problems 
145
the fluid friction force disappears as soon as the fish’s 
head breaks the water surface and assume the force on 
its tail is constant. Model the gravitational force as sud-
denly switching full on when half the length of the fish 
is out of the water. Find the value of P.
69. Review. A magician pulls a tablecloth from under a 
200-g mug located 30.0 cm from the edge of the cloth. 
The cloth exerts a friction force of 0.100 N on the mug, 
and the cloth is pulled with a constant acceleration of 
3.00 m/s2. How far does the mug move relative to the 
horizontal tabletop before the cloth is completely out 
from under it? Note that the cloth must move more 
than 30 cm relative to the tabletop during the process.
70. A 5.00-kg block is placed on top of a 10.0-kg block (Fig. 
P5.70). A horizontal force of 45.0 N is applied to the 
10-kg block, and the 5.00-kg block is tied to the wall. 
The coefficient of kinetic friction between all moving 
surfaces is 0.200. (a) Draw a free-body diagram for each 
block and identify the action–reaction forces between 
the blocks. (b) Determine the tension in the string and 
the magnitude of the acceleration of the 10.0-kg block.
5.00
kg
10.0 kg
= 45.0 N
Figure P5.70
71. The system shown in Figure P5.49 has an acceleration 
of magnitude 1.50 m/s2. Assume that the coefficient of 
kinetic friction between block and incline is the same 
for both inclines. Find (a) the coefficient of kinetic 
friction and (b) the tension in the string.
Additional Problems
72. A black aluminum glider floats on a film of air above a 
level aluminum air track. Aluminum feels essentially no 
force in a magnetic field, and air resistance is negligi-
ble. A strong magnet is attached to the top of the glider, 
forming a total mass of 240 g. A piece of scrap iron 
attached to one end stop on the track attracts the mag-
net with a force of 0.823N when the iron and the mag-
net are separated by 2.50 cm. (a) Find the acceleration 
of the glider at this instant. (b) The scrap iron is now 
attached to another green glider, forming total mass 
120 g. Find the acceleration of each glider when the glid-
ers are simultaneously released at 2.50-cm separation.
73. A young woman buys an inexpensive used car for stock 
car racing. It can attain highway speed with an accelera-
tion of 8.40 mi/h · s. By making changes to its engine, 
she can increase the net horizontal force on the car by 
24.0%. With much less expense, she can remove material 
from the body of the car to decrease its mass by 24.0%. 
(a) Which of these two changes, if either, will result in 
the greater increase in the car’s acceleration? (b) If she 
makes both changes, what acceleration can she attain?
74. Why is the following situation impossible? A book sits on an 
inclined plane on the surface of the Earth. The angle 
2.00kg, and the pulleys are frictionless. (a) Draw a free-
body diagram of each object. (b) Determine the accel-
eration of each object, including its direction. (c) Deter-
mine the tensions in the two cords. What If? (d) If the 
tabletop were smooth, would the tensions increase, 
decrease, or remain the same? Explain.
m
1
m
2
m
3
Figure P5.64
65. Two blocks connected by a 
rope of negligible mass are 
being dragged by a hori-
zontal force (Fig. P5.65). 
Suppose F 5 68.0 N, m
1
12.0 kg, m
2
 5 18.0 kg,  
and the coefficient of kinetic friction between each 
block and the surface is 0.100. (a) Draw a free-body 
diagram for each block. Determine (b) the accelera-
tion of the system and (c)the tension T in the rope.
66. A block of mass 3.00 kg is pushed 
up against a wall by a force P
S
that 
makes an angle of u 5 50.0° with 
the horizontal as shown in Figure 
P5.66. The coefficient of static fric-
tion between the block and the wall 
is 0.250. (a) Determine the possible 
values for the magnitude of P
S
that 
allow the block to remain station-
ary. (b) Describe what happens if 
0
P
S
0
has a larger value 
and what happens if it is smaller. (c) Repeat parts (a) and 
(b), assuming the force makes an angle of u 5 13.0° with 
the horizontal.
67. Review. One side of the roof of a house slopes up at 
37.0°. A roofer kicks a round, flat rock that has been 
thrown onto the roof by a neighborhood child. The 
rock slides straight up the incline with an initial speed 
of 15.0 m/s. The coefficient of kinetic friction between 
the rock and the roof is 0.400. The rock slides 10.0 m 
up the roof to its peak. It crosses the ridge and goes 
into free fall, following a parabolic trajectory above 
the far side of the roof, with negligible air resistance. 
Determine the maximum height the rock reaches 
above the point where it was kicked.
68. Review. A Chinook salmon can swim underwater at 
3.58m/s, and it can also jump vertically upward, leav-
ing the water with a speed of 6.26 m/s. A record salmon 
has length 1.50 m and mass 61.0 kg. Consider the fish 
swimming straight upward in the water below the sur-
face of a lake. The gravitational force exerted on it is 
very nearly canceled out by a buoyant force exerted 
by the water as we will study in Chapter 14. The fish 
experiences an upward force P exerted by the water 
on its threshing tail fin and a downward fluid friction 
force that we model as acting on its front end. Assume 
T
m
1
m
2
F
S
Figure P5.65
AMT
M
u
P
S
Figure P5.66
Q/C
BIO
Best pdf to html converter online - Convert PDF to html files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
How to Convert PDF to HTML Webpage with C# PDF Conversion SDK
change pdf to html; conversion pdf to html
Best pdf to html converter online - VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
PDF to HTML Webpage Converter SDK for VB.NET PDF to HTML Conversion
converting pdf to html code; create html email from pdf
146
chapter 5 The Laws of Motion
to the force on the block as the rope’s mass approaches 
zero? What can you state about the tension in a light 
cord joining a pair of moving objects?
79. Two blocks of masses m
1
and m
2
are placed on a table in 
contact with each other as discussed in Example 5.7 and 
shown in Figure 5.12a. The coefficient of kinetic friction 
between the block of mass m
1
and the table is m
1
, and 
that between the block of mass m
2
and the table is m
2
 
A horizontal force of magnitude F is applied to the block 
of mass m
1
. We wish to find P, the magnitude of the con-
tact force between the blocks. (a) Draw diagrams show-
ing the forces for each block. (b) What is the net force 
on the  system of two blocks? (c) What is the net force 
acting on m
1
? (d) What is the net force acting on m
2
 
(e) Write Newton’s second law in the x direction for each 
block. (f) Solve the two equations in two unknowns for 
the acceleration a of the blocks in terms of the masses, 
the applied force F, the coefficients of friction, and g. 
(g) Find the magnitude P of the contact force between 
the blocks in terms of the same quantities.
80. On a single, light, vertical cable that does not stretch, 
a crane is lifting a 1 207-kg Ferrari and, below it, a   
1 461-kg BMW Z8. The Ferrari is moving upward with 
speed 3.50m/s and acceleration 1.25m/s2. (a) How 
do the velocity and acceleration of the BMW compare 
with those of the Ferrari? (b)Find the tension in the 
cable between the BMW and the Ferrari. (c)Find the 
tension in the cable above the Ferrari.
81. An inventive child named Nick wants to reach an apple 
in a tree without climbing the tree. Sitting in a chair 
connected to a rope that passes over a frictionless pul-
ley (Fig. P5.81), Nick pulls on the loose end of the rope 
with such a force that the spring scale reads 250 N. 
Nick’s true weight is 320N, and the chair weighs 160 N. 
Nick’s feet are not touching the ground. (a) Draw one 
pair of diagrams showing the forces for Nick and the 
chair considered as separate systems and another dia-
gram for Nick and the chair considered as one system. 
(b) Show that the acceleration of the system is upward 
and find its magnitude. (c) Find the force Nick exerts 
on the chair.
h
0
θ
z
m
v
y
v
x
x
y
Figure P5.76
77. A frictionless plane is 10.0 m long and inclined at 35.0°. 
A sled starts at the bottom with an initial speed of 
5.00  m/s up the incline. When the sled reaches the 
point at which it momentarily stops, a second sled is 
released from the top of the incline with an initial 
speed v
i
. Both sleds reach the bottom of the incline at 
the same moment. (a) Determine the distance that the 
first sled traveled up the incline. (b) Determine the ini-
tial speed of the second sled.
78. A rope with mass m
r
is 
attached to a block with 
mass m
b
as in Figure P5.78. 
The block rests on a friction-
less, horizontal surface. The 
rope does not stretch. The 
free end of the rope is pulled to the right with a hori-
zontal force F
S
. (a) Draw force diagrams for the rope 
and the block, noting that the tension in the rope is 
not uniform. (b) Find the acceleration of the system in 
terms of m
b
m
r
, and F. (c) Find the magnitude of the 
force the rope exerts on the block. (d) What happens 
S
M
m
r
m
b
F
S
Figure P5.78
S
Q/C
Online Convert PDF to HTML5 files. Best free online PDF html
Online PDF to HTML5 Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF file to HTML. Just upload your file by clicking on the blue button
pdf to html; convert pdf to html form
Purchase RasterEdge Product License Online
Converter XDoc.Converter for .NET. Best file conversions common business files, including Adobe PDF, Microsoft Word, Excel, PowerPoint, HTML, Open Office ODF
converting pdf into html; convert pdf to web page
problems 
147
or the inclined plane, are very simple. Some machines 
do not even look like machines. For example, your car is 
stuck in the mud and you can’t pull hard enough to get it 
out. You do, however, have a long cable that you connect 
taut between your front bumper and the trunk of a stout 
tree. You now pull sideways on the cable at its midpoint, 
exerting a force f. Each half of the cable is displaced 
through a small angle u from the straight line between 
the ends of the cable. (a) Deduce an expression for the 
force acting on the car. (b) Evaluate the cable tension for 
the case where u 5 7.00° and f 5 100 N.
87. Objects with masses m
1
5 10.0 kg and m
2
5 5.00 kg are 
connected by a light string that passes over a friction-
less pulley as in Figure P5.40. If, when the system starts 
from rest, m
2
falls 1.00 m in 1.20 s, determine the coef-
ficient of kinetic friction between m
1
and the table.
88. Consider the three connected objects shown in Figure 
P5.88. Assume first that the inclined plane is friction-
less and that the system is in equilibrium. In terms of m
g, and u, find (a) the mass M and (b) the tensions T
1
and 
T
2
. Now assume that the value of M is double the value 
found in part (a). Find (c) the acceleration of each 
object and (d) the tensions T
1
and T
2
. Next, assume that 
the coefficient of static friction between m and 2m and 
the inclined plane is m
s
and that the system is in equilib-
rium. Find (e) the maximum value of M and  
(f) the minimum value of M. (g) Compare the values of 
T
2
when M has its minimum and maximum values. 
2m
m
M
T
1
T
2
θ
Figure P5.88
89. A crate of weight F
g
is pushed by a force 
P
S
on a horizontal floor as shown 
in Figure P5.89. The coefficient of 
static friction is m
s
, and P
S
is directed 
at angle u below the horizontal.  
(a) Show that the minimum value of P 
that will move the crate is given by
P5
m
s
F
g
sec u
12m
s
tan u
(b) Find the condition on u in terms of m
s
for which 
motion of the crate is impossible for any value of P.
90. A student is asked to measure the acceleration of a 
glider on a frictionless, inclined plane, using an air 
track, a stopwatch, and a meterstick. The top of the 
track is measured to be 1.774 cm higher than the bot-
tom of the track, and the length of the track is d 5 
127.1 cm. The cart is released from rest at the top of 
the incline, taken as x 5 0, and its position x along the 
incline is measured as a function of time. For x values 
of 10.0 cm, 20.0 cm, 35.0 cm, 50.0cm, 75.0 cm, and  
100 cm, the measured times at which these positions 
are reached (averaged over five runs) are 1.02 s, 1.53 s, 
M
P
S
Figure P5.89
S
Q/C
ley are negligible. Nick’s feet are not touching the 
ground. (a)Assume Nick is momentarily at rest when he 
stops pulling down on the rope and passes the end of 
the rope to another child, of weight 440 N, who is stand-
ing on the ground next to him. The rope does not 
break. Describe the ensuing motion. (b) Instead, 
assume Nick is momentarily at rest when he ties the end 
of the rope to a strong hook projecting from the tree 
trunk. Explain why this action can make the rope break.
83. In Example 5.7, we pushed on two blocks on a table. 
Suppose three blocks are in contact with one another 
on a frictionless, horizontal surface as shown in Figure 
P5.83. A horizontal force F
S
is applied to m
1
. Take m
1
 
2.00 kg, m
2
5 3.00 kg, m
3
5 4.00 kg, and F 5 18.0 N.  
(a) Draw a separate free-body diagram for each block. 
(b) Determine the acceleration of the blocks. (c) Find 
the resultant force on each block. (d) Find the magni-
tudes of the contact forces between the blocks. (e) You 
are working on a construction project. A coworker is 
nailing up plasterboard on one side of a light partition, 
and you are on the opposite side, providing “backing” 
by leaning against the wall with your back pushing on 
it. Every hammer blow makes your back sting. The 
supervisor helps you put a heavy block of wood between 
the wall and your back. Using the situation analyzed in 
parts (a) through (d) as a model, explain how this 
change works to make your job more comfortable.
m
1
m
2
m
3
F
S
Figure P5.83
84. An aluminum block of 
mass m
1
5 2.00kg and a 
copper block of mass m
2
6.00 kg are connected by a 
light string over a friction-
less pulley. They sit on a 
steel surface as shown in 
Figure P5.84, where u 5 
30.0°. (a) When they are released from rest, will they 
start to move? If they do, determine (b) their accelera-
tion and (c) the tension in the string. If they do not 
move, determine (d) the sum of the 
magnitudes of the forces of friction 
acting on the blocks.
85. An object of mass M is held in place 
by an applied force F
S
and a pulley 
system as shown in Figure P5.85. The 
pulleys are massless and friction-
less. (a) Draw diagrams showing the 
forces on each pulley. Find (b) the 
tension in each section of rope, T
1
T
2
T
3
T
4
, and T
5
and (c) the mag-
nitude of F
S
.
86. Any device that allows you to increase 
the force you exert is a kind of machine. 
Some machines, such as the prybar 
Q/C
Aluminum
Copper
Steel
m
1
m
2
u
Figure P5.84
T
4
T
2
T
3
T
5
M
T
1
F
S
Figure P5.85
S
Online Convert PDF file to Tiff. Best free online PDF Tif
Online PDF to Tiff Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF File to Tiff. Just upload your file by clicking on the blue button
convert pdf fillable form to html; convert pdf to web
Online Convert PDF to Jpeg images. Best free online PDF JPEG
Online PDF to JPEG Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF File to JPG. Drag and drop your PDF in the box above and we'll convert the files for you.
how to convert pdf to html email; convert pdf to html code for email
148
chapter 5 The Laws of Motion
95. A car accelerates down a 
hill (Fig. P5.95), going from 
rest to 30.0 m/s in 6.00 s. A 
toy inside the car hangs by 
a string from the car’s ceil-
ing. The ball in the figure 
represents the toy, of mass 
0.100 kg. The acceleration is 
such that the string remains 
perpendicular to the ceiling. Determine (a)the angle u 
and (b) the tension in the string.
Challenge Problems
96. A time-dependent force, F
S
5
1
8.00
i
^
24.00t
j
^
2
, where 
F
S
is in newtons and t is in seconds, is exerted on a 
2.00-kg object initially at rest. (a) At what time will the 
object be moving with a speed of 15.0 m/s? (b) How far 
is the object from its initial position when its speed is 
15.0 m/s? (c)Through what total displacement has the 
object traveled at this moment?
97. The board sandwiched between two other boards in 
Figure P5.97 weighs 95.5N. If the coefficient of static 
friction between the boards is 0.663, what must be 
the magnitude of the compression forces (assumed 
horizontal) acting on both sides of the center board to 
keep it from slipping?
Figure P5.97
98. Initially, the system of objects shown in Figure P5.93 is 
held motionless. The pulley and all surfaces and wheels 
are frictionless. Let the force F
S
be zero and assume 
that m
1
can move only vertically. At the instant after 
the system of objects is released, find (a) the tension T 
in the string, (b) the acceleration of m
2
, (c) the accel-
eration of M, and (d) the acceleration of m
1
. (Note: The 
pulley accelerates along with the cart.) 
99. A block of mass 2.20 kg is accel-
erated across a rough surface 
by a light cord passing over a 
small pulley as shown in Fig-
ure P5.99. The tension T in the 
cord is maintained at 10.0 N,  
and the pulley is 0.100 m above 
the top of the block. The coef-
ficient of kinetic friction is 
0.400. (a)Determine the accel-
eration of the block when x 5  
0.400 m. (b)Describe the gen-
eral behavior of the acceleration as the block slides 
from a location where x is large to x 5 0. (c)Find the 
maximum value of the acceleration and the position 
x for which it occurs. (d) Find the value of x for which 
the acceleration is zero.
M
S
M
T
x
Figure P5.99
Q/C
2.01 s, 2.64 s, 3.30 s, and 3.75 s, respectively. (a) Con-
struct a graph of x versus t2, with a best-fit straight line 
to describe the data. (b) Determine the acceleration of 
the cart from the slope of this graph. (c) Explain how 
your answer to part (b) compares with the theoretical 
value you calculate using a 5 g sin u as derived in 
Example 5.6.
91. A flat cushion of mass m is 
released from rest at the cor-
ner of the roof of a building, 
at height h. A wind blowing 
along the side of the building 
exerts a constant horizontal 
force of magnitude F on the 
cushion as it drops as shown 
in FigureP5.91. The air exerts 
no vertical force. (a) Show 
that the path of the cushion is 
a straight line. (b)Does the 
cushion fall with constant velocity? Explain. (c) If m 5 
1.20kg, h 5 8.00 m, and F 5 2.40 N, how far from the 
building will the cushion hit the level ground? What 
If? (d) If the cushion is thrown downward with a non-
zero speed at the top of the building, what will be the 
shape of its trajectory? Explain.
92. In Figure P5.92, the pulleys 
and the cord are light, all sur-
faces are frictionless, and the 
cord does not stretch. (a) How 
does the acceleration of block 
1 compare with the accelera-
tion of block 2? Explain your 
reasoning. (b)The mass of 
block 2 is 1.30 kg. Find its 
acceleration as it depends on 
the mass m
1
of block 1.  
(c) What If? What does the result of part (b) predict if 
m
1
is very much less than 1.30 kg? (d) What does the 
result of part (b) predict if m
1
approaches infinity?  
(e) In this last case, what is the tension in the cord?  
(f) Could you anticipate the answers to parts (c), (d), 
and (e) without first doing part (b)? Explain.
93. What horizontal force must 
be applied to a large block 
of mass M shown in Figure 
P5.93 so that the tan blocks 
remain stationary relative 
to M? Assume all surfaces 
and the pulley are friction-
less. Notice that the force 
exerted by the string accelerates m
2
.
94. An 8.40-kg object slides down a fixed, frictionless, 
inclined plane. Use a computer to determine and tabu-
late (a) the normal force exerted on the object and  
(b) its acceleration for a series of incline angles (mea-
sured from the horizontal) ranging from 0° to 90° in 5° 
increments. (c) Plot a graph of the normal force and 
the acceleration as functions of the incline angle.  
(d) In the limiting cases of 0° and 90°, are your results 
consistent with the known behavior?
h
Cushion
Wind
force
Figure P5.91
Q/C
Figure P5.92
Q/C
F
S
m
1
m
2
M
Figure P5.93 
Problems 93 and 98.
S
Q/C
u
u
Figure P5.95
Online Convert PDF to Text file. Best free online PDF txt
Online PDF to Text Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF to Text. Just upload your file by clicking on the blue button or drag
convert pdf to html for online; convert pdf to web pages
VB.NET PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in vb.
Best VB.NET adobe PDF to Tiff converter SDK for When converting PDF document to TIFF image using VB.NET TIFF image is regarded as the best image format for
embed pdf into webpage; embed pdf into html
problems 
149
shown in Figure P5.103a. If the distance L that the 
leading edge of the smaller block travels on the larger 
block is 3.00 m, (a) in what time interval will the 
smaller block make it to the right side of the 8.00-kg 
block as shown in Figure P5.103b? (Note: Both blocks 
are set into motion when F
S
is applied.) (b) How far 
does the 8.00-kg block move in the process?
F
S
F
S
M
M
m
m
L
a
b
Figure P5.103
104. A mobile is formed by supporting four metal butter-
flies of equal mass m from a string of length L. The 
points of support are evenly spaced a distance , apart 
as shown in Figure P5.104. The string forms an angle 
u
1
with the ceiling at each endpoint. The center sec-
tion of string is horizontal. (a) Find the tension in 
each section of string in terms of u
1
m, and g. (b) In 
terms of u
1
, find the angle u
2
that the sections of string 
between the outside butterflies and the inside butter-
flies form with the horizontal. (c) Show that the dis-
tance D between the endpoints of the string is
D5
L
5
b2 cos u
1
12 cos
3
tan21
11
2
tan u
1
24
11r
D
m
m
m
m
L = 5
u
1
u
2
u
2
u
1
Figure P5.104
S
100. Why is the following situation impossible? A 1.30-kg toaster  
is not plugged in. The coefficient of static friction 
between the toaster and a horizontal countertop is 
0.350. To make the toaster start moving, you carelessly 
pull on its electric cord. Unfortunately, the cord has 
become frayed from your previous similar actions and 
will break if the tension in the cord exceeds 4.00 N. 
By pulling on the cord at a particular angle, you suc-
cessfully start the toaster moving without breaking the 
cord.
101. Review. A block of mass m 5 2.00 kg is released from 
rest at h 5 0.500 m above the surface of a table, at the 
top of a u 5 30.0° incline as shown in Figure P5.101. 
The frictionless incline is fixed on a table of height  
H 5 2.00 m. (a)Determine the acceleration of the 
block as it slides down the incline. (b) What is the 
velocity of the block as it leaves the incline? (c) How far 
from the table will the block hit the floor? (d) What 
time interval elapses between when the block is 
released and when it hits the floor? (e) Does the mass of 
the block affect any of the above calculations?
h
H
u
R
m
Figure P5.101 
Problems 101 and 102.
102. In Figure P5.101, the incline has mass M and is fas-
tened to the stationary horizontal tabletop. The block 
of mass m is placed near the bottom of the incline and 
is released with a quick push that sets it sliding 
upward. The block stops near the top of the incline as 
shown in the figure and then slides down again, 
always without friction. Find the force that the table-
top exerts on the incline throughout this motion in 
terms of m, Mg, and u.
103. A block of mass m 5 2.00 kg rests on the left edge of a 
block of mass M 5 8.00 kg. The coefficient of kinetic 
friction between the two blocks is 0.300, and the sur-
face on which the 8.00-kg block rests is frictionless. A 
constant horizontal force of magnitude F 5 10.0 N is 
applied to the 2.00-kg block, setting it in motion as 
S
C# PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images in C#
Online C# Demo Codes for Converting PDF to Raster Images, .NET Graphics, and REImage in C#.NET Project. Best PDF converter SDK for Visual Studio .NET for
convert pdf to html code online; convert pdf link to html
Online Convert PDF file to Word. Best free online PDF Conversion
Online PDF to Word Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF File to Word. Just upload your file by clicking on the blue button
convert pdf to html with images; convert pdf into html file
150 
In the preceding chapter, we introduced Newton’s laws of motion and incorporated 
them into two analysis models involving linear motion. Now we discuss motion that is 
slightly more complicated. For example, we shall apply Newton’s laws to objects traveling in 
circular paths. We shall also discuss motion observed from an accelerating frame of refer-
ence and motion of an object through a viscous medium. For the most part, this chapter 
consists of a series of examples selected to illustrate the application of Newton’s laws to a 
variety of new circumstances.
6.1 Extending the Particle in Uniform  
Circular Motion Model
In Section 4.4, we discussed the analysis model of a particle in uniform circular 
motion, in which a particle moves with constant speed v in a circular path having a 
radius r. The particle experiences an acceleration that has a magnitude
a
c
5
v2
r
c h a p p t t e r 
6
6.1 Extending the Particle in 
Uniform Circular Motion 
Model
6.2 Nonuniform Circular Motion
6.3 Motion in Accelerated 
Frames
6.4 Motion in the Presence of 
Resistive Forces
circular Motion and  
Other applications 
of Newton’s Laws
Kyle Busch, driver of the #18 
Snickers Toyota, leads Jeff Gordon, 
driver of the #24 Dupont Chevrolet, 
during the NASCAR Sprint Cup 
Series Kobalt Tools 500 at the 
Atlanta Motor Speedway on March 
9, 2008, in Hampton, Georgia. The 
cars travel on a banked roadway to 
help them undergo circular motion 
on the turns. 
(Chris Graythen/Getty 
Images for NASCAR)
6.1 extending the particle in Uniform circular Motion Model 
151
The acceleration is called centripetal acceleration because a
S
c
is directed toward 
the center of the circle. Furthermore, a
S
c
is always perpendicular to v
S
. (If there 
were a component of acceleration parallel to v
S
, the particle’s speed would be 
changing.)
Let us now extend the particle in uniform circular motion model from Section 
4.4 by incorporating the concept of force. Consider a puck of mass m that is tied 
to a string of length r and moves at constant speed in a horizontal, circular path 
as illustrated in Figure 6.1. Its weight is supported by a frictionless table, and the 
string is anchored to a peg at the center of the circular path of the puck. Why does 
the puck move in a circle? According to Newton’s first law, the puck would move 
in a straight line if there were no force on it; the string, however, prevents motion 
along a straight line by exerting on the puck a radial force F
S
r
that makes it follow 
the circular path. This force is directed along the string toward the center of the 
circle as shown in Figure 6.1.
If Newton’s second law is applied along the radial direction, the net force caus-
ing the centripetal acceleration can be related to the acceleration as follows:
a
F5ma
c
5m 
v
2
r
(6.1)
A force causing a centripetal acceleration acts toward the center of the circular 
path and causes a change in the direction of the velocity vector. If that force 
should vanish, the object would no longer move in its circular path; instead, it 
would move along a straight-line path tangent to the circle. This idea is illustrated 
in Figure 6.2 for the puck moving in a circular path at the end of a string in a 
horizontal plane. If the string breaks at some instant, the puck moves along the 
straight-line path that is tangent to the circle at the position of the puck at this 
instant.
uick Quiz 6.1 You are riding on a Ferris wheel that is rotating with constant 
speed. The car in which you are riding always maintains its correct upward ori-
entation; it does not invert. (i) What is the direction of the normal force on you 
from the seat when you are at the top of the wheel? (a) upward (b)downward  
(c) impossible to determine (ii) From the same choices, what is the direction of 
the net force on you when you are at the top of the wheel?
WWForce causing centripetal  
acceleration
m
r
r
r
F
S
S
A force F  , directed 
toward the center 
of the circle, keeps 
the puck moving 
in its circular path.
S
r
Figure 6.1 
An overhead view of a 
puck moving in a circular path in a 
horizontal plane.
Figure 6.2 
The string holding the 
puck in its circular path breaks.
r
When the 
string breaks, 
the puck
moves in the
direction 
tangent
to the circle. 
v
S
Pitfall Prevention 6.1
Direction of Travel When  
the String Is Cut Study Figure 
6.2 very carefully. Many students 
(wrongly) think that the puck will 
move radially away from the center 
of the circle when the string is cut. 
The velocity of the puck is tangent 
to the circle. By Newton’s first law, 
the puck continues to move in 
the same direction in which it is 
moving just as the force from the 
string disappears. 
152
chapter 6 circular Motion and Other applications of Newton’s Laws
Example 6.1   The Conical Pendulum 
A small ball of mass m is suspended from a string of length L. The ball revolves 
with constant speed v in a horizontal circle of radius r as shown in Figure 6.3. 
(Because the string sweeps out the surface of a cone, the system is known as a 
conical pendulum.) Find an expression for in terms of the geometry in Figure 6.3.
Conceptualize Imagine the motion of the ball in Figure 6.3a and convince your-
self that the string sweeps out a cone and that the ball moves in a horizontal circle.
Categorize The ball in Figure 6.3 does not accelerate vertically. Therefore, we 
model it as a particle in equilibrium in the vertical direction. It experiences a cen-
tripetal acceleration in the horizontal direction, so it is modeled as a particle in 
uniform circular motion in this direction.
Analyze Let u represent the angle between the string and the vertical. In the dia-
gram of forces acting on the ball in Figure 6.3b, the force T
S
exerted by the string on the ball is resolved into a vertical 
component T cos u and a horizontal component T sin u acting toward the center of the circular path.
AM
SoluTIoN
Apply the particle in equilibrium model in the vertical 
direction:
o
F
y
T cos u 2 mg 5 0
(1)   T cos u 5 mg
Use Equation 6.1 from the particle in uniform circular 
motion model in the horizontal direction:
(2)   
a
F
x
5T sin u5ma
c
5
mv2
r
Divide Equation (2) by Equation (1) and use  
sin u/cos u 5 tan u:
tan u5
v2
rg
Solve for v:
v5"rg tan u
Incorporate r 5 L sin u from the geometry in Figure6.3a:
v
"Lg sin u tan u
Finalize Notice that the speed is independent of the mass of the ball. Consider what happens when u goes to 908 so 
that the string is horizontal. Because the tangent of 908 is infinite, the speed v is infinite, which tells us the string can-
not possibly be horizontal. If it were, there would be no vertical component of the force T
S
to balance the gravitational 
force on the ball. That is why we mentioned in regard to Figure 6.1 that the puck’s weight in the figure is supported by 
a frictionless table.
Imagine a moving object that can be mod-
eled as a particle. If it moves in a circular 
path of radius r at a constant speed v, it 
experiences a centripetal acceleration.  
Because the particle is accelerating, there 
must be a net force acting on the particle. 
That force is directed toward the center of 
the circular path and is given by 
a
F5ma
c
5m 
v2
r
(6.1)
Analysis Model   Particle in Uniform Circular Motion (Extension)
Examples
• the tension in a string of constant length 
acting on a rock twirled in a circle
• the gravitational force acting on a planet 
traveling around the Sun in a perfectly 
circular orbit (Chapter 13)
• the magnetic force acting on a charged 
particle moving in a uniform magnetic field (Chapter 29)
• the electric force acting on an electron in orbit around a 
nucleus in the Bohr model of the hydrogen atom (Chapter 42)
r
v
S
a
c
S
F
S
r
L
m
u
u
T sinu
T cosu
T
S
g
S
mg
S
a
b
Figure 6.3 
(Example 6.1) (a) A 
conical pendulum. The path of the 
ball is a horizontal circle. (b) The 
forces acting on the ball.
Example 6.2   How Fast Can It Spin? 
A puck of mass 0.500 kg is attached to the end of a cord 1.50 m long. The puck moves in a horizontal circle as shown in 
Figure 6.1. If the cord can withstand a maximum tension of 50.0 N, what is the maximum speed at which the puck can 
move before the cord breaks? Assume the string remains horizontal during the motion.
Conceptualize It makes sense that the stronger the cord, the faster the puck can move before the cord breaks. Also, we 
expect a more massive puck to break the cord at a lower speed. (Imagine whirling a bowling ball on the cord!)
Categorize Because the puck moves in a circular path, we model it as a particle in uniform circular motion.
AM
SoluTIoN
Analyze Incorporate the tension and the centripetal acceler-
ation into Newton’s second law as described by Equation 6.1:
T5m 
v2
r
continued
Solve for v:
(1)   v5
Å
Tr
m
Example 6.3   What Is the Maximum Speed of the Car? 
A 1 500-kg car moving on a flat, horizontal road negotiates a curve as shown 
in Figure 6.4a. If the radius of the curve is 35.0 m and the coefficient of static 
friction between the tires and dry pavement is 0.523, find the maximum speed 
the car can have and still make the turn successfully.
Conceptualize Imagine that the curved roadway is part of a large circle so 
that the car is moving in a circular path.
Categorize Based on the Conceptualize step of the problem, we model the car 
as a particle in uniform circular motion in the horizontal direction. The car is not 
accelerating vertically, so it is modeled as a particle in equilibrium in the vertical 
direction.
Analyze Figure 6.4b shows the forces on the car. The force that enables the 
car to remain in its circular path is the force of static friction. (It is static 
because no slipping occurs at the point of contact between road and tires. If 
this force of static friction were zero—for example, if the car were on an icy 
road—the car would continue in a straight line and slide off the curved road.) 
The maximum speed v
max
the car can have around the curve is the speed at 
which it is on the verge of skidding outward. At this point, the friction force 
has its maximum value f
s,max
5 m
s
n.
AM
SoluTIoN
Find the maximum speed the puck can have, which corre-
sponds to the maximum tension the string can withstand:
v
max
5
Å
T
max
r
m
5
Å
1
50.0 N
21
1.50 m
2
0.500 kg
5 12.2 m/s
Finalize Equation (1) shows that v increases with T and decreases with larger m, as we expected from our conceptual-
ization of the problem.
Suppose the puck moves in a circle of larger radius at the same speed v. Is the cord more likely or less 
likely to break?
Answer The larger radius means that the change in the direction of the velocity vector will be smaller in a given time 
interval. Therefore, the acceleration is smaller and the required tension in the string is smaller. As a result, the string 
is less likely to break when the puck travels in a circle of larger radius.
WhaT IF?
n
S
f
s
S
f
s
S
mg
S
a
b
Figure 6.4 
(Example 6.3) (a)The force 
of static friction directed toward the center 
of the curve keeps the car moving in a cir-
cular path. (b) The forces acting on the car.
6.1 extending the particle in Uniform circular Motion Model 
153
154
chapter 6 circular Motion and Other applications of Newton’s Laws
Finalize This speed is equivalent to 30.0 mi/h. Therefore, if the speed limit on this roadway is higher than 30 mi/h, 
this roadway could benefit greatly from some banking, as in the next example! Notice that the maximum speed does 
not depend on the mass of the car, which is why curved highways do not need multiple speed limits to cover the various 
masses of vehicles using the road.
Suppose a car travels this curve on a wet day and begins to skid on the curve when its speed reaches only 
8.00 m/s. What can we say about the coefficient of static friction in this case?
Answer The coefficient of static friction between the tires and a wet road should be smaller than that between the 
tires and a dry road. This expectation is consistent with experience with driving because a skid is more likely on a wet 
road than a dry road.
To check our suspicion, we can solve Equation (2) for the coefficient of static friction:
m
s
5
v2
max
gr
Substituting the numerical values gives
m
s
5
v2
max
gr
5
1
8.00 m/s
22
19.80 m/s22135.0 m2
50.187
which is indeed smaller than the coefficient of 0.523 for the dry road.
WhaT IF?
Example 6.4   The Banked Roadway 
A civil engineer wishes to redesign the curved roadway in Example 6.3 in such a way 
that a car will not have to rely on friction to round the curve without skidding. In 
other words, a car moving at the designated speed can negotiate the curve even when 
the road is covered with ice. Such a road is usually banked, which means that the road-
way is tilted toward the inside of the curve as seen in the opening photograph for this 
chapter. Suppose the designated speed for the road is to be 13.4m/s (30.0 mi/h) and 
the radius of the curve is 35.0 m. At what angle should the curve be banked?
Conceptualize The difference between this example and Example 6.3 is that the 
car is no longer moving on a flat roadway. Figure 6.5 shows the banked roadway, 
with the center of the circular path of the car far to the left of the figure. Notice 
that the horizontal component of the normal force participates in causing the car’s 
centripetal acceleration.
Categorize As in Example 6.3, the car is modeled as a particle in equilibrium in 
the vertical direction and a particle in uniform circular motion in the horizontal 
direction.
Analyze On a level (unbanked) road, the force that causes the centripetal accelera-
tion is the force of static friction between tires and the road as we saw in the pre-
ceding example. If the road is banked at an angle u as in Figure 6.5, however, the 
AM
SoluTIoN
Figure 6.5 
(Example 6.4) A car 
moves into the page and is round-
ing a curve on a road banked at an 
angle u to the horizontal. When 
friction is neglected, the force that 
causes the centripetal accelera-
tion and keeps the car moving in 
its circular path is the horizontal 
component of the normal force.
n
x
n
y
u
u
F
g
S
n
S
▸ 6.3 
continued
Apply Equation 6.1 from the particle in uniform circular motion 
model in the radial direction for the maximum speed condition:
(1)   f
s,max
5m
s
n5m 
v2
max
r
Apply the particle in equilibrium model to the car in the verti-
cal direction:
o
F
y
5 0  S  n 2 mg 5 0  S  n 5 mg
Solve Equation (1) for the maximum speed and substitute for n:
(2)   v
max
5
Å
m
s
nr
m
5
Å
m
s
mgr
m
5"m
s
gr
Substitute numerical values:
v
max
5"
1
0.523
21
9.80 m/s2
21
35.0 m
2
5
13.4 m/s
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested