J 5 0 to the J 5 1 
rotational level:
E
photon
5
h2
4p2I
1
1
2
5
h2
4p2I
Equate this energy to E 5 hf for the absorbed photon 
and solve for I:
h2
4p2I
5hf   S   I5
h
4p2f
Substitute the frequency given in the problem statement:
I5
6.626310234 J
#
s
4p2
1
1.1531011 s21
2
5
1.46310246 kg
#
m2
(B)  Calculate the bond length of the molecule.
SoluTIon
Find the reduced mass m of the CO molecule:
m5
m
1
m
2
m
1
1m
2
5
1
12 u
21
16 u
2
12 u116 u
56.86 u
5 16.86 u2
a
1.66310227 kg
1 u
b
51.14310226 kg
Solve Equation 43.3 for r and substitute for the reduced 
mass and the moment of inertia from part (A):
r5
Å
I
m
5
Å
1.46310246 kg
#
m2
1.14310226 kg
5 1.13 3 10210 m 5 
0.113 nm
Finalize  The moment of inertia of the molecule and the separation distance between the atoms are both very small, as 
expected for a microscopic system.
What if another photon of frequency 1.15 3 1011 Hz is incident on the CO molecule while that molecule 
is in the J 5 1 state? What happens?
Answer  Because the rotational quantum states are not equally spaced in energy, the J 5 1 to J 5 2 transition does not 
have the same energy as the J 5 0 to J 5 1 transition. Therefore, the molecule will not be excited to the J 5 2 state. Two 
WhAT IF?
C#: How to Add HTML5 Document Viewer Control to Your Web Page
the necessary resources for creating web document viewer addCommand(new RECommand("convert")); _tabFile.addCommand new UserCommand("pdf"); _userCmdDemoPdf.
convert pdf to html for online; convert fillable pdf to html
C# Image: How to Integrate Web Document and Image Viewer
RasterEdge DocImage SDK for .NET link directly. project for building a modern web document image RasterEdgeImagingDeveloperGuide8.0.pdf: from this user manual
how to convert pdf into html code; convert pdf to html code for email
43.2 energy States and Spectra of Molecules 
1347
possibilities exist. The photon could pass by the molecule with no interaction, or the photon could induce a stimulated 
emission, similar to that for atoms and discussed in Section 42.9. In this case, the molecule makes a transition back to 
the J 5 0 state and the original photon and a second identical photon leave the scene of the interaction.
Vibrational Motion of Molecules
If we consider a molecule to be a flexible structure in which the atoms are bonded 
together by “effective springs” as shown in Figure 43.6a, we can apply the particle in 
simple harmonic motion analysis model to the molecule as long as the atoms in the 
molecule are not too far from their equilibrium positions. Recall from Section 15.3 
that the potential energy function for a simple harmonic oscillator is parabolic, 
varying as the square of the position of the particle relative to the equilibrium posi-
tion. (See Eq. 15.20 and Fig. 15.9b.) Figure 43.6b shows a plot of potential energy 
versus atomic separation for a diatomic molecule, where r
0
is the equilibrium 
atomic separation. For separations close to r
0
, the shape of the potential energy 
curve closely resembles the parabolic shape of the potential energy function in the 
particle in simple harmonic motion model.
According to classical mechanics, the frequency of vibration for the system 
shown in Figure 43.6a is given by Equation 15.14:
f5
1
2pÅ
k
m
(43.8)
where k is the effective spring constant and m is the reduced mass given by Equation 
43.4. In Section 21.3, we studied the contribution of a molecule’s vibration to the 
specific heats of gases.
Quantum mechanics predicts that a molecule vibrates in quantized states as 
described in Section 41.7. The vibrational motion and quantized vibrational energy 
can be altered if the molecule acquires energy of the proper value to cause a transi-
tion between quantized vibrational states. As discussed in Section 41.7, the allowed 
vibrational energies are
E
vib
5
1
v1
1
2
2
hf
v50, 1, 2,c 
(43.9)
where v is an integer called the vibrational quantum number. (We used n in Sec-
tion 41.7 for a general harmonic oscillator, but v is often used for the quantum 
number when discussing molecular vibrations.) If the system is in the lowest vibra-
tional state, for which v 5 0, its ground-state energy is 
1
2
hf. In the first excited vibra-
tional state, v 5 1 and the energy is 
3
2
hf, and so on.
k
r
r
r
0
U(r)
a
b
The vibration of the 
molecule is along 
the molecular axis.
The distance r
0
is the 
equilibrium separation 
distance of the atoms.
m
1
m
2
Figure 43.6 
(a) Effective-spring 
model of a diatomic molecule.  
(b) Plot of the potential energy  
of a diatomic molecule versus  
atomic separation distance.  
Compare with Figure 15.11a.
▸ 43.1 
continued
VB.NET PDF: Create PDF Document Viewer in C#.NET for Document
reading PDF document in ASP.NET web, .NET Windows Forms and mobile developing applications respectively. For more information on them, just click the link and
attach pdf to html; online pdf to html converter
C# PDF: How to Create PDF Document Viewer in C#.NET with
Support rendering web viewer PDF document to images or svg file; Free to convert viewing PDF document to TIFF file for document management;
convert pdf fillable form to html; how to change pdf to html
1348
chapter 43 Molecules and Solids
Substituting Equation 43.8 into Equation 43.9 gives the following expression for 
the allowed vibrational energies:
E
vib
5
1
v1
1
2
2
h
2p
Å
k
m
v50, 1, 2,c 
(43.10)
The selection rule for the allowed vibrational transitions is Dv 5 61. Transitions 
between vibrational levels are caused by absorption of photons in the infrared 
region of the spectrum. The energy of an absorbed photon is equal to the energy 
difference between any two successive vibrational levels. Therefore, the photon 
energy is given by
E
photon
5DE
vib
5
h
2p
Å
k
m
(43.11)
The vibrational energies of a diatomic molecule are plotted in Figure 43.7. At 
ordinary temperatures, most molecules have vibrational energies corresponding to 
the v 5 0 state because the spacing between vibrational states is much greater than 
k
B
T, where k
B
is Boltzmann’s constant and T is the temperature.
uick Quiz 43.3  A gas of identical diatomic molecules absorbs electromagnetic 
radiation over a wide range of frequencies. Molecule 1, initially in the v 5 0 
vibrational state, makes a transition to the v 5 1 state. Molecule 2, initially in 
the v 5 2 state, makes a transition to the v 5 3 state. What is the ratio of the fre-
quency of the photon that excited molecule 2 to that of the photon that excited 
molecule 1? (a) 1 (b) 2 (c) 3 (d) 4 (e) impossible to determine
Allowed values of 
vibrational energy
Vibrational
energy
v
5
hf
11
2
4
hf
9
2
3
hf
7
2
2
hf
5
2
1
hf
3
2
0
hf
1
2
E
vib
E
N
E
R
G
Y
The spacings between 
adjacent vibrational 
levels are equal if the 
molecule behaves as a 
harmonic oscillator.
Example 43.2   Vibration of the CO Molecule 
The frequency of the photon that causes the v 5 0 to v 5 1 transition in the CO molecule is 6.42 3 1013 Hz. We ignore 
any changes in the rotational energy for this example.
(A)  Calculate the force constant k for this molecule.
Conceptualize  Imagine that the two atoms in Figure 43.6a are carbon and oxygen. As the molecule vibrates, a given 
point on the imaginary spring is at rest. This point is not midway between the atoms because of the difference in 
masses of the C and O atoms.
Categorize  The statement of the problem tells us to categorize this example as one involving a quantum-mechanical 
treatment and to restrict our investigation to the vibrational motion of a diatomic molecule. The molecule is analyzed 
with portions of the particle in simple harmonic motion analysis model.
AM
SoluTIon
Figure 43.7 
Allowed vibrational 
energies of a diatomic molecule, 
where f is the frequency of vibra-
tion of the molecule, given by 
Equation 43.8.
VB.NET Image: VB Code to Download and Save Image from Web URL
users to download image from website link more easily. Apart from image downloading from web URL, RasterEdge & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
best website to convert pdf to word online; converting pdf into html
C# PDF Convert to SVG SDK: Convert PDF to SVG files in C#.net, ASP
In some situations, it is quite necessary to convert PDF document into SVG image format. indexed, scripted, and supported by most of the up to date web browsers
how to convert pdf to html email; how to convert pdf to html
43.2 energy States and Spectra of Molecules 
1349
Molecular Spectra
In general, a molecule vibrates and rotates simultaneously. To a first approxima-
tion, these motions are independent of each other, so the total energy of the mol-
ecule for these motions is the sum of Equations 43.6 and 43.9:
E5
1
v1
1
2
2
hf1
U2
2I
J
1
J11
2
(43.12)
The energy levels of any molecule can be calculated from this expression, and each 
level is indexed by the two quantum numbers v and J. From these calculations, 
an energy-level diagram like the one shown in Figure 43.8a (page 1350) can be 
constructed. For each allowed value of the vibrational quantum number v, there 
is a complete set of rotational levels corresponding to J 5 0, 1, 2, . . . . The energy 
separation between successive rotational levels is much smaller than the separation 
between successive vibrational levels. As noted earlier, most molecules at ordinary 
temperatures are in the v 5 0 vibrational state; these molecules can be in various 
rotational states as Figure 43.8a shows.
When a molecule absorbs a photon with the appropriate energy, the vibrational 
quantum number v increases by one unit while the rotational quantum number J 
either increases or decreases by one unit as can be seen in Figure 43.8. Therefore, 
the molecular absorption spectrum in Figure 43.8b consists of two groups of lines: 
one group to the right of center and satisfying the selection rules DJ 5 11 and Dv 5 
11, and the other group to the left of center and satisfying the selection rules DJ 5 
21 and Dv 5 11.
The energies of the absorbed photons can be calculated from Equation 43.12:
E
photon
5DE5hf1
U2
I
1
J11
2
J50, 1, 2,c
1
DJ511
2
(43.13)
E
photon
5DE5hf2
U
2
I
J
J51, 2, 3,c
1
DJ521
2
(43.14)
Substitute the frequency given in the prob-
lem statement and the reduced mass from 
Example43.1:
k54p2
1
1.14310226 kg
21
6.4231013 s21
22
5
1.853103 N/m
Analyze  Set Equation 43.11 equal to the pho-
ton energy hf and solve for the force constant:
h
2p
Å
k
m
5hf   S   k54p2mf2
(B)  What is the classical amplitude A of vibration for this molecule in the v 5 0 vibrational state?
SoluTIon
Substitute the value for k from part (A) and 
the value for m:
A5
Å
6.626310234 J
#
s
2p
c
1
1
1.14310226 kg
21
1.853103 N/m
2
d
1/4
5 4.79 3 10212 m 5 
0.004 79 nm
Equate the maximum elastic potential energy 
1
2
kA2 in the molecule (Eq. 15.21) to the vibra-
tional energy given by Equation 43.10 with  
v 5 0 and solve for A:
1
2
kA5
h
4p
Å
k
m
  A5
Å
h
2p
a
1
mk
b
1/4
Finalize  Comparing this result with the bond length of 0.113 nm we calculated in Example 43.1 shows that the classical 
amplitude of vibration is approximately 4% of the bond length.
▸ 43.2 
continued
C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
and quickly convert a large-size multi-page PDF document to a group of high-quality separate JPEG image files within .NET projects, including ASP.NET web and
changing pdf to html; how to convert pdf into html
VB.NET Image: Tutorial for Converting Image and Document in VB.NET
Use VB.NET Code to Convert Image to Stream, PDF to Image Conversion Through VB Programming. To convert image in web application, you may use our ASP.NET image
convert pdf into html online; convert pdf form to web form
1350
chapter 43 Molecules and Solids
where J is the rotational quantum number of the initial state. Equation 43.13 gener-
ates the series of equally spaced lines higher than the frequency f, whereas Equation 
43.14 generates the series lower than this frequency. Adjacent lines are separated 
in frequency by the fundamental unit "/2pI. Figure 43.8b shows the expected 
frequencies in the absorption spectrum of the molecule; these same frequencies 
appear in the emission spectrum.
The experimental absorption spectrum of the HCl molecule shown in Figure 
43.9 follows this pattern very well and reinforces our model. One peculiarity is 
apparent, however: each line is split into a doublet. This doubling occurs because 
two chlorine isotopes (Cl-35 and Cl-37; see Section 44.1) were present in the sample 
used to obtain this spectrum. Because the isotopes have different masses, the two 
HCl molecules have different values of I.
The intensity of the spectral lines in Figure 43.9 follows an interesting pattern, 
rising first as one moves away from the central gap (located at about 8.65 3 1013Hz, 
corresponding to the forbidden J 5 0 to J 5 0 transition) and then falling. This 
intensity is determined by a product of two functions of J. The first function cor-
responds to the number of available states for a given value of J. This function is  
2J1 1, corresponding to the number of values of m
J
, the molecular rotation ana-
log to m
,
for atomic states. For example, the J 5 2 state has five substates with five 
values of m
J
(m
J
5 22, 21, 0, 1, 2), whereas the J 5 1 state has only three substates 
(m
J
5 21, 0, 1). Therefore, on average and without regard for the second function 
described below, five-thirds as many molecules make the transition from the J 5 2 
state as from the J 5 1 state.
The second function determining the envelope of the intensity of the spectral 
lines is the Boltzmann factor, introduced in Section 21.5. The number of molecules 
in an excited rotational state is given by
n5n
0
e
2U2J
1
J11
2
/
1
2Ik
B
T
2
where n
0
is the number of molecules in the J 5 0 state.
Multiplying these factors together indicates that the intensity of spectral lines 
should be described by a function of J as follows:
I~
1
2J11
2
e2U
2J1J112/12Ik
B
T
2
(43.15)
Intensity variation in the 
Wvibration–rotation 
spectrum of a molecule
J = 4
J = 3
J = 2
J = 1
J = 0
v = 1
J = 4
J = 3
J = 2
J = 1
J = 0
v = 0
J = -1
J = +1
E
N
E
R
G
Y
a
The transitions obey the selection 
rule ∆= ±1 and fall into two 
sequences, those for ∆= +1 and 
those for ∆= -1.
Photon frequency
ℏ/2  I
b
The lines to the right of the center 
mark correspond to transitions in 
which J changes by +1; the lines to the 
left of the center mark correspond to 
transitions for which J changes by -1.
Figure 43.8 
(a) Absorptive 
transitions between the v 5 0 
and v 5 1 vibrational states of a 
diatomic molecule. Compare the 
energy levels in this figure with 
those in Figure 21.7. (b) Expected 
lines in the absorption spectrum 
of a molecule. These same lines 
appear in the emission spectrum.
VB.NET Word: VB Code to Create Word Mobile Viewer with .NET Doc
Directly convert your Android, iOS or Windows mobile device into a Process Word web page(s) within a few steps like png, gif, bmp, jpeg, tiff, pdf, and dicom.
convert pdf to html code; convert pdf to website html
43.2 energy States and Spectra of Molecules 
1351
The factor (2J 1 1) increases with J while the exponential second factor decreases. 
The product of the two factors gives a behavior that closely describes the envelope 
of the spectral lines in Figure 43.9.
The excitation of rotational and vibrational energy levels is an important consid-
eration in current models of global warming. Most of the absorption lines for CO
2
are in the infrared portion of the spectrum. Therefore, visible light from the Sun 
is not absorbed by atmospheric CO
2
but instead strikes the Earth’s surface, warm-
ing it. In turn, the surface of the Earth, being at a much lower temperature than 
the Sun, emits thermal radiation that peaks in the infrared portion of the electro-
magnetic spectrum (Section 40.1). This infrared radiation is absorbed by the CO
2
molecules in the air instead of radiating out into space. Atmospheric CO
2
acts like 
a one-way valve for energy from the Sun and is responsible, along with some other 
atmospheric molecules, for raising the temperature of the Earth’s surface above 
its value in the absence of an atmosphere. This phenomenon is commonly called 
the “greenhouse effect.” The burning of fossil fuels in today’s industrialized society 
adds more CO
2
to the atmosphere. This addition of CO
2
increases the absorption 
of infrared radiation, raising the Earth’s temperature further. In turn, this increase 
in temperature causes substantial climatic changes. 
As seen in Figure 43.10, the amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere has 
been steadily increasing since the middle of the 20th century. This graph shows 
hard data that indicate that the atmosphere is undergoing a distinct change, 
although not all scientists agree on the interpretation of what that change means in 
terms of global temperatures. 
The  Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) is a scientific body that 
assesses the available information related to global warming and associated effects 
8.0
8.2
8.4
8.6
8.8
9.0
9.2 
Frequency (× 10
13 
Hz)
I
n
t
e
n
s
i
t
y
Each line is split into a doublet because the sample 
contains two chlorine isotopes that have different 
masses and therefore different moments of inertia.
Figure 43.9 
Experimental 
absorption spectrum of the HCl 
molecule.
370
380
390
360
350
340
330
320
310
C
O
2
m
o
l
e
c
u
l
e
s
p
e
r
m
i
l
l
i
o
n
m
o
l
e
c
u
l
e
s
o
f
a
i
r
2000 20052010
1995
1990
1985
1980
1975
1970
1965
1960
Year
Figure 43.10 
The concentra-
tion of atmospheric carbon 
dioxide in parts per million 
(ppm) of dry air as a function of 
time. These data were recorded 
at the Mauna Loa Observatory 
in Hawaii. The yearly variations 
(red-brown curve) coincide with 
growing seasons because vegeta-
tion absorbs carbon dioxide from 
the air. The steady increase in 
the average concentration (black 
curve) is of concern to scientists.
1352
chapter 43 Molecules and Solids
related to climate change. It was originally established in 1988 by two United Nations 
organizations, the World Meteorological Organization and the United Nations Envi-
ronment Programme. The IPCC has published four assessment reports on climate 
change, the most recent in 2007, and a fifth report is scheduled to be released in 
2014. The 2007 report concludes that there is a probability of greater than 90% that 
the increased global temperature measured by scientists is due to the placement of 
greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide in the atmosphere by humans. The report 
also predicts a global temperature increase between 1°C and 6°C in the 21st century, 
a sea level rise from 18 cm to 59 cm, and very high probabilities of weather extremes, 
including heat waves, droughts, cyclones, and heavy rainfall.
In addition to its scientific aspects, global warming is a social issue with many fac-
ets. These facets encompass international politics and economics, because global 
warming is a worldwide problem. Changing our policies requires real costs to solve 
the problem. Global warming also has technological aspects, and new methods of 
manufacturing, transportation, and energy supply must be designed to slow down 
or reverse the increase in temperature.
Conceptual Example 43.3   Comparing Figures 43.8 and 43.9
In Figure 43.8a, the transitions indicated correspond to spectral lines that are equally spaced as shown in Figure 43.8b. 
The actual spectrum in Figure 43.9, however, shows lines that move closer together as the frequency increases. Why 
does the spacing of the actual spectral lines differ from the diagram in Figure 43.8?
In Figure 43.8, we modeled the rotating diatomic molecule as a rigid object (Chapter 10). In reality, however, as the 
molecule rotates faster and faster, the effective spring in Figure 43.6a stretches and provides the increased force asso-
ciated with the larger centripetal acceleration of each atom. As the molecule stretches along its length, its moment of 
inertia I increases. Therefore, the rotational part of the energy expression in Equation 43.12 has an extra dependence 
on J in the moment of inertia I. Because the increasing moment of inertia is in the denominator, as J increases, the 
energies do not increase as rapidly with J as indicated in Equation 43.12. With each higher energy level being lower 
than indicated by Equation 43.12, the energy associated with a transition to that level is smaller, as is the frequency 
of the absorbed photon, destroying the even spacing of the spectral lines and giving the spacing that decreases with 
increasing frequency seen in Figure 43.9.
SoluTIon
43.3 Bonding in Solids
A crystalline solid consists of a large number of atoms arranged in a regular array, 
forming a periodic structure. The ions in the NaCl crystal are ionically bonded, 
as already noted, and the carbon atoms in diamond form covalent bonds with one 
another. The metallic bond described at the end of this section is responsible for 
the cohesion of copper, silver, sodium, and other solid metals.
Ionic Solids
Many crystals are formed by ionic bonding, in which the dominant interaction 
between ions is the Coulomb force. Consider a portion of the NaCl crystal shown in 
Figure 43.11a. The red spheres are sodium ions, and the blue spheres are chlorine 
ions. As shown in Figure 43.11b, each Na1 ion has six nearest-neighbor Cl2 ions. 
Similarly, in Figure 43.11c, we see that each Cl2 ion has six nearest-neighbor Na1 
ions. Each Na1 ion is attracted to its six Cl2 neighbors. The corresponding poten-
tial energy is 26k
e
e2/r, where k
e
is the Coulomb constant and r is the separation dis-
tance between each Na1 and Cl2. In addition, there are 12 next-nearest-neighbor 
43.3 Bonding in Solids 
1353
Na
+
Cl
-
b
c
The blue spheres represent 
Cl
-
ions, and the red spheres 
represent Na
+
ions.
Figure 43.11 
(a) Crystalline 
structure of NaCl. (b) Each posi-
tive sodium ion is surrounded by 
six negative chlorine ions. (c) Each 
chlorine ion is surrounded by six 
sodium ions.
Na1 ions at a distance of !2
r from the Na1 ion, and these 12 positive ions exert 
weaker repulsive forces on the central Na1. Furthermore, beyond these 12 Na1 ions 
are more Cl2 ions that exert an attractive force, and so on. The net effect of all 
these interactions is a resultant negative electric potential energy
U
attractive
52ak
e
e2
r
(43.16)
where a is a dimensionless number known as the Madelung constant. The value 
of a depends only on the particular crystalline structure of the solid. For example,  
a 5 1.747 6 for the NaCl structure. When the constituent ions of a crystal are brought 
close together, a repulsive force exists because of electrostatic forces and the exclu-
sion principle as discussed in Section 43.1. The potential energy term B/rm in Equa-
tion 43.1 accounts for this repulsive force. We do not include neighbors other than 
nearest neighbors here because the repulsive forces occur only for ions that are very 
close together. (Electron shells must overlap for exclusion- principle effects to become 
important.) Therefore, we can express the total potential energy of the crystal as
U
total
52ak
e
e2
r
1
B
rm
(43.17)
where m in this expression is some small integer.
A plot of total potential energy versus ion separation distance is shown in Figure 
43.12. The potential energy has its minimum value U
0
at the equilibrium separa-
tion, when r 5 r
0
. It is left as a problem (Problem 59) to show that
U
0
52ak
e
e
2
r
0
a12
1
m
(43.18)
This minimum energy U
0
is called the ionic cohesive energy of the solid, and its 
absolute value represents the energy required to separate the solid into a collection 
of isolated positive and negative ions. Its value for NaCl is 27.84 eV per ion pair.
To calculate the atomic cohesive energy, which is the binding energy relative to 
the energy of the neutral atoms, 5.14 eV must be added to the ionic cohesive energy 
value to account for the transition from Na1 to Na and 3.62 eV must be subtracted 
to account for the conversion of Cl2 to Cl. Therefore, the atomic cohesive energy of 
NaCl is
27.84 eV 1 5.14 eV 2 3.62 eV 5 26.32 eV
In other words, 6.32 eV of energy per ion pair is needed to separate the solid into 
isolated neutral atoms of Na and Cl.
U
0
r
0
0
U
total
r
Figure 43.12 
Total potential 
energy versus ion separation dis-
tance for an ionic solid, where U
0
is the ionic cohesive energy and 
r
0
is the equilibrium separation 
distance between ions.
1354
chapter 43 Molecules and Solids
Ionic crystals form relatively stable, hard crystals. They are poor electrical con-
ductors because they contain no free electrons; each electron in the solid is bound 
tightly to one of the ions, so it is not sufficiently mobile to carry current. Ionic 
crystals have high melting points; for example, the melting point of NaCl is 801°C. 
Ionic crystals are transparent to visible radiation because the shells formed by the 
electrons in ionic solids are so tightly bound that visible radiation does not possess 
sufficient energy to promote electrons to the next allowed shell. Infrared radiation 
is absorbed strongly because the vibrations of the ions have natural resonant fre-
quencies in the low-energy infrared region.
Covalent Solids
Solid carbon, in the form of diamond, is a crystal whose atoms are covalently 
bonded. Because atomic carbon has the electronic configuration 1s22s22p2, it is 
four electrons short of filling its n 5 2 shell, which can accommodate eight elec-
trons. Because of this electron structure, two carbon atoms have a strong attraction 
for each other, with a cohesive energy of 7.37 eV. In the diamond structure, each 
carbon atom is covalently bonded to four other carbon atoms located at four cor-
ners of a cube as shown in Figure 43.13a.
The crystalline structure of diamond is shown in Figure 43.13b. Notice that each 
carbon atom forms covalent bonds with four nearest-neighbor atoms. The basic 
structure of diamond is called tetrahedral (each carbon atom is at the center of 
a regular tetrahedron), and the angle between the bonds is 109.5°. Other crystals 
such as silicon and germanium have the same structure.
Carbon is interesting in that it can form several different types of structures. 
In addition to the diamond structure, it forms graphite, with completely different 
properties. In this form, the carbon atoms form flat layers with hexagonal arrays of 
atoms. A very weak interaction between the layers allows the layers to be removed 
easily under friction, as occurs in the graphite used in pencil lead.
Carbon atoms can also form a large hollow structure; in this case, the compound 
is called buckminsterfullerene after the famous architect R. Buckminster Fuller, 
who invented the geodesic dome. The unique shape of this molecule (Fig. 43.14) 
provides a “cage” to hold other atoms or molecules. Related structures, called 
“buckytubes” because of their long, narrow cylindrical arrangements of carbon 
atoms, may provide the basis for extremely strong, yet lightweight, materials.
A current area of active research is in the properties and applications of gra-
phene. Graphene consists of a monolayer of carbon atoms, with the atoms arranged 
in hexagons so that the monolayer looks like chicken wire. Graphite flakes that are 
shed from a pencil while writing contain small fragments of graphene. Pioneers 
in graphene research include Andre Geim (b. 1958) and Konstantin Novoselov 
(b. 1974) of the University of Manchester, who received the Nobel Prize in Physics 
in 2010 for their experiments. Graphene has interesting electronic, thermal, and 
optical properties that are currently under investigation. Its mechanical properties 
include a breaking strength 200 times that of steel. Potential applications under 
b
Figure 43.13 
(a) Each carbon 
atom in a diamond crystal is 
covalently bonded to four other 
carbon atoms so that a tetrahe-
dral structure is formed. (b) The 
crystal structure of diamond, 
showing the tetrahedral bond 
arrangement.
A cylinder of nearly pure crystal-
line silicon (Si), approximately 
25cm long. Such crystals are cut 
into wafers and processed to make 
various semiconductor devices.
©
C
e
n
g
a
g
e
L
e
a
r
n
i
n
g
/
C
h
a
r
l
e
s
D
.
W
i
n
t
e
r
s
Figure 43.14 
Computer render-
ing of a “buckyball,” short for the 
molecule buckminsterfullerene. 
These nearly spherical molecular 
structures that look like soccer 
balls were named for the inventor 
of the geodesic dome. This form 
of carbon, C
60
, was discovered by 
astrophysicists investigating the 
carbon gas that exists between 
stars. Scientists are actively study-
ing the properties and potential 
uses of buckminsterfullerene and 
related molecules.
.
C
e
n
g
a
g
e
L
e
a
r
n
i
n
g
/
C
h
a
r
l
e
s
D
.
W
i
n
t
e
r
s
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested