mvc display pdf in browser : Convert pdf to html email Library application component .net windows wpf mvc doc-3-pdf-67a5de9fa89738da0c6835ef457b5878-original23-part269

7.6 potential Energy of a System 
195
either stretched or compressed. Because the elastic potential energy is proportional 
to x2, we see that U
s
is always positive in a deformed spring. Everyday examples of 
the storage of elastic potential energy can be found in old-style clocks or watches 
that operate from a wound-up spring and small wind-up toys for children.
Consider Figure 7.16 once again, which shows a spring on a frictionless, hori-
zontal surface. When a block is pushed against the spring by an external agent, the 
elastic potential energy and the total energy of the system increase as indicated 
in Figure 7.16b. When the spring is compressed a distance x
max 
(Fig. 7.16c), the 
elastic potential energy stored in the spring is 
1
2
kx
2
max
. When the block is released 
from rest, the spring exerts a force on the block and pushes the block to the right. 
The elastic potential energy of the system decreases, whereas the kinetic energy 
increases and the total energy remains fixed (Fig. 7.16d). When the spring returns 
to its original length, the stored elastic potential energy is completely transformed 
into kinetic energy of the block (Fig. 7.16e).
No work is done on the 
spring–block system from 
the surroundings, so the 
total energy of the system 
stays constant.
x = 0
m
%
0
50
100
Potential
energy
Total
energy
Kinetic
energy
m
m
%
0
50
100
Potential
energy
Total
energy
Kinetic
energy
m
%
0
50
100
Potential
energy
Total
energy
Kinetic
energy
x = 0
m
%
0
50
100
Potential
energy
Total
energy
Kinetic
energy
m
%
0
50
100
Potential
energy
Total
energy
Kinetic
energy
v
S
v
S
Before the spring is 
compressed, there is no 
energy in the spring–block 
system.
When the spring is partially 
compressed, the total energy 
of the system is elastic 
potential energy.
The spring is compressed by a 
maximum amount, and the 
block is held steady; there is 
elastic potential energy in the 
system and no kinetic energy.
After the block is released, 
the elastic potential energy in 
the system decreases and the 
kinetic energy increases.
After the block loses contact 
with the spring, the total 
energy of the system is kinetic 
energy.
x
x
max
x
a
b
c
d
e
Figure 7.16 
A spring on a frictionless, horizontal surface is compressed a distance x
max
when a 
block of mass m is pushed against it. The block is then released and the spring pushes it to the right, 
where the block eventually loses contact with the spring. Parts (a) through (e) show various instants in 
the process. Energy bar charts on the right of each part of the figure help keep track of the energy in 
the system.
Convert pdf to html email - Convert PDF to html files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
How to Convert PDF to HTML Webpage with C# PDF Conversion SDK
embed pdf into webpage; convert pdf into html
Convert pdf to html email - VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
PDF to HTML Webpage Converter SDK for VB.NET PDF to HTML Conversion
convert pdf to html email; create html email from pdf
196
chapter 7 Energy of a System
uick Quiz 7.7  A ball is connected to a light spring suspended vertically as 
shown in Figure 7.17. When pulled downward from its equilibrium position and 
released, the ball oscillates up and down. (i) In the system of the ball, the spring, 
and the Earth, what forms of energy are there during the motion? (a) kinetic and 
elastic potential (b) kinetic and gravitational potential (c)kinetic, elastic poten-
tial, and gravitational potential (d) elastic potential and gravitational potential 
(ii) In the system of the ball and the spring, what forms of energy are there during 
the motion? Choose from the same possibilities (a) through (d).
Figure 7.18 
(a) A book sliding 
to the right on a horizontal sur-
face slows down in the presence of 
a force of kinetic friction acting to 
the left. (b) An energy bar chart 
showing the energy in the system 
of the book and the surface at the 
initial instant of time. The energy 
of the system is all kinetic energy. 
(c) While the book is sliding, 
the kinetic energy of the system 
decreases as it is transformed to 
internal energy. (d) After the 
book has stopped, the energy of 
the system is all internal energy.
Physics
Physics
i
k
x
v = 0
f
S
v
S
%
0
50
100
Internal
energy
Total
energy
Kinetic
energy
%
0
50
100
Internal
energy
Total
energy
Kinetic
energy
%
0
50
100
Internal
energy
Total
energy
Kinetic
energy
a
b
c
d
m
Figure 7.17 
(Quick Quiz 7.7) 
A ball connected to a massless 
spring suspended vertically. What 
forms of potential energy are asso-
ciated with the system when the 
ball is displaced downward?
Energy Bar Charts
Figure 7.16 shows an important graphical representation of information related 
to energy of systems called an energy bar chart. The vertical axis represents the 
amount of energy of a given type in the system. The horizontal axis shows the 
types of energy in the system. The bar chart in Figure 7.16a shows that the system 
contains zero energy because the spring is relaxed and the block is not moving. 
Between Figure 7.16a and Figure 7.16c, the hand does work on the system, com-
pressing the spring and storing elastic potential energy in the system. In Figure 
7.16d, the block has been released and is moving to the right while still in contact 
with the spring. The height of the bar for the elastic potential energy of the system 
decreases, the kinetic energy bar increases, and the total energy bar remains fixed. 
In Figure 7.16e, the spring has returned to its relaxed length and the system now 
contains only kinetic energy associated with the moving block.
Energy bar charts can be a very useful representation for keeping track of the 
various types of energy in a system. For practice, try making energy bar charts for 
the book–Earth system in Figure 7.15 when the book is dropped from the higher 
position. Figure 7.17 associated with Quick Quiz 7.7 shows another system for which 
drawing an energy bar chart would be a good exercise. We will show energy bar 
charts in some figures in this chapter. Some figures will not show a bar chart in the 
text but will include one in animated versions that appear in Enhanced WebAssign.
7.7 Conservative and Nonconservative Forces
We now introduce a third type of energy that a system can possess. Imagine that 
the book in Figure 7.18a has been accelerated by your hand and is now sliding to 
the right on the surface of a heavy table and slowing down due to the friction force. 
Suppose the surface is the system. Then the friction force from the sliding book 
does work on the surface. The force on the surface is to the right and the displace-
ment of the point of application of the force is to the right because the book has 
moved to the right. The work done on the surface is therefore positive, but the 
surface is not moving after the book has stopped. Positive work has been done on 
the surface, yet there is no increase in the surface’s kinetic energy or the potential 
energy of any system. So where is the energy?
From your everyday experience with sliding over surfaces with friction, you can 
probably guess that the surface will be warmer after the book slides over it. The 
work that was done on the surface has gone into warming the surface rather than 
increasing its speed or changing the configuration of a system. We call the energy 
associated with the temperature of a system its internal energy, symbolized E
int
(We will define internal energy more generally in Chapter 20.) In this case, the 
work done on the surface does indeed represent energy transferred into the sys-
tem, but it appears in the system as internal energy rather than kinetic or potential 
energy.
Now consider the book and the surface in Figure 7.18a together as a system. Ini-
tially, the system has kinetic energy because the book is moving. While the book is 
sliding, the internal energy of the system increases: the book and the surface are 
warmer than before. When the book stops, the kinetic energy has been completely 
RasterEdge.com General FAQs for Products
or need additional assistance, please contact us via email (support@rasteredge dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
convert pdf into html email; convert pdf to web page online
.NET RasterEdge XDoc.PDF Purchase Details
View, Convert, Edit, Process, Protect, SignPDF Files. PDF Print. Support Plans Each RasterEdge license comes with 1-year dedicated support (email, online chat
convert pdf to html code online; batch convert pdf to html
7.7 conservative and Nonconservative Forces 
197
transformed to internal energy. We can consider the nonconservative force within 
the system—that is, between the book and the surface—as a transformation mecha-
nism for energy. This nonconservative force transforms the kinetic energy of the sys-
tem into internal energy. Rub your hands together briskly to experience this effect!
Figures 7.18b through 7.18d show energy bar charts for the situation in Figure 
7.18a. In Figure 7.18b, the bar chart shows that the system contains kinetic energy 
at the instant the book is released by your hand. We define the reference amount of 
internal energy in the system as zero at this instant. Figure 7.18c shows the kinetic 
energy transforming to internal energy as the book slows down due to the friction 
force. In Figure 7.18d, after the book has stopped sliding, the kinetic energy is zero, 
and the system now contains only internal energy E
int
. Notice that the total energy 
bar in red has not changed during the process. The amount of internal energy in 
the system after the book has stopped is equal to the amount of kinetic energy in 
the system at the initial instant. This equality is described by an important prin-
ciple called conservation of energy. We will explore this principle in Chapter 8.
Now consider in more detail an object moving downward near the surface of the 
Earth. The work done by the gravitational force on the object does not depend on 
whether it falls vertically or slides down a sloping incline with friction. All that mat-
ters is the change in the object’s elevation. The energy transformation to internal 
energy due to friction on that incline, however, depends very much on the distance 
the object slides. The longer the incline, the more potential energy is transformed 
to internal energy. In other words, the path makes no difference when we consider 
the work done by the gravitational force, but it does make a difference when we 
consider the energy transformation due to friction forces. We can use this varying 
dependence on path to classify forces as either conservative or nonconservative. Of the 
two forces just mentioned, the gravitational force is conservative and the friction 
force is nonconservative.
Conservative Forces
Conservative forces have these two equivalent properties:
1. The work done by a conservative force on a particle moving between any 
two points is independent of the path taken by the particle.
2. The work done by a conservative force on a particle moving through any 
closed path is zero. (A closed path is one for which the beginning point and 
the endpoint are identical.)
The gravitational force is one example of a conservative force; the force that 
an ideal spring exerts on any object attached to the spring is another. The work 
done by the gravitational force on an object moving between any two points near 
the Earth’s surface is W
g
52mg
j
^
?
31
y
f
2y
i
2
j
^
4
5mgy
i
2mgy
f
. From this equation, 
notice that W
g
depends only on the initial and final y coordinates of the object and 
hence is independent of the path. Furthermore, W
g
is zero when the object moves 
over any closed path (where y
i
y
f
).
For the case of the object–spring system, the work W
s
done by the spring force is 
given by W
s
5
1
2
kx
i
22
1
2
kx
f
2 (Eq. 7.12). We see that the spring force is conservative 
because W
s
depends only on the initial and final x coordinates of the object and is 
zero for any closed path.
We can associate a potential energy for a system with a force acting between 
members of the system, but we can do so only if the force is conservative. In gen-
eral, the work W
int
done by a conservative force on an object that is a member of 
a system as the system changes from one configuration to another is equal to the 
initial value of the potential energy of the system minus the final value:
W
int
5U
i
2U
f
52DU 
(7.24)
The subscript “int” in Equation 7.24 reminds us that the work we are discussing is 
done by one member of the system on another member and is therefore internal to 
WW Properties of conservative 
forces
Pitfall Prevention 7.9
Similar Equation Warning Com-
pare Equation 7.24 with Equation 
7.20. These equations are similar 
except for the negative sign, which 
is a common source of confusion. 
Equation 7.20 tells us that posi-
tive work done by an outside agent 
on a system causes an increase in 
the potential energy of the system 
(with no change in the kinetic or 
internal energy). Equation 7.24 
states that positive work done on 
a component of a system by a con-
servative force internal to the system 
causes a decrease in the potential 
energy of the system.
About RasterEdge.com - A Professional Image Solution Provider
Email to: support@rasteredge.com. We are dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image to pdf files and components for
online pdf to html converter; convert pdf to html with
VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
Create editable Word file online without email. This VB.NET PDF to Word converter control is a and mature .NET solution which aims to convert PDF document to
convert pdf to html form; add pdf to website
198
chapter 7 Energy of a System
the system. It is different from the work W
ext
done on the system as a whole by an 
external agent. As an example, compare Equation 7.24 with the equation for the 
work done by an external agent on a block–spring system (Eq. 7.23) as the exten-
sion of the spring changes.
Nonconservative Forces
A force is nonconservative if it does not satisfy properties 1 and 2 above. The work 
done by a nonconservative force is path-dependent. We define the sum of the 
kinetic and potential energies of a system as the mechanical energy of the system:
E
mech
K 1 U 
(7.25)
where K includes the kinetic energy of all moving members of the system and U 
includes all types of potential energy in the system. For a book falling under the 
action of the gravitational force, the mechanical energy of the book–Earth system 
remains fixed; gravitational potential energy transforms to kinetic energy, and 
the total energy of the system remains constant. Nonconservative forces acting 
within a system, however, cause a change in the mechanical energy of the system. 
For example, for a book sent sliding on a horizontal surface that is not frictionless 
(Fig. 7.18a), the mechanical energy of the book–surface system is transformed to 
internal energy as we discussed earlier. Only part of the book’s kinetic energy is 
transformed to internal energy in the book. The rest appears as internal energy 
in the surface. (When you trip and slide across a gymnasium floor, not only does 
the skin on your knees warm up, so does the floor!) Because the force of kinetic 
friction transforms the mechanical energy of a system into internal energy, it is a 
nonconservative force.
As an example of the path dependence of the work for a nonconservative force, 
consider Figure 7.19. Suppose you displace a book between two points on a table. If 
the book is displaced in a straight line along the blue path between points A and 
B in Figure 7.19, you do a certain amount of work against the kinetic friction force 
to keep the book moving at a constant speed. Now, imagine that you push the book 
along the brown semicircular path in Figure 7.19. You perform more work against 
friction along this curved path than along the straight path because the curved 
path is longer. The work done on the book depends on the path, so the friction 
force cannot be conservative.
7.8  Relationship Between Conservative  
Forces and Potential Energy
In the preceding section, we found that the work done on a member of a system by 
a conservative force between the members of the system does not depend on the 
path taken by the moving member. The work depends only on the initial and final 
coordinates. For such a system, we can define a potential energy function U such 
that the work done within the system by the conservative force equals the negative of 
the change in the potential energy of the system according to Equation 7.24. Let us 
imagine a system of particles in which a conservative force F
S
acts between the par-
ticles. Imagine also that the configuration of the system changes due to the motion 
of one particle along the x axis. Then we can evaluate the internal work done by this 
force as the particle moves along the x axis4 using Equations 7.7 and 7.24:
W
int
5
3
x
f
x
i
F
x
dx52DU 
(7.26)
The work done in moving the 
book is greater along the brown 
path than along the blue path.
A
B
P
h
y
s
i
c
s
Figure 7.19 
The work done 
against the force of kinetic fric-
tion depends on the path taken as 
the book is moved from A to B.
4For a general displacement, the work done in two or three dimensions also equals 2DU, where U 5 U(xyz). We 
write this equation formally as W
int
5
e
f
i
F
S
?r
S
5U
i
2U
f
.
RasterEdge Product Refund Policy
send back RasterEdge Software Refund Agreement that we will email to you We are dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
how to add pdf to website; add pdf to website html
XDoc.Converter for .NET Purchase information
Convert PDF to Word. Convert to HTML. Convert to PDF. Convert to Text. Convert MS Office 03 to 07. Convert OpenOffice to MS Office. Other .NET Document Imaging SDK
convert fillable pdf to html form; convert pdf to url online
7.9 Energy Diagrams and Equilibrium of a System 
199
where F
x
is the component of F
S
in the direction of the displacement. We can also 
express Equation 7.26 as
DU5U
f
2U
i
52
3
x
f
x
i
F
x
dx 
(7.27)
Therefore, DU is negative when F
x
and dx are in the same direction, as when an 
object is lowered in a gravitational field or when a spring pushes an object toward 
equilibrium.
It is often convenient to establish some particular location x
i
of one member of a 
system as representing a reference configuration and measure all potential energy 
differences with respect to it. We can then define the potential energy function as
U
f
1
x
2
52
3
x
f
x
i
F
x
dx1U
i
(7.28)
The value of U
i
is often taken to be zero for the reference configuration. It does not 
matter what value we assign to U
i
because any nonzero value merely shifts U
f
(x) by 
a constant amount and only the change in potential energy is physically meaningful.
If the point of application of the force undergoes an infinitesimal displacement dx
we can express the infinitesimal change in the potential energy of the system dU as
dU 5 2F
x
dx
Therefore, the conservative force is related to the potential energy function 
through the relationship5
F
x
52
dU
dx
(7.29)
That is, the x component of a conservative force acting on a member within a   
system equals the negative derivative of the potential energy of the system with respect 
to x.
We can easily check Equation 7.29 for the two examples already discussed. In the 
case of the deformed spring, U
s
5
1
2
kx2; therefore,
F
s
52
dU
s
dx
52
d
dx
11
2
kx2
2
52kx
which corresponds to the restoring force in the spring (Hooke’s law). Because the 
gravitational potential energy function is U
g
mgy, it follows from Equation 7.29 
that F
g
5 2mg when we differentiate U
g
with respect to y instead of x.
We now see that U is an important function because a conservative force can be 
derived from it. Furthermore, Equation 7.29 should clarify that adding a constant 
to the potential energy is unimportant because the derivative of a constant is zero.
uick Quiz 7.8  What does the slope of a graph of U(x) versus x represent? (a)the 
magnitude of the force on the object (b) the negative of the magnitude of the 
force on the object (c) the x component of the force on the object (d) the nega-
tive of the x component of the force on the object
WW Relation of force between 
members of a system to  
the potential energy of  
the system
5In three dimensions, the expression is
F
S
52
'U
'x
i
^
2
'U
'y
j
^
2
'U
'z
k
^
where (0U/0x) and so forth are partial derivatives. In the language of vector calculus, F
S
equals the negative of the 
gradient of the scalar quantity U(xyz).
7.9 Energy Diagrams and Equilibrium of a System
The motion of a system can often be understood qualitatively through a graph of its 
potential energy versus the position of a member of the system. Consider the potential  
XDoc.HTML5 Viewer for .NET Purchase information
information. Have a Question Email us at. support@rasteredge.com. More Information Order Process FAQ. Tiff; Online Convert PDF to Html. SUPPORT: Customer
online convert pdf to html; conversion pdf to html
XDoc.Windows Viewer for .NET Purchase information
information. Have a Question Email us at. support@rasteredge.com. More Information Order Process FAQ. Tiff; Online Convert PDF to Html. SUPPORT: Customer
how to convert pdf to html email; convert pdf to html for online
200
chapter 7 Energy of a System
energy function for a block–spring system, given by U
s
5
1
2
kx2. This function is 
plotted versus x in Figure 7.20a, where x is the position of the block. The force F
s
exerted by the spring on the block is related to U
s
through Equation 7.29:
F
s
52
dU
s
dx
52kx
As we saw in Quick Quiz 7.8, the x component of the force is equal to the nega-
tive of the slope of the U-versus-x curve. When the block is placed at rest at the 
equilibrium position of the spring (x 5 0), where F
s
5 0, it will remain there unless 
some external force F
ext
acts on it. If this external force stretches the spring from 
equilibrium, x is positive and the slope dU/dx is positive; therefore, the force F
s
exerted by the spring is negative and the block accelerates back toward x 5 0 when 
released. If the external force compresses the spring, x is negative and the slope is 
negative; therefore, F
s
is positive and again the mass accelerates toward x 5 0 upon 
release.
From this analysis, we conclude that the x 5 0 position for a block–spring sys-
tem is one of stable equilibrium. That is, any movement away from this position 
results in a force directed back toward x 5 0. In general, configurations of a sys-
tem in stable equilibrium correspond to those for which U(x) for the system is a 
minimum.
If the block in Figure 7.20 is moved to an initial position x
max
and then released 
from rest, its total energy initially is the potential energy 
1
2
kx2
max
stored in the spring. 
As the block starts to move, the system acquires kinetic energy and loses potential 
energy. The block oscillates (moves back and forth) between the two points x 5 
2x
max
and x 5 1x
max
, called the turning points. In fact, because no energy is trans-
formed to internal energy due to friction, the block oscillates between 2x
max
and 
1x
max
forever. (We will discuss these oscillations further in Chapter 15.)
Another simple mechanical system with a configuration of stable equilibrium is 
a ball rolling about in the bottom of a bowl. Anytime the ball is displaced from its 
lowest position, it tends to return to that position when released.
Now consider a particle moving along the x axis under the influence of a conser-
vative force F
x
, where the U-versus-x curve is as shown in Figure 7.21. Once again,  
F
x
5 0 at x 5 0, and so the particle is in equilibrium at this point. This position, 
however, is one of unstable equilibrium for the following reason. Suppose the 
particle is displaced to the right (x . 0). Because the slope is negative for x . 0,  
F
x
5 2dU/dx is positive and the particle accelerates away from x 5 0. If instead the 
particle is at x 5 0 and is displaced to the left (x , 0), the force is negative because 
the slope is positive for x , 0 and the particle again accelerates away from the equi-
librium position. The position x 5 0 in this situation is one of unstable equilibrium 
because for any displacement from this point, the force pushes the particle farther 
away from equilibrium and toward a position of lower potential energy. A pencil 
balanced on its point is in a position of unstable equilibrium. If the pencil is dis-
placed slightly from its absolutely vertical position and is then released, it will surely 
fall over. In general, configurations of a system in unstable equilibrium correspond 
to those for which U(x) for the system is a maximum.
Finally, a configuration called neutral equilibrium arises when U is constant 
over some region. Small displacements of an object from a position in this region 
produce neither restoring nor disrupting forces. A ball lying on a flat, horizontal 
surface is an example of an object in neutral equilibrium.
0
x
U
Negative slope
Positive slope
< 0
> 0
Figure 7.21 
A plot of U versus  
x for a particle that has a position 
of unstable equilibrium located 
at x 5 0. For any finite displace-
ment of the particle, the force on 
the particle is directed away from 
x 5 0.
Pitfall Prevention 7.10
Energy Diagrams A common 
mistake is to think that potential 
energy on the graph in an energy 
diagram represents the height of 
some object. For example, that 
is not the case in Figure 7.20, 
where the block is only moving 
horizontally.
E
-x
max
0
U
s
x
= - kx
2
1
2
U
s
x
max
x
max
x = 0
m
F
s
S
The restoring force exerted by the 
spring always acts toward x = 0, 
the position of stable equilibrium.
a
b
Figure 7.20 
(a) Potential energy 
as a function of x for the friction-
less block–spring system shown in 
(b). For a given energy E of the sys-
tem, the block oscillates between 
the turning points, which have the 
coordinates x 5 6x
max
.
.NET RasterEdge XDoc.Dicom Purchase Details
information. Have a Question Email us at. support@rasteredge.com. More Information Order Process FAQ. Tiff; Online Convert PDF to Html. SUPPORT: Customer
convert pdf table to html; convert pdf form to html form
.NET RasterEdge XImage.Twain Purchase Details
information. Have a Question Email us at. support@rasteredge.com. More Information Order Process FAQ. Tiff; Online Convert PDF to Html. SUPPORT: Customer
pdf to html; convert pdf to html5
Summary 
201
Example 7.9   Force and Energy on an Atomic Scale
The potential energy associated with the force between two neutral atoms in a molecule can be modeled by the 
Lennard–Jones potential energy function:
U
1
x
2
54P
ca
s
x
b
12
2
a
s
x
b
6
d
where x is the separation of the atoms. The function U(x) contains two parameters s and P that are determined from 
experiments. Sample values for the interaction between two atoms in a molecule are s 5 0.263 nm and P 5 1.51 3 
10222J. Using a spreadsheet or similar tool, graph this function and find the most likely distance between the two atoms.
Conceptualize  We identify the two atoms in the molecule as a system. Based on our understanding that stable mol-
ecules exist, we expect to find stable equilibrium when the two atoms are separated by some equilibrium distance.
Categorize  Because a potential energy function exists, we categorize the force between the atoms as conservative. For 
a conservative force, Equation 7.29 describes the relationship between the force and the potential energy function.
Analyze  Stable equilibrium exists for a separation distance at which the potential energy of the system of two atoms 
(the molecule) is a minimum.
SoluTIon
Take the derivative of the function U(x):
dU
1
x
2
dx
54P 
d
dx
ca
s
x
b
12
2a
s
x
b
6
d 54Pc
212s12
x13
1
6s6
x7
d
Minimize the function U(x) by setting its derivative 
equal to zero:
4Pc
212s12
x
eq
13
1
6s6
x
eq
7
d 50    x
eq
5
1
2
21/6
s
Evaluate x
eq
, the equilibrium separation of the two 
atoms in the molecule:
x
eq
5
1
2
21/61
0.263 nm
2
5
2.95310210 m
We graph the Lennard–Jones function on both sides of 
this critical value to create our energy diagram as shown 
in Figure 7.22.
Finalize  Notice that U(x) is extremely large when the 
atoms are very close together, is a minimum when the 
atoms are at their critical separation, and then increases 
again as the atoms move apart. When U(x) is a minimum, 
the atoms are in stable equilibrium, indicating that the 
most likely separation between them occurs at this point.
continued
Summary
Definitions
system is most often a single parti-
cle, a collection of particles, or a region 
of space, and may vary in size and shape.  
system boundary separates the system 
from the environment.
The work W done on a system by an agent exerting a constant  
force F
S
on the system is the product of the magnitude Dr of the dis-
placement of the point of application of the force and the component 
F cos u of the force along the direction of the displacement Dr
S
:
W ; F Dr cos u 
(7.1)
–20
–10
0
3
4
5
6
x(10
-10 
m)
U(10
-23 
J)
x
eq
Figure 7.22 
(Example 7.9) Potential energy curve associated 
with a molecule. The distance x is the separation between the two 
atoms making up the molecule.
continued
202
chapter 7 Energy of a System
1. Alex and John are loading identical cabinets onto 
a truck. Alex lifts his cabinet straight up from the  
ground to the bed of the truck, whereas John slides  
his cabinet up a rough ramp to the truck. Which state-
ment is correct about the work done on the cabinet–
Earth system? (a) Alex and John do the same amount 
of work. (b) Alex does more work than John. (c) John 
does more work than Alex. (d) None of those state-
ments is necessarily true because the force of friction 
is unknown. (e) None of those statements is necessar-
ily true because the angle of the incline is unknown.
2. If the net work done by external forces on a particle is 
zero, which of the following statements about the par-
ticle must be true? (a) Its velocity is zero. (b) Its veloc-
ity is decreased. (c) Its velocity is unchanged. (d) Its 
speed is unchanged. (e) More information is needed.
The kinetic energy of a particle of 
mass m moving with a speed v is
K;1
2
mv2 
(7.16)
The total mechanical energy of  
a system is defined as the sum of 
the kinetic energy and the potential 
energy:
E
mech
 ; K 1 U 
(7.25)
If a particle of mass m is at a distance y above the Earth’s surface, the 
gravitational potential energy of the particle–Earth system is
U
g
mgy 
(7.19)
The elastic potential energy stored in a spring of force constant k is
U
s
;
1
2
kx2 
(7.22)
A force is conservative if the work it does on a particle that is a member 
of the system as the particle moves between two points is independent of 
the path the particle takes between the two points. Furthermore, a force 
is conservative if the work it does on a particle is zero when the particle 
moves through an arbitrary closed path and returns to its initial position. 
A force that does not meet these criteria is said to be nonconservative.
The scalar product (dot product) of two  
vectors A
S
and B
S
is defined by the relationship
A
S
?B
S
;AB cos u 
(7.2)
where the result is a scalar quantity and u is the 
angle between the two vectors. The scalar product 
obeys the commutative and distributive laws.
If a varying force does work on a particle as the particle 
moves along the x axis from x
i
to x
f
, the work done by the 
force on the particle is given by
W5
3
x
f
x
i
F
x
dx 
(7.7)
where F
x
is the component of force in the x direction.
Concepts and Principles
potential energy function U can be associated only with 
a conservative force. If a conservative force F
S
acts between 
members of a system while one member moves along the x 
axis from x
i
to x
f
, the change in the potential energy of the 
system equals the negative of the work done by that force:
U
f
2U
i
52
3
x
f
x
i
F
x
dx 
(7.27)
Configurations of 
unstable equilibrium 
correspond to those for 
which U(x) is a maximum. 
Neutral equilibrium 
arises when U is constant 
as a member of the system 
moves over some region.
The work–kinetic energy theorem states that 
if work is done on a system by external forces and 
the only change in the system is in its speed,
W
ext
5K
f
2K
i
5DK5
1
2
mv
f
2
1
2
mv
i
2 
(7.15, 7.17)
Systems can be in three types of equilibrium con-
figurations when the net force on a member of the 
system is zero. Configurations of stable equilibrium 
correspond to those for which U(x) is a minimum. 
Objective Questions
1. 
denotes answer available in Student Solutions Manual/Study Guide
Objective Questions 
203
3. A worker pushes a wheelbarrow with a horizontal 
force of 50 N on level ground over a distance of 5.0 m.  
If a friction force of 43 N acts on the wheelbarrow 
in a direction opposite that of the worker, what work 
is done on the wheelbarrow by the worker? (a) 250 J 
(b) 215 J (c) 35 J (d) 10 J (e)None of those answers is 
correct.
4. A cart is set rolling across a level table, at the same 
speed on every trial. If it runs into a patch of sand, the 
cart exerts on the sand an average horizontal force of  
6 N and travels a distance of 6 cm through the sand as 
it comes to a stop. If instead the cart runs into a patch 
of gravel on which the cart exerts an average horizon-
tal force of 9 N, how far into the gravel will the cart roll 
before stopping? (a) 9 cm (b)6cm (c) 4 cm (d) 3 cm 
(e) none of those answers
5. Let N
^
represent the direction horizontally north, 
NE represent northeast (halfway between north and 
east), and so on. Each direction specification can be 
thought of as a unit vector. Rank from the largest to 
the smallest the following dot products. Note that zero 
is larger than a negative number. If two quantities 
are equal, display that fact in your ranking. (a) N
^
?N
^
(b) N
^
?NE (c) N
^
?S
^
(d) N
^
?E
^
(e) SE?S
^
6. Is the work required to be done by an external force 
on an object on a frictionless, horizontal surface to 
accelerate it from a speed v to a speed 2v (a) equal to 
the work required to accelerate the object from v 5 0  
to v, (b) twice the work required to accelerate the 
object from v 5 0 to v, (c) three times the work required 
to accelerate the object from v50 to v, (d) four  
times the work required to accelerate the object from 
0 to v, or (e) not known without knowledge of the 
acceleration?
7. A block of mass m is dropped from the fourth floor of 
an office building and hits the sidewalk below at speed 
v. From what floor should the block be dropped to 
double that impact speed? (a) the sixth floor (b) the 
eighth floor (c) the tenth floor (d) the twelfth floor  
(e) the sixteenth floor
8. As a simple pendulum swings back and forth, the 
forces acting on the suspended object are (a) the gravi-
tational force, (b) the tension in the supporting cord, 
and (c) air resistance. (i) Which of these forces, if any, 
does no work on the pendulum at any time? (ii) Which 
of these forces does negative work on the pendulum at 
all times during its motion?
9. Bullet 2 has twice the mass of bullet 1. Both are fired so 
that they have the same speed. If the kinetic energy of 
bullet 1 is K, is the kinetic energy of bullet 2 (a) 0.25K, 
(b)0.5K, (c)0.71K, (d) K, or (e) 2K?
10. Figure OQ7.10 shows a light extended spring exerting 
a force F
s
to the left on a block. (i) Does the block exert 
a force on the spring? Choose every correct answer. 
(a) No, it doesn’t. (b) Yes, it does, to the left. (c) Yes, 
it does, to the right. (d) Yes, it does, and its magni-
tude is larger than F
s
. (e) Yes, it does, and its magni-
tude is equal to F
s
(ii) Does the spring exert a force 
7
7
7
on the wall? Choose your answers from the same list  
(a) through (e).
11. If the speed of a particle is doubled, what happens to 
its kinetic energy? (a) It becomes four times larger. 
(b) It becomes two times larger. (c) It becomes !2
times larger. (d) It is unchanged. (e) It becomes half 
as large.
12. Mark and David are loading identical cement blocks 
onto David’s pickup truck. Mark lifts his block straight 
up from the ground to the truck, whereas David slides 
his block up a ramp containing frictionless rollers. 
Which statement is true about the work done on the 
block–Earth system? (a) Mark does more work than 
David. (b) Mark and David do the same amount of 
work. (c) David does more work than Mark. (d) None 
of those statements is necessarily true because the 
angle of the incline is unknown. (e) None of those 
statements is necessarily true because the mass of one 
block is not given.
13. (i) Rank the gravitational accelerations you would mea-
sure for the following falling objects: (a) a 2-kg object 
5 cm above the floor, (b) a 2-kg object 120 cm above 
the floor, (c) a 3-kg object 120 cm above the floor, and 
(d) a 3-kg object 80 cm above the floor. List the one 
with the largest magnitude of acceleration first. If any 
are equal, show their equality in your list. (ii) Rank the 
gravitational forces on the same four objects, listing 
the one with the largest magnitude first. (iii) Rank the 
gravitational potential energies (of the object–Earth 
system) for the same four objects, largest first, taking  
y 5 0 at the floor.
14. A certain spring that obeys Hooke’s law is stretched 
by an external agent. The work done in stretching the 
spring by 10 cm is 4 J. How much additional work is 
required to stretch the spring an additional 10 cm?  
(a) 2 J (b) 4 J (c) 8 J (d) 12 J (e) 16 J
15. A cart is set rolling across a level table, at the same 
speed on every trial. If it runs into a patch of sand, the 
cart exerts on the sand an average horizontal force of 
6 N and travels a distance of 6 cm through the sand as 
it comes to a stop. If instead the cart runs into a patch 
of flour, it rolls an average of 18 cm before stopping. 
What is the average magnitude of the horizontal force 
the cart exerts on the flour? (a) 2 N (b) 3 N (c) 6 N  
(d) 18 N (e) none of those answers
16. An ice cube has been given a push and slides without 
friction on a level table. Which is correct? (a) It is in sta-
ble equilibrium. (b) It is in unstable equilibrium. (c) It  
is in neutral equilibrium. (d) It is not in equilibrium.
x
x = 0
x
x
F
s
S
Figure oQ7.10
204
chapter 7 Energy of a System
8. If only one external force acts on a particle, does it nec-
essarily change the particle’s (a) kinetic energy? (b) Its 
velocity?
9. Preparing to clean them, you pop all the removable 
keys off a computer keyboard. Each key has the shape 
of a tiny box with one side open. By accident, you spill 
the keys onto the floor. Explain why many more keys 
land letter-side down than land open-side down.
10. You are reshelving books in a library. You lift a book 
from the floor to the top shelf. The kinetic energy of 
the book on the floor was zero and the kinetic energy 
of the book on the top shelf is zero, so no change 
occurs in the kinetic energy, yet you did some work in 
lifting the book. Is the work–kinetic energy theorem 
violated? Explain.
11. A certain uniform spring has spring constant k. Now 
the spring is cut in half. What is the relationship 
between k and the spring constant k9 of each resulting 
smaller spring? Explain your reasoning.
12. What shape would the graph of U versus x have if a par-
ticle were in a region of neutral equilibrium?
13. Does the kinetic energy of an object depend on the 
frame of reference in which its motion is measured? 
Provide an example to prove this point.
14. Cite two examples in which a force is exerted on an 
object without doing any work on the object.
1. Can a normal force do work? If not, why not? If so, give 
an example.
2. Object 1 pushes on object 2 as the objects move 
together, like a bulldozer pushing a stone. Assume 
object 1 does 15.0J of work on object 2. Does object 2 
do work on object 1? Explain your answer. If possible, 
determine how much work and explain your reasoning.
3. A student has the idea that the total work done on an 
object is equal to its final kinetic energy. Is this idea true  
always, sometimes, or never? If it is sometimes true, 
under what circumstances? If it is always or never  
true, explain why.
4. (a) For what values of the angle u between two vectors 
is their scalar product positive? (b) For what values of u 
is their scalar product negative?
5. Can kinetic energy be negative? Explain.
6. Discuss the work done by a pitcher throwing a baseball. 
What is the approximate distance through which the 
force acts as the ball is thrown?
7. Discuss whether any work is being done by each of the 
following agents and, if so, whether the work is posi-
tive or negative. (a) a chicken scratching the ground 
(b) a person studying (c) a crane lifting a bucket of 
concrete (d)the gravitational force on the bucket in 
part (c) (e) the leg muscles of a person in the act of 
sitting down
Section 7.2 Work Done by a Constant Force
1. A shopper in a supermarket pushes a cart with a  
force of 35.0 N directed at an angle of 25.08 below 
the horizontal. The force is just sufficient to bal-
ance various friction forces, so the cart moves at con-
stant speed. (a) Find the work done by the shopper 
on the cart as she moves down a 50.0-m-long aisle.  
(b) The shopper goes down the next aisle, pushing hor-
izontally and maintaining the same speed as before.  
If the friction force doesn’t change, would the shop-
per’s applied force be larger, smaller, or the same? 
(c) What about the work done on the cart by the 
shopper?
2. A raindrop of mass 3.35 3 1025 kg falls vertically at 
constant speed under the influence of gravity and 
air resistance. Model the drop as a particle. As it falls  
Q/C
W
100 m, what is the work done on the raindrop (a) by 
the gravitational force and (b) by air resistance?
3. In 1990, Walter Arfeuille of Belgium lifted a 281.5-kg 
object through a distance of 17.1 cm using only his 
teeth. (a) How much work was done on the object by 
Arfeuille in this lift, assuming the object was lifted at 
constant speed? (b) What total force was exerted on 
Arfeuille’s teeth during the lift?
4. The record number of boat lifts, including the boat 
and its ten crew members, was achieved by Sami Hei-
nonen and Juha Räsänen of Sweden in 2000. They 
lifted a total mass of 653.2 kg approximately 4 in. off 
the ground a total of 24 times. Estimate the total work 
done by the two men on the boat in this record lift, 
ignoring the negative work done by the men when they 
lowered the boat back to the ground.
Conceptual Questions
1. 
denotes answer available in Student Solutions Manual/Study Guide
Problems
The problems found in this  
chapter may be assigned 
online in Enhanced WebAssign
1.
 straightforward; 
2. 
intermediate;  
3. 
challenging
1.
full solution available in the Student 
Solutions Manual/Study Guide
AMT
Analysis Model tutorial available in 
Enhanced WebAssign
GP
Guided Problem
M
Master It tutorial available in Enhanced 
WebAssign
W
Watch It video solution available in 
Enhanced WebAssign
BIO
Q/C
S
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested