44.7 Nuclear reactions 
1405
226Ra (whose half-life is only 1 600 years) would have been depleted by radioactive 
decay long ago if it were not for the radioactive series starting with 238U.
44.7 Nuclear Reactions
We have studied radioactivity, which is a spontaneous process in which the struc-
ture of a nucleus changes. It is also possible to stimulate changes in the structure of 
nuclei by bombarding them with energetic particles. Such collisions, which change 
the identity of the target nuclei, are called nuclear reactions. Rutherford was the 
first to observe them, in 1919, using naturally occurring radioactive sources for 
the bombarding particles. Since then, a wide variety of nuclear reactions has been 
observed following the development of charged-particle accelerators in the 1930s. 
With today’s advanced technology in particle accelerators and particle detectors, 
the Large Hadron Collider (see Section 46.10) in Europe can achieve particle ener-
gies of 14 000 GeV 5 14 TeV. These high-energy particles are used to create new 
particles whose properties are helping to solve the mysteries of the nucleus.
Consider a reaction in which a target nucleus X is bombarded by a particle a, 
resulting in a daughter nucleus Y and an outgoing particle b:
a 1 X   S   Y 1 b 
(44.28)
Sometimes this reaction is written in the more compact form
X(a, b)Y
In Section 44.5, the Q value, or disintegration energy, of a radioactive decay was 
defined as the rest energy transformed to kinetic energy as a result of the decay 
process. Likewise, we define the reaction energy Q associated with a nuclear reac-
tion as the difference between the initial and final rest energies resulting from the reaction:
Q 5 (M
a
M
X
M
Y
M
b
)c2 
(44.29)
As an example, consider the reaction 7Li(p, a)4He. The notation p indicates a 
proton, which is a hydrogen nucleus. Therefore, we can write this reaction in the 
expanded form
1
1
H 1 7
3
Li   S   4
2
He 1 4
2
He
The Q value for this reaction is 17.3 MeV. A reaction such as this one, for which Q is 
positive, is called exothermic. A reaction for which Q is negative is called endother-
mic. To satisfy conservation of momentum for the isolated system, an endother-
mic reaction does not occur unless the bombarding particle has a kinetic energy 
greater than Q. (See Problem 74.) The minimum energy necessary for such a reac-
tion to occur is called the threshold energy.
If particles a and b in a nuclear reaction are identical so that X and Y are also 
necessarily identical, the reaction is called a scattering event. If the kinetic energy 
of the system (a and X) before the event is the same as that of the system (b and Y) 
after the event, it is classified as elastic scattering. If the kinetic energy of the system 
after the event is less than that before the event, the reaction is described as inelastic 
scattering. In this case, the target nucleus has been raised to an excited state by the 
event, which accounts for the difference in energy. The final system now consists 
of b and an excited nucleus Y*, and eventually it will become b, Y, and g, where g is 
the gamma-ray photon that is emitted when the system returns to the ground state. 
This elastic and inelastic terminology is identical to that used in describing colli-
sions between macroscopic objects as discussed in Section 9.4.
In addition to energy and momentum, the total charge and total number of 
nucleons must be conserved in any nuclear reaction. For example, consider the 
WWNuclear reaction
WWReaction energy 
Q
Add pdf to website html - Convert PDF to html files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
How to Convert PDF to HTML Webpage with C# PDF Conversion SDK
convert pdf to html email; convert pdf into web page
Add pdf to website html - VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
PDF to HTML Webpage Converter SDK for VB.NET PDF to HTML Conversion
converting pdf to html email; adding pdf to html
1406
chapter 44 Nuclear Structure
reaction 19F(p, a)16O, which has a Q value of 8.11 MeV. We can show this reaction 
more completely as
1
1
H 1 19
9
  S   16
8
O 1 4
2
He 
(44.30)
The total number of nucleons before the reaction (1 1 19 5 20) is equal to the 
total number after the reaction (16 1 4 5 20). Furthermore, the total charge is the 
same before (1 1 9) and after (8 1 2) the reaction.
44.8  Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and  
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
In this section, we describe an important application of nuclear physics in medicine 
called magnetic resonance imaging. To understand this application, we first discuss 
the spin angular momentum of the nucleus. This discussion has parallels with the 
discussion of spin for atomic electrons.
In Chapter 42, we discussed that the electron has an intrinsic angular momen-
tum, called spin. Nuclei also have spin because their component particles— 
neutrons and protons—each have spin 
1
2
as well as orbital angular momentum 
within the nucleus. All types of angular momentum obey the quantum rules that 
were outlined for orbital and spin angular momentum in Chapter 42. In particu-
lar, two quantum numbers associated with the angular momentum determine the 
allowed values of the magnitude of the angular momentum vector and its direction 
in space. The magnitude of the nuclear angular momentum is 
!
I
1
I11
2
U, where I 
is called the nuclear spin quantum number and may be an integer or a half-integer, 
depending on how the individual proton and neutron spins combine. The quan-
tum number I is the analog to , for the electron in an atom as discussed in Section 
42.6. Furthermore, there is a quantum number m
I
that is the analog to m
,
, in that 
the allowed projections of the nuclear spin angular momentum vector on the z axis 
are m
I
". The values of m
I
range from 2I to 1I in steps of 1. (In fact, for any type of 
spin with a quantum number S, there is a quantum number m
S
that ranges in value 
from 2S to 1S in steps of 1.) Therefore, the maximum value of the z component of 
the spin angular momentum vector is I". Figure 44.19 is a vector model (see Sec-
tion 42.6) illustrating the possible orientations of the nuclear spin vector and its 
projections along the z axis for the case in which I5
3
2
.
Nuclear spin has an associated nuclear magnetic moment, similar to that of 
the electron. The spin magnetic moment of a nucleus is measured in terms of the 
nuclear magneton m
n
, a unit of moment defined as
m
n
;
eU
2m
p
55.05310227 J/T 
(44.31)
where m
p
is the mass of the proton. This definition is analogous to that of the Bohr 
magneton m
B
, which corresponds to the spin magnetic moment of a free electron 
(see Section 42.6). Note that m
n
is smaller than m
B
(5 9.274 3 10224 J/T) by a factor of  
1 836 because of the large difference between the proton mass and the electron 
mass.
The magnetic moment of a free proton is 2.792 8m
n
. Unfortunately, there is no 
general theory of nuclear magnetism that explains this value. The neutron also has 
a magnetic moment, which has a value of 21.913 5m
n
. The negative sign indicates 
that this moment is opposite the spin angular momentum of the neutron. The exis-
tence of a magnetic moment for the neutron is surprising in view of the neutron 
being uncharged. That suggests that the neutron is not a fundamental particle but 
rather has an underlying structure consisting of charged constituents. We shall 
explore this structure in Chapter 46.
Nuclear magneton 
15
2
-
z
2
3
-
2
1
2
1
2
3
Figure 44.19 
A vector model 
showing possible orientations of 
the nuclear spin angular momen-
tum vector and its projections 
along the z axis for the case I5
3
2
.
C# HTML5 Viewer: Deployment on DotNetNuke Site
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.HTML5Editor.dll. Add following content into <webServer Set Website: Click Site->Settings, set website running port and .NET Framework Version.
converting pdfs to html; convert fillable pdf to html
C#: How to Add HTML5 Document Viewer Control to Your Web Page
FileName: "/RasterEdge_Demo_Docs/pdf/demo_1.pdf" })); _tabDemoFiles.addCommand Now, add the following HTML into your file system or another website through the
convert pdf to html online; change pdf to html
44.8 Nuclear Magnetic resonance and Magnetic resonance Imaging 
1407
The potential energy associated with a magnetic dipole moment m
S
in an exter-
nal magnetic field B
S
is given by 2m
S
?B
S
(Eq. 29.18). When the magnetic moment m
S
is lined up with the field as closely as quantum physics allows, the potential energy 
of the dipole–field system has its minimum value E
min
. When m
S
is as antiparallel to 
the field as possible, the potential energy has its maximum value E
max
. In general, 
there are other energy states between these values corresponding to the quantized 
directions of the magnetic moment with respect to the field. For a nucleus with spin 
1
2
, there are only two allowed states, with energies E
min
and E
max
. These two energy 
states are shown in Figure 44.20.
It is possible to observe transitions between these two spin states using a  
technique called NMR, for nuclear magnetic resonance. A constant magnetic field  
(B
S
in Fig. 44.20) is introduced to define a z axis and split the energies of the spin 
states. A second, weaker, oscillating magnetic field is then applied perpendicular 
to B
S
, creating a cloud of radio-frequency photons around the sample. When the 
frequency of the oscillating field is adjusted so that the photon energy matches the 
energy difference between the spin states, there is a net absorption of photons by 
the nuclei that can be detected electronically.
Figure 44.21 is a simplified diagram of the apparatus used in nuclear magnetic 
resonance. The energy absorbed by the nuclei is supplied by the tunable oscilla-
tor producing the oscillating magnetic field. Nuclear magnetic resonance and a 
related technique called electron spin resonance are extremely important methods for 
studying nuclear and atomic systems and the ways in which these systems interact 
with their surroundings.
A widely used medical diagnostic technique called MRI, for magnetic resonance 
imaging, is based on nuclear magnetic resonance. Because nearly two-thirds of the 
atoms in the human body are hydrogen (which gives a strong NMR signal), MRI 
works exceptionally well for viewing internal tissues. The patient is placed inside a 
large solenoid that supplies a magnetic field that is constant in time but whose mag-
nitude varies spatially across the body. Because of the variation in the field, hydro-
gen atoms in different parts of the body have different energy splittings between 
spin states, so the resonance signal can be used to provide information about the 
positions of the protons. A computer is used to analyze the position information to 
provide data for constructing a final image. Contrast in the final image among dif-
ferent types of tissues is created by computer analysis of the time intervals for the 
nuclei to return to the lower-energy spin state between pulses of radio-frequency 
photons. Contrast can be enhanced with the use of contrast agents such as gadolin-
ium compounds or iron oxide nanoparticles taken orally or injected intravenously. 
An MRI scan showing incredible detail in internal body structure is shown in Fig-
ure 44.22.
B=0
> 0
E
min
E=E
max 
- 
E
min
E
max
E
N
E
R
G
Y
B
S
m
S
m
S
The magnetic field splits a single 
state of the nucleus into two states.
Figure 44.20 
A nucleus with 
spin 
1
2
is placed in a magnetic field.
N
S
Electromagnet
Sample
Tunable
oscillator
Resonance
signal
Oscilloscope
Figure 44.21 
Experimental arrangement for 
nuclear magnetic resonance. The radio-frequency 
magnetic field created by the coil surrounding the 
sample and provided by the variable-frequency 
oscillator is perpendicular to the constant mag-
netic field created by the electromagnet. When the 
nuclei in the sample meet the resonance condition, 
the nuclei absorb energy from the radio-frequency 
field of the coil; this absorption changes the charac-
teristics of the circuit in which the coil is included. 
Most modern NMR spectrometers use supercon-
ducting magnets at fixed field strengths and oper-
ate at frequencies of approximately 200 MHz.
U
H
B
T
r
u
s
t
/
S
t
o
n
e
/
G
e
t
t
y
I
m
a
g
e
s
Figure 44.22 
A color-enhanced 
MRI scan of a human brain, show-
ing a tumor in white.
C# PDF: C# Code to Create Mobile PDF Viewer; C#.NET Mobile PDF
NET package, activated C#.NET mobile PDF document viewer Start a Website project in Visual Studio 2005 and Add all following dlls to your project reference by
convert pdf to url online; convert pdf to web
C# Image: How to Integrate Web Document and Image Viewer
RasterEdgeImagingDeveloperGuide8.0.pdf: from this user manual, you can your existing one from where the website is ready Next, add the following HTML into your
best website to convert pdf to word; convert pdf into webpage
1408
chapter 44 Nuclear Structure
Definitions 
A nucleus is represented by the symbol A
Z
X, where A is the mass 
number (the total number of nucleons) and Z is the atomic number 
(the total number of protons). The total number of neutrons in a 
nucleus is the neutron number N, where A 5 N 1 Z. Nuclei having the 
same Z value but different A and N values are isotopes of each other.
The magnetic moment of a nucleus is 
measured in terms of the nuclear magne-
ton m
n
, where
m
n
;
eU
2m
p
55.05310227 J/T (44.31)
Summary
Concepts and Principles
Assuming nuclei are spherical, 
their radius is given by
r 5 aA1/3 
(44.1)
where a 5 1.2 fm.
The difference between the sum of the masses 
of a group of separate nucleons and the mass of 
the compound nucleus containing these nucleons, 
when multiplied by c2, gives the binding energy E
b
of the nucleus. The binding energy of a nucleus 
can be calculated in MeV using the expression
E
b
5 [ZM(H) 1 Nm
n
M(
A
Z
X)] 3 931.494 MeV/u
(44.2)
where M(H) is the atomic mass of the neutral 
hydrogen atom, M(
A
Z
X) represents the atomic 
mass of an atom of the isotope 
A
Z
X, and m
n
is the 
mass of the neutron.
The liquid-drop model of nuclear structure treats the 
nucleons as molecules in a drop of liquid. The four main 
contributions influencing binding energy are the volume 
effect, the surface effect, the Coulomb repulsion effect, and 
the symmetry effect. Summing such contributions results in 
the semiempirical binding-energy formula:
E
b
5C
1
A2C
2
A2/3 2C
3
Z
1
Z21
2
A1/3
2C
4
1
N2Z
22
A
(44.3)
The shell model, or independent-particle model, 
assumes each nucleon exists in a shell and can only have 
discrete energy values. The stability of certain nuclei can be 
explained with this model.
Nuclei are stable because of the nuclear force between nucleons. This 
short-range force dominates the Coulomb repulsive force at distances of less 
than about 2 fm and is independent of charge. Light stable nuclei have equal 
numbers of protons and neutrons. Heavy stable nuclei have more neutrons 
than protons. The most stable nuclei have Z and N values that are both even.
The main advantage of MRI over other imaging techniques is that it causes mini-
mal cellular damage. The photons associated with the radio-frequency signals used 
in MRI have energies of only about 1027 eV. Because molecular bond strengths are 
much larger (approximately 1 eV), the radio-frequency radiation causes little cel-
lular damage. In comparison, x-rays have energies ranging from 104 to 106 eV and 
can cause considerable cellular damage. Therefore, despite some individuals’ fears 
of the word nuclear associated with MRI, the radio-frequency radiation involved is 
overwhelmingly safer than the x-rays that these individuals might accept more read-
ily. A disadvantage of MRI is that the equipment required to conduct the procedure 
is very expensive, so MRI images are costly.
The magnetic field produced by the solenoid is sufficient to lift a car, and the 
radio signal is about the same magnitude as that from a small commercial broad-
casting station. Although MRI is inherently safe in normal use, the strong mag-
netic field of the solenoid requires diligent care to ensure that no ferromagnetic 
materials are located in the room near the MRI apparatus. Several accidents have 
occurred, such as a 2000 incident in which a gun pulled from a police officer’s 
hand discharged upon striking the machine.
C# Image: Tutorial for Document Viewing & Displaying in ASP.NET
Following are detailed steps for website configuration No-Postback Navigation Controls to Viewer. Add two HTML & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
convert pdf to web page online; convert pdf to url link
C# TIFF: C#.NET Mobile TIFF Viewer, TIFF Reader for Mobile
TIFF Mobile Viewer in C#.NET. As creating PDF and Word Create a website project in Visual Studio 2005 and name it as any related name; Add all RasterEdge
best pdf to html converter; create html email from pdf
Objective Questions 
1409
A radioactive substance 
decays by alpha decay, beta 
decay, or gamma decay. An 
alpha particle is the 4He 
nucleus, a beta particle is 
either an electron (e2) or a pos-
itron (e1), and a gamma par-
ticle is a high-energy photon.
In alpha decay, a helium nucleus is ejected from 
the parent nucleus with a discrete set of kinetic 
energies. A nucleus undergoing beta decay emits 
either an electron (e2) and an antineutrino (n
) or 
a positron (e1) and a neutrino (n). The electron or 
positron is ejected with a continuous range of ener-
gies. In electron capture, the nucleus of an atom 
absorbs one of its own electrons and emits a neu-
trino. In gamma decay, a nucleus in an excited state 
decays to its ground state and emits a gamma ray.
If a radioactive material contains N
0
radioactive nuclei at t 5 0, the number 
N of nuclei remaining after a time t has elapsed is
N 5 N
0
e2lt 
(44.6)
where l is the decay constant, a number equal to the probability per second that 
a nucleus will decay. The decay rate, or activity, of a radioactive substance is
R`
dN
dt
` 5R
0
e2lt 
(44.7)
where R
0
5 lN
0
is the activity at t 5 0. The half-life T
1/2
is the time interval 
required for half of a given number of radioactive nuclei to decay, where
T
1/2
5
0.693
l
(44.8)
Nuclear reactions can occur when a target nucleus X is 
bombarded by a particle a, resulting in a daughter nucleus 
Y and an outgoing particle b:
a 1 X S Y 1 b 
(44.28)
The mass–energy conversion in such a reaction, called the 
reaction energy Q, is
Q 5 (M
a
M
X
M
Y
M
b
)c2 
(44.29)
1. In nuclear magnetic resonance, suppose we increase 
the value of the constant magnetic field. As a result, 
the frequency of the photons that are absorbed in a 
particular transition changes. How is the frequency of 
the photons absorbed related to the magnetic field? 
(a) The frequency is proportional to the square of 
the magnetic field. (b) The frequency is directly pro-
portional to the magnetic field. (c)The frequency is 
independent of the magnetic field. (d)The frequency 
is inversely proportional to the magnetic field. (e) The  
frequency is proportional to the reciprocal of the 
square of the magnetic field.
2. When the 95
36
Kr nucleus undergoes beta decay by emit-
ting an electron and an antineutrino, does the daughter  
nucleus (Rb) contain (a) 58 neutrons and 37 protons, 
(b)58 protons and 37 neutrons, (c) 54 neutrons and 41 
protons, or (d) 55 neutrons and 40 protons?
3. When 32
15
P decays to 32
16
S, which of the following particles 
is emitted? (a) a proton (b) an alpha particle (c) an 
electron (d) a gamma ray (e) an antineutrino
4. The half-life of radium-224 is about 3.6 days. What 
approximate fraction of a sample remains undecayed 
after two weeks? (a) 1
2
(b) 1
4
(c) 1
8
(d) 1
16
(e) 1
32
5. Two samples of the same radioactive nuclide are  
prepared. Sample G has twice the initial activity of 
sample H. (i) How does the half-life of G compare with 
the half-life of H? (a)It is two times larger. (b) It is the 
same. (c) It is half as large. (ii) After each has passed 
through five half-lives, how do their activities com-
pare? (a) G has more than twice the activity of H. (b) G 
has twice the activity of H. (c) G and H have the same 
activity. (d) G has lower activity than H.
6. If a radioactive nuclide A
Z
X decays by emitting a gamma 
ray, what happens? (a) The resulting nuclide has a 
different Z value. (b) The resulting nuclide has the 
same A and Z values. (c) The resulting nuclide has a 
different A value. (d) Both A and Z decrease by one.  
(e) None of those statements is correct.
7. Does a nucleus designated as 40
18
X contain (a) 20 neu-
trons and 20 protons, (b) 22 protons and 18 neutrons, 
(c) 18 protons and 22 neutrons, (d) 18 protons and 40 
neutrons, or (e) 40 protons and 18 neutrons?
8. When 144
60
Nd decays to 140
58
Ce, identify the particle that 
is released. (a) a proton (b) an alpha particle (c) an 
electron (d) a neutron (e) a neutrino
9. What is the Q value for the reaction 9Be 1 a S 12C 1 n?  
(a)8.4MeV (b) 7.3 MeV (c) 6.2 MeV (d) 5.7 MeV 
(e)4.2MeV
10. (i) To predict the behavior of a nucleus in a fission 
reaction, which model would be more appropriate, 
Objective Questions
1. 
denotes answer available in Student Solutions Manual/Study Guide
VB.NET Image: VB Tutorial to View Document Online with Imaging Web
including png, jpeg, gif, tiff, bmp, PDF, Microsoft Word VB.NET developers will configure a website so you NET. We will show you how to add a WebThumbnailViewer
converter pdf to html; pdf to html
VB.NET Word: VB Code to Create Word Mobile Viewer with .NET Doc
Add, reorder and even remove Word document page(s VB.NET prorgam, please link to see: PDF Document Mobile Begin a website project with Visual Basic language and
embed pdf into web page; change pdf to html format
1410
chapter 44 Nuclear Structure
(a) the  liquid-drop model or (b) the shell model?  
(ii) Which model would be more successful in pre-
dicting the magnetic moment of a given nucleus? 
Choose from the same answers as in part (i).  
(iii) Which could better explain the gamma-ray spec-
trum of an excited nucleus? Choose from the same 
answers as in part (i).
11. A free neutron has a half-life of 614 s. It undergoes 
beta decay by emitting an electron. Can a free pro-
ton undergo a similar decay? (a) yes, the same decay  
(b) yes, but by emitting a positron (c) yes, but with a 
very different half-life (d)no
12. Which of the following quantities represents the reac-
tion energy of a nuclear reaction? (a) (final mass 2 ini-
tial mass)/c2 (b) (initial mass 2 final mass)/c2 (c) (final 
mass 2 initial mass)c (d) (initial mass 2 final mass)c2 
(e) none of those quantities
13. In the decay 234
90
Th S A
Z
Ra 1 4
2
He, identify the mass 
number and the atomic number of the Ra nucleus:  
(a) A 5 230, Z5 92 (b) A 5 238, Z 5 88 (c) A 5 230,  
Z 5 88 (d) A 5 234, Z5 88 (e) A 5 238, Z 5 86
Conceptual Questions
1. 
denotes answer available in Student Solutions Manual/Study Guide
1. If a nucleus such as 226Ra initially at rest undergoes 
alpha decay, which has more kinetic energy after the 
decay, the alpha particle or the daughter nucleus? 
Explain your answer.
2. “If no more people were to be born, the law of popu-
lation growth would strongly resemble the radioactive 
decay law.’’ Discuss this statement.
3. A student claims that a heavy form of hydrogen decays 
by alpha emission. How do you respond?
4. In beta decay, the energy of the electron or positron 
emitted from the nucleus lies somewhere in a relatively 
large range of possibilities. In alpha decay, however, 
the alpha-particle energy can only have discrete values. 
Explain this difference.
5. Can carbon-14 dating be used to measure the age of a 
rock? Explain.
6. In positron decay, a proton in the nucleus becomes a 
neutron and its positive charge is carried away by the 
positron. A neutron, though, has a larger rest energy 
than a proton. How is that possible?
7. (a) How many values of I
z
are possible for I55
2
? (b) For 
I53?
8. Why do nearly all the naturally occurring isotopes lie 
above the N 5  line in Figure 44.4?
9. Why are very heavy nuclei unstable?
10. Explain why nuclei that are well off the line of stability 
in Figure 44.4 tend to be unstable.
11. Consider two heavy nuclei X and Y having similar 
mass numbers. If X has the higher binding energy, 
which nucleus tends to be more unstable? Explain your 
answer.
12. What fraction of a radioactive sample has decayed 
after two half-lives have elapsed?
13. Figure CQ44.13 shows a watch from the early 20th 
century. The numbers and the hands of the watch are 
painted with a paint that contains a small amount of 
natural radium 226
88
Ra mixed with a phosphorescent 
material. The decay of the radium causes the phos-
phorescent material to glow continuously. The radio-
active nuclide 226
88
Ra has a half-life of approximately  
1.60 3 103 years. Being that the solar system is approxi-
mately 5 billion years old, why was this isotope still 
available in the 20th century for use on this watch?
Figure CQ44.13
©
R
i
c
h
a
r
d
M
e
g
n
a
/
F
u
n
d
a
m
e
n
t
a
l
P
h
o
t
o
g
r
a
p
h
s
14. Can a nucleus emit alpha particles that have different 
energies? Explain.
15. In Rutherford’s experiment, assume an alpha particle 
is headed directly toward the nucleus of an atom. Why 
doesn’t the alpha particle make physical contact with 
the nucleus?
16. Suppose it could be shown that the cosmic-ray intensity 
at the Earth’s surface was much greater 10 000 years 
ago. How would this difference affect what we accept as 
valid carbon-dated values of the age of ancient samples 
of once-living matter? Explain your answer.
17. Compare and contrast the properties of a photon and 
a neutrino.
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
RasterEdge PDF SDK for .NET package offers robust APIs for editing PDF document hyperlink (url), which provide quick access to the website or other file.
convert pdf to webpage; how to convert pdf to html
VB.NET Word: How to Create Word Online Web Viewer in VB.NET
Copy package folder "RasterEdge_Imaging_Files" to your created VB.NET website Application; Add reference "RasterEdge.css" and "RasterEdge.js" to Visual Studio
embed pdf into webpage; batch convert pdf to html
problems 
1411
9. Review. Singly ionized carbon is accelerated through 
1 000V and passed into a mass spectrometer to deter-
mine the isotopes present (see Chapter 29). The mag-
nitude of the magnetic field in the spectrometer is 
0.200 T. The orbit radius for a 12C isotope as it passes 
through the field is r 5 7.89 cm. Find the radius of the 
orbit of a 13C isotope.
10. Review. Singly ionized carbon is accelerated through 
a potential difference DV and passed into a mass spec-
trometer to determine the isotopes present (see Chap-
ter 29). The magnitude of the magnetic field in the 
spectrometer is B. The orbit radius for an isotope of 
mass m
1
as it passes through the field is r
1
. Find the 
radius of the orbit of an isotope of mass m
2
.
11. An alpha particle (Z 5 2, mass 5 6.64 3 10227 kg) 
approaches to within 1.00 3 10214 m of a carbon 
nucleus (Z 5 6). What are (a) the magnitude of the 
maximum Coulomb force on the alpha particle, (b) the  
magnitude of the acceleration of the alpha particle at 
the time of the maximum force, and (c) the potential 
energy of the system of the alpha particle and the car-
bon nucleus at this time?
12. In a Rutherford scattering experiment, alpha particles 
having kinetic energy of 7.70 MeV are fired toward a 
gold nucleus that remains at rest during the collision. 
The alpha particles come as close as 29.5 fm to the 
gold nucleus before turning around. (a) Calculate the 
de Broglie wavelength for the 7.70-MeV alpha particle 
and compare it with the distance of closest approach, 
AMT
S
M
Q/C
Section 44.1  Some Properties of Nuclei
1. Find the nuclear radii of (a) 2
1
H, (b) 60
27
Co, (c) 197
79
Au, 
and (d)239
94
Pu.
2. (a) Determine the mass number of a nucleus whose 
radius is approximately equal to two-thirds the radius 
of 230
88
Ra. (b) Identify the element. (c) Are any other 
answers possible? Explain.
3. (a) Use energy methods to calculate the distance of 
closest approach for a head-on collision between an 
alpha particle having an initial energy of 0.500 MeV 
and a gold nucleus (197Au) at rest. Assume the gold 
nucleus remains at rest during the collision. (b) What 
minimum initial speed must the alpha particle have to 
approach as close as 300 fm to the gold nucleus?
4. (a) What is the order of magnitude of the number of 
protons in your body? (b) Of the number of neutrons? 
(c) Of the number of electrons?
5. Consider the 65
29
Cu nucleus. Find approximate values 
for its (a) radius, (b) volume, and (c) density.
6. Using 2.30 3 1017 kg/m3 as the density of nuclear mat-
ter, find the radius of a sphere of such matter that 
would have a mass equal to that of a baseball, 0.145 kg.
7. A star ending its life with a mass of four to eight 
times the Sun’s mass is expected to collapse and then 
undergo a supernova event. In the remnant that is not 
carried away by the supernova explosion, protons and 
electrons combine to form a neutron star with approxi-
mately twice the mass of the Sun. Such a star can be 
thought of as a gigantic atomic nucleus. Assume r 5 
aA1/3 (Eq. 44.1). If a star of mass 3.983 1030 kg is com-
posed entirely of neutrons (m
n
5 1.67 3 10227 kg), what 
would its radius be?
8. Figure P44.8 shows the potential energy for two pro-
tons as a function of separation distance. In the text, 
it was claimed that, to be visible on such a graph, the 
peak in the curve is exaggerated by a factor of ten.  
(a) Find the electric potential energy of a pair of pro-
tons separated by 4.00 fm. (b) Verify that the peak in 
Figure P44.8 is exaggerated by a factor of ten.
Q/C
M
Q/C
Problems
The problems found in this  
chapter may be assigned 
online in Enhanced WebAssign
1.
 straightforward; 
2. 
intermediate;  
3. 
challenging
1.
full solution available in the Student 
Solutions Manual/Study Guide
AMT
Analysis Model tutorial available in 
Enhanced WebAssign
GP
Guided Problem
M
Master It tutorial available in Enhanced 
WebAssign
W
Watch It video solution available in 
Enhanced WebAssign
BIO
Q/C
S
r (fm)
U(r) (MeV)
0
20
-20
-40
-60
40
8
5 6 7
1 2 2 3 3 4
p–p system
Figure P44.8
1412
chapter 44 Nuclear Structure
radioactive isobar of 139
57
La, 139
55
Cs, decays by e2 emission 
and is located above the line of stable nuclei in Figure 
P44.19. (a)Which of these three isobars has the high-
est neutron-to-proton ratio? (b) Which has the greatest 
binding energy per nucleon? (c) Which do you expect 
to be heavier, 139
59
Pr or 139
55
Cs?
20. The energy required to construct a uniformly charged 
sphere of total charge Q and radius R is U 5 3k
e
Q2/5R
where k
e
is the Coulomb constant (see Problem 77). 
Assume a 40Ca nucleus contains 20 protons uniformly 
distributed in a spherical volume. (a) How much 
energy is required to counter their electrical repulsion 
according to the above equation? (b) Calculate the 
binding energy of 40Ca. (c) Explain what you can con-
clude from comparing the result of part (b) with that 
of part (a).
21. Calculate the minimum energy required to remove a 
neutron from the 43
20
Ca nucleus.
Section 44.3  Nuclear Models
22. Using the graph in Figure 44.5, estimate how much 
energy is released when a nucleus of mass number 200 
fissions into two nuclei each of mass number 100.
23. (a) Use the semiempirical binding-energy formula 
(Eq. 44.3) to compute the binding energy for 56
26
Fe.  
(b) What percentage is contributed to the binding 
energy by each of the four terms?
24. (a) In the liquid-drop model of nuclear structure, why 
does the surface-effect term 2C
2
A2/3 have a negative 
sign? (b) What If? The binding energy of the nucleus 
increases as the volume-to-surface area ratio increases. 
Calculate this ratio for both spherical and cubical 
shapes and explain which is more plausible for nuclei.
Section 44.4  Radioactivity
25. What time interval is required for the activity of a sam-
ple of the radioactive isotope 72
33
As to decrease by 90.0% 
from its original value? The half-life of 72
33
As is 26 h.
26. A freshly prepared sample of a certain radioactive iso-
tope has an activity of 10.0 mCi. After 4.00 h, its activity 
is 8.00 mCi. Find (a) the decay constant and (b) the 
half-life. (c)How many atoms of the isotope were con-
tained in the freshly prepared sample? (d) What is the 
sample’s activity 30.0 h after it is prepared?
27. A sample of radioactive material contains 1.00 3 1015 
atoms and has an activity of 6.00 3 1011 Bq. What is its 
half-life?
28. From the equation expressing the law of radioactive 
decay, derive the following useful expressions for the 
decay constant and the half-life, in terms of the time 
interval Dt during which the decay rate decreases from 
R
0
to R:
l5
1
Dt
ln 
a
R
0
R
b
T
1/2
5
1
ln 2
2
Dt
ln 
1
R
0
/R
2
Q/C
Q/C
S
M
S
29.5 fm. (b) Based on this comparison, why is it proper 
to treat the alpha particle as a particle and not as a 
wave in the Rutherford scattering experiment?
13. Review. Two golf balls each have a 4.30-cm diameter 
and are 1.00 m apart. What would be the gravitational 
force exerted by each ball on the other if the balls were 
made of nuclear matter?
14. Assume a hydrogen atom is a sphere with diameter 
0.100nm and a hydrogen molecule consists of two such 
spheres in contact. (a) What fraction of the space in 
a tank of hydrogen gas at 0°C and 1.00 atm is occu-
pied by the hydrogen molecules themselves? (b) What  
fraction of the space within one hydrogen atom is 
occupied by its nucleus, of radius 1.20 fm?
Section 44.2 Nuclear Binding Energy
15. Calculate the binding energy per nucleon for (a) 2H, 
(b)4He, (c) 56Fe, and (d) 238U.
16. (a) Calculate the difference in binding energy per 
nucleon for the nuclei 23
11
Na and 23
12
Mg. (b) How do you 
account for the difference?
17. A pair of nuclei for which Z
1
N
2
and Z
2
N
1
are 
called mirror isobars (the atomic and neutron numbers 
are interchanged). Binding-energy measurements on 
these nuclei can be used to obtain evidence of the 
charge independence of nuclear forces (that is, proton– 
proton, proton–neutron, and neutron–neutron nuclear 
forces are equal). Calculate the difference in binding 
energy for the two mirror isobars 15
8
O and 15
7
N. The 
electric repulsion among eight protons rather than 
seven accounts for the difference.
18. The peak of the graph of nuclear binding energy per 
nucleon occurs near 56Fe, which is why iron is promi-
nent in the spectrum of the Sun and stars. Show that 
56Fe has a higher binding energy per nucleon than its 
neighbors 55Mn and 59Co.
19. Nuclei having the same mass numbers are called iso-
bars. The isotope 139
57
La is stable. A radioactive isobar, 
139
59
Pr, is located below the line of stable nuclei as shown 
in Figure P44.19 and decays by e1 emission. Another 
Q/C
Q/C
N
Z
95
90
85
80
75
70
65
60
60
65
50 55
57
La
139
55
Cs
139
59
Pr
139
Figure P44.19
problems 
1413
36. 3H nucleus beta decays into 3He by creating an elec-
tron and an antineutrino according to the reaction
3
1
H   S   3
2
He1e1n
Determine the total energy released in this decay.
37. The 14C isotope undergoes beta decay according to the 
process given by Equation 44.21. Find the Q value for 
this process.
38. Identify the unknown nuclide or particle (X). 
(a) X S 65
28
Ni1 g 
(b) 215
84
Po S  X 1 a  
(c) X S 55
26
Fe 1 e1 1 n
39. Find the energy released in the alpha decay
238
92
  S   234
90
Th 1 4
2
He
40. A sample consists of 1.00 3 106 radioactive nuclei with 
a half-life of 10.0 h. No other nuclei are present at time 
t 5 0. The stable daughter nuclei accumulate in the 
sample as time goes on. (a) Derive an equation giv-
ing the number of daughter nuclei N
d
as a function of 
time. (b)Sketch or describe a graph of the number of 
daughter nuclei as a function of time. (c) What are the 
maximum and minimum numbers of daughter nuclei, 
and when do they occur? (d)What are the maximum 
and minimum rates of change in the number of daugh-
ter nuclei, and when do they occur?
41. The nucleus 15
8
O decays by electron capture. The 
nuclear reaction is written
15
8
O 1 e2 S 15
7
N 1 n
(a) Write the process going on for a single particle 
within the nucleus. (b) Disregarding the daughter’s 
recoil, determine the energy of the neutrino.
42. A living specimen in equilibrium with the atmosphere 
contains one atom of 14C (half-life 5 5 730 yr) for every 
7.70 3 1011 stable carbon atoms. An archeological  
sample of wood (cellulose, C
12
H
22
O
11
) contains 21.0 mg 
of carbon. When the sample is placed inside a shielded 
beta counter with 88.0% counting efficiency, 837 
counts are accumulated in one week. We wish to find 
the age of the sample. (a)Find the number of carbon 
atoms in the sample. (b)Find the number of carbon-14 
atoms in the sample. (c)Find the decay constant for 
carbon-14 in inverse seconds. (d) Find the initial num-
ber of decays per week just after the specimen died.  
(e) Find the corrected number of decays per week 
from the current sample. (f) From the answers to parts  
(d) and (e), find the time interval in years since the 
specimen died.
Section 44.6  Natural Radioactivity
43. Uranium is naturally present in rock and soil. At one 
step in its series of radioactive decays, 238U produces 
the chemically inert gas radon-222, with a half-life of 
3.82 days. The radon seeps out of the ground to mix 
into the atmosphere, typically making open air radio-
active with activity 0.3pCi/L. In homes, 222Rn can be a 
serious pollutant, accumulating to reach much higher 
Q/C
GP
BIO
W
BIO
29. The radioactive isotope 198Au has a half-life of 64.8 h.  
A sample containing this isotope has an initial activ-
ity (t 5 0) of 40.0 mCi. Calculate the number of nuclei 
that decay in the time interval between t
1
5 10.0 h and  
t
2
5 12.0 h.
30. A radioactive nucleus has half-life T
1/2
. A sample con-
taining these nuclei has initial activity R
at t 5 0. 
Calculate the number of nuclei that decay during the 
interval between the later times t
1
and t
2
.
31. The half-life of 131I is 8.04 days. (a) Calculate the decay 
constant for this nuclide. (b) Find the number of 131I 
nuclei necessary to produce a sample with an activity 
of 6.40mCi. (c) A sample of 131I with this initial activity 
decays for 40.2d. What is the activity at the end of that 
period?
32. Tritium has a half-life of 12.33 years. What fraction 
of the nuclei in a tritium sample will remain (a) after  
5.00 yr? (b) After 10.0 yr? (c) After 123.3 yr? (d) Accord-
ing to Equation 44.6, an infinite amount of time 
is required for the entire sample to decay. Discuss 
whether that is realistic.
33. Consider a radioactive sample. Determine the ratio of 
the number of nuclei decaying during the first half of 
its half-life to the number of nuclei decaying during 
the second half of its half-life.
34. (a) The daughter nucleus formed in radioactive decay 
is often radioactive. Let N
10
represent the number of 
parent nuclei at time t 5 0, N
1
(t) the number of parent 
nuclei at time t, and l
1
the decay constant of the par-
ent. Suppose the number of daughter nuclei at time t 5 
0 is zero. Let N
2
(t) be the number of daughter nuclei at 
time t and let l
2
be the decay constant of the daughter. 
Show that N
2
(t) satisfies the differential equation
dN
2
dt
5l
1
N
1
2l
2
N
2
(b) Verify by substitution that this differential equa-
tion has the solution
N
2
1
t
2
5
N
10
l
1
l
1
2l
2
1
e2l
2
2e2l
1
t2
This equation is the law of successive radioactive decays. 
(c)218Po decays into 214Pb with a half-life of 3.10 min, 
and 214Pb decays into 214Bi with a half-life of 26.8 min. 
On the same axes, plot graphs of N
1
(t) for 218Po and 
N
2
(t) for 214Pb. Let N
10
5 1 000 nuclei and choose values 
of t from 0 to 36min in 2-min intervals. (d) The curve 
for 214Pb obtained in part (c) at first rises to a maximum 
and then starts to decay. At what instant t
m
is the number 
of 214Pb nuclei a maximum? (e) By applying the condi-
tion for a maximum dN
2
/dt 5 0, derive a symbolic equa-
tion for t
m
in terms of l
1
and l
2
. (f) Explain whether the 
value obtained in part (c) agrees with this equation.
Section 44.5  The Decay Processes
35. Determine which decays can occur spontaneously.  
(a) 40
20
Ca S e1 1 40
19
   (b) 98
44
Ru S 4
2
He 1 94
42
Mo  
(c) 144
60
Nd S 4
2
He 1 140
58
Ce
M
S
Q/C
Q/C
1414
chapter 44 Nuclear Structure
activities in enclosed spaces, sometimes reaching  
4.00 pCi/L. If the radon radioactivity exceeds  
4.00 pCi/L, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency 
suggests taking action to reduce it such as by reducing 
infiltration of air from the ground. (a) Convert the 
activity 4.00 pCi/L to units of becquerels per cubic 
meter. (b) How many 222Rn atoms are in 1 m3 of air 
displaying this activity? (c) What fraction of the mass 
of the air does the radon constitute?
44. The most common isotope of radon is 222Rn, which has 
half-life 3.82 days. (a) What fraction of the nuclei that 
were on the Earth one week ago are now undecayed? 
(b)Of those that existed one year ago? (c) In view of 
these results, explain why radon remains a problem, 
contributing significantly to our background radiation 
exposure.
45. Enter the correct nuclide symbol in each open tan 
rectangle in Figure P44.45, which shows the sequences 
of decays in the natural radioactive series starting with 
the long-lived isotope uranium-235 and ending with 
the stable nucleus lead-207.
N
Z
95
90
85
80
Alpha decay
Beta (-) decay
145
140
135
130
125
92
U
235
82
Pb
207
Figure P44.45
46. A rock sample contains traces of 238U, 235U, 232Th, 208Pb, 
207Pb, and 206Pb. Analysis shows that the ratio of the 
amount of 238U to 206Pb is 1.164. (a) Assuming the rock 
originally contained no lead, determine the age of the 
rock. (b) What should be the ratios of 235U to 207Pb and 
of 232Th to 208Pb so that they would yield the same age 
for the rock? Ignore the minute amounts of the inter-
mediate decay products in the decay chains. Note: This 
form of multiple dating gives reliable geological dates.
Section 44.7  Nuclear Reactions
47. A beam of 6.61-MeV protons is incident on a target of 
27
13
Al. Those that collide produce the reaction
p 1 27
13
Al   S   27
14
Si 1 n
Q/C
W
W
Ignoring any recoil of the product nucleus, determine 
the kinetic energy of the emerging neutrons.
48. (a) One method of producing neutrons for experimen-
tal use is bombardment of light nuclei with alpha par-
ticles. In the method used by James Chadwick in 1932, 
alpha particles emitted by polonium are incident on 
beryllium nuclei:
4
2
He 1 9
4
Be   S   12
6
C 1 1
0
n
What is the Q value of this reaction? (b) Neutrons are 
also often produced by small-particle accelerators. In 
one design, deuterons accelerated in a Van de Graaff 
generator bombard other deuterium nuclei and cause 
the reaction
2
1
H 1 2
1
H   S   3
2
He 1 1
0
n
Calculate the Q value of the reaction. (c) Is the reac-
tion in part (b) exothermic or endothermic?
49. Identify the unknown nuclides and particles X and 
X9 in the nuclear reactions (a) X 1 4
2
He S 24
12
Mg 1 1
0
n,  
(b) 235
92
U 1 1
0
n S 90
38
Sr 1 X 1 2(1
0
n), and (c) 2(1
1
H) S  
2
1
H 1 X 1 X9.
50. Natural gold has only one isotope, 197
79
Au. If natural 
gold is irradiated by a flux of slow neutrons, electrons 
are emitted. (a) Write the reaction equation. (b) Cal-
culate the maximum energy of the emitted electrons.
51. The following reactions are observed:
9
4
Be 1 n   S   10
4
Be 1 g Q 5 6.812 MeV
9
4
Be 1 g   S   8
4
Be 1 n Q 5 21.665 MeV
Calculate the masses of 8Be and 10Be in unified mass 
units to four decimal places from these data.
Section 44.8  Nuclear Magnetic Resonance  
and Magnetic Resonance Imaging
52. Construct a diagram like that of Figure 44.19 for the 
cases when I equals (a) 
5
2
and (b) 4.
53. The radio frequency at which a nucleus having a mag-
netic moment of magnitude m displays resonance 
absorption between spin states is called the Larmor 
frequency and is given by
f5
DE
h
5
2mB
h
Calculate the Larmor frequency for (a) free neutrons 
in a magnetic field of 1.00 T, (b) free protons in a mag-
netic field of 1.00 T, and (c) free protons in the Earth’s 
magnetic field at a location where the magnitude of 
the field is 50.0mT.
Additional Problems
54. A wooden artifact is found in an ancient tomb. Its  
carbon-14 (14
6
C) activity is measured to be 60.0% of 
that in a fresh sample of wood from the same region. 
M
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested