44.5 the Decay processes 
1395
ity (with a few exceptions) are tan circles that represent very proton-rich nuclei for 
which the primary decay mechanism is alpha decay, which we discuss first.
Alpha Decay
A nucleus emitting an alpha particle (4
2
He) loses two protons and two neutrons. 
Therefore, the atomic number Z decreases by 2, the mass number A decreases by 4, 
and the neutron number decreases by 2. The decay can be written
A
Z
  S   
A
Z
2
2
4
2
Y 1 4
2
He 
(44.10)
where X is called the parent nucleus and Y the daughter nucleus. As a general rule 
in any decay expression such as this one, (1) the sum of the mass numbers A must 
be the same on both sides of the decay and (2) the sum of the atomic numbers Z 
must be the same on both sides of the decay. As examples, 238U and 226Ra are both 
alpha emitters and decay according to the schemes
238
92
U S 234
90
Th 1 4
2
He 
(44.11)
226
88
Ra S 222
86
Rn 1 4
2
He 
(44.12)
The decay of 226Ra is shown in Figure 44.12.
When the nucleus of one element changes into the nucleus of another as hap-
pens in alpha decay, the process is called spontaneous decay. In any spontane-
ous decay, relativistic energy and momentum of the parent nucleus as an isolated 
system must be conserved. The final components of the system are the daughter 
nucleus and the alpha particle. If we call M
X
the mass of the parent nucleus, M
Y
the 
mass of the daughter nucleus, and M
a
the mass of the alpha particle, we can define 
the disintegration energy Q of the system as
Q 5 (M
X
M
Y
M
a
)c2 
(44.13)
The energy Q is in joules when the masses are in kilograms and c is the speed of 
light, 3.00 3 108 m/s. When the masses are expressed in atomic mass units u, how-
ever, Q can be calculated in MeV using the expression
Q 5 (M
X
M
Y
M
a
) 3 931.494 MeV/u 
(44.14)
Table 44.2 (page 1396) contains information on selected isotopes, including masses 
of neutral atoms that can be used in Equation 44.14 and similar equations.
The disintegration energy Q is the amount of rest energy transformed and 
appears in the form of kinetic energy in the daughter nucleus and the alpha par-
ticle and is sometimes referred to as the Q value of the nuclear decay. Consider the 
case of the 226Ra decay described in Figure 44.12. If the parent nucleus is at rest 
before the decay, the total kinetic energy of the products is 4.87 MeV. (See Example 
44.7.) Most of this kinetic energy is associated with the alpha particle because this 
particle is much less massive than the daughter nucleus 222Rn. That is, because the 
system is also isolated in terms of momentum, the lighter alpha particle recoils with 
a much higher speed than does the daughter nucleus. Generally, less massive par-
ticles carry off most of the energy in nuclear decays.
Experimental observations of alpha-particle energies show a number of discrete 
energies rather than a single energy because the daughter nucleus may be left in an 
130
125
120
115
110
105
100
95
90
85
80
65
70
75
80
Beta (electron)
Stable
Beta (positron) or
electron capture
Alpha
N
Z
Figure 44.11 
A close-up view of 
the line of stability in Figure 44.4 
from Z 5 65 to Z 5 80. The black 
dots represent stable nuclei as in 
Figure 44.4. The other colored 
dots represent unstable isotopes 
above and below the line of stabil-
ity, with the color of the dot indi-
cating the primary means of decay.
Pitfall Prevention 44.6
Another 
Q
We have seen the 
symbol Q before, but this use is a 
brand-new meaning for this sym-
bol: the disintegration energy. In 
this context, it is not heat, charge, 
or quality factor for a resonance, 
for which we have used Q before.
222
 Rn
86
After decay
K
Rn
α
Rn
Before decay
226
 Ra
88
K
Ra
= 0
Ra
= 0
K
α
α
p
S
p
S
p
S
Figure 44.12 
The alpha decay of 
radium-226. The radium nucleus is 
initially at rest. After the decay, the 
radon nucleus has kinetic energy 
K
Rn
and momentum p
S
Rn
and the 
alpha particle has kinetic energy 
K
a
and momentum p
S
a
.
Convert pdf to web page - Convert PDF to html files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
How to Convert PDF to HTML Webpage with C# PDF Conversion SDK
pdf to html converters; convert pdf into html email
Convert pdf to web page - VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
PDF to HTML Webpage Converter SDK for VB.NET PDF to HTML Conversion
pdf to html converter online; changing pdf to html
1396
chapter 44 Nuclear Structure
Table 44.2
Chemical and Nuclear Information for Selected Isotopes
Mass
Atomic 
Number A 
Mass of 
Half-life, if
Number 
Chemical 
(* means 
Neutral 
Percent 
Radioactive
Element 
Symbol 
radioactive) 
Atom (u) 
Abundance 
T
1/2
21 
electron 
e2 
0.000 549 
neutron 
1* 
1.008 665 
614 s
hydrogen 
1H 5 p 
1.007 825 
99.988 5
[deuterium 
2H 5 D] 
2.014 102 
0.011 5
[tritium 
3H 5 T] 
3* 
3.016 049 
12.33 yr
helium 
He 
3.016 029 
0.000 137
[alpha particle 
a 5 4He] 
4.002 603 
99.999 863
6* 
6.018 889 
0.81 s
lithium 
Li 
6.015 123 
7.5
7.016 005 
92.5
beryllium 
Be 
7* 
7.016 930 
53.3 d
8* 
8.005 305 
10217 s
9.012 182 
100
boron 
10 
10.012 937 
19.9
11 
11.009 305 
80.1
carbon 
11* 
11.011 434 
20.4 min
12 
12.000 000 
98.93
13 
13.003 355 
1.07
14* 
14.003 242 
5 730 yr
nitrogen 
13* 
13.005 739 
9.96 min
14 
14.003 074 
99.632
15 
15.000 109 
0.368
oxygen 
14* 
14.008 596 
70.6 s
15* 
15.003 066 
122 s
16 
15.994 915 
99.757
17 
16.999 132 
0.038
18 
17.999 161 
0.205
fluorine 
18* 
18.000 938 
109.8 min
19 
18.998 403 
100
10 
neon 
Ne 
20 
19.992 440 
90.48
11 
sodium 
Na 
23 
22.989 769 
100
12 
magnesium 
Mg 
23* 
22.994 124 
11.3 s
24 
23.985 042 
78.99
13 
aluminum 
Al 
27 
26.981 539 
100
14 
silicon 
Si 
27* 
26.986 705 
4.2 s
15 
phosphorus 
30* 
29.978 314 
2.50 min
31 
30.973 762 
100
32* 
31.973 907 
14.26 d
16 
sulfur 
32 
31.972 071 
94.93
19 
potassium 
39 
38.963 707 
93.258 1
40* 
39.963 998 
0.011 7 
1.28 3 109 yr
20 
calcium 
Ca 
40 
39.962 591 
96.941
42 
41.958 618 
0.647
43 
42.958 767 
0.135
25 
manganese 
Mn 
55 
54.938 045 
100
26 
iron 
Fe 
56 
55.934 938 
91.754
57 
56.935 394 
2.119
continued
C# PDF Convert to SVG SDK: Convert PDF to SVG files in C#.net, ASP
Instantly convert all PDF document pages to SVG image files in C#.NET class Perform high-fidelity PDF to SVG conversion in both ASP.NET web and WinForms
convert pdf to html5 open source; how to add pdf to website
C# PDF: How to Create PDF Document Viewer in C#.NET with
image and outline preview for quick PDF document page navigation; Support rendering web viewer PDF document to images or svg file; Free to convert viewing PDF
add pdf to website; convert pdf table to html
44.5 the Decay processes 
1397
Table 44.2
Chemical and Nuclear Information for Selected Isotopes (continued)
Mass
Atomic 
Number A 
Mass of 
Half-life, if
Number 
Chemical 
(* means 
Neutral 
Percent 
Radioactive
Element 
Symbol 
radioactive) 
Atom (u) 
Abundance 
T
1/2
27 
cobalt 
Co 
57* 
56.936 291 
272 d
59 
58.933 195 
100
60* 
59.933 817 
5.27 yr
28 
nickel 
Ni 
58 
57.935 343 
68.076 9
60 
59.930 786 
26.223 1
29 
copper 
Cu 
63 
62.929 598 
69.17
64* 
63.929 764 
12.7 h
65 
64.927 789 
30.83
30 
zinc 
Zn 
64 
63.929 142 
48.63
37 
rubidium 
Rb 
87* 
86.909 181 
27.83
38 
strontium 
Sr 
87 
86.908 877 
7.00
88 
87.905 612 
82.58
90* 
89.907 738 
29.1 yr
41 
niobium 
Nb 
93 
92.906 378 
100
42 
molybdenum 
Mo 
94 
93.905 088 
9.25
44 
ruthenium 
Ru 
98 
97.905 287 
1.87
54 
xenon 
Xe 
136* 
135.907 219 
2.4 3 1021
yr
55 
cesium 
Cs 
137* 
136.907 090 
30 yr
56 
barium 
Ba 
137 
136.905 827 
11.232
58 
cerium 
Ce 
140 
139.905 439 
88.450
59 
praseodymium 
Pr 
141 
140.907 653 
100
60 
neodymium 
Nd 
144* 
143.910 087 
23.8 
2.3 3 1015 yr
61 
promethium 
Pm 
145* 
144.912 749 
17.7 yr
79 
gold 
Au 
197 
196.966 569 
100
80 
mercury 
Hg 
198 
197.966 769 
9.97
202 
201.970 643 
29.86
82 
lead 
Pb 
206 
205.974 465 
24.1
207 
206.975 897 
22.1
208 
207.976 652 
52.4
214* 
213.999 805 
26.8 min
83 
bismuth 
Bi 
209 
208.980 399 
100
84 
polonium 
Po 
210* 
209.982 874 
138.38 d
216* 
216.001 915 
0.145 s
218* 
218.008 973 
3.10 min
86 
radon 
Rn 
220* 
220.011 394 
55.6 s
222* 
222.017 578 
3.823 d
88 
radium 
Ra 
226* 
226.025 410 
1 600 yr
90 
thorium 
Th 
232* 
232.038 055 
100 
1.40 3 1010
yr
234* 
234.043 601 
24.1 d
92 
uranium 
234* 
234.040 952 
2.45 3 105 yr
235* 
235.043 930 
0.720 0 
7.04 3 108 yr
236* 
236.045 568 
2.34 3 107 yr
238* 
238.050 788 
99.274 5 
4.47 3 109 yr
93 
neptunium 
Np 
236* 
236.046 570 
1.15 3 105 yr
237* 
237.048 173 
2.14 3 106 yr
94 
plutonium 
Pu 
239* 
239.052 163 
24 120 yr
Source: G. Audi, A. H. Wapstra, and C. Thibault, “The AME2003 Atomic Mass Evaluation,” Nuclear Physics A 729:337–676, 2003.
C# HTML5 Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
When viewing PDF document on web viewer, users can C# users can perform various PDF conversion actions, such as convert PDF to Microsoft Office Word
add pdf to website html; convert pdf to html form
C#: How to Add HTML5 Document Viewer Control to Your Web Page
the necessary resources for creating web document viewer addCommand(new RECommand("convert")); _tabFile.addCommand new UserCommand("pdf"); _userCmdDemoPdf.
best website to convert pdf to word online; convert pdf to url
1398
chapter 44 Nuclear Structure
excited quantum state after the decay. As a result, not all the disintegration energy 
is available as kinetic energy of the alpha particle and daughter nucleus. The emis-
sion of an alpha particle is followed by one or more gamma-ray photons (discussed 
shortly) as the excited nucleus decays to the ground state. The observed discrete 
alpha- particle energies represent evidence of the quantized nature of the nucleus 
and allow a determination of the energies of the quantum states.
If one assumes 238U (or any other alpha emitter) decays by emitting either a pro-
ton or a neutron, the mass of the decay products would exceed that of the parent 
nucleus, corresponding to a negative Q value. A negative Q value indicates that 
such a proposed decay does not occur spontaneously.
uick Quiz 44.3  Which of the following is the correct daughter nucleus associ-
ated with the alpha decay of 157
72
Hf?   (a) 153
72
Hf   (b) 153
70
Yb   (c) 157
70
Yb
Example 44.7   The Energy Liberated When Radium Decays 
The 226Ra nucleus undergoes alpha decay according to Equation 44.12. 
(A) Calculate the Q value for this process. From Table 44.2, the masses are 226.025 410 u for 226Ra, 222.017 578 u for 
222Rn, and 4.002 603 u for 4
2
He.
Conceptualize  Study Figure 44.12 to understand the process of alpha decay in this nucleus.
Categorize  The parent nucleus is an isolated system that decays into an alpha particle and a daughter nucleus. The sys-
tem is isolated in terms of both energy and momentum.
AM
SoluTIoN
Analyze Evaluate Q using Equation 44.14:
Q 5 (M
X
M
Y
M
a
) 3 931.494 MeV/u
5 (226.025 410 u 2 222.017 578 u 2 4.002 603 u) 3 931.494 MeV/u
5 (0.005 229 u) 3 931.494 MeV/u 5 
4.87 MeV
Set up a conservation of momentum equation, noting 
that the initial momentum of the system is zero:
(1)    0 5 M
Y
v
Y
M
a
v
a
Set the disintegration energy equal to the sum of the 
kinetic energies of the alpha particle and the daughter 
nucleus (assuming the daughter nucleus is left in the 
ground state):
(2)   Q5
1
2
M
a
v
a
1
1
2
M
Y
v
Y
2
Solve Equation (1) for v
Y
and substitute into 
Equation(2):
Q51
2
M
a
v
a
2 11
2
M
Y
a
M
a
v
a
M
Y
b
2
51
2
M
a
v
a
2
a
11
M
a
M
Y
b
Q5K
a
a
M
Y
1M
a
M
Y
b
Solve for the kinetic energy of the alpha particle:
K
a
5Q 
a
M
Y
M
Y
1M
a
b
Evaluate this kinetic energy for the specific decay of 
226Ra that we are exploring in this example:
K
a
5 14.87 MeV2
a
222
22214
b
5
4.78 MeV
(B) What is the kinetic energy of the alpha particle after the decay?
Analyze  The value of 4.87 MeV is the disintegration energy for the decay. It includes the kinetic energy of both the 
alpha particle and the daughter nucleus after the decay. Therefore, the kinetic energy of the alpha particle would be 
less than 4.87 MeV.
Finalize The kinetic energy of the alpha particle is indeed less than the disintegration energy, but notice that the 
alpha particle carries away most of the energy available in the decay.
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
Support to create new page to PDF document in both web server-side application and Windows Forms. Ability to add PDF page number in preview.
convert pdf to web form; embed pdf into website
C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
and quickly convert a large-size multi-page PDF document to a group of high-quality separate JPEG image files within .NET projects, including ASP.NET web and
convert pdf form to html form; how to convert pdf into html
44.5 the Decay processes 
1399
To understand the mechanism of alpha decay, let’s model the parent nucleus 
as a system consisting of (1) the alpha particle, already formed as an entity within 
the nucleus, and (2) the daughter nucleus that will result when the alpha particle 
is emitted. Figure 44.13 shows a plot of potential energy versus separation distance 
r between the alpha particle and the daughter nucleus, where the distance marked 
R is the range of the nuclear force. The curve represents the combined effects 
of (1)the repulsive Coulomb force, which gives the positive part of the curve for  
r  . R, and (2) the attractive nuclear force, which causes the curve to be negative 
for r  , R. As shown in Example 44.7, a typical disintegration energy Q is approxi-
mately 5 MeV, which is the approximate kinetic energy of the alpha particle, repre-
sented by the lower dashed line in Figure 44.13.
According to classical physics, the alpha particle is trapped in a potential well. 
How, then, does it ever escape from the nucleus? The answer to this question 
was first provided by George Gamow (1904–1968) in 1928 and independently by 
R.W. Gurney (1898–1953) and E. U. Condon (1902–1974) in 1929, using quantum 
mechanics. In the view of quantum mechanics, there is always some probability 
that a particle can tunnel through a barrier (Section 41.5). That is exactly how we 
can describe alpha decay: the alpha particle tunnels through the barrier in Fig-
ure 44.13, escaping the nucleus. Furthermore, this model agrees with the observa-
tion that higher-energy alpha particles come from nuclei with shorter half-lives. 
For higher-energy alpha particles in Figure 44.13, the barrier is narrower and the 
probability is higher that tunneling occurs. The higher probability translates to a 
shorter half-life.
As an example, consider the decays of 238U and 226Ra in Equations 44.11 and 
44.12, along with the corresponding half-lives and alpha-particle energies:
238U: 
T
1/2
5 4.47 3 109 yr 
K
a
5 4.20 MeV
226Ra: 
T
1/2
5 1.60 3 103 yr 
K
a
5 4.78 MeV
Notice that a relatively small difference in alpha-particle energy is associated with 
a tremendous difference of six orders of magnitude in the half-life. The origin of 
this effect can be understood as follows. Figure 44.13 shows that the curve below 
an alpha-particle energy of 5 MeV has a slope with a relatively small magnitude. 
Therefore, a small difference in energy on the vertical axis has a relatively large 
effect on the width of the potential barrier. Second, recall Equation 41.22, which 
describes the exponential dependence of the probability of transmission on the 
barrier width. These two factors combine to give the very sensitive relationship 
between half-life and alpha-particle energy that the data above suggest.
A life-saving application of alpha decay is the household smoke detector, shown 
in Figure 44.14. The detector consists of an ionization chamber, a sensitive current 
detector, and an alarm. A weak radioactive source (usually 241
95
Am) ionizes the air 
in the chamber of the detector, creating charged particles. A voltage is maintained 
between the plates inside the chamber, setting up a small but detectable current in 
the external circuit due to the ions acting as charge carriers between the plates. As 
long as the current is maintained, the alarm is deactivated. If smoke drifts into the 
chamber, however, the ions become attached to the smoke particles. These heavier 
particles do not drift as readily as do the lighter ions, which causes a decrease in the 
detector current. The external circuit senses this decrease in current and sets off 
the alarm.
Beta Decay
When a radioactive nucleus undergoes beta decay, the daughter nucleus contains 
the same number of nucleons as the parent nucleus but the atomic number is 
changed by 1, which means that the number of protons changes:
A
Z
  S  
Z11
A
Y 1 e2 (incomplete expression) 
(44.15)
A
Z
  S   
Z21
A
Y 1 e1 (incomplete expression) 
(44.16)
U(r)
≈30 MeV
5 MeV
0
R
r
≈–40 MeV
Classically, the 5-MeV energy 
of the alpha particle is not 
sufficiently large to overcome 
the energy barrier, so the 
particle should not be able to 
escape from the nucleus.
Figure 44.13 
Potential energy 
versus separation distance for a 
system consisting of an alpha par-
ticle and a daughter nucleus. The 
alpha particle escapes by tunnel-
ing through the barrier.
+
-
-
+
Radioactive
source
Alarm
b
Current
detector
Ions
a
.
M
i
c
h
a
e
l
D
a
l
t
o
n
/
F
u
n
d
a
m
e
n
t
a
l
P
h
o
t
o
g
r
a
p
h
s
,
N
Y
C
Figure 44.14 
(a) A smoke 
detector uses alpha decay to deter-
mine whether smoke is in the air. 
The alpha source is in the black 
cylinder at the right. (b) Smoke 
entering the chamber reduces 
the detected current, causing the 
alarm to sound.
XDoc.HTML5 Viewer for .NET, Zero Footprint AJAX Document Image
View, Convert, Edit, Sign Documents and Images. Wide range of web browsers support including IE9+ powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image to
conversion pdf to html; to html
DocImage SDK for .NET: Web Document Image Viewer Online Demo
Document Viewer Demo to View, Annotate, Convert and Print upload a file to display in web viewer Suppported files are Word, Excel, PowerPoint, PDF, Tiff, Dicom
converting pdf to html code; pdf to html converter
1400
chapter 44 Nuclear Structure
where, as mentioned in Section 44.4, e2 designates an electron and e1 designates a 
positron, with beta particle being the general term referring to either. Beta decay is not 
described completely by these expressions. We shall give reasons for this statement shortly.
As with alpha decay, the nucleon number and total charge are both conserved in 
beta decays. Because A does not change but Z does, we conclude that in beta decay, 
either a neutron changes to a proton (Eq. 44.15) or a proton changes to a neutron 
(Eq. 44.16). Note that the electron or positron emitted in these decays is not pres-
ent beforehand in the nucleus; it is created in the process of the decay from the rest 
energy of the decaying nucleus. Two typical beta-decay processes are
14
6
C   S   14
7
N 1 e2 (incomplete expression) 
(44.17)
12
7
N   S   12
6
C 1 e1    (incomplete expression) 
(44.18)
Let’s consider the energy of the system undergoing beta decay before and after 
the decay. As with alpha decay, energy of the isolated system must be conserved. 
Experimentally, it is found that beta particles from a single type of nucleus are 
emitted over a continuous range of energies (Fig. 44.15a), as opposed to alpha 
decay, in which the alpha particles are emitted with discrete energies (Fig. 44.15b). 
The kinetic energy of the system after the decay is equal to the decrease in rest 
energy of the system, that is, the Q value. Because all decaying nuclei in the sample 
have the same initial mass, however, the Q value must be the same for each decay. So, 
why do the emitted particles have the range of kinetic energies shown in Figure 
44.15a? The isolated system model and the law of conservation of energy seem to 
be violated! It becomes worse: further analysis of the decay processes described by 
Equations 44.15 and 44.16 shows that the laws of conservation of angular momen-
tum (spin) and linear momentum are also violated!
After a great deal of experimental and theoretical study, Pauli in 1930 proposed 
that a third particle must be present in the decay products to carry away the “miss-
ing” energy and momentum. Fermi later named this particle the neutrino (little 
neutral one) because it had to be electrically neutral and have little or no mass. 
Although it eluded detection for many years, the neutrino (symbol n, Greek nu) 
was finally detected experimentally in 1956 by Frederick Reines (1918–1998), who 
received the Nobel Prize in Physics for this work in 1995. The neutrino has the fol-
lowing properties:
• It has zero electric charge.
• Its mass is either zero (in which case it travels at the speed of light) or very 
small; much recent persuasive experimental evidence suggests that the neu-
trino mass is not zero. Current experiments place the upper bound of the 
mass of the neutrino at approximately 7 eV/c2.
• It has a spin of 
1
2
, which allows the law of conservation of angular momentum 
to be satisfied in beta decay.
• It interacts very weakly with matter and is therefore very difficult to detect.
We can now write the beta-decay processes (Eqs. 44.15 and 44.16) in their cor-
rect and complete form:
A
Z
  S   
Z11
AY 1 e
2 1 n
(complete expression) 
(44.19)
A
Z
  S   
Z21
A
Y 1 e1 1 n 
(complete expression) 
(44.20)
as well as those for carbon-14 and nitrogen-12 (Eqs. 44.17 and 44.18):
14
6
   S   14
7
N 1 e2 1 n
(complete expression) 
(44.21)
12
7
  S   12
6
C 1 e1 1 n 
(complete expression) 
(44.22)
where the symbol n
represents the antineutrino, the antiparticle to the neutrino. 
We shall discuss antiparticles further in Chapter 46. For now, it suffices to say that 
a neutrino is emitted in positron decay and an antineutrino is emitted in electron 
Properties of the neutrino 
Beta decay processes 
Kinetic energy
N
u
m
b
e
r
o
f
-
p
a
r
t
i
c
l
e
s
K
max
Kinetic energy
N
u
m
b
e
r
o
f
-
p
a
r
t
i
c
l
e
s
b
a
a
b
The observed energies of beta 
particles are continuous, having 
all values up to a maximum value.
The observed energies of 
alpha particles are discrete, 
having only a few values.
Figure 44.15 
(a) Distribution 
of beta-particle energies in a typi-
cal beta decay. (b)Distribution of 
alpha-particle energies in a typical 
alpha decay.
C# Image: Quick to Navigate Document in .NET Web Viewer
API can be called from any document page object for navigate to the target part of web viewer document well-formed documents, like Word and PDF, will contain
convert pdf to html link; convert pdf to website
44.5 the Decay processes 
1401
decay. As with alpha decay, the decays listed above are analyzed by applying con-
servation laws, but relativistic expressions must be used for beta particles because 
their kinetic energy is large (typically 1 MeV) compared with their rest energy of  
0.511 MeV. Figure 44.16 shows a pictorial representation of the decays described by 
Equations 44.21 and 44.22.
In Equation 44.19, the number of protons has increased by one and the number 
of neutrons has decreased by one. We can write the fundamental process of e2 
decay in terms of a neutron changing into a proton as follows:
  S   p1e
2
1n
(44.23)
The electron and the antineutrino are ejected from the nucleus, with the net result 
that there is one more proton and one fewer neutron, consistent with the changes 
in Z and A 2 Z. A similar process occurs in e1 decay, with a proton changing into a 
neutron, a positron, and a neutrino. This latter process can only occur within the 
nucleus, with the result that the nuclear mass decreases. It cannot occur for an iso-
lated proton because its mass is less than that of the neutron.
A process that competes with e1 decay is electron capture, which occurs when a 
parent nucleus captures one of its own orbital electrons and emits a neutrino. The 
final product after decay is a nucleus whose charge is Z 2 1:
A
Z
X 1 
2
0
1
e   S   
Z21
A
Y 1 n 
(44.24)
In most cases, it is a K-shell electron that is captured and the process is therefore 
referred to as K capture. One example is the capture of an electron by 7
4
Be:
7
4
Be 1 
21
0  S   7
3
Li 1 n
Because the neutrino is very difficult to detect, electron capture is usually observed 
by the x-rays given off as higher-shell electrons cascade downward to fill the vacancy 
created in the K shell.
Finally, we specify Q values for the beta-decay processes. The Q values for e2 
decay and electron capture are given by Q 5 (M
X
M
Y
)c2, where M
X
and M
Y
are the masses of neutral atoms. In e2 decay, the parent nucleus experiences an 
increase in atomic number and, for the atom to become neutral, an electron must 
be absorbed by the atom. If the neutral parent atom and an electron (which will 
eventually combine with the daughter to form a neutral atom) is the initial system 
and the final system is the neutral daughter atom and the beta-ejected electron, 
the system contains a free electron both before and after the decay. Therefore, in 
subtracting the initial and final masses of the system, this electron mass cancels.
WWElectron capture
14
C
6
14
N
7
K
C
= 0
C
= 0
Before decay
K
N
N
After decay
Antineutrino
Electron
K
e
e
K
ν
ν
12
N
7
12
C
6
K
N
= 0
N
= 0
Before decay
K
C
C
After decay
Neutrino
Positron
K
e
+
e
+
K
ν
ν
p
S
p
S
p
S
p
S
The final products of the beta 
decay of the carbon-14 nucleus 
are a nitrogen-14 nucleus, an 
electron, and an antineutrino.
The final products of the beta 
decay of the nitrogen-12 nucleus 
are a carbon-12 nucleus, a positron, 
and a neutrino.
p
S
p
S
p
S
p
S
a
b
Figure 44.16 
(a) The beta 
decay of carbon-14. (b)The beta 
decay of nitrogen-12.
Pitfall Prevention 44.7
Mass Number of the Electron An 
alternative notation for an elec-
tron, as we see in Equation 44.24, 
is the symbol 
21
0e, which does not 
imply that the electron has zero 
rest energy. The mass of the elec-
tron is so much smaller than that 
of the lightest nucleon, however, 
that we approximate it as zero in 
the context of nuclear decays and 
reactions.
1402
Chapter 44 Nuclear Structure
The Q values for e1 decay are given by Q 5 (M
X
M
Y
2 2m
e
)c2. The extra term 
22m
e
c2 in this expression is necessary because the atomic number of the parent 
decreases by one when the daughter is formed. After it is formed by the decay, 
the daughter atom sheds one electron to form a neutral atom. Therefore, the final 
products are the daughter atom, the shed electron, and the ejected positron.
These relationships are useful in determining whether or not a process is ener-
getically possible. For example, the Q value for proposed e1 decay for a particular 
parent nucleus may turn out to be negative. In that case, this decay does not occur. 
The Q value for electron capture for this parent nucleus, however, may be a positive 
number, so electron capture can occur even though e1 decay is not possible. Such is 
the case for the decay of 7
4
Be shown above.
uick Quiz 44.4  Which of the following is the correct daughter nucleus associ-
ated with the beta decay of 184
72
Hf? (a) 183
72
Hf   (b) 183
73
Ta   (c) 184
73
Ta 
Carbon Dating
The beta decay of 14C (Eq. 44.21) is commonly used to date organic samples. 
Cosmic rays in the upper atmosphere cause nuclear reactions (Section 44.7) that 
create 14C. The ratio of 14C to 12C in the carbon dioxide molecules of our atmo-
sphere has a constant value of approximately r
0
5 1.3 3 10212. The carbon atoms 
in all living organisms have this same 14C/12C ratio r
0
because the organisms con-
tinuously exchange carbon dioxide with their surroundings. When an organism 
dies, however, it no longer absorbs 14C from the atmosphere, and so the 14C/12C 
ratio decreases as the 14C decays with a half-life of 5 730 yr. It is therefore possible 
to measure the age of a material by measuring its 14C activity. Using this tech-
nique, scientists have been able to identify samples of wood, charcoal, bone, and 
shell as having lived from 1 000 to 25 000 years ago. This knowledge has helped 
us reconstruct the history of living organisms—including humans—during this 
time span.
A particularly interesting example is the dating of the Dead Sea Scrolls. This 
group of manuscripts was discovered by a shepherd in 1947. Translation showed 
them to be religious documents, including most of the books of the Old Testament. 
Because of their historical and religious significance, scholars wanted to know their 
age. Carbon dating applied to the material in which they were wrapped established 
their age at approximately 1 950 yr.
Conceptual Example 44.8   The Age of Iceman
In 1991, German tourists discovered the well-preserved remains of a man, now called “Ötzi the Iceman,” trapped in a 
glacier in the Italian Alps. (See the photograph at the opening of this chapter.) Radioactive dating with 14C revealed 
that this person was alive approximately 5 300 years ago. Why did scientists date a sample of Ötzi using 14C rather than 
11C, which is a beta emitter having a half-life of 20.4 min?
Solution
Because 14C has a half-life of 5 730 yr, the fraction of 14C 
nuclei remaining after thousands of years is high enough 
to allow accurate measurements of changes in the sam-
ple’s activity. Because 11C has a very short half-life, it is 
not useful; its activity decreases to a vanishingly small 
value over the age of the sample, making it impossible to 
detect.
An isotope used to date a sample must be present in a 
known amount in the sample when it is formed. As a gen-
eral rule, the isotope chosen to date a sample should also 
have a half-life that is on the same order of magnitude 
as the age of the sample. If the half-life is much less than 
the age of the sample, there won’t be enough activity left 
to measure because almost all the original radioactive 
nuclei will have decayed. If the half-life is much greater 
than the age of the sample, the amount of decay that has 
taken place since the sample died will be too small to 
measure. For example, if you have a specimen estimated 
44.5 the Decay processes 
1403
Conceptualize  Because the charcoal was found in ancient ruins, we expect the current activity to be smaller than the 
initial activity. If we can determine the initial activity, we can find out how long the wood has been dead.
Categorize  The text of the question helps us categorize this example as a carbon dating problem.
Example 44.9   Radioactive Dating
A piece of charcoal containing 25.0 g of carbon is found in some ruins of an ancient city. The sample shows a 14C activ-
ity R of 250 decays/min. How long has the tree from which this charcoal came been dead?
SoluTIoN
Analyze  Solve Equation 44.7 for t:
(1)   t52
1
l
ln a
R
R
0
b
Evaluate the ratio R/R
0
using Equation 44.7, the initial 
value of the 14C/12C ratio r
0
, the number of moles n of 
carbon, and Avogadro’s number N
A
:
R
R
0
5
R
lN
0
114
C
2
5
R
lr
0
N
0
112
C
2
5
R
lr
0
nN
A
Replace the number of moles in terms of the molar mass 
M of carbon and the mass m of the sample and substitute 
for the decay constant l:
R
R
0
5
R
1
ln 2/T
1/2
2
r
0
1
m/M
2
N
A
5
RMT
1/2
r
0
mN
A
ln 2
Substitute numerical values:
R
R
0
5
1
250 min21
21
12.0 g/mol
21
5 730 yr
2
1
1.3310212
21
25.0 g
21
6.02231023 mol21
2
ln 2
a
3.1563107 s
1 yr
ba
1 min
60 s
b
5 0.667
Substitute this ratio into Equation (1) and substitute for 
the decay constant l:
t52
1
l
ln a
R
R
0
b52
T
1/2
ln 2
ln a
R
R
0
b
52
5 730 yr
ln 2
ln 10.66725
3.43103 yr
Finalize  Note that the time interval found here is on the same order of magnitude as the half-life, so 14C is a valid iso-
tope to use for this sample, as discussed in Conceptual Example 44.8.
Gamma Decay
Very often, a nucleus that undergoes radioactive decay is left in an excited energy 
state. The nucleus can then undergo a second decay to a lower-energy state, per-
haps to the ground state, by emitting a high-energy photon:
A
Z
X*   S   
A
Z
X 1 g 
(44.25)
where X* indicates a nucleus in an excited state. The typical half-life of an excited 
nuclear state is 10210 s. Photons emitted in such a de-excitation process are called 
gamma rays. Such photons have very high energy (1 MeV to 1 GeV) relative to 
the energy of visible light (approximately 1 eV). Recall from Section 42.3 that the 
energy of a photon emitted or absorbed by an atom equals the difference in energy 
WWGamma decay
to have died 50 years ago, neither 14C (5 730 yr) nor 11C 
(20 min) is suitable. If you know your sample contains 
hydrogen, however, you can measure the activity of 3H 
(tritium), a beta emitter that has a half-life of 12.3 yr.
▸ 44.8 
continued
1404
chapter 44 Nuclear Structure
between the two electronic states involved in the transition. Similarly, a gamma-ray 
photon has an energy hf that equals the energy difference DE between two nuclear 
energy levels. When a nucleus decays by emitting a gamma ray, the only change in 
the nucleus is that it ends up in a lower-energy state. There are no changes in Z, N
or A.
A nucleus may reach an excited state as the result of a violent collision with 
another particle. More common, however, is for a nucleus to be in an excited state 
after it has undergone alpha or beta decay. The following sequence of events repre-
sents a typical situation in which gamma decay occurs:
12
5
  S   12
6
C*1e1n
(44.26)
12
6
C*   S   12
6
C 1 g 
(44.27)
Figure 44.17 shows the decay scheme for 12B, which undergoes beta decay to either 
of two levels of 12C. It can either (1) decay directly to the ground state of 12C by 
emitting a 13.4-MeV electron or (2) undergo beta decay to an excited state of 12C* 
followed by gamma decay to the ground state. The latter process results in the emis-
sion of a 9.0-MeV electron and a 4.4-MeV photon.
The various pathways by which a radioactive nucleus can undergo decay are 
summarized in Table 44.3.
44.6 Natural Radioactivity
Radioactive nuclei are generally classified into two groups: (1) unstable nuclei 
found in nature, which give rise to natural radioactivity, and (2) unstable nuclei 
produced in the laboratory through nuclear reactions, which exhibit artificial 
radioactivity.
As Table 44.4 shows, there are three series of naturally occurring radioactive 
nuclei. Each series starts with a specific long-lived radioactive isotope whose half-
life exceeds that of any of its unstable descendants. The three natural series begin 
with the isotopes 238U, 235U, and 232Th, and the corresponding stable end products 
are three isotopes of lead: 206Pb, 207Pb, and 208Pb. The fourth series in Table 44.4 
begins with 237Np and has as its stable end product 209Bi. The element 237Np is a 
transuranic element (one having an atomic number greater than that of uranium) 
not found in nature. This element has a half-life of “only” 2.14 3 106 years.
Figure 44.18 shows the successive decays for the 232Th series. First, 232Th under-
goes alpha decay to 228Ra. Next, 228Ra undergoes two successive beta decays to 
228Th. The series continues and finally branches when it reaches 212Bi. At this point, 
there are two decay possibilities. The sequence shown in Figure 44.18 is character-
ized by a mass-number decrease of either 4 (for alpha decays) or 0 (for beta or 
gamma decays). The two uranium series are more complex than the 232Th series. In 
addition, several naturally occurring radioactive isotopes, such as 14C and 40K, are 
not part of any decay series.
Because of these radioactive series, our environment is constantly replenished 
with radioactive elements that would otherwise have disappeared long ago. For 
example, because our solar system is approximately 5 3 109 years old, the supply of 
13.4 MeV
4.4 MeV
12
6
C*
12
6
C
e-
e-
12
5
B
g
In this decay process, the 
daughter nucleus is in an 
excited state, denoted by 
12
C*, and the beta decay is 
followed by a gamma decay. 
In this decay process, the 
daughter nucleus 
12
C is left 
in the ground state.
E
N
E
R
G
Y
6
6
Figure 44.17 
An energy-level 
diagram showing the initial 
nuclear state of a 12B nucleus and 
two possible lower-energy states of 
the 12C nucleus.
Table 44.3
Various Decay Pathways
Alpha decay 
A
Z
X S   A
Z
2
2
4
2
Y 1 4
2
He
Beta decay (e2
A
Z
X S   
Z11
AY 1 e2 1 n
Beta decay (e1
A
Z
X S   
Z21
AY 1 e1 1 n
Electron capture 
A
Z
X 1 e2   S   
Z21
AY 1 n
Gamma decay 
A
Z
X* S   
A
Z
X 1 g
Table 44.4
The Four Radioactive Series
Starting 
Half-life 
Stable End
Series 
Isotope 
(years) 
Product
Uranium 
238
92
4.47 3 109 
206
82
Pb
Actinium  Natural 
235
92
7.04 3 108 
207
82
Pb
Thorium 
232
90
Th 
1.41 3 1010 
208
82
Pb
Neptunium 
237
93
Np 
2.14 3 106 
209
83
Bi
s
N
Z
140
135
130
125
80
85
90
216Po
220Rn
212Pb
208Tl
208Pb
212Po
212Bi
224Ra
228Ra
232Th
228Ac
228Th
Decays with violet arrows toward 
the lower left are alpha decays, 
in which A changes by 4.
Decays with blue arrows toward 
the lower right are beta decays, 
in which A does not change.
Figure 44.18 
Successive decays 
for the 232Th series.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested