44.1 Some properties of Nuclei 
1385
are the same, apart from the additional repulsive Coulomb force for the proton– 
proton interaction.
Evidence for the limited range of nuclear forces comes from scattering experi-
ments and from studies of nuclear binding energies. The short range of the nuclear 
force is shown in the neutron–proton (n–p) potential energy plot of Figure 44.3a 
obtained by scattering neutrons from a target containing hydrogen. The depth of 
the n–p potential energy well is 40 to 50 MeV, and there is a strong repulsive com-
ponent that prevents the nucleons from approaching much closer than 0.4 fm.
The nuclear force does not affect electrons, enabling energetic electrons to serve 
as point-like probes of nuclei. The charge independence of the nuclear force also 
means that the main difference between the n–p and p–p interactions is that the 
p–p potential energy consists of a superposition of nuclear and Coulomb interactions 
as shown in Figure 44.3b. At distances less than 2 fm, both p–p and n–p potential 
energies are nearly identical, but for distances of 2 fm or greater, the p–p potential 
has a positive energy barrier with a maximum at 4 fm.
The existence of the nuclear force results in approximately 270 stable nuclei; 
hundreds of other nuclei have been observed, but they are unstable. A plot of neu-
tron number N versus atomic number Z for a number of stable nuclei is given in Fig-
ure 44.4. The stable nuclei are represented by the black dots, which lie in a narrow 
range called the line of stability. Notice that the light stable nuclei contain an equal 
number of protons and neutrons; that is, N 5 Z. Also notice that in heavy stable 
nuclei, the number of neutrons exceeds the number of protons: above Z 5 20, the 
line of stability deviates upward from the line representing N 5 Z. This deviation 
can be understood by recognizing that as the number of protons increases, the 
strength of the Coulomb force increases, which tends to break the nucleus apart. 
As a result, more neutrons are needed to keep the nucleus stable because neutrons 
experience only the attractive nuclear force. Eventually, the repulsive Coulomb 
forces between protons cannot be compensated by the addition of more neutrons. 
This point occurs at Z 5 83, meaning that elements that contain more than 83 pro-
tons do not have stable nuclei.
0
20
-20
-40
-60
(fm)
r (fm)
40
U(r) (MeV)
U(r) (MeV)
0
20
-20
-40
-60
40
8
5 6 7
1 2 2 3 3 4
8
5 6 7
2 3 3 4
1
n–p system
p–p system
a
b
The difference in the two curves 
is due to the large Coulomb 
repulsion in the case of the 
proton–proton interaction.
Figure 44.3 
(a) Potential 
energy versus separation distance 
for a  neutron–proton system.  
(b) Potential energy versus separa-
tion distance for a proton–proton 
system. To display the difference 
in the curves on this scale, the 
height of the peak for the proton–
proton curve has been exagger-
ated by a factor of 10.
20
40
20
40
60
80
60
80
100
120
130
0
90
70
50
10
10
30
50
70
90
110
30
N
e
u
t
r
o
n
n
u
m
b
e
r
N
Atomic number Z
The stable nuclei lie
in a narrow band called 
the line of stability.
The dashed line 
corresponds to the 
condition = Z.
Figure 44.4 
Neutron number N 
versus atomic number Z for stable 
nuclei (black dots).
Convert pdf to web page - Convert PDF to html files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
How to Convert PDF to HTML Webpage with C# PDF Conversion SDK
convert pdf into html file; how to change pdf to html
Convert pdf to web page - VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
PDF to HTML Webpage Converter SDK for VB.NET PDF to HTML Conversion
convert pdf form to html; convert pdf to html format
1386
Chapter 44 Nuclear Structure
44.2 Nuclear Binding Energy
As mentioned in the discussion of 12C in Section 44.1, the total mass of a nucleus 
is less than the sum of the masses of its individual nucleons. Therefore, the rest 
energy of the bound system (the nucleus) is less than the combined rest energy of 
the separated nucleons. This difference in energy is called the binding energy of 
the nucleus and can be interpreted as the energy that must be added to a nucleus 
to break it apart into its components. Therefore, to separate a nucleus into protons 
and neutrons, energy must be delivered to the system.
Conservation of energy and the Einstein mass–energy equivalence relationship 
show that the binding energy E
b
in MeV of any nucleus is
E
b
5 [ZM(H) 1 Nm
n
M(
A
Z
X)] 3 931.494 MeV/u 
(44.2)
where M(H) is the atomic mass of the neutral hydrogen atom, m
n
is the mass of the 
neutron, M(
A
Z
X) represents the atomic mass of an atom of the isotope 
A
Z
X, and the 
masses are all in atomic mass units. The mass of the Z electrons included in M(H) 
cancels with the mass of the Z electrons included in the term M(
A
Z
X) within a small 
difference associated with the atomic binding energy of the electrons. Because 
atomic binding energies are typically several electron volts and nuclear binding 
energies are several million electron volts, this difference is negligible.
A plot of binding energy per nucleon E
b
/A as a function of mass number A for 
various stable nuclei is shown in Figure 44.5. Notice that the binding energy in Fig-
ure 44.5 peaks in the vicinity of A 5 60. That is, nuclei having mass numbers either 
greater or less than 60 are not as strongly bound as those near the middle of the peri-
odic table. The decrease in binding energy per nucleon for A . 60 implies that energy 
is released when a heavy nucleus splits, or fissions, into two lighter nuclei. Energy is 
released in fission because the nucleons in each product nucleus are more tightly 
bound to one another than are the nucleons in the original nucleus. The impor-
tant process of fission and a second important process of fusion, in which energy is 
released as light nuclei combine, shall be considered in detail in Chapter 45.
Binding energy of a nucleus 
240
220
200
180
160
140
120
100
80
60
40
20
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
0
0
4
He
12
C
20
Ne
62
Ni
208
Pb
6
Li
9
Be
11
B
19
F
23
Na
56
Fe
35
Cl
72
Ge
98
Mo
107
Ag
127
I
159
Tb
197
Au
226
Ra
238
U
Mass number A 
B
i
n
d
i
n
g
e
n
e
r
g
y
p
e
r
n
u
c
l
e
o
n
(
M
e
V
)
2
H
14
N
The region of greatest 
binding energy per nucleon 
is shown by the tan band.
Nuclei to the right of 
208
Pb are unstable.
Figure 44.5 
Binding energy 
per nucleon versus mass number 
for nuclides that lie along the line 
of stability in Figure 44.4. Some 
representative nuclides appear as 
black dots with labels.
Pitfall Prevention 44.2
Binding Energy When separate 
nucleons are combined to form a 
nucleus, the energy of the system 
is reduced. Therefore, the change 
in energy is negative. The absolute 
value of this change is called the 
binding energy. This difference 
in sign may be confusing. For 
example, an increase in binding 
energy corresponds to a decrease in 
the energy of the system.
C# PDF Convert to SVG SDK: Convert PDF to SVG files in C#.net, ASP
Instantly convert all PDF document pages to SVG image files in C#.NET class Perform high-fidelity PDF to SVG conversion in both ASP.NET web and WinForms
convert pdf to html code; convert pdf to html code for email
C# PDF: How to Create PDF Document Viewer in C#.NET with
image and outline preview for quick PDF document page navigation; Support rendering web viewer PDF document to images or svg file; Free to convert viewing PDF
pdf to html conversion; convert pdf into html code
44.3 Nuclear Models 
1387
Another important feature of Figure 44.5 is that the binding energy per nucleon 
is approximately constant at around 8 MeV per nucleon for all nuclei with A . 50.  
For these nuclei, the nuclear forces are said to be saturated, meaning that in the 
closely packed structure shown in Figure 44.2, a particular nucleon can form 
attractive bonds with only a limited number of other nucleons.
Figure 44.5 provides insight into fundamental questions about the origin of the 
chemical elements. In the early life of the Universe, the only elements that existed 
were hydrogen and helium. Clouds of cosmic gas coalesced under gravitational 
forces to form stars. As a star ages, it produces heavier elements from the lighter 
elements contained within it, beginning by fusing hydrogen atoms to form helium. 
This process continues as the star becomes older, generating atoms having larger 
and larger atomic numbers, up to the tan band shown in Figure 44.5.
The nucleus 63
28
Ni has the largest binding energy per nucleon of 8.794 5 MeV. 
It takes additional energy to create elements with mass numbers larger than 63 
because of their lower binding energies per nucleon. This energy comes from the 
supernova explosion that occurs at the end of some large stars’ lives. Therefore, all 
the heavy atoms in your body were produced from the explosions of ancient stars. 
You are literally made of stardust!
44.3 Nuclear Models
The details of the nuclear force are still an area of active research. Several nuclear 
models have been proposed that are useful in understanding general features of 
nuclear experimental data and the mechanisms responsible for binding energy. 
Two such models, the liquid-drop model and the shell model, are discussed below.
The Liquid-Drop Model
In 1936, Bohr proposed treating nucleons like molecules in a drop of liquid. In this 
liquid-drop model, the nucleons interact strongly with one another and undergo 
frequent collisions as they jiggle around within the nucleus. This jiggling motion is 
analogous to the thermally agitated motion of molecules in a drop of liquid.
Four major effects influence the binding energy of the nucleus in the liquid-
drop model:
• The volume effect. Figure 44.5 shows that for A . 50, the binding energy per 
nucleon is approximately constant, which indicates that the nuclear force on 
a given nucleon is due only to a few nearest neighbors and not to all the other 
nucleons in the nucleus. On average, then, the binding energy associated 
with the nuclear force for each nucleon is the same in all nuclei: that associ-
ated with an interaction with a few neighbors. This property indicates that 
the total binding energy of the nucleus is proportional to A and therefore 
proportional to the nuclear volume. The contribution to the binding energy 
of the entire nucleus is C
1
A, where C
1
is an adjustable constant that can be 
determined by fitting the prediction of the model to experimental results.
• The surface effect. Because nucleons on the surface of the drop have fewer 
neighbors than those in the interior, surface nucleons reduce the binding 
energy by an amount proportional to their number. Because the number 
of surface nucleons is proportional to the surface area 4pr2 of the nucleus 
(modeled as a sphere) and because r2 ~ A2/3 (Eq. 44.1), the surface term can 
be expressed as 2C
2
A2/3, where C
2
is a second adjustable constant.
• The Coulomb repulsion effect. Each proton repels every other proton in the 
nucleus. The corresponding potential energy per pair of interacting protons 
is k
e
e2/r, where k
e
is the Coulomb constant. The total electric potential energy 
is equivalent to the work required to assemble Z protons, initially infinitely far 
apart, into a sphere of volume V. This energy is proportional to the number 
C# HTML5 Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
When viewing PDF document on web viewer, users can C# users can perform various PDF conversion actions, such as convert PDF to Microsoft Office Word
how to convert pdf file to html; convert url pdf to word
C#: How to Add HTML5 Document Viewer Control to Your Web Page
the necessary resources for creating web document viewer addCommand(new RECommand("convert")); _tabFile.addCommand new UserCommand("pdf"); _userCmdDemoPdf.
converting pdf to html format; convert pdf to html with
1388
Chapter 44 Nuclear Structure
of proton pairs Z(Z 2 1)/2 and inversely proportional to the nuclear radius. 
Consequently, the reduction in binding energy that results from the Coulomb 
effect is 2C
3
Z(Z 2 1)/A1/3, where C
3
is yet another adjustable constant.
• The symmetry effect. Another effect that lowers the binding energy is related 
to the symmetry of the nucleus in terms of values of N and Z. For small values 
of A, stable nuclei tend to have N < Z. Any large asymmetry between N and Z 
for light nuclei reduces the binding energy and makes the nucleus less stable. 
For larger A, the value of N for stable nuclei is naturally larger than Z. This 
effect can be described by a binding-energy term of the form 2C
4
(N 2 Z)2/A, 
where C
4
is another adjustable constant.1 For small A, any large asymmetry 
between values of N and Z makes this term relatively large and reduces the 
binding energy. For large A, this term is small and has little effect on the over-
all binding energy.
Adding these contributions gives the following expression for the total binding 
energy:
E
b
5C
1
A2C
2
A2/3 2C
3
Z
1
Z21
2
A1/3
2C
4
1
N2Z
22
A
(44.3)
This equation, often referred to as the semiempirical binding-energy formula, 
contains four constants that are adjusted to fit the theoretical expression to experi-
mental data. For nuclei having A $ 15, the constants have the values
C
1
5 15.7 MeV 
C
2
5 17.8 MeV
C
3
5 0.71 MeV  C
4
5 23.6 MeV 
Equation 44.3, together with these constants, fits the known nuclear mass values 
very well as shown by the theoretical curve and sample experimental values in Fig-
ure 44.6. The liquid-drop model does not, however, account for some finer details 
of nuclear structure, such as stability rules and angular momentum. Equation 44.3 
is a theoretical equation for the binding energy, based on the liquid-drop model, 
whereas binding energies calculated from Equation 44.2 are experimental values 
based on mass measurements.
100
200
0
2
4
6
8
10
2
H
35
Cl
107
Ag
208
Pb
B
i
n
d
i
n
g
e
n
e
r
g
y
p
e
r
n
u
c
l
e
o
n
(
M
e
V
)
Mass number A 
Figure 44.6 
The binding-
energy curve plotted by using the 
semiempirical binding-energy for-
mula (red-brown). For comparison 
to the theoretical curve, experi-
mental values for four sample 
nuclei are shown.
1The liquid-drop model describes that heavy nuclei have N . Z. The shell model, as we shall see shortly, explains why 
that is true with a physical argument.
Example 44.3   Applying the Semiempirical Binding-Energy Formula
The nucleus 64Zn has a tabulated binding energy of 559.09 MeV. Use the semiempirical binding-energy formula to 
generate a theoretical estimate of the binding energy for this nucleus.
Conceptualize  Imagine bringing the separate protons and neutrons together to form a 64Zn nucleus. The rest energy of 
the nucleus is smaller than the rest energy of the individual particles. The difference in rest energy is the binding energy.
Categorize  From the text of the problem, we know to apply the liquid-drop model. This example is a substitution 
problem.
Solution
For the 64Zn nucleus, Z 5 30, N 5 34, and A 5 64. Evalu-
ate the four terms of the semiempirical binding-energy 
formula:
C
1
A 5 (15.7 MeV)(64) 5 1 005 MeV 
C
2
A2/3 5 (17.8 MeV)(64)2/3 5 285 MeV
C
3
Z
1
Z21
2
A1/3
5
1
0.71 MeV
2
1
30
21
29
2
1
64
21/3
5154 MeV
C
4
1
N2Z
22
A
5
1
23.6 MeV
2
1
34230
22
64
55.90 MeV
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
Support to create new page to PDF document in both web server-side application and Windows Forms. Ability to add PDF page number in preview.
convert fillable pdf to html form; convert pdf to web pages
C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
and quickly convert a large-size multi-page PDF document to a group of high-quality separate JPEG image files within .NET projects, including ASP.NET web and
adding pdf to html page; converting pdf into html
44.3 Nuclear Models 
1389
The Shell Model
The liquid-drop model describes the general behavior of nuclear binding energies 
relatively well. When the binding energies are studied more closely, however, we 
find the following features:
• Most stable nuclei have an even value of A. Furthermore, only eight stable 
nuclei have odd values for both Z and N.
• Figure 44.7 shows a graph of the difference between the binding energy per 
nucleon calculated by Equation 44.3 and the measured binding energy. There 
is evidence for regularly spaced peaks in the data that are not described by the 
semiempirical binding-energy formula. The peaks occur at values of N or Z 
that have become known as magic numbers:
Z or N 5 2, 8, 20, 28, 50, 82 
(44.4)
• High-precision studies of nuclear radii show deviations from the simple 
expression in Equation 44.1. Graphs of experimental data show peaks in the 
curve of radius versus N at values of N equal to the magic numbers.
• A group of isotones is a collection of nuclei having the same value of N and vary-
ing values of Z. When the number of stable isotones is graphed as function of 
N, there are peaks in the graph, again at the magic numbers in Equation 44.4.
• Several other nuclear measurements show anomalous behavior at the magic 
numbers.2
These peaks in graphs of experimental data are reminiscent of the peaks in Figure 
42.20 for the ionization energy of atoms, which arose because of the shell structure 
of the atom. The shell model of the nucleus, also called the  independent-particle 
model, was developed independently by two German scientists: Maria Goeppert-
Mayer in 1949 and Hans Jensen (1907–1973) in 1950. Goeppert-Mayer and Jensen 
WWMagic numbers
This value differs from the tabulated value by less than 0.2%. Notice how the sizes of the terms decrease from the first 
to the fourth term. The fourth term is particularly small for this nucleus, which does not have an excessive number of 
neutrons.
Substitute these values into Equation 44.3:
E
b
5 1 005 MeV 2 285 MeV 2 154 MeV 2 5.90 MeV 5
560 MeV
0.20
0.10
0.00
-0.10
-0.20
50
100
150
200
250
N = 82
Z = 50
N = 126
Z = 82
N = 50
N = 28
Z = 28
Mass number A
D
i
f
f
e
r
e
n
c
e
b
e
t
w
e
e
n
m
e
a
s
u
r
e
d
a
n
d
p
r
e
d
i
c
t
e
d
b
i
n
d
i
n
g
e
n
e
r
g
y
p
e
r
n
u
c
l
e
o
n
(
M
e
V
)
The appearance of regular peaks 
in the experimental data suggests 
behavior that is not predicted in 
the liquid-drop model.
Figure 44.7 
The difference 
between measured binding ener-
gies and those calculated from the 
liquid-drop model as a function of 
A. (Adapted from R. A. Dunlap, 
The Physics of Nuclei and Particles, 
Brooks/Cole, Belmont, CA, 2004.)
2For further details, see chapter 5 of R. A. Dunlap, The Physics of Nuclei and Particles, Brooks/Cole, Belmont, CA, 2004.
▸ 44.3 
continued
XDoc.HTML5 Viewer for .NET, Zero Footprint AJAX Document Image
View, Convert, Edit, Sign Documents and Images. Wide range of web browsers support including IE9+ powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image to
convert pdf into html; convert pdf to html for online
DocImage SDK for .NET: Web Document Image Viewer Online Demo
Document Viewer Demo to View, Annotate, Convert and Print upload a file to display in web viewer Suppported files are Word, Excel, PowerPoint, PDF, Tiff, Dicom
convert pdf to web page; convert pdf fillable form to html
1390
chapter 44 Nuclear Structure
shared the 1963 Nobel Prize in Physics for their work. In this model, each nucleon 
is assumed to exist in a shell, similar to an atomic shell for an electron. The nucle-
ons exist in quantized energy states, and there are few collisions between nucleons. 
Obviously, the assumptions of this model differ greatly from those made in the 
liquid-drop model.
The quantized states occupied by the nucleons can be described by a set of quan-
tum numbers. Because both the proton and the neutron have spin 
1
2
, the exclusion 
principle can be applied to describe the allowed states (as it was for electrons in 
Chapter 42). That is, each state can contain only two protons (or two neutrons) 
having opposite spins (Fig. 44.8). The proton states differ from those of the neutrons 
because the two species move in different potential wells. The proton energy levels 
are farther apart than the neutron levels because the protons experience a super-
position of the Coulomb force and the nuclear force, whereas the neutrons experi-
ence only the nuclear force.
One factor influencing the observed characteristics of nuclear ground states is 
nuclear spinorbit effects. The atomic spin–orbit interaction between the spin of an 
electron and its orbital motion in an atom gives rise to the sodium doublet dis-
cussed in Section 42.6 and is magnetic in origin. In contrast, the nuclear spin–
orbit effect for nucleons is due to the nuclear force. It is much stronger than in the 
atomic case, and it has opposite sign. When these effects are taken into account, 
the shell model is able to account for the observed magic numbers.
The shell model helps us understand why nuclei containing an even number of 
protons and neutrons are more stable than other nuclei. (There are 160 stable even–
even isotopes.) Any particular state is filled when it contains two protons (or two 
neutrons) having opposite spins. An extra proton or neutron can be added to the 
nucleus only at the expense of increasing the energy of the nucleus. This increase 
in energy leads to a nucleus that is less stable than the original nucleus. A careful 
inspection of the stable nuclei shows that the majority have a special stability when 
their nucleons combine in pairs, which results in a total angular momentum of zero.
The shell model also helps us understand why nuclei tend to have more neutrons 
than protons. As in Figure 44.8, the proton energy levels are higher than those for 
neutrons due to the extra energy associated with Coulomb repulsion. This effect 
becomes more pronounced as Z increases. Consequently, as Z increases and higher 
states are filled, a proton level for a given quantum number will be much higher 
in energy than the neutron level for the same quantum number. In fact, it will be 
even higher in energy than neutron levels for higher quantum numbers. Hence, it 
is more energetically favorable for the nucleus to form with neutrons in the lower 
energy levels rather than protons in the higher energy levels, so the number of neu-
trons is greater than the number of protons.
More sophisticated models of the nucleus have been and continue to be devel-
oped. For example, the collective model combines features of the liquid-drop and 
shell models. The development of theoretical models of the nucleus continues to be 
an active area of research.
44.4 Radioactivity
In 1896, Becquerel accidentally discovered that uranyl potassium sulfate crystals 
emit an invisible radiation that can darken a photographic plate even though the 
plate is covered to exclude light. After a series of experiments, he concluded that 
the radiation emitted by the crystals was of a new type, one that requires no exter-
nal stimulation and was so penetrating that it could darken protected photographic 
plates and ionize gases. This process of spontaneous emission of radiation by ura-
nium was soon to be called radioactivity.
Subsequent experiments by other scientists showed that other substances were 
more powerfully radioactive. The most significant early investigations of this type 
were conducted by Marie and Pierre Curie (1859–1906). After several years of care-
Maria Goeppert-Mayer
German Scientist (1906–1972)
Goeppert-Mayer was born and edu-
cated in Germany. She is best known 
for her development of the shell model 
(independent-particle model) of the 
nucleus, published in 1950. A similar 
model was simultaneously developed 
by Hans Jensen, another German  
scientist. Goeppert-Mayer and Jensen 
were awarded the Nobel Prize in Phys-
ics in 1963 for their extraordinary  
work in understanding the structure  
of the nucleus.
S
c
i
e
n
c
e
S
o
u
r
c
e
Energy
aA
1/3
aA
1/3
r
p
n
The energy levels for the 
protons are slightly higher 
than those for the neutrons 
because of the electric 
potential energy associated 
with the system of protons.
Figure 44.8 
A square potential 
well containing 12 nucleons. The 
red spheres represent protons, 
and the gray spheres represent 
neutrons.
C# Image: Quick to Navigate Document in .NET Web Viewer
API can be called from any document page object for navigate to the target part of web viewer document well-formed documents, like Word and PDF, will contain
online pdf to html converter; how to convert pdf into html code
44.4 radioactivity 
1391
ful and laborious chemical separation processes on tons of pitchblende, a radioac-
tive ore, the Curies reported the discovery of two previously unknown elements, 
both radioactive, named polonium and radium. Additional experiments, including 
Rutherford’s famous work on alpha-particle scattering, suggested that radioactivity 
is the result of the decay, or disintegration, of unstable nuclei.
Three types of radioactive decay occur in radioactive substances: alpha (a) 
decay, in which the emitted particles are 4He nuclei; beta (b) decay, in which the 
emitted particles are either electrons or positrons; and gamma (g) decay, in which 
the emitted particles are high-energy photons. A positron is a particle like the elec-
tron in all respects except that the positron has a charge of 1e. (The positron is the 
antiparticle of the electron; see Section 46.2.) The symbol e2 is used to designate an 
electron, and e1 designates a positron.
We can distinguish among these three forms of radiation by using the scheme 
described in Figure 44.9. The radiation from radioactive samples that emit all three 
types of particles is directed into a region in which there is a magnetic field. Follow-
ing the particle in a field (magnetic) analysis model, the radiation beam splits into 
three components, two bending in opposite directions and the third experiencing 
no change in direction. This simple observation shows that the radiation of the 
undeflected beam carries no charge (the gamma ray), the component deflected 
upward corresponds to positively charged particles (alpha particles), and the com-
ponent deflected downward corresponds to negatively charged particles (e2). If the 
beam includes a positron (e1), it is deflected upward like the alpha particle, but it 
follows a different trajectory due to its smaller mass.
The three types of radiation have quite different penetrating powers. Alpha par-
ticles barely penetrate a sheet of paper, beta particles can penetrate a few millime-
ters of aluminum, and gamma rays can penetrate several centimeters of lead.
The decay process is probabilistic in nature and can be described with statisti-
cal calculations for a radioactive substance of macroscopic size containing a large 
number of radioactive nuclei. For such large numbers, the rate at which a particu-
lar decay process occurs in a sample is proportional to the number of radioactive 
nuclei present (that is, the number of nuclei that have not yet decayed). If N is the 
number of undecayed radioactive nuclei present at some instant, the rate of change 
of N with time is
dN
dt
52lN 
(44.5)
where l, called the decay constant, is the probability of decay per nucleus per sec-
ond. The negative sign indicates that dN/dt is negative; that is, N decreases in time.
Equation 44.5 can be written in the form
dN
N
52l dt
Marie Curie
Polish Scientist (1867–1934)
In 1903, Marie Curie shared the Nobel 
Prize in Physics with her husband, 
Pierre, and with Becquerel for their 
studies of radioactive substances. In 
1911, she was awarded a Nobel Prize in 
Chemistry for the discovery of radium 
and polonium.
T
i
m
e
&
L
i
f
e
P
i
c
t
u
r
e
s
/
G
e
t
t
y
I
m
a
g
e
s
Pitfall Prevention 44.3
Rays or Particles? Early in the 
history of nuclear physics, the 
term radiation was used to describe 
the emanations from radioactive 
nuclei. We now know that alpha 
radiation and beta radiation 
involve the emission of particles 
with nonzero rest energy. Even 
though they are not examples of 
electromagnetic radiation, the 
use of the term radiation for all 
three types of emission is deeply 
entrenched in our language and 
in the physics community.
Pitfall Prevention 44.4
Notation Warning In Section 44.1, 
we introduced the symbol N as an 
integer representing the number 
of neutrons in a nucleus. In this 
discussion, the symbol N repre-
sents the number of undecayed 
nuclei in a radioactive sample 
remaining after some time inter-
val. As you read further, be sure to 
consider the context to determine 
the appropriate meaning for the 
symbol N.
Lead
Detector
array
e-
a
g
A mixture of sources 
emits alpha, beta, 
and gamma rays.
The charged particles are deflected in
opposite directions by the magnetic field, 
and the gamma ray is not deflected at all.
B
in
S
Figure 44.9 
The radiation from 
radioactive sources can be sepa-
rated into three components by 
using a magnetic field to deflect 
the charged particles. The detec-
tor array at the right records the 
events.
1392
chapter 44 Nuclear Structure
which, upon integration, gives
N 5 N
0
e2lt 
(44.6)
where the constant N
0
represents the number of undecayed radioactive nuclei at 
t 5 0. Equation 44.6 shows that the number of undecayed radioactive nuclei in a 
sample decreases exponentially with time. The plot of N versus t shown in Figure 
44.10 illustrates the exponential nature of the decay. The curve is similar to that for 
the time variation of electric charge on a discharging capacitor in an RC circuit, as 
studied in Section 28.4.
The decay rate R, which is the number of decays per second, can be obtained by 
combining Equations 44.5 and 44.6:
R5
`
dN
dt
`
5lN5lN
0
e2lt5R
0
e2lt 
(44.7)
where R
0
5 lN
0
is the decay rate at t 5 0. The decay rate R of a sample is often 
referred to as its activity. Note that both N and R decrease exponentially with time.
Another parameter useful in characterizing nuclear decay is the half-life T
1/2
:
The half-life of a radioactive substance is the time interval during which half 
of a given number of radioactive nuclei decay.
To find an expression for the half-life, we first set N 5 N
0
/2 and t 5 T
1/2
in Equa-
tion 44.6 to give
N
0
2
5N
0
e
2lT
1/2
Canceling the N
0
factors and then taking the reciprocal of both sides, we obtain 
elT
1/2
52. Taking the natural logarithm of both sides gives
T
1/2
5
ln 2
l
5
0.693
l
(44.8)
After a time interval equal to one half-life, there are N
0
/2 radioactive nuclei remain-
ing (by definition); after two half-lives, half of these remaining nuclei have decayed 
and N
0
/4 radioactive nuclei are left; after three half-lives, N
0
/8 are left; and so on. In 
general, after n half-lives, the number of undecayed radioactive nuclei remaining is
N5N
0
11
2
2n
(44.9)
where n can be an integer or a noninteger.
A frequently used unit of activity is the curie (Ci), defined as
1 Ci ; 3.7 3 1010 decays/s
This value was originally selected because it is the approximate activity of 1 g of 
radium. The SI unit of activity is the becquerel (Bq):
1 Bq ; 1 decay/s
Therefore, 1 Ci 5 3.7 3 1010 Bq. The curie is a rather large unit, and the more fre-
quently used activity units are the millicurie and the microcurie.
Exponential behavior of the 
number of undecayed nuclei
Exponential behavior  
of the decay rate
Half-life 
The curie 
The becquerel 
N(t)
N
0
N
0
N
0
1
4
1
2
t
N=N
0
e
–  t
T
1/2
2T
1/2
The time interval T
1/2
is 
the half-life of the sample.
Figure 44.10 
Plot of the expo-
nential decay of radioactive nuclei. 
The vertical axis represents the 
number of undecayed radioactive 
nuclei present at any time t, and 
the horizontal axis is time.
Pitfall Prevention 44.5
Half-life It is not true that all the 
original nuclei have decayed after 
two half-lives! In one half-life, half 
of the original nuclei will decay. 
In the second half-life, half of 
those remaining will decay, leav-
ing 
1
4
of the original number.
44.4 radioactivity 
1393
uick Quiz 44.2  On your birthday, you measure the activity of a sample of 210Bi, 
which has a half-life of 5.01 days. The activity you measure is 1.000 mCi. What is 
the activity of this sample on your next birthday? (a) 1.000 mCi (b) 0 (c) , 0.2 mCi   
(d) , 0.01 mCi (e) , 10222 mCi
Example 44.4   How Many Nuclei Are Left?
The isotope carbon-14, 14
6
C, is radioactive and has a half-life of 5 730 years. If you start with a sample of 1 000 carbon-14 
nuclei, how many nuclei will still be undecayed in 25 000 years?
Conceptualize  The time interval of 25 000 years is much longer than the half-life, so only a small fraction of the origi-
nally undecayed nuclei will remain.
Categorize  The text of the problem allows us to categorize this example as a substitution problem involving radioac-
tive decay.
SoluTIoN
Analyze  Divide the time interval by the half-life to deter-
mine the number of half-lives:
n5
25 000 yr
5 730 yr
54.363
Determine how many undecayed nuclei are left after this 
many half-lives using Equation 44.9:
N5N
0
11
2
2n
51 000
11
2
24.363
5
49
Finalize  As we have mentioned, radioactive decay is a probabilistic process and accurate statistical predictions are pos-
sible only with a very large number of atoms. The original sample in this example contains only 1 000 nuclei, which is 
certainly not a very large number. Therefore, if you counted the number of undecayed nuclei remaining after 25 000 
years, it might not be exactly 49.
Example 44.5   The Activity of Carbon
At time t 5 0, a radioactive sample contains 3.50 mg of pure 11
6
C, which has a half-life of 20.4 min.
(A) Determine the number N
0
of nuclei in the sample at t 5 0.
Conceptualize  The half-life is relatively short, so the number of undecayed nuclei drops rapidly. The molar mass of 11
6
is approximately 11.0 g/mol.
Categorize  We evaluate results using equations developed in this section, so we categorize this example as a substitu-
tion problem.
SoluTIoN
Find the number of moles in 3.50 mg of 
pure 11
6
C:
n5
3.5031026 g
11.0 g/mol
53.1831027 mol
Find the number of undecayed nuclei in 
this amount of pure 11
6
C:
N
0
513.1831027 mol216.0231023 nuclei/mol25
1.9231017 nuclei
(B)  What is the activity of the sample initially and after 8.00 h?
SoluTIoN
Find the initial activity of the sample 
using Equations 44.7 and 44.8:
R
0
5lN
0
5
0.693
T
1/2
N
0
5
0.693
20.4 min
a
1 min
60 s
b
1
1.92310
172
5 (5.66 3 1024 s21)(1.92 3 1017) 5 
1.0931014 Bq
continued
1394
chapter 44 Nuclear Structure
Example 44.6   A Radioactive Isotope of Iodine
A sample of the isotope 131I, which has a half-life of 8.04 days, has an activity of 5.0 mCi at the time of shipment. Upon 
receipt of the sample at a medical laboratory, the activity is 2.1 mCi. How much time has elapsed between the two 
measurements?
Conceptualize  The sample is continuously decaying as it is in transit. The decrease in the activity is 58% during the 
time interval between shipment and receipt, so we expect the elapsed time to be greater than the half-life of 8.04 d.
Categorize  The stated activity corresponds to many decays per second, so N is large and we can categorize this prob-
lem as one in which we can use our statistical analysis of radioactivity.
SoluTIoN
Analyze  Solve Equation 44.7 for the ratio of the final 
activity to the initial activity:
R
R
0
5e
2lt
Take the natural logarithm of both sides:
ln a
R
R
0
b52lt
Solve for the time t:
(1)   t52
1
l
ln a
R
R
0
b
Use Equation 44.8 to substitute for l:
t52
T
1/2
ln 2
ln 
a
R
R
0
b
Substitute numerical values:
t52
8.04 d
0.693
ln 
a
2.1 mCi
5.0 mCi
b
5
10 d
Finalize  This result is indeed greater than the half-life, as expected. This example demonstrates the difficulty in ship-
ping radioactive samples with short half-lives. If the shipment is delayed by several days, only a small fraction of the 
sample might remain upon receipt. This difficulty can be addressed by shipping a combination of isotopes in which 
the desired isotope is the product of a decay occurring within the sample. It is possible for the desired isotope to be 
in equilibrium, in which case it is created at the same rate as it decays. Therefore, the amount of the desired isotope 
remains constant during the shipping process and subsequent storage. When needed, the desired isotope can be sepa-
rated from the rest of the sample; its decay from the initial activity begins at this point rather than upon shipment.
44.5 The Decay Processes
As we stated in Section 44.4, a radioactive nucleus spontaneously decays by one 
of three processes: alpha decay, beta decay, or gamma decay. Figure 44.11 shows a 
close-up view of a portion of Figure 44.4 from Z 5 65 to Z 5 80. The black circles are 
the stable nuclei seen in Figure 44.4. In addition, unstable nuclei above and below 
the line of stability for each value of Z are shown. Above the line of stability, the blue 
circles show unstable nuclei that are neutron-rich and undergo a beta decay process 
in which an electron is emitted. Below the black circles are red circles corresponding 
to proton-rich unstable nuclei that primarily undergo a beta-decay process in which 
a positron is emitted or a competing process called electron capture. Beta decay and 
electron capture are described in more detail below. Further below the line of stabil-
▸ 44.5 
continued
Use Equation 44.7 to find the activity at  
t 5 8.00 h 5 2.88 3 104 s:
R5R
0
e2l5
1
1.0931014 Bq
2
e2
1
5.66310
24
s
2121
2.88310
4
s
2
5
8.963106 Bq
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested