Summary 
135
Finalize The acceleration of the block can be either to the right or to the left depending on the sign of the numerator 
in Equation (5). If the velocity is to the left, we must reverse the sign of f
k
in Equation (1) because the force of kinetic 
friction must oppose the motion of the block relative to the surface. In this case, the value of a is the same as in Equa-
tion (5), with the two plus signs in the numerator changed to minus signs.
What does Equation (5) reduce to if the force F
S
is removed and the surface becomes frictionless? Call this expres-
sion Equation (6). Does this algebraic expression match your intuition about the physical situation in this case? Now 
go back to Example 5.10 and let angle u go to zero in Equation (5) of that example. How does the resulting equation 
compare with your Equation (6) here in Example 5.13? Should the algebraic expressions compare in this way based on 
the physical situations?
Substitute Equation (4) and the value of T from Equation (3) 
into Equation (1):
F cos u 2 m
k
(m
2
g
F sin u) 2 m
1
(a 1 g) 5 m
2
a
Solve for a:
(5)   a 5 
F
1
cos u1m
k
sin u
2
2
1
m
1
1m
k
m
2
2
g
m
1
1m
2
continued
▸ 5.13 
continued
Summary
Definitions
An inertial frame of reference is a frame in which an object that does not 
interact with other objects experiences zero acceleration. Any frame moving 
with constant velocity relative to an inertial frame is also an inertial frame.
We define force as that 
which causes a change in 
motion of an object.
Concepts and Principles
The gravitational force 
exerted on an object is equal 
to the product of its mass (a 
scalar quantity) and the free-
fall acceleration:
F
S
g
5mg
S
(5.5)
The weight of an object is the 
magnitude of the gravitational 
force acting on the object:
F
g
mg 
(5.6)
When an object slides over a surface, the 
magnitude of the force of kinetic friction f
S
k
is 
given by f
k
5 m
k
n, where m
k
is the coefficient of 
kinetic friction.
Newton’s first law states that it is possible to find an inertial frame in which 
an object that does not interact with other objects experiences zero acceleration, 
or, equivalently, in the absence of an external force, when viewed from an iner-
tial frame, an object at rest remains at rest and an object in uniform motion in a 
straight line maintains that motion.
Newton’s second law states that the acceleration of an object is directly propor-
tional to the net force acting on it and inversely proportional to its mass.
Newton’s third law states that if two objects interact, the force exerted by object 
1 on object 2 is equal in magnitude and opposite in direction to the force 
exerted by object 2 on object 1.
The maximum force of static friction f
S
s,max
between an 
object and a surface is proportional to the normal force acting 
on the object. In general, f
s
# m
s
n, where m
s
is the coefficient 
of static friction and n is the magnitude of the normal force. 
Convert pdf to web page - Convert PDF to html files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
How to Convert PDF to HTML Webpage with C# PDF Conversion SDK
convert pdf into webpage; attach pdf to html
Convert pdf to web page - VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
PDF to HTML Webpage Converter SDK for VB.NET PDF to HTML Conversion
export pdf to html; pdf to html converter
136
chapter 5 The Laws of Motion
Analysis Models for Problem Solving
Particle Under a Net Force If a particle of mass 
m experiences a nonzero net force, its acceleration 
is related to the net force by Newton’s second law:
a
F
S
5m
a
S
(5.2)
m
F
S
a
S
Particle in Equilibrium If a particle maintains a constant 
velocity (so that a
S
50), which could include a velocity of 
zero, the forces on the particle balance and Newton’s second 
law reduces to
a
F
S
50 
(5.8)
m
= 0
S
= 0
S
400 g
9 m/s
400 g
8 m/s
12 m/s
300 g
12 m/s
200 g
10 m/s
500 g
b
a
c
e
d
Figure oQ5.3
4. The driver of a speeding truck slams on the brakes and 
skids to a stop through a distance d. On another trial, 
the initial speed of the truck is half as large. What now 
will be the truck’s skidding distance? (a) 2d (b) !2
d  
(c) d (d) d/2 (e)d/4
5. An experiment is performed on a puck on a level 
air hockey table, where friction is negligible. A con-
stant horizontal force is applied to the puck, and the 
puck’s acceleration is measured. Now the same puck is 
transported far into outer space, where both friction 
and gravity are negligible. The same constant force 
is applied to the puck (through a spring scale that 
stretches the same amount), and the puck’s acceleration 
(relative to the distant stars) is measured. What is the 
puck’s acceleration in outer space? (a)It is somewhat 
greater than its acceleration on the Earth. (b)It is the 
same as its acceleration on the Earth. (c) It is less than 
its acceleration on the Earth. (d) It is infinite because 
neither friction nor gravity constrains it. (e) It is very 
large because acceleration is inversely proportional to 
weight and the puck’s weight is very small but not zero.
6. The manager of a department store is pushing horizon-
tally with a force of magnitude 200 N on a box of shirts. 
The box is sliding across the horizontal floor with a for-
ward acceleration. Nothing else touches the box. What 
must be true about the magnitude of the force of kinetic 
friction acting on the box (choose one)? (a) It is greater 
than 200N. (b)It is less than 200 N. (c) It is equal to 
200 N. (d) None of those statements is necessarily true.
1. The driver of a speeding empty truck slams on the brakes 
and skids to a stop through a distance d. On a second 
trial, the truck carries a load that doubles its mass. What 
will now be the truck’s “skidding distance”? (a) 4d (b) 2d  
(c)!2
d (d) d (e) d/2
2. In Figure OQ5.2, a locomotive has broken through the 
wall of a train station. During the collision, what can 
be said about the force exerted by the locomotive on 
the wall? (a)The force exerted by the locomotive on 
the wall was larger than the force the wall could exert 
on the locomotive. (b) The force exerted by the loco-
motive on the wall was the same in magnitude as the 
force exerted by the wall on the locomotive. (c) The 
force exerted by the locomotive on the wall was less 
than the force exerted by the wall on the locomotive. 
(d) The wall cannot be said to “exert” a force; after all, 
it broke.
Figure oQ5.2
©
N
D
/
R
o
g
e
r
V
i
o
l
l
e
t
/
T
h
e
I
m
a
g
e
W
o
r
k
s
3. The third graders are on one side of a schoolyard, and 
the fourth graders are on the other. They are throw-
ing snowballs at each other. Between them, snowballs 
of various masses are moving with different velocities 
as shown in Figure OQ5.3. Rank the snowballs (a) 
through (e) according to the magnitude of the total 
force exerted on each one. Ignore air resistance. If two 
snowballs rank together, make that fact clear.
Objective Questions
1. 
denotes answer available in Student Solutions Manual/Study Guide
C# PDF Convert to SVG SDK: Convert PDF to SVG files in C#.net, ASP
Instantly convert all PDF document pages to SVG image files in C#.NET class Perform high-fidelity PDF to SVG conversion in both ASP.NET web and WinForms
convert pdf to website html; online pdf to html converter
C# PDF: How to Create PDF Document Viewer in C#.NET with
image and outline preview for quick PDF document page navigation; Support rendering web viewer PDF document to images or svg file; Free to convert viewing PDF
change pdf to html format; convert from pdf to html
conceptual Questions 
137
force (c) the friction force (d)the ma force exerted by 
the crate (e) No force is required.
11. If an object is in equilibrium, which of the following 
statements is not true? (a) The speed of the object 
remains constant. (b) The acceleration of the object 
is zero. (c) The net force acting on the object is zero.  
(d) The object must be at rest. (e) There are at least 
two forces acting on the object.
12. A crate remains stationary after it has been placed on 
a ramp inclined at an angle with the horizontal. Which 
of the following statements is or are correct about the 
magnitude of the friction force that acts on the crate? 
Choose all that are true. (a) It is larger than the weight 
of the crate. (b) It is equal to m
s
n. (c) It is greater than 
the component of the gravitational force acting down 
the ramp. (d) It is equal to the component of the gravi-
tational force acting down the ramp. (e) It is less than 
the component of the gravitational force acting down 
the ramp.
13. An object of mass m moves with acceleration a
S
down 
a rough incline. Which of the following forces should 
appear in a free-body diagram of the object? Choose 
all correct answers. (a) the gravitational force exerted 
by the planet (b) ma
S
in the direction of motion (c) the 
normal force exerted by the incline (d) the friction 
force exerted by the incline (e) the force exerted by the 
object on the incline
7. Two objects are connected by a string that passes over 
a frictionless pulley as in Figure 5.14a, where m
1
m
2
and a
1
and a
2
are the magnitudes of the respective 
accelerations. Which mathematical statement is true 
regarding the magnitude of the acceleration a
2
of the 
mass m
2
? (a) a
2
g  (b) a
2
g  (c) a
2
g  (d) a
2
a
1
(e) a
2
a
1
8. An object of mass m is sliding with speed v
i
at some 
instant across a level tabletop, with which its coefficient 
of kinetic friction is m. It then moves through a dis-
tance d and comes to rest. Which of the following equa-
tions for the speed v
i
is reasonable? (a) v
i
5 !22mmgd
(b) v
i
5 !2mmgd
(c) v
i
5 !22mgd
(d) v
i
5!2mgd
(e) v
i
5 !2md
9. A truck loaded with sand accelerates along a high-
way. The driving force on the truck remains constant. 
What happens to the acceleration of the truck if its 
trailer leaks sand at a constant rate through a hole 
in its bottom? (a) It decreases at a steady rate. (b) It 
increases at a steady rate. (c) It increases and then 
decreases. (d) It decreases and then increases. (e) It 
remains constant.
10. A large crate of mass m is place on the flatbed of a 
truck but not tied down. As the truck accelerates for-
ward with acceleration a, the crate remains at rest  
relative to the truck. What force causes the crate to 
accelerate? (a) the normal force (b) the gravitational 
Conceptual Questions
1. 
denotes answer available in Student Solutions Manual/Study Guide
1. If you hold a horizontal metal bar several centimeters 
above the ground and move it through grass, each leaf 
of grass bends out of the way. If you increase the speed 
of the bar, each leaf of grass will bend more quickly. 
How then does a rotary power lawn mower manage to 
cut grass? How can it exert enough force on a leaf of 
grass to shear it off?
2. Your hands are wet, and the restroom towel dispenser 
is empty. What do you do to get drops of water off your 
hands? How does the motion of the drops exemplify 
one of Newton’s laws? Which one?
3. In the motion picture It Happened One Night (Colum-
bia Pictures, 1934), Clark Gable is standing inside a 
stationary bus in front of Claudette Colbert, who is 
seated. The bus suddenly starts moving forward and 
Clark falls into Claudette’s lap. Why did this happen?
4. If a car is traveling due westward with a constant speed 
of 20 m/s, what is the resultant force acting on it?
5. A passenger sitting in the rear of a bus claims that she 
was injured when the driver slammed on the brakes, 
causing a suitcase to come flying toward her from the 
front of the bus. If you were the judge in this case, what 
disposition would you make? Why?
6. A child tosses a ball straight up. She says that the ball 
is moving away from her hand because the ball feels an 
upward “force of the throw” as well as the gravitational 
force. (a) Can the “force of the throw” exceed the 
gravitational force? How would the ball move if it did?  
(b) Can the “force of the throw” be equal in magni-
tude to the gravitational force? Explain. (c) What 
strength can accurately be attributed to the “force of 
the throw”? Explain. (d) Why does the ball move away 
from the child’s hand?
7. A person holds a ball in her hand. (a) Identify all the 
external forces acting on the ball and the Newton’s 
third-law reaction force to each one. (b) If the ball is 
dropped, what force is exerted on it while it is falling? 
Identify the reaction force in this case. (Ignore air 
resistance.)
8. A spherical rubber balloon inflated with air is held 
stationary, with its opening, on the west side, pinched 
shut. (a)Describe the forces exerted by the air inside 
and outside the balloon on sections of the rubber. 
(b) After the balloon is released, it takes off toward 
the east, gaining speed rapidly. Explain this motion 
in terms of the forces now acting on the rubber.  
(c) Account for the motion of a skyrocket taking off 
from its launch pad.
9. A rubber ball is dropped onto the floor. What force 
causes the ball to bounce?
10. Twenty people participate in a tug-of-war. The two 
teams of ten people are so evenly matched that nei-
ther team wins. After the game they notice that a car 
is stuck in the mud. They attach the tug-of-war rope to 
the bumper of the car, and all the people pull on the 
C# HTML5 Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
When viewing PDF document on web viewer, users can C# users can perform various PDF conversion actions, such as convert PDF to Microsoft Office Word
convert pdf to html online; converting pdf to html
C#: How to Add HTML5 Document Viewer Control to Your Web Page
the necessary resources for creating web document viewer addCommand(new RECommand("convert")); _tabFile.addCommand new UserCommand("pdf"); _userCmdDemoPdf.
convert pdf into html file; how to convert pdf into html code
138
chapter 5 The Laws of Motion
floor on the ball be different in magnitude from the 
force the ball exerts on the floor?
20. Balancing carefully, three boys inch out onto a hori-
zontal tree branch above a pond, each planning to 
dive in separately. The third boy in line notices that 
the branch is barely strong enough to support them. 
He decides to jump straight up and land back on the 
branch to break it, spilling all three into the pond. 
When he starts to carry out his plan, at what precise 
moment does the branch break? Explain. Suggestion: 
Pretend to be the third boy and imitate what he does 
in slow motion. If you are still unsure, stand on a bath-
room scale and repeat the suggestion.
21. Identify action–reaction pairs in the following situa-
tions: (a) a man takes a step (b) a snowball hits a girl in 
the back (c) a baseball player catches a ball (d) a gust 
of wind strikes a window
22. As shown in Figure CQ5.22, student A, a 55-kg girl, 
sits on one chair with metal runners, at rest on a class-
room floor. Student B, an 80-kg boy, sits on an identi-
cal chair. Both students keep their feet off the floor.  
A rope runs from student A’s hands around a light pul-
ley and then over her shoulder to the hands of a teacher 
standing on the floor behind her. The low-friction axle 
of the pulley is attached to a second rope held by stu-
dent B. All ropes run parallel to the chair runners.  
(a) If student A pulls on her end of the rope, will her 
chair or will B’s chair slide on the floor? Explain why. 
(b) If instead the teacher pulls on his rope end, which 
chair slides? Why this one? (c) If student B pulls on his 
rope, which chair slides? Why? (d) Now the teacher 
ties his end of the rope to student A’s chair. Student A 
pulls on the end of the rope in her hands. Which chair 
slides and why?
Student B
Student A
Teacher
Figure CQ5.22
23. A car is moving forward slowly and is speeding up. A 
student claims that “the car exerts a force on itself” 
or that “the car’s engine exerts a force on the car.”  
(a) Argue that this idea cannot be accurate and that 
friction exerted by the road is the propulsive force 
on the car. Make your evidence and reasoning as per-
suasive as possible. (b) Is it static or kinetic friction?  
Suggestions: Consider a road covered with light gravel. 
Consider a sharp print of the tire tread on an asphalt 
road, obtained by coating the tread with dust.
rope. The heavy car has just moved a couple of deci-
meters when the rope breaks. Why did the rope break 
in this situation when it did not break when the same 
twenty people pulled on it in a tug-of-war?
11. Can an object exert a force on itself? Argue for your 
answer.
12. When you push on a box with a 200-N force instead of 
a 50-N force, you can feel that you are making a greater 
effort. When a table exerts a 200-N normal force 
instead of one of smaller magnitude, is the table really 
doing anything differently?
13. A weightlifter stands on a bathroom scale. He pumps a 
barbell up and down. What happens to the reading on 
the scale as he does so? What If? What if he is strong 
enough to actually throw the barbell upward? How does 
the reading on the scale vary now?
14. An athlete grips a light rope that passes over a low-
friction pulley attached to the ceiling of a gym. A sack 
of sand precisely equal in weight to the athlete is tied 
to the other end of the rope. Both the sand and the 
athlete are initially at rest. The athlete climbs the rope, 
sometimes speeding up and slowing down as he does 
so. What happens to the sack of sand? Explain.
15. Suppose you are driving a classic car. Why should you 
avoid slamming on your brakes when you want to stop 
in the shortest possible distance? (Many modern cars 
have antilock brakes that avoid this problem.)
16. In Figure CQ5.16, the light, 
taut, unstretchable cord B 
joins block 1 and the larger-
mass block 2. Cord A exerts 
a force on block 1 to make it 
accelerate forward. (a) How 
does the magnitude of the force exerted by cord A 
on block 1 compare with the magnitude of the force 
exerted by cord B on block 2? Is it larger, smaller, or 
equal? (b) How does the acceleration of block 1 com-
pare with the acceleration (if any) of block 2? (c) Does 
cord B exert a force on block 1? If so, is it forward or 
backward? Is it larger, smaller, or equal in magnitude 
to the force exerted by cord B on block 2?
17. Describe two examples in which the force of friction 
exerted on an object is in the direction of motion of 
the object.
18. The mayor of a city reprimands some city employees 
because they will not remove the obvious sags from the 
cables that support the city traffic lights. What expla-
nation can the employees give? How do you think the 
case will be settled in mediation?
19. Give reasons for the answers to each of the follow-
ing questions: (a) Can a normal force be horizontal?  
(b) Can a normal force be directed vertically downward?  
(c) Consider a tennis ball in contact with a stationary 
floor and with nothing else. Can the normal force be 
different in magnitude from the gravitational force 
exerted on the ball? (d) Can the force exerted by the 
2
1
B
A
Figure CQ5.16
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
Support to create new page to PDF document in both web server-side application and Windows Forms. Ability to add PDF page number in preview.
pdf to html conversion; convert pdf to url link
C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
and quickly convert a large-size multi-page PDF document to a group of high-quality separate JPEG image files within .NET projects, including ASP.NET web and
changing pdf to html; pdf to html converter online
problems 
139
opposite direction, what is the average acceleration of 
the molecule during this time interval? (b) What aver-
age force does the molecule exert on the wall?
7. The distinction between mass and weight was discov-
ered after Jean Richer transported pendulum clocks 
from Paris, France, to Cayenne, French Guiana, in 
1671. He found that they quite systematically ran slower 
in Cayenne than in Paris. The effect was reversed when 
the clocks returned to Paris. How much weight would a 
90.0 kg person lose in traveling from Paris, where g 5 
9.809 5 m/s2, to Cayenne, where g 5 9.780 8 m/s2? (We 
will consider how the free-fall acceleration influences 
the period of a pendulum in Section 15.5.) 
8. (a) A car with a mass of 850 kg is moving to the right 
with a constant speed of 1.44 m/s. What is the total 
force on the car? (b) What is the total force on the car 
if it is moving to the left?
9. Review. The gravitational force exerted on a baseball 
is 2.21N down. A pitcher throws the ball horizontally 
with velocity 18.0 m/s by uniformly accelerating it 
along a straight horizontal line for a time interval of 
170 ms. The ball starts from rest. (a) Through what 
distance does it move before its release? (b) What are 
the magnitude and direction of the force the pitcher 
exerts on the ball?
10. Review. The gravitational force exerted on a baseball is 
2F
g
j
^
. A pitcher throws the ball with velocity v
i
^
by uni-
formly accelerating it along a straight horizontal line 
for a time interval of Dt 5 t 2 0 5 t. (a) Starting from 
rest, through what distance does the ball move before 
its release? (b)What force does the pitcher exert on 
the ball?
11. Review. An electron of mass 9.11 3 10231 kg has an 
initial speed of 3.00 3 105 m/s. It travels in a straight 
line, and its speed increases to 7.00 3 105 m/s in a dis-
tance of 5.00cm. Assuming its acceleration is constant,  
(a) determine the magnitude of the force exerted on 
the electron and (b)compare this force with the weight 
of the electron, which we ignored.
12. Besides the gravitational force, a 2.80-kg object is sub-
jected to one other constant force. The object starts 
from rest and in 1.20 s experiences a displacement 
of 
1
4.20
i
^
23.30
j
^
2
m, where the direction of j
^
is the 
upward vertical direction. Determine the other force.
S
M
Section 5.1 the Concept of Force
Section 5.2 Newton’s First Law and Inertial Frames
Section 5.3 Mass
Section 5.4 Newton’s Second Law
Section 5.5 the Gravitational Force and Weight
Section 5.6 Newton’s third Law
1. A woman weighs 120 lb. Determine (a) her weight in 
newtons and (b) her mass in kilograms.
2. If a man weighs 900 N on the Earth, what would he 
weigh on Jupiter, where the free-fall acceleration is 
25.9 m/s2?
3. A 3.00-kg object undergoes an acceleration given by 
a
S
5
1
2.00
i
^
15.00
j
^
2
m/s2. Find (a) the resultant force 
acting on the object and (b) the magnitude of the 
resultant force.
4. A certain orthodontist uses a wire brace to align a 
patient’s crooked tooth as in Figure P5.4. The tension 
in the wire is adjusted to have a magnitude of 18.0 N. 
Find the magnitude of the net force exerted by the 
wire on the crooked tooth.
14°
14°
y
x
T
S
T
S
Figure P5.4
5. A toy rocket engine is securely fastened to a large puck 
that can glide with negligible friction over a horizon-
tal surface, taken as the xy plane. The 4.00-kg puck 
has a velocity of 3.00
i
^
m/s at one instant. Eight sec-
onds later, its velocity is 
1
8.00
i
^
110.00
j
^
2
m/s. Assum-
ing the rocket engine exerts a constant horizontal 
force, find (a) the components of the force and (b) its 
magnitude.
6. The average speed of a nitrogen molecule in air is about 
6.70 3 102 m/s, and its mass is 4.68 3 10226 kg. (a) If it 
takes 3.00 3 10213 s for a nitrogen molecule to hit a wall 
and rebound with the same speed but moving in the 
W
BIO
M
Problems
The problems found in this  
chapter may be assigned 
online in Enhanced WebAssign
1.
 straightforward; 
2. 
intermediate;  
3. 
challenging
1.
full solution available in the Student 
Solutions Manual/Study Guide
AMT
Analysis Model tutorial available in 
Enhanced WebAssign
GP
Guided Problem
M
Master It tutorial available in Enhanced 
WebAssign
W
Watch It video solution available in 
Enhanced WebAssign
BIO
Q/C
S
XDoc.HTML5 Viewer for .NET, Zero Footprint AJAX Document Image
View, Convert, Edit, Sign Documents and Images. Wide range of web browsers support including IE9+ powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image to
embed pdf to website; convert pdf form to html form
DocImage SDK for .NET: Web Document Image Viewer Online Demo
Document Viewer Demo to View, Annotate, Convert and Print upload a file to display in web viewer Suppported files are Word, Excel, PowerPoint, PDF, Tiff, Dicom
embed pdf into website; how to convert pdf to html
140
chapter 5 The Laws of Motion
20. You stand on the seat of a chair and then hop off.  
(a) During the time interval you are in flight down to 
the floor, the Earth moves toward you with an accel-
eration of what order of magnitude? In your solution, 
explain your logic. Model the Earth as a perfectly solid 
object. (b) The Earth moves toward you through a dis-
tance of what order of magnitude?
21. A 15.0-lb block rests on the floor. (a) What force does 
the floor exert on the block? (b) A rope is tied to the 
block and is run vertically over a pulley. The other end 
is attached to a free-hanging 10.0-lb object. What now 
is the force exerted by the floor on the 15.0-lb block? 
(c) If the 10.0-lb object in part (b) is replaced with a 
20.0-lb object, what is the force exerted by the floor on 
the 15.0-lb block?
22. Review. Three forces acting on an object are given by 
F
S
1
5 (22.00i
^
1 2.00j
^
) N, and F
S
2
5(5.00i
^
2 3.00j
^
) N, 
and F
S
3
5
1
245.0
i
^
2
N. The object experiences an accel- 
eration of magnitude 3.75 m/s2. (a) What is the direc-
tion of the acceleration? (b) What is the mass of the 
object? (c) If the object is initially at rest, what is its 
speed after 10.0 s? (d) What are the velocity compo-
nents of the object after 10.0s?
23. A 1 000-kg car is pulling a 300-kg trailer. Together, 
the car and trailer move forward with an acceleration 
of 2.15 m/s2. Ignore any force of air drag on the car 
and all friction forces on the trailer. Determine (a) the 
net force on the car, (b) the net force on the trailer,  
(c) the force exerted by the trailer on the car, and  
(d) the resultant force exerted by the car on the road.
24. If a single constant force acts on an object that moves 
on a straight line, the object’s velocity is a linear func-
tion of time. The equation v 5 v
i
at gives its velocity 
v as a function of time, where a is its constant accelera-
tion. What if velocity is instead a linear function of posi-
tion? Assume that as a particular object moves through 
a resistive medium, its speed decreases as described by 
the equation v 5 v
i
kx, where k is a constant coef-
ficient and x is the position of the object. Find the law 
describing the total force acting on this object.
Section 5.7 Analysis Models using Newton’s Second Law
25. Review. Figure P5.25 shows a 
worker poling a boat—a very 
efficient mode of transporta-
tion—across a shallow lake. He 
pushes parallel to the length of 
the light pole, exerting a force 
of magnitude 240 N on the 
bottom of the lake. Assume the 
pole lies in the vertical plane 
containing the keel of the 
boat. At one moment, the pole 
makes an angle of 35.0° with 
the vertical and the water exerts a horizontal drag force 
of 47.5 N on the boat, opposite to its forward velocity of 
magnitude 0.857 m/s. The mass of the boat including 
its cargo and the worker is 370 kg. (a) The water exerts 
W
S
Figure P5.25
A
P
P
h
o
t
o
/
R
e
b
e
c
c
a
B
l
a
c
k
w
e
l
l
13. One or more external forces, large enough to be eas-
ily measured, are exerted on each object enclosed in a 
dashed box shown in Figure 5.1. Identify the reaction 
to each of these forces.
14. A brick of mass M has been placed on a rubber cush-
ion of mass m. Together they are sliding to the right 
at constant velocity on an ice-covered parking lot.  
(a) Draw a free-body diagram of the brick and identify 
each force acting on it. (b) Draw a free-body diagram 
of the cushion and identify each force acting on it.  
(c) Identify all of the action– reaction pairs of forces in 
the brick–cushion–planet system.
15. Two forces, F
S
1
5
1
26.00
i
^
24.00
j
^
2
N and F
S
2
1
23.00
i
^
17.00
j
^
2
N, act on a particle of mass 2.00 kg  
that is initially at rest at coordinates (22.00 m,  
14.00 m). (a) What are the components of the particle’s 
velocity at t 5 10.0 s? (b) In what direction is the par-
ticle moving at t 5 10.0 s? (c) What displacement does 
the particle undergo during the first 10.0 s? (d) What 
are the coordinates of the particle at t 5 10.0 s? 
16. The force exerted by the wind on the sails of a sailboat 
is 390 N north. The water exerts a force of 180 N east. If 
the boat (including its crew) has a mass of 270 kg, what 
are the magnitude and direction of its acceleration?
17. An object of mass m is dropped at t 5 0 from the roof 
of a building of height h. While the object is falling, a 
wind blowing parallel to the face of the building exerts 
a constant horizontal force F on the object. (a) At what 
time t does the object strike the ground? Express t 
in terms of g and h. (b) Find an expression in terms 
of m and F for the acceleration a
x
of the object in the 
horizontal direction (taken as the positive x direction).  
(c) How far is the object displaced horizontally before 
hitting the ground? Answer in terms of mgF, and h. 
(d) Find the magnitude of the object’s acceleration 
while it is falling, using the variables F, m, and g.
18. A force F
S
applied to an object of mass m
1
produces  
an acceleration of 3.00 m/s2. The same force applied 
to a second object of mass m
2
produces an acceleration 
of 1.00m/s2. (a) What is the value of the ratio m
1
/m
2
(b) If m
1
and m
2
are combined into one object, find its 
acceleration under the action of the force F
S
.
19. Two forces F
S
1
and F
S
2
act on a 5.00-kg object. Taking  
F
1
5 20.0 N and F
2
5 15.0 N, find the accelerations 
of the object for the configurations of forces shown in 
parts (a) and (b) of Figure P5.19.
M
S
W
M
90.0°
2
1
60.0°
2
1
m
m
F
S
F
S
F
S
F
S
a
b
Figure P5.19
C# Image: Quick to Navigate Document in .NET Web Viewer
API can be called from any document page object for navigate to the target part of web viewer document well-formed documents, like Word and PDF, will contain
converting pdf to html format; add pdf to website
problems 
141
a buoyant force vertically upward on the boat. Find the 
magnitude of this force. (b) Model the forces as con-
stant over a short interval of time to find the velocity of 
the boat 0.450 s after the moment described.
26. An iron bolt of mass 65.0 g hangs from a string 35.7 cm 
long. The top end of the string is fixed. Without touch-
ing it, a magnet attracts the bolt so that it remains sta-
tionary, but is displaced horizontally 28.0 cm to the 
right from the previously vertical line of the string. 
The magnet is located to the right of the bolt and on 
the same vertical level as the bolt in the final configu-
ration. (a) Draw a free-body diagram of the bolt.  
(b) Find the tension in the string. (c)Find the mag-
netic force on the bolt.
27. Figure P5.27 shows the 
horizontal forces acting on 
a sailboat moving north at 
constant velocity, seen 
from a point straight above 
its mast. At the particular 
speed of the sailboat, the 
water exerts a 220-N drag 
force on its hull and u 5 
40.0°. For each of the situa-
tions (a) and (b) described 
below, write two component equations representing 
Newton’s second law. Then solve the equations for P 
(the force exerted by the wind on the sail) and for n (the 
force exerted by the water on the keel). (a) Choose the 
x direction as east and the y direction as north. (b) Now 
choose the x direction as u 5 40.0° north of east and 
the y direction as u 5 40.0° west of north. (c) Compare 
your solutions to parts (a) and (b). Do the results agree?  
Is one method significantly easier?
28. The systems shown in Figure P5.28 are in equilibrium. 
If the spring scales are calibrated in newtons, what do 
they read? Ignore the masses of the pulleys and strings 
and assume the pulleys and the incline in Figure 
P5.28d are frictionless.
E
N
S
W
220 N
n
S
P
S
u
Figure P5.27
Q/C
W
29. Assume the three blocks portrayed in Figure P5.29 
move on a frictionless surface and a 42-N force acts as 
shown on the 3.0-kg block. Determine (a) the accelera-
tion given this system, (b) the tension in the cord con-
necting the 3.0-kg and the 1.0-kg blocks, and (c) the 
force exerted by the 1.0-kg block on the 2.0-kg block.
42 N
1.0 kg
2.0 kg
3.0 kg
Figure P5.29
30. A block slides down a frictionless plane having an incli-
nation of u 5 15.0°. The block starts from rest at the 
top, and the length of the incline is 2.00 m. (a) Draw a 
free-body diagram of the block. Find (b) the accelera-
tion of the block and (c) its speed when it reaches the 
bottom of the incline.
31. The distance between two telephone poles is 50.0 m. 
When a 1.00-kg bird lands on the telephone wire mid-
way between the poles, the wire sags 0.200 m. (a) Draw 
a free-body diagram of the bird. (b) How much tension 
does the bird produce in the wire? Ignore the weight of 
the wire.
32. A 3.00-kg object is moving in a plane, with its x and y 
coordinates given by x 5 5t2 2 1 and y 5 3t3 1 2, 
where x and y are in meters and t is in seconds. Find 
the magnitude of the net force acting on this object at 
t 5 2.00 s.
33. A bag of cement weighing 325 N  
hangs in equilibrium from 
three wires as suggested in Fig-
ure P5.33. Two of the wires make 
angles u
1
5 60.0° and u
2
5 40.0°  
with the horizontal. Assuming 
the system is in equilibrium, 
find the tensions T
1
T
2
, and T
3
in the wires.
34. A bag of cement whose weight 
is F
g
hangs in equilibrium from 
three wires as shown in Figure 
P5.33. Two of the wires make 
angles u
1
and u
2
with the horizontal. Assuming the sys-
tem is in equilibrium, show that the tension in the left-
hand wire is
T
1
5
F
g
cos u
2
sin 
1
u
1
1u
2
2
35. Two people pull as hard as they can on horizontal 
ropes attached to a boat that has a mass of 200 kg.  
If they pull in the same direction, the boat has an 
acceleration of 1.52 m/s2 to the right. If they pull in 
opposite directions, the boat has an acceleration of 
0.518 m/s2 to the left. What is the magnitude of the 
force each person exerts on the boat? Disregard any 
other horizontal forces on the boat.
M
W
W
C
E
M
E
N
T
T
1
T
2
T
3
u
2
u
1
F
g
5.00 kg
5.00 kg
5.00 kg
5.00 kg
5.00 kg
a
b
c
5.00 kg
30.0°
d
Figure P5.28
142
chapter 5 The Laws of Motion
diagrams of both objects. Find (b) the magnitude of 
the acceleration of the objects and (c) the tension in 
the string.
41. Figure P5.41 shows the speed of a person’s body as he 
does a chin-up. Assume the motion is vertical and the 
mass of the person’s body is 64.0 kg. Determine the 
force exerted by the chin-up bar on his body at (a) t 5 
0, (b) t 5 0.5 s, (c)t 5 1.1 s, and (d) t 5 1.6 s.
time (s)
1.0
1.5
0
10
20
30
0.5
2.0
s
p
e
e
d
(
c
m
/
s
)
Figure P5.41
42. Two objects are connected by a 
light string that passes over a  
frictionless pulley as shown in  
Figure P5.42. Assume the incline 
is frictionless and take m
1
 
2.00 kg, m
2
5 6.00kg, and u 5 
55.0°. (a)Draw free-body dia-
grams of both objects. Find 
(b)the magnitude of the accel-
eration of the objects, (c) the ten-
sion in the string, and (d) the 
speed of each object 2.00 s after 
it is released from rest.
43. Two blocks, each of mass m 5 
3.50kg, are hung from the ceiling 
of an elevator as in Figure P5.43. 
(a)If the elevator moves with an 
upward acceler ation a
S
of magni-
tude 1.60m/s2, find the tensions 
T
1
and T
2
in the upper and lower 
strings. (b) If the strings can 
withstand a maximum tension of 
85.0N, what maximum accelera-
tion can the elevator have before 
a string breaks?
44. Two blocks, each of mass m, are 
hung from the ceiling of an eleva-
tor as in Figure P5.43. The elevator has an upward accel-
eration a. The strings have negligible mass. (a) Find the 
tensions T
1
and T
2
in the upper and lower strings in 
terms of m, a, and g. (b) Compare the two tensions and 
determine which string would break first if a is made 
sufficiently large. (c) What are the tensions if the cable 
supporting the elevator breaks?
45. In the system shown in Figure P5.45, a horizontal force 
F
S
x
acts on an object of mass m
2
5 8.00 kg. The hori-
m
1
m
2
u
Figure P5.42
T
1
T
2
a
S
m
m
Figure P5.43 
Problems 43 and 44.
S
M
36. Figure P5.36 shows loads hanging from the ceiling of 
an elevator that is moving at constant velocity. Find the 
tension in each of the three strands of cord supporting 
each load.
50.0°
40.0°
T
1
T
2
T
3
5.00 kg
60.0°
T
1
T
3
10.0 kg
T
2
a
b
Figure P5.36
37. An object of mass m 5 1.00 kg 
is observed to have an accel-
eration a
S
with a magnitude of  
10.0m/s2 in a direction 60.0° 
east of north. Figure P5.37 
shows a view of the object 
from above. The force F
S
2
act-
ing on the object has a magni-
tude of 5.00 N and is directed 
north. Determine the magnitude and direction of the 
one other horizontal force F
S
1
acting on the object.
38. A setup similar to the one shown in Figure P5.38 is often 
used in hospitals to support and apply a horizontal trac-
tion force to an injured leg. (a) Determine the force of 
tension in the rope supporting the leg. (b) What is the 
traction force exerted to the right on the leg?
70°
Figure P5.38
39. A simple accelerometer is constructed inside a car by 
suspending an object of mass m from a string of length 
L that is tied to the car’s ceiling. As the car accelerates 
the string–object system makes a constant angle of u 
with the vertical. (a) Assuming that the string mass is 
negligible compared with m, derive an expression for 
the car’s acceleration in terms of u and show that it is 
independent of the mass m and the length L. (b) Deter-
mine the acceleration of the car 
when u 5 23.0°.
40. An object of mass m
1
5 5.00 kg 
placed on a frictionless, horizon-
tal table is connected to a string 
that passes over a pulley and then 
is fastened to a hanging object of 
mass m
2
5 9.00 kg as shown in 
Figure P5.40. (a) Draw free-body 
60.0°
m
a
S
F
2
S
F
1
S
Figure P5.37
BIO
m
1
m
2
Figure P5.40 
Problems 40, 63, 
and 87.
AMT
W
problems 
143
acts on the top pin. Draw a free-body diagram of the 
pin. Use the condition for equilibrium of the pin to 
translate the free-body diagram into equations. From 
the equations calculate the forces exerted by struts A 
and B. If you obtain a positive answer, you correctly 
guessed the direction of the force. A negative answer 
means that the direction should be reversed, but the 
absolute value correctly gives the magnitude of the 
force. If a strut pulls on a pin, it is in tension. If it 
pushes, the strut is in compression. Identify whether 
each strut is in tension or in compression. 
60.0°
A
B
Figure P5.48
49. Two blocks of mass 3.50 kg and 8.00 kg are connected 
by a massless string that passes over a frictionless pul-
ley (Fig. P5.49). The inclines are frictionless. Find (a) 
the magnitude of the acceleration of each block and 
(b) the tension in the string.
3.50 kg
8.00 kg
35.0°
35.0°
Figure P5.49 
Problems 49 and 71.
50. In the Atwood machine discussed in Example 5.9 and 
shown in Figure 5.14a, m
1
5 2.00 kg and m
2
5 7.00kg. 
The masses of the pulley and string are negligible by 
comparison. The pulley turns without friction, and the 
string does not stretch. The lighter object is released 
with a sharp push that sets it into motion at v
i
 
2.40 m/s downward. (a) How far will m
1
descend below 
its initial level? (b)Find the velocity of m
1
after 1.80 s.
51. In Example 5.8, we investigated the apparent weight of 
a fish in an elevator. Now consider a 72.0-kg man stand-
ing on a spring scale in an elevator. Starting from rest, 
the elevator ascends, attaining its maximum speed of 
1.20 m/s in 0.800 s. It travels with this constant speed 
for the next 5.00s. The elevator then undergoes a uni-
form acceleration in the negative y direction for 1.50 s 
and comes to rest. What does the spring scale register 
(a) before the elevator starts to move, (b) during the 
first 0.800 s, (c) while the elevator is traveling at con-
stant speed, and (d) during the time interval it is slow-
ing down?
Section 5.8 Forces of Friction
52. Consider a large truck carrying a heavy load, such as 
steel beams. A significant hazard for the driver is that 
the load may slide forward, crushing the cab, if the 
truck stops suddenly in an accident or even in braking. 
Assume, for example, that a 10 000-kg load sits on the 
AMT
M
zontal surface is frictionless. Consider the acceleration 
of the sliding object as a function of F
x
. (a) For what 
values of F
x
does the object of mass m
1
5 2.00 kg accel-
erate upward? (b) For what values of F
x
is the tension in 
the cord zero? (c) Plot the acceleration of the m
2
object 
versus F
x
. Include values of F
x
from 2100 N to 1100 N.
F
x
S
m
1
m
2
Figure P5.45
46. An object of mass m
1
hangs from a string that passes 
over a very light fixed pulley P
1
as shown in Figure 
P5.46. The string connects to a second very light pul-
ley P
2
. A second string passes around this pulley with 
one end attached to a wall and the other to an object 
of mass m
2
on a frictionless, horizontal table. (a) If a
1
and a
2
are the accelerations of m
1
and m
2
, respectively, 
what is the relation between these accelerations? Find 
expressions for (b) the tensions in the strings and  
(c) the accelerations a
1
and a
2
in terms of the masses 
m
1
and m
2
, and g.
P
2
P
1
m
1
Figure P5.46
47. A block is given an initial velocity of 5.00 m/s up a fric-
tionless incline of angle u 5 20.0° (Fig. P5.47). How far 
up the incline does the block slide before coming to rest?
θ
Figure P5.47
48. A car is stuck in the mud. A tow truck pulls on the 
car with the arrangement shown in Fig. P5.48. The tow 
cable is under a tension of 2 500 N and pulls down-
ward and to the left on the pin at its upper end. The 
light pin is held in equilibrium by forces exerted by 
the two bars A and B. Each bar is a strut; that is, each 
is a bar whose weight is small compared to the forces 
it exerts and which exerts forces only through hinge 
pins at its ends. Each strut exerts a force directed par-
allel to its length. Determine the force of tension or 
compression in each strut. Proceed as follows. Make a 
guess as to which way (pushing or pulling) each force 
S
144
chapter 5 The Laws of Motion
mum value of m
s
is necessary to achieve the record 
time? (b) Suppose the driver were able to increase his 
or her engine power, keeping other things equal. How 
would this change affect the elapsed time?
59. To meet a U.S. Postal Service requirement, employees’ 
footwear must have a coefficient of static friction of 0.5 
or more on a specified tile surface. A typical athletic 
shoe has a coefficient of static friction of 0.800. In an 
emergency, what is the minimum time interval in 
which a person starting from rest can move 3.00 m on 
the tile surface if she is wearing (a) footwear meeting 
the Postal Service minimum and (b) a typical athletic 
shoe?
60. A woman at an airport is towing 
her 20.0-kg suitcase at constant 
speed by pulling on a strap at 
an angle u above the horizontal 
(Fig. P5.60). She pulls on the 
strap with a 35.0-N force, and 
the friction force on the suit-
case is 20.0N. (a)Draw a free-
body diagram of the suitcase. 
(b) What angle does the strap 
make with the horizontal? (c) 
What is the magnitude of the normal force that the 
ground exerts on the suitcase?
61. Review. A 3.00-kg block starts from rest at the top of a 
30.0° incline and slides a distance of 2.00 m down the 
incline in 1.50 s. Find (a) the magnitude of the acceler-
ation of the block, (b) the coefficient of kinetic friction 
between block and plane, (c) the friction force acting 
on the block, and (d) the speed of the block after it has 
slid 2.00 m.
62. The person in Figure P5.62 
weighs 170 lb. As seen from 
the front, each light crutch 
makes an angle of 22.0° 
with the vertical. Half of the 
person’s weight is supported 
by the crutches. The other 
half is supported by the ver-
tical forces of the ground 
on the person’s feet. Assum-
ing that the person is mov-
ing with constant velocity 
and the force exerted by the 
ground on the crutches acts 
along the crutches, deter-
mine (a) the smallest possible coefficient of friction 
between crutches and ground and (b) the magnitude 
of the compression force in each crutch.
63. A 9.00-kg hanging object is connected by a light, inex-
tensible cord over a light, frictionless pulley to a 5.00-
kg block that is sliding on a flat table (Fig. P5.40). Tak-
ing the coefficient of kinetic friction as 0.200, find the 
tension in the string.
64. Three objects are connected on a table as shown in Fig-
ure P5.64. The coefficient of kinetic friction between 
the block of mass m
2
and the table is 0.350. The objects 
have masses of m
1
5 4.00 kg, m
2
5 1.00 kg, and m
3
u
Figure P5.60
W
M
22.0°
22.0°
Figure P5.62
BIO
W
Q/C
flatbed of a 20 000-kg truck moving at 12.0 m/s. Assume 
that the load is not tied down to the truck, but has a coef-
ficient of friction of 0.500 with the flatbed of the truck. 
(a) Calculate the minimum stopping distance for which 
the load will not slide forward relative to the truck.  
(b) Is any piece of data unnecessary for the solution?
53. Review. A rifle bullet with a mass of 12.0 g traveling 
toward the right at 260 m/s strikes a large bag of sand 
and penetrates it to a depth of 23.0 cm. Determine the 
magnitude and direction of the friction force (assumed 
constant) that acts on the bullet.
54. Review. A car is traveling at 50.0 mi/h on a horizontal 
highway. (a) If the coefficient of static friction between 
road and tires on a rainy day is 0.100, what is the mini-
mum distance in which the car will stop? (b) What is 
the stopping distance when the surface is dry and m
s
0.600?
55. A 25.0-kg block is initially at rest on a horizontal sur-
face. A horizontal force of 75.0 N is required to set 
the block in motion, after which a horizontal force of  
60.0 N is required to keep the block moving with con-
stant speed. Find (a)the coefficient of static friction 
and (b) the coefficient of kinetic friction between the 
block and the surface.
56. Why is the following situation impossible? Your 3.80-kg  
physics book is placed next to you on the horizontal seat 
of your car. The coefficient of static friction between the 
book and the seat is 0.650, and the coefficient of kinetic 
friction is 0.550. You are traveling forward at 72.0 km/h 
and brake to a stop with constant acceleration over a  
distance of 30.0 m. Your physics book remains on the 
seat rather than sliding forward onto the floor.
57. To determine the coefficients of friction between rub-
ber and various surfaces, a student uses a rubber eraser 
and an incline. In one experiment, the eraser begins 
to slip down the incline when the angle of inclination 
is 36.0° and then moves down the incline with constant 
speed when the angle is reduced to 30.0°. From these 
data, determine the coefficients of static and kinetic 
friction for this experiment.
58. Before 1960, people believed that the maximum 
attainable coefficient of static friction for an automo-
bile tire on a roadway was m
s
5 1. Around 1962, three 
companies independently developed racing tires with 
coefficients of 1.6. This problem shows that tires have 
improved further since then. The shortest time inter-
val in which a piston-engine car initially at rest has 
covered a distance of one-quarter mile is about 4.43 s. 
(a) Assume the car’s rear wheels lift the front wheels 
off the pavement as shown in Figure P5.58. What mini-
W
Q/C
Figure P5.58
J
a
m
i
e
S
q
u
i
r
e
/
A
l
l
s
p
o
r
t
/
G
e
t
t
y
I
m
a
g
e
s
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested