45.4 Nuclear Fusion 
1425
tainers used to transport nuclear materials. Container manufacturers must demon-
strate that their containers will not rupture even in high-speed collisions.
Despite these risks, there are advantages to the use of nuclear power to be  
weighed against the risks. For example, nuclear power plants do not produce air 
pollution and greenhouse gases as do fossil fuel plants, and the supply of ura-
nium on the Earth is predicted to last longer than the supply of fossil fuels. For 
each source of energy—whether nuclear, hydroelectric, fossil fuel, wind, solar, or 
other—the risks must be weighed against the benefits and the availability of the 
energy source.
45.4 Nuclear Fusion
In Chapter 44, we found that the binding energy for light nuclei (A , 20) is much 
smaller than the binding energy for heavier nuclei, which suggests a process that is 
the reverse of fission. As mentioned in Section 39.8, when two light nuclei combine 
to form a heavier nucleus, the process is called nuclear fusion. Because the mass of 
the final nucleus is less than the combined masses of the original nuclei, there is a 
loss of mass accompanied by a release of energy.
Two examples of such energy-liberating fusion reactions are as follows:
11
1
H 1 11
1
  S   22
1
H 1 e1 1 n
11
1
H 1 2
1
  S   3
2
He 1 g
These reactions occur in the core of a star and are responsible for the outpouring 
of energy from the star. The second reaction is followed by either hydrogen–helium 
fusion or helium–helium fusion:
1
1
H 1 3
2
He   S   4
2
He 1 e1 1 n
3
2
He 1 3
2
He   S   4
2
He 1 1
1
H 1 11
1
H
These fusion reactions are the basic reactions in the proton–proton cycle, believed 
to be one of the basic cycles by which energy is generated in the Sun and other stars 
that contain an abundance of hydrogen. Most of the energy production takes place 
in the Sun’s interior, where the temperature is approximately 1.5 3 107 K. Because 
such high temperatures are required to drive these reactions, they are called ther-
monuclear fusion reactions. All the reactions in the proton–proton cycle are exo-
thermic. An overview of the cycle is that four protons combine to generate an alpha 
particle, positrons, gamma rays, and neutrinos.
uick Quiz 45.4  In the core of a star, hydrogen nuclei combine in fusion reac-
tions. Once the hydrogen has been exhausted, fusion of helium nuclei can 
occur. If the star is sufficiently massive, fusion of heavier and heavier nuclei 
can occur once the helium is used up. Consider a fusion reaction involving two 
nuclei with the same value of A. For this reaction to be  exothermic, which of the 
following values of A are impossible? (a) 12 (b) 20 (c) 28 (d)64
Pitfall Prevention 45.2
Fission and Fusion The words 
fission and fusion sound similar, 
but they correspond to different 
processes. Consider the binding-
energy graph in Figure 44.5. 
There are two directions from 
which you can approach the 
peak of the graph so that energy 
is released: combining two light 
nuclei, or fusion, and separating 
a heavy nucleus into two lighter 
nuclei, or fission.
Example 45.2   Energy Released in Fusion
Find the total energy released in the fusion reactions in the proton–proton cycle.
Conceptualize  The net nuclear result of the proton–proton cycle is to fuse four protons to form an alpha particle. Study 
the reactions above for the proton–proton cycle to be sure you understand how four protons become an alpha particle.
Categorize  We use concepts discussed in this section, so we categorize this example as a substitution problem.
SolutIoN
continued
Convert pdf to html for online - Convert PDF to html files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
How to Convert PDF to HTML Webpage with C# PDF Conversion SDK
convert pdf to html code for email; pdf to web converter
Convert pdf to html for online - VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
PDF to HTML Webpage Converter SDK for VB.NET PDF to HTML Conversion
to html; convert pdf to html5
1426
chapter 45 applications of Nuclear physics
Terrestrial Fusion Reactions
The enormous amount of energy released in fusion reactions suggests the possibil-
ity of harnessing this energy for useful purposes. A great deal of effort is currently 
under way to develop a sustained and controllable thermonuclear reactor, a fusion 
power reactor. Controlled fusion is often called the ultimate energy source because 
of the availability of its fuel source: water. For example, if deuterium were used as 
the fuel, 0.12 g of it could be extracted from 1 gal of water at a cost of about four 
cents. This amount of deuterium would release approximately 1010 J if all nuclei 
underwent fusion. By comparison, 1 gal of gasoline releases approximately 108 J 
upon burning and costs far more than four cents.
An additional advantage of fusion reactors is that comparatively few radioactive 
by-products are formed. For the proton–proton cycle, for instance, the end prod-
uct is safe, nonradioactive helium. Unfortunately, a thermonuclear reactor that can 
deliver a net power output spread over a reasonable time interval is not yet a reality, 
and many difficulties must be resolved before a successful device is constructed.
The Sun’s energy is based in part on a set of reactions in which hydrogen is con-
verted to helium. The proton–proton interaction is not suitable for use in a fusion 
reactor, however, because the event requires very high temperatures and densities. 
The process works in the Sun only because of the extremely high density of protons 
in the Sun’s interior.
The reactions that appear most promising for a fusion power reactor involve deu-
terium (2
1
H) and tritium (3
1
H):
22
1
H 1 22
1
  S   3
2
He 1 1
0
   Q 5 3.27 MeV
22
1
H 1 22
1
  S   3
1
H 1 1
1
    Q 5 4.03 MeV 
(45.4)
2
1
H 1 3
1
  S   4
2
He 1 1
0
   Q 5 17.59 MeV
As noted earlier, deuterium is available in almost unlimited quantities from our 
lakes and oceans and is very inexpensive to extract. Tritium, however, is radioactive 
(T
1/2
5 12.3 yr) and undergoes beta decay to 3He. For this reason, tritium does not 
occur naturally to any great extent and must be artificially produced.
One major problem in obtaining energy from nuclear fusion is that the Cou-
lomb repulsive force between two nuclei, which carry positive charges, must be 
overcome before they can fuse. Figure 45.7 is a graph of potential energy as a 
function of the separation distance between two deuterons (deuterium nuclei, 
each having charge 1e). The potential energy is positive in the region r . R,  
where the Coulomb repulsive force dominates (R < 1 fm), and negative in the 
region r , R, where the nuclear force dominates. The fundamental problem then 
is to give the two nuclei enough kinetic energy to overcome this repulsive force. 
This requirement can be accomplished by raising the fuel to extremely high tem-
peratures (to approximately 108 K). At these high temperatures, the atoms are 
ionized and the system consists of a collection of electrons and nuclei, commonly 
referred to as a plasma.
r
R
E
U(r)
The Coulomb repulsive force is 
dominant for large separation 
distances between the deuterons.
The attractive nuclear force is 
dominant when the deuterons 
are close together.
Figure 45.7 
Potential energy as 
a function of separation distance 
between two deuterons. R is on the 
order of 1 fm. If we neglect tunnel-
ing, the two deuterons require an 
energy E greater than the height 
of the barrier to undergo fusion.
Find the initial mass of the system using the atomic mass 
of hydrogen from Table 44.2:
4(1.007 825 u) 5 4.031 300 u
Find the change in mass of the system as this value 
minus the mass of a 4He atom:
4.031 300 u 2 4.002 603 u 5 0.028 697 u
Convert this mass change into energy units:
E 5 0.028 697 u 3 931.494 MeV/u 5
26.7 MeV
This energy is shared among the alpha particle and other particles such as positrons, gamma rays, and neutrinos.
▸ 45.2 
continued
Online Convert PDF to HTML5 files. Best free online PDF html
Online PDF to HTML5 Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF file to HTML. Just upload your file by clicking on the blue button
converting pdf to html email; how to convert pdf to html code
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
RasterEdge. PRODUCTS: ONLINE DEMOS: Online HTML5 Document Viewer; Online XDoc.PDF Demo▶: Convert PDF to Word; Convert PDF to Tiff; Convert PDF to HTML; Convert
how to convert pdf file to html document; convert pdf into web page
45.4 Nuclear Fusion 
1427
(B)  Estimate the temperature required for a deuteron to overcome the potential barrier, assuming an energy of 
3
2
k
B
T 
per deuteron (where k
B
is Boltzmann’s constant).
Because the total Coulomb energy of the pair is 0.14 MeV, the Coulomb energy per deuteron is equal to 0.07 MeV 5  
1.1 3 10214 J.
SolutIoN
Analyze  Evaluate the potential energy 
associated with two charges separated by a 
distance r (Eq. 25.13) for two deuterons:
U5k
e
q
1
q
2
r
5k
e
1
1e
22
r
5
1
8.993109 N
#
m2/C2
2
1
1.60310219 C
22
1.0310214 m
5 2.3 3 10214 J 5 
0.14 MeV
Solve for T:
T5
2
1
1.1310214 J
2
3
1
1.38310223 J/K
2
5
5.63108 K
Find the change in mass and convert to 
energy units:
4.028 204 u 2 4.023 874 u 5 0.004 33 u
5 0.004 33 u 3 931.494 MeV/u 5 
4.03 MeV
Set this energy equal to the average energy per 
deuteron:
3
2
k
B
T51.1310214 J
Find the sum of the masses after the reaction:
3.016 049 u 1 1.007 825 u 5 4.023 874 u
(C)  Find the energy released in the deuterium–deuterium reaction
2
1
H 1 2
1
H   S   3
1
H 1 1
1
H
The mass of a single deuterium atom is equal to 2.014 102 u. Therefore, the total mass of the system before the reaction 
is 4.028 204 u.
SolutIoN
Finalize  The calculated temperature in part (B) is too high because the particles in the plasma have a Maxwellian 
speed distribution (Section 21.5) and therefore some fusion reactions are caused by particles in the high-energy tail 
of this distribution. Furthermore, even those particles that do not have enough energy to overcome the barrier have 
some probability of tunneling through (Section 41.5). When these effects are taken into account, a temperature of 
“only” 4 3 108 K appears adequate to fuse two deuterons in a plasma. In part (C), notice that the energy value is consis-
tent with that already given in Equation 45.4.
Suppose the tritium resulting from the reaction in part (C) reacts with another deuterium in the reaction
2
1
H 1 3
1
  S   4
2
He 1 1
0
How much energy is released in the sequence of two reactions?
What IF?
Example 45.3   The Fusion of Two Deuterons
For the nuclear force to overcome the repulsive Coulomb force, the separation distance between two deuterons must 
be approximately 1.0 3 10214 m.
(A)  Calculate the height of the potential barrier due to the repulsive force.
Conceptualize Imagine moving two deuterons toward each other. As they move closer together, the Coulomb repul-
sion force becomes stronger. Work must be done on the system to push against this force, and this work appears in the 
system of two deuterons as electric potential energy.
Categorize  We categorize this problem as one involving the electric potential energy of a system of two charged particles.
SolutIoN
continued
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to
RasterEdge. PRODUCTS: ONLINE DEMOS: Online HTML5 Document Viewer; Online XDoc.PDF Demo▶: Convert PDF to Word; Convert PDF to Tiff; Convert PDF to HTML; Convert
convert pdf to web form; convert from pdf to html
VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.
RasterEdge. PRODUCTS: ONLINE DEMOS: Online HTML5 Document Viewer; Online XDoc.PDF Demo▶: Convert PDF to Word; Convert PDF to Tiff; Convert PDF to HTML; Convert
convert pdf link to html; convert pdf into html file
1428
chapter 45 applications of Nuclear physics
The temperature at which the power generation rate in any fusion reaction 
exceeds the loss rate is called the critical ignition temperature T
ignit
. This tempera-
ture for the deuterium–deuterium (D–D) reaction is 4 3 108 K. From the relation-
ship E<
3
2
k
B
T, the ignition temperature is equivalent to approximately 52 keV. The 
critical ignition temperature for the deuterium–tritium (D–T) reaction is approxi-
mately 4.5 3 107 K, or only 6 keV. A plot of the power P
gen
generated by fusion versus 
temperature for the two reactions is shown in Figure 45.8. The straight green line 
represents the power P
lost
lost via the radiation mechanism known as bremsstrah-
lung (Section 42.8). In this principal mechanism of energy loss, radiation (primarily 
x-rays) is emitted as the result of electron–ion collisions within the plasma. The inter-
sections of the P
lost
line with the P
gen
curves give the critical ignition temperatures.
In addition to the high-temperature requirements, two other critical param-
eters determine whether or not a thermonuclear reactor is successful: the ion 
density n and confinement time t, which is the time interval during which energy 
injected into the plasma remains within the plasma. British physicist J. D. Lawson 
(1923–2008) showed that both the ion density and confinement time must be large 
enough to ensure that more fusion energy is released than the amount required to 
raise the temperature of the plasma. For a given value of n, the probability of fusion 
between two particles increases as t increases. For a given value of t, the collision 
rate between nuclei increases as n increases. The product nt is referred to as the 
Lawson number of a reaction. A graph of the value of nt necessary to achieve a net 
energy output for the D–T and D–D reactions at different temperatures is shown in 
Figure 45.9. In particular, Lawson’s criterion states that a net energy output is pos-
sible for values of nt that meet the following conditions:
nt $ 1014 s/cm3    (D–T) 
(45.5)
nt $ 1016 s/cm3    (D–D)
These values represent the minima of the curves in Figure 45.9.
P
o
w
e
r
g
e
n
e
r
a
t
e
d
o
r
l
o
s
t
(
W
/
m
3
)
10
100
1 000
45
400
1.3
13
129
5.8
52
T
P
gen
P
lost
(MK)
k
B
T(keV)
10
4
10
5
10
6
10
7
10
8
(D–T)
(D–D)
3
2
The green line represents 
power lost by bremsstrahlung 
as a function of temperature.
P
gen
Figure 45.8 
Power generated versus 
temperature for deuterium–deuterium 
(D–D) and deuterium–tritium (D–T) 
fusion. When the generation rate exceeds 
the loss rate, ignition takes place.
10
18
10
17
10
16
10
15
10
14
10
13
0.1
1
10
100 1000
Kinetic temperature (keV)
n
(
s
/
c
m
3
)
D–T
D–D
t
The regions above the colored 
curves represent favorable 
conditions for fusion.
Figure 45.9 
The Lawson number 
nt at which net energy output is pos-
sible versus temperature for the D–T 
and D–D fusion reactions.
Answer  The overall effect of the sequence of two reactions is that three deuterium nuclei have combined to form 
a helium nucleus, a hydrogen nucleus, and a neutron. The initial mass is 3(2.014 102 u) 5 6.042 306 u. After the 
reaction, the sum of the masses is 4.002 603 u 1 1.007 825 u 1 1.008 665 5 6.019 093 u. The excess mass is equal to 
0.023 213 u, equivalent to an energy of 21.6 MeV. Notice that this value is the sum of the Q values for the second and 
third reactions in Equation 45.4.
▸ 45.3 
continued
VB.NET PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in vb.
Resize converted Tiff image using VB.NET. Convert PDF file to Tiff and jpeg in ASPX webpage online. Online source code for VB.NET class.
how to change pdf to html format; convert pdf into html online
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
RasterEdge. PRODUCTS: ONLINE DEMOS: Online HTML5 Document Viewer; Online XDoc.PDF Demo▶: Convert PDF to Word; Convert PDF to Tiff; Convert PDF to HTML; Convert
convert pdf to html email; convert pdf to web pages
45.4 Nuclear Fusion 
1429
Lawson’s criterion was arrived at by comparing the energy required to raise the 
temperature of a given plasma with the energy generated by the fusion process.2 
The energy E
in
required to raise the temperature of the plasma is proportional  
to the ion density n, which we can express as E
in
C
1
n, where C
1
is some constant. 
The energy generated by the fusion process is proportional to n2t, or E
gen
C
2
n2t. 
This dependence may be understood by realizing that the fusion energy released is 
proportional to both the rate at which interacting ions collide (~ n2) and the con-
finement time t. Net energy is produced when E
gen
E
in
. When the constants C
1
and C
2
are calculated for different reactions, the condition that E
gen
E
in
leads to 
Lawson’s criterion.
Current efforts are aimed at meeting Lawson’s criterion at temperatures exceed-
ing T
ignit
. Although the minimum required plasma densities have been achieved, 
the problem of confinement time is more difficult. The two basic techniques 
under investigation for solving this problem are magnetic confinement and inertial 
confinement.
Magnetic Confinement
Many fusion-related plasma experiments use magnetic confinement to contain the 
plasma. A toroidal device called a tokamak, first developed in Russia, is shown in 
Figure 45.10a. A combination of two magnetic fields is used to confine and stabilize 
the plasma: (1) a strong toroidal field produced by the current in the toroidal wind-
ings surrounding a doughnut-shaped vacuum chamber and (2) a weaker “poloidal” 
field produced by the toroidal current. In addition to confining the plasma, the 
toroidal current is used to raise its temperature. The resultant helical magnetic 
field lines spiral around the plasma and keep it from touching the walls of the 
vacuum chamber. (If the plasma touches the walls, its temperature is reduced and 
heavy impurities sputtered from the walls “poison” it, leading to large power losses.)
One major breakthrough in magnetic confinement in the 1980s was in the area 
of auxiliary energy input to reach ignition temperatures. Experiments have shown 
2Lawson’s criterion neglects the energy needed to set up the strong magnetic field used to confine the hot plasma in 
a magnetic confinement approach. This energy is expected to be about 20 times greater than the energy required to 
raise the temperature of the plasma. It is therefore necessary either to have a magnetic energy recovery system or to 
use superconducting magnets.
Vacuum chamber
Current
Plasma
a
B
S
b
C
o
u
r
t
e
s
y
o
f
P
r
i
n
c
e
t
o
n
P
l
a
s
m
a
P
h
y
s
i
c
s
L
a
b
o
r
a
t
o
r
y
c
C
o
u
r
t
e
s
y
o
f
P
r
i
n
c
e
t
o
n
U
n
i
v
e
r
s
i
t
y
Figure 45.10 
(a) Diagram of 
a tokamak used in the magnetic 
confinement scheme. (b) Inte-
rior view of the closed Tokamak 
Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) 
vacuum vessel at the Princeton 
Plasma Physics Laboratory.  
(c) The National Spherical 
Torus Experiment (NSTX) that 
began operation in March 1999.
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
RasterEdge. PRODUCTS: ONLINE DEMOS: Online HTML5 Document Viewer; Online XDoc.PDF Demo▶: Convert PDF to Word; Convert PDF to Tiff; Convert PDF to HTML; Convert
convert pdf to html file; adding pdf to html page
C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
NET library to batch convert PDF files to jpg image files. Turn multiple pages PDF into single jpg files respectively online.
embed pdf to website; pdf to html conversion
1430
chapter 45 applications of Nuclear physics
that injecting a beam of energetic neutral particles into the plasma is a very effi-
cient method of raising it to ignition temperatures. Radio-frequency energy input 
will probably be needed for reactor-size plasmas.
When it was in operation from 1982 to 1997, the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor 
(TFTR, Fig. 45.10b) at Princeton University reported central ion temperatures of 
510 million degrees Celsius, more than 30 times greater than the temperature at 
the center of the Sun. The nt values in the TFTR for the D–T reaction were well 
above 1013 s/cm3 and close to the value required by Lawson’s criterion. In 1991, 
reaction rates of 6 3 1017 D–T fusions per second were reached in the Joint Euro-
pean Torus (JET) tokamak at Abington, England.
One of the new generation of fusion experiments is the National Spherical 
Torus Experiment (NSTX) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory and shown 
in Figure 45.10c. This reactor was brought on line in February 1999 and has been 
running fusion experiments since then. Rather than the doughnut-shaped plasma 
of a tokamak, the NSTX produces a spherical plasma that has a hole through its 
center. The major advantage of the spherical configuration is its ability to confine 
the plasma at a higher pressure in a given magnetic field. This approach could lead 
to development of smaller, more economical fusion reactors.
An international collaborative effort involving the United States, the European 
Union, Japan, China, South Korea, India, and Russia is currently under way to 
build a fusion reactor called ITER. This acronym stands for International Thermo-
nuclear Experimental Reactor, although recently the emphasis has shifted to inter-
preting “iter” in terms of its Latin meaning, “the way.” One reason proposed for 
this change is to avoid public misunderstanding and negative connotations toward 
the word thermonuclear. This facility will address the remaining technological and 
scientific issues concerning the feasibility of fusion power. The design is completed, 
and Cadarache, France, was chosen in June 2005 as the reactor site. Construction 
began in 2007 and will require about 10 years, with fusion operation projected to 
begin in 2019. If the planned device works as expected, the Lawson number for 
ITER will be about six times greater than the current record holder, the JT-60U 
tokamak in Japan. ITER is expected to produce ten times as much output power as 
input power, and the energy content of the alpha particles inside the reactor will be 
so intense that they will sustain the fusion reaction, allowing the auxiliary energy 
sources to be turned off once the reaction is initiated.
Example 45.4   Inside a Fusion Reactor
In 1998, the JT-60U tokamak in Japan operated with a D–T plasma density of 4.8 3 1013 cm23 at a temperature (in 
energy units) of 24.1 keV. It confined this plasma inside a magnetic field for 1.1 s.
(A)  Do these data meet Lawson’s criterion?
Conceptualize  With the help of the third of Equations 45.4, imagine many such reactions occurring in a plasma of 
high temperature and high density.
Categorize  We use the concept of the Lawson number discussed in this section, so we categorize this example as a 
substitution problem.
SolutIoN
Evaluate the Lawson number for the JT-60U:
nt 5 (4.8 3 1013 cm23)(1.1 s) 5 5.3 3 1013 s/cm3
This value is close to meeting Lawson’s criterion of 1014 s/cm3 for a D–T plasma given in Equation 45.5. In fact, sci-
entists recorded a power gain of 1.25, indicating that the reactor operated slightly past the break-even point and pro-
duced more energy than it required to maintain the plasma.
(B)  How does the plasma density compare with the density of atoms in an ideal gas when the gas is under standard 
conditions (T 5 0°C and P 5 1 atm)?
45.4 Nuclear Fusion 
1431
Inertial Confinement
The second technique for confining a plasma, called inertial confinement, makes 
use of a D–T target that has a very high particle density. In this scheme, the confine-
ment time is very short (typically 10211 to 1029 s), and, because of their own inertia, 
the particles do not have a chance to move appreciably from their initial positions. 
Therefore, Lawson’s criterion can be satisfied by combining a high particle density 
with a short confinement time.
Laser fusion is the most common form of inertial confinement. A small D–T pel-
let, approximately 1 mm in diameter, is struck simultaneously by several focused, 
high-intensity laser beams, resulting in a large pulse of input energy that causes 
the surface of the fuel pellet to evaporate (Fig. 45.11). The escaping particles exert 
a third-law reaction force on the core of the pellet, resulting in a strong, inwardly 
moving compressive shock wave. This shock wave increases the pressure and density 
of the core and produces a corresponding increase in temperature. When the tem-
perature of the core reaches ignition temperature, fusion reactions occur.
One of the leading laser fusion laboratories in the United States is the Omega 
facility at the University of Rochester in New York. This facility focuses 24 laser 
beams on the target. Currently under operation at the Lawrence Livermore 
National Laboratory in Livermore, California, is the National Ignition Facility. 
The research apparatus there includes 192 laser beams that can be focused on a  
deuterium–tritium pellet. Construction was completed in early 2009, and a test fir-
ing of the lasers in March 2012 broke the record for lasers, delivering 1.87 MJ to 
a target. This energy is delivered in such a short time interval that the power is 
immense: 500 trillion watts, more than 1 000 times the power used in the United 
States at any moment.
Fusion Reactor Design
In the D–T fusion reaction
2
1
H 1 3
1
H   S   4
2
He 1 1
0
 Q 5 17.59 MeV
the alpha particle carries 20% of the energy and the neutron carries 80%, or 
approximately 14 MeV. A diagram of the deuterium–tritium fusion reaction is 
shown in Figure 45.12. Because the alpha particles are charged, they are primarily 
absorbed by the plasma, causing the plasma’s temperature to increase. In contrast, 
the 14-MeV neutrons, being electrically neutral, pass through the plasma and are 
absorbed by a surrounding blanket material, where their large kinetic energy is 
extracted and used to generate electric power.
One scheme is to use molten lithium metal as the neutron-absorbing material 
and to circulate the lithium in a closed heat-exchange loop, thereby producing 
steam and driving turbines as in a conventional power plant. Figure 45.13 (page 
1432) shows a diagram of such a reactor. It is estimated that a blanket of lithium 
approximately 1 m thick will capture nearly 100% of the neutrons from the fusion 
of a small D–T pellet.
This value is more than 500 000 times greater than the plasma density in the reactor.
Expanding
plasma
Laser
radiation
Imploding
fuel pellet
Figure 45.11 
In inertial confine-
ment, a D–T fuel pellet fuses when 
struck by several high-intensity 
laser beams simultaneously.
H
+
Figure 45.12 
Deuterium– 
tritium fusion. Eighty percent 
of the energy released is in the 
14-MeV neutron.
Find the density of atoms in a sample of ideal gas by 
evaluating N
A
/V
mol
, where N
A
is Avogadro’s number 
and V
mol
is the molar volume of an ideal gas under 
standard conditions, 2.24 3 1022 m3/mol:
N
A
V
mol
5
6.0231023 atoms/mol
2.2431022 m3/mol
52.731025 atoms/m3
5 2.7 3 1019 atoms/cm3
▸ 45.4 
continued
SolutIoN
1432
chapter 45 applications of Nuclear physics
The capture of neutrons by lithium is described by the reaction
1
0
n 1 6
3
Li   S   3
1
H 1 4
2
He 
where the kinetic energies of the charged tritium 3
1
H and alpha particle are trans-
formed to internal energy in the molten lithium. An extra advantage of using lith-
ium as the energy-transfer medium is that the tritium produced can be separated 
from the lithium and returned as fuel to the reactor.
Advantages and Problems of Fusion
If fusion power can ever be harnessed, it will offer several advantages over fission-
generated power: (1) low cost and abundance of fuel (deuterium), (2) impossibility 
of runaway accidents, and (3) decreased radiation hazard. Some of the anticipated 
problems and disadvantages include (1) scarcity of lithium, (2) limited supply of 
helium, which is needed for cooling the superconducting magnets used to pro-
duce strong confining fields, and (3) structural damage and induced radioactivity 
caused by neutron bombardment. If such problems and the engineering design 
factors can be resolved, nuclear fusion may become a feasible source of energy in 
the twenty-first century.
45.5 Radiation Damage
In Chapter 34, we learned that electromagnetic radiation is all around us in the 
form of radio waves, microwaves, light waves, and so on. In this section, we describe 
forms of radiation that can cause severe damage as they pass through matter, such 
as radiation resulting from radioactive processes and radiation in the form of ener-
getic particles such as neutrons and protons.
The degree and type of damage depend on several factors, including the type 
and energy of the radiation and the properties of the matter. The metals used in 
nuclear reactor structures can be severely weakened by high fluxes of energetic 
neutrons because these high fluxes often lead to metal fatigue. The damage in 
such situations is in the form of atomic displacements, often resulting in major 
alterations in the properties of the material.
Energy is carried to the
heat exchanger by means
of a mixture of molten
lithium and tritium.
DT fuel
injector
Distilling unit
Pure Li
n
1-m-thick
Li absorber
n
n
n
Neutrons
Steam to
turbine
Cold
water
S
h
i
e
l
d
Li + T
i
Purified tritium
Energy enters the
reactor by means
of a laser pulse
or other method.
Deuterium
Figure 45.13 
Diagram of a 
fusion reactor.
45.5 radiation Damage 
1433
Radiation damage in biological organisms is primarily due to ionization effects 
in cells. A cell’s normal operation may be disrupted when highly reactive ions are 
formed as the result of ionizing radiation. For example, hydrogen and the hydroxyl 
radical OH2 produced from water molecules can induce chemical reactions that 
may break bonds in proteins and other vital molecules. Furthermore, the ionizing 
radiation may affect vital molecules directly by removing electrons from their struc-
ture. Large doses of radiation are especially dangerous because damage to a great 
number of molecules in a cell may cause the cell to die. Although the death of a 
single cell is usually not a problem, the death of many cells may result in irreversible 
damage to the organism. Cells that divide rapidly, such as those of the digestive 
tract, reproductive organs, and hair follicles, are especially susceptible. In addition, 
cells that survive the radiation may become defective. These defective cells can pro-
duce more defective cells and can lead to cancer.
In biological systems, it is common to separate radiation damage into two cat-
egories: somatic damage and genetic damage. Somatic damage is that associated with 
any body cell except the reproductive cells. Somatic damage can lead to cancer or 
can seriously alter the characteristics of specific organisms. Genetic damage affects 
only reproductive cells. Damage to the genes in reproductive cells can lead to defec-
tive offspring. It is important to be aware of the effect of diagnostic treatments, 
such as x-rays and other forms of radiation exposure, and to balance the significant 
benefits of treatment with the damaging effects.
Damage caused by radiation also depends on the radiation’s penetrating power. 
Alpha particles cause extensive damage, but penetrate only to a shallow depth in 
a material due to the strong interaction with other charged particles. Neutrons do 
not interact via the electric force and hence penetrate deeper, causing significant 
damage. Gamma rays are high-energy photons that can cause severe damage, but 
often pass through matter without interaction.
Several units have been used historically to quantify the amount, or dose, of any 
radiation that interacts with a substance.
The roentgen (R) is that amount of ionizing radiation that produces an elec-
tric charge of 3.33 3 10210 C in 1 cm3 of air under standard conditions.
Equivalently, the roentgen is that amount of radiation that increases the energy of 
1 kg of air by 8.76 3 1023 J.
For most applications, the roentgen has been replaced by the rad (an acronym 
for radiation absorbed dose):
One rad is that amount of radiation that increases the energy of 1 kg of 
absorbing material by 1 3 1022 J.
Although the rad is a perfectly good physical unit, it is not the best unit for mea-
suring the degree of biological damage produced by radiation because damage 
depends not only on the dose but also on the type of the radiation. For example, a 
given dose of alpha particles causes about ten times more biological damage than 
an equal dose of x-rays. The RBE (relative biological effectiveness) factor for a 
given type of radiation is the number of rads of x-radiation or gamma radiation 
that produces the same biological damage as 1 rad of the radiation being used. 
The RBE factors for different types of radiation are given in Table 45.1 (page 1434).  
The values are only approximate because they vary with particle energy and  
with the form of the damage. The RBE factor should be considered only a first-
approximation guide to the actual effects of radiation.
Finally, the rem (radiation equivalent in man) is the product of the dose in rad 
and the RBE factor:
Dose in rem ; dose in rad 3 RBE 
(45.6)
WWRadiation dose in rem
1434
chapter 45 applications of Nuclear physics
According to this definition, 1 rem of any two types of radiation produces the same 
amount of biological damage. Table 45.1 shows that a dose of 1 rad of fast neutrons 
represents an effective dose of 10 rem, but 1 rad of gamma radiation is equivalent 
to a dose of only 1 rem.
This discussion has focused on measurements of radiation dosage in units such as 
rads and rems because these units are still widely used. They have, however, been for-
mally replaced with new SI units. The rad has been replaced with the gray (Gy), equal 
to 100 rad, and the rem has been replaced with the sievert (Sv), equal to 100rem. 
Table 45.2 summarizes the older and the current SI units of radiation dosage.
Low-level radiation from natural sources such as cosmic rays and radioactive 
rocks and soil delivers to each of us a dose of approximately 2.4 mSv/yr.  This radia-
tion, called background radiation, varies with geography, with the main factors being 
altitude (exposure to cosmic rays) and geology (radon gas released by some rock 
formations, deposits of naturally radioactive minerals).
The upper limit of radiation dose rate recommended by the U.S. government 
(apart from background radiation) is approximately 5 mSv/yr. Many occupations 
involve much higher radiation exposures, so an upper limit of 50 mSv/yr has been 
set for combined whole-body exposure. Higher upper limits are permissible for cer-
tain parts of the body, such as the hands and the forearms. A dose of 4 to 5 Sv 
results in a mortality rate of approximately 50% (which means that half the people 
exposed to this radiation level die). The most dangerous form of exposure for most 
people is either ingestion or inhalation of radioactive isotopes, especially isotopes 
of those elements the body retains and concentrates, such as 90Sr.
45.6 Uses of Radiation
Nuclear physics applications are extremely widespread in manufacturing, medi-
cine, and biology. In this section, we present a few of these applications and the 
underlying theories supporting them.
Tracing
Radioactive tracers are used to track chemicals participating in various reactions. 
One of the most valuable uses of radioactive tracers is in medicine. For example, 
iodine, a nutrient needed by the human body, is obtained largely through the 
Table 45.2
Units for Radiation Dosage
Relations
to Other
Quantity 
SI Unit 
Symbol 
SI Units 
Older Unit 
Conversion
Absorbed dose 
gray 
Gy 
5 1 J/kg 
rad 
1 Gy 5 100 rad
Dose equivalent 
sievert 
Sv 
5 1 J/kg 
rem 
1 Sv 5 100 rem
Table 45.1
RBE Factors for Several 
Types of Radiation
Radiation 
RBE Factor
X-rays and gamma rays 
1.0
Beta particles 
1.0–1.7
Alpha particles 
10–20
Thermal neutrons 
4–5
Fast neutrons and protons 
10
Heavy ions 
20
Note: RBE 5 relative biological effectiveness.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested