mvc display pdf in browser : Convert pdf to html5 software SDK dll winforms wpf windows web forms doc-3-pdf-67a5de9fa89738da0c6835ef457b5878-original31-part279

9.8 Deformable Systems 
275
to calculate the kinetic energy before and after the event in this example, you would find that the kinetic energy of 
the system increases. (Try it!) This increase in kinetic energy comes from the potential energy stored in whatever fuel 
exploded to cause the breakup of the rocket.
▸ 9.14 
continued
9.8 Deformable Systems
So far in our discussion of mechanics, we have analyzed the motion of particles or 
nondeformable systems that can be modeled as particles. The discussion in Section 
9.7 can be applied to an analysis of the motion of deformable systems. For example, 
suppose you stand on a skateboard and push off a wall, setting yourself in motion 
away from the wall. Your body has deformed during this event: your arms were bent 
before the event, and they straightened out while you pushed off the wall. How 
would we describe this event?
The force from the wall on your hands moves through no displacement; the 
force is always located at the interface between the wall and your hands. Therefore, 
the force does no work on the system, which is you and your skateboard. Pushing 
off the wall, however, does indeed result in a change in the kinetic energy of the 
system. If you try to use the work–kinetic energy theorem, W 5 DK, to describe this 
event, you will notice that the left side of the equation is zero but the right side is 
not zero. The work–kinetic energy theorem is not valid for this event and is often 
not valid for systems that are deformable. 
To analyze the motion of deformable systems, we appeal to Equation 8.2, the 
conservation of energy equation, and Equation 9.40, the impulse–momentum the-
orem. For the example of you pushing off the wall on your skateboard, identifying 
the system as you and the skateboard, Equation 8.2 gives
DE
system
o
T S DK 1 DU 5 0
where DK is the change in kinetic energy, which is related to the increased speed 
of the system, and DU is the decrease in potential energy stored in the body from 
previous meals. This equation tells us that the system transformed potential energy 
into kinetic energy by virtue of the muscular exertion necessary to push off the 
wall. Notice that the system is isolated in terms of energy but nonisolated in terms 
of momentum.
Applying Equation 9.40 to the system in this situation gives us
Dp
S
tot
5
I
S
m Dv
S
5
3
F
S
wall
dt
where F
S
wall
is the force exerted by the wall on your hands, m is the mass of you and 
the skateboard, and Dv
S
is the change in the velocity of the system during the event. 
To evaluate the right side of this equation, we would need to know how the force 
from the wall varies in time. In general, this process might be complicated. In the 
case of constant forces, or well-behaved forces, however, the integral on the right 
side of the equation can be evaluated.
Example 9.15   Pushing on a Spring
3
As shown in Figure 9.22a (page 276), two blocks are at rest on a frictionless, level table. Both blocks have the same 
mass m, and they are connected by a spring of negligible mass. The separation distance of the blocks when the spring 
is relaxed is L. During a time interval Dt, a constant force of magnitude F is applied horizontally to the left block,  
AM
3Example 9.15 was inspired in part by C. E. Mungan, “A primer on work–energy relationships for introductory physics,” The Physics Teacher 43:10, 2005.
continued
Convert pdf to html5 - Convert PDF to html files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
How to Convert PDF to HTML Webpage with C# PDF Conversion SDK
convert pdf table to html; convert pdf to web
Convert pdf to html5 - VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
PDF to HTML Webpage Converter SDK for VB.NET PDF to HTML Conversion
convert pdf to html5 open source; embed pdf into website
276
Chapter 9 Linear Momentum and Collisions
moving it through a distance x
1
as shown in Figure 9.22b. During this time inter-
val, the right block moves through a distance x
2
. At the end of this time interval, 
the force F is removed.
(A)  Find the resulting speed v
S
CM
of the center of mass of the system.
Conceptualize Imagine what happens as you push on the left block. It begins to 
move to the right in Figure 9.22, and the spring begins to compress. As a result, the 
spring pushes to the right on the right block, which begins to move to the right. At 
any given time, the blocks are generally moving with different velocities. As the cen-
ter of mass of the system moves to the right with a constant speed after the force is 
removed, the two blocks oscillate back and forth with respect to the center of mass.
Categorize  We apply three analysis models in this problem: the deformable sys-
tem of two blocks and a spring is modeled as a nonisolated system in terms of energy 
because work is being done on it by the applied force. It is also modeled as a noniso-
lated system in terms of momentum because of the force acting on the system during 
a time interval. Because the applied force on the system is constant, the acceleration of its center of mass is constant 
and the center of mass is modeled as a particle under constant acceleration.
Analyze  Using the nonisolated system (momentum) model, we apply the impulse–momentum theorem to the system 
of two blocks, recognizing that the force F is constant during the time interval Dt while the force is applied.
SoluTIoN
Write Equation 9.40 for the system:
Dp
x
5I
x
  
1
2m
21
v
CM
20
2
F Dt
(1)   2mv
CM
F Dt
During the time interval Dt, the center of mass of the sys-
tem moves a distance 
1
2
1
x
1
1x
2
2
. Use this fact to express 
the time interval in terms of v
CM,avg
:
Dt5
1
2
1
x
1
1x
2
2
v
CM,avg
Because the center of mass is modeled as a particle 
under constant acceleration, the average velocity of the 
center of mass is the average of the initial velocity, which 
is zero, and the final velocity v
CM
:
Dt5
1
2
1
x
1
1x
2
2
1
2
1
01v
CM
2
5
1
x
1
1x
2
2
v
CM
Substitute this expression into Equation (1):
2mv
CM
5F  
1
x
1
1x
2
2
v
CM
Solve for v
CM
:
v
CM
Å
F  
1
x
1
1x
2
2
2m
(B) Find the total energy of the system associated with vibration relative to its center of mass after the force F is 
removed.
Analyze  The vibrational energy is all the energy of the system other than the kinetic energy associated with transla-
tional motion of the center of mass. To find the vibrational energy, we apply the conservation of energy equation. The 
kinetic energy of the system can be expressed as K 5 K
CM
K
vib
, where K
vib
is the kinetic energy of the blocks relative 
to the center of mass due to their vibration. The potential energy of the system is U
vib
, which is the potential energy 
stored in the spring when the separation of the blocks is some value other than L.
SoluTIoN
From the nonisolated system (energy) model, express 
Equation 8.2 for this system:
(2)   DK
CM
1 DK
vib
1 DU
vib
W
▸ 9.15 
continued
m
m
L
F
x
2
x
1
m
m
a
b
Figure 9.22 
(Example 9.15)  
(a) Two blocks of equal mass are 
connected by a spring. (b) The left 
block is pushed with a constant 
force of magnitude F and moves a 
distance x
1
during some time inter-
val. During this same time interval, 
the right block moves through a 
distance x
2
.
Online Convert PDF to HTML5 files. Best free online PDF html
Online PDF to HTML5 Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF file to HTML. Just upload your file by clicking on the blue button
best pdf to html converter; attach pdf to html
XDoc.HTML5 Viewer for .NET, Zero Footprint AJAX Document Image
View, Convert, Edit, Sign Documents and Images. Online Demo See the HTML5 Viewer SDK for .NET in powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image to
adding pdf to html page; change pdf to html format
9.9 rocket propulsion 
277
M + ∆m
M
m
v
S
v
S
v
S
a
b
p
S
v
S
i
= (M + ∆m)
Figure 9.23 
Rocket propul-
sion. (a)The initial mass of the 
rocket plus all its fuel is M 1 Dm 
at a time t, and its speed is v. 
(b) At a time t 1 Dt, the rocket’s 
mass has been reduced to M 
and an amount of fuel Dm has 
been ejected. The rocket’s speed 
increases by an amount Dv.
Express Equation (2) in an alternate form, noting that 
K
vib
U
vib
E
vib
:
DK
CM
1 DE
vib
W
The initial values of the kinetic energy of the center of 
mass and the vibrational energy of the system are zero. 
Use this fact and substitute for the work done on the sys-
tem by the force F:
K
CM
E
vib
Fx
1
Solve for the vibrational energy and use the result from 
part (A):
E
vib
5Fx
1
2K
CM
5Fx
1
2
1
2
1
2m
2
v
CM
5
F  
1x
1
2x
2
2
2
Finalize  Neither of the two answers in this example depends on the spring length, the spring constant, or the time 
interval. Notice also that the magnitude x
1
of the displacement of the point of application of the applied force is differ-
ent from the magnitude 
1
2
1
x
1
1x
2
2
of the displacement of the center of mass of the system. This difference reminds us 
that the displacement in the definition of work (Eq. 7.1) is that of the point of application of the force.
9.9 Rocket Propulsion
When ordinary vehicles such as cars are propelled, the driving force for the motion 
is friction. In the case of the car, the driving force is the force exerted by the road 
on the car. We can model the car as a nonisolated system in terms of momentum. 
An impulse is applied to the car from the roadway, and the result is a change in the 
momentum of the car as described by Equation 9.40.
A rocket moving in space, however, has no road to push against. The rocket is an 
isolated system in terms of momentum. Therefore, the source of the propulsion of 
a rocket must be something other than an external force. The operation of a rocket 
depends on the law of conservation of linear momentum as applied to an isolated 
system, where the system is the rocket plus its ejected fuel.
Rocket propulsion can be understood by first considering our archer standing 
on frictionless ice in Example 9.1. Imagine the archer fires several arrows hori-
zontally. For each arrow fired, the archer receives a compensating momentum 
in the opposite direction. As more arrows are fired, the archer moves faster and 
faster across the ice. In addition to this analysis in terms of momentum, we can also 
understand this phenomenon in terms of Newton’s second and third laws. Every 
time the bow pushes an arrow forward, the arrow pushes the bow (and the archer) 
backward, and these forces result in an acceleration of the archer.
In a similar manner, as a rocket moves in free space, its linear momentum 
changes when some of its mass is ejected in the form of exhaust gases. Because 
the gases are given momentum when they are ejected out of the engine, the rocket 
receives a compensating momentum in the opposite direction. Therefore, the 
rocket is accelerated as a result of the “push,” or thrust, from the exhaust gases. In 
free space, the center of mass of the system (rocket plus expelled gases) moves uni-
formly, independent of the propulsion process.4
Suppose at some time t the magnitude of the momentum of a rocket plus its fuel 
is (M 1 Dm)v, where v is the speed of the rocket relative to the Earth (Fig. 9.23a). 
Over a short time interval Dt, the rocket ejects fuel of mass Dm. At the end of this 
interval, the rocket’s mass is M and its speed is v 1 Dv, where Dv is the change in 
speed of the rocket (Fig. 9.23b). If the fuel is ejected with a speed v
e
relative to 
4The rocket and the archer represent cases of the reverse of a perfectly inelastic collision: momentum is conserved, 
but the kinetic energy of the rocket–exhaust gas system increases (at the expense of chemical potential energy in 
the fuel), as does the kinetic energy of the archer–arrow system (at the expense of potential energy from the archer’s 
previous meals).
▸ 9.15 
continued
The force from a nitrogen-
propelled hand-controlled device 
allows an astronaut to move about 
freely in space without restrictive 
tethers, using the thrust force 
from the expelled nitrogen.
C
o
u
r
t
e
s
y
o
f
N
A
S
A
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer. 3. Export To HTML5. Export and convert PDF to HTML5 file. 4. Export To DOCX.
convert pdf to website html; online convert pdf to html
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to
C# PDF - Convert PDF Online with C#.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer. 3. Export To HTML5. Export and convert PDF to HTML5 file. 4. Export To DOCX. Export PDF to DOCX document
convert pdf to html email; convert pdf into html
278
Chapter 9 Linear Momentum and Collisions
the rocket (the subscript e stands for exhaust, and v
e
is usually called the exhaust 
speed), the velocity of the fuel relative to the Earth is v 2 v
e
. Because the system of 
the rocket and the ejected fuel is isolated, we apply the isolated system model for 
momentum and obtain
Dp 5 0   S   p
i
p
f
  
1
M1Dm
2
v5M
1
v1Dv
2
1Dm
1
v2v
e
2
Simplifying this expression gives
M Dv5v
e
Dm 
If we now take the limit as Dt goes to zero, we let Dv S dv and Dm S dm. Fur-
thermore, the increase in the exhaust mass dm corresponds to an equal decrease in 
the rocket mass, so dm 5 2dM. Notice that dM is negative because it represents a 
decrease in mass, so 2dM is a positive number. Using this fact gives
M dv 5 v
e
dm 5 2v
e
dM 
(9.43)
Now divide the equation by M and integrate, taking the initial mass of the rocket 
plus fuel to be M
i
and the final mass of the rocket plus its remaining fuel to be M
f
The result is
3
v
f
v
i
dv52v
e
3
M
f
M
i
dM
M
v
f
2v
i
5v
e
lna
M
i
M
f
(9.44)
which is the basic expression for rocket propulsion. First, Equation 9.44 tells us that 
the increase in rocket speed is proportional to the exhaust speed v
e
of the ejected 
gases. Therefore, the exhaust speed should be very high. Second, the increase in 
rocket speed is proportional to the natural logarithm of the ratio M
i
/M
f
. There-
fore, this ratio should be as large as possible; that is, the mass of the rocket without 
its fuel should be as small as possible and the rocket should carry as much fuel as 
possible.
The thrust on the rocket is the force exerted on it by the ejected exhaust gases. 
We obtain the following expression for the thrust from Newton’s second law and 
Equation 9.43:
Thrust5M 
dv
dt
5 `v
e
dM
dt
(9.45)
This expression shows that the thrust increases as the exhaust speed increases and 
as the rate of change of mass (called the burn rate) increases.
Expression for rocket  
propulsion
Example 9.16   Fighting a Fire
Two firefighters must apply a total force of 600 N to steady a hose that is discharging water at the rate of 3 600 L/min. 
Estimate the speed of the water as it exits the nozzle.
Conceptualize  As the water leaves the hose, it acts in a way similar to the gases being ejected from a rocket engine. As a 
result, a force (thrust) acts on the firefighters in a direction opposite the direction of motion of the water. In this case, 
we want the end of the hose to be modeled as a particle in equilibrium rather than to accelerate as in the case of the 
rocket. Consequently, the firefighters must apply a force of magnitude equal to the thrust in the opposite direction to 
keep the end of the hose stationary.
Categorize  This example is a substitution problem in which we use given values in an equation derived in this section. 
The water exits at 3 600 L/min, which is 60 L/s. Knowing that 1 L of water has a mass of 1 kg, we estimate that about 
60kg of water leaves the nozzle each second.
SoluTIoN
XDoc.HTML5 Viewer, Create Web Doc & Image Viewer in C#.NET
RasterEdge. PRODUCTS: ONLINE DEMOS: Online HTML5 Document Viewer; Online XDoc.PDF Demo▶: Convert PDF to Word; Convert PDF to Tiff; Convert PDF to HTML;
convert pdf to html open source; convert fillable pdf to html form
VB.NET PDF- HTML5 PDF Viewer for VB.NET Project
Convert PDF Online in HTML5 PDF Viewer. With RasterEdge VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer, users can directly convert and export PDF to Tiff
convert pdf form to web form; convert pdf to html
Summary 
279
Use Equation 9.45 for the thrust:
Thrust5
`
v
e
dM
dt
`
Solve for the exhaust speed: 
v
e
5
Thrust
0
dM/dt
0
Substitute numerical values:
v
e
5
600 N
60 kg/s
5
10 m/s
Solve Equation 9.44 for the final velocity and substitute 
the known values:
v
f
5v
i
1v
e
ln
a
M
i
M
f
b
53.03103 m/s1
1
5.03103 m/s
2
lna
M
i
0.50M
i
b
5   6.5 3 103 m/s
(B)  What is the thrust on the rocket if it burns fuel at the rate of 50 kg/s?
Use Equation 9.45, noting that dM/dt 5 50 kg/s:
Thrust5 `v
e
dM
dt
`5
1
5.03103 m/s
21
50 kg/s
2
2.53105 N
SoluTIoN
continued
▸ 9.16 
continued
Example 9.17   A Rocket in Space
A rocket moving in space, far from all other objects, has a speed of 3.0 3 103 m/s relative to the Earth. Its engines are 
turned on, and fuel is ejected in a direction opposite the rocket’s motion at a speed of 5.0 3 103 m/s relative to the 
rocket.
(A)  What is the speed of the rocket relative to the Earth once the rocket’s mass is reduced to half its mass before 
ignition?
Conceptualize  Figure 9.23 shows the situation in this problem. From the discussion in this section and scenes from sci-
ence fiction movies, we can easily imagine the rocket accelerating to a higher speed as the engine operates.
Categorize  This problem is a substitution problem in which we use given values in the equations derived in this section.
SoluTIoN
Summary
Definitions
The linear momentum p
S
of a particle of mass m 
moving with a velocity v
S
is
p
S
;mv
S
(9.2)
The impulse imparted to a particle by a net force 
gF
S
is equal to the time integral of the force:
I
S
;
3
t
f
t
i
a
F
S
dt 
(9.9)
VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.
RasterEdge. PRODUCTS: ONLINE DEMOS: Online HTML5 Document Viewer; Online XDoc.PDF Demo▶: Convert PDF to Word; Convert PDF to Tiff; Convert PDF to HTML;
convert pdf to html code c#; convert fillable pdf to html
C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
C# PDF - Convert PDF to JPEG in C#.NET. C#.NET PDF to JPEG Converting & Conversion Control. Convert PDF to JPEG Using C#.NET. Add necessary references:
convert pdf to web page; convert pdf to html online
280
Chapter 9 Linear Momentum and Collisions
An inelastic collision is one for which the 
total kinetic energy of the system of colliding 
particles is not conserved. A perfectly inelastic 
collision is one in which the colliding particles 
stick together after the collision. An elastic col-
lision is one in which the kinetic energy of the 
system is conserved.
The position vector of the center of mass of a system of par-
ticles is defined as
r
S
CM
;
1
M
a
i
m
i
r
S
i
(9.31)
where M 5 S
i
m
i
is the total mass of the system and r
S
i
is the 
position vector of the ith particle.
Concepts and Principles
Newton’s second law applied to a system of 
particles is
a
F
S
ext
5Ma
S
CM
(9.39)
where a
S
CM
is the acceleration of the center of 
mass and the sum is over all external forces. 
The center of mass moves like an imaginary 
particle of mass M under the influence of the 
resultant external force on the system.
The position vector of the center of mass of an extended 
object can be obtained from the integral expression
r
S
CM
5
1
M
3
r
S
dm 
(9.34)
The velocity of the center of mass for a system of particles is
v
S
CM
5
1
M
a
i
m
i
v
S
i
(9.35)
The total momentum of a system of particles equals the total 
mass multiplied by the velocity of the center of mass.
Analysis Models for Problem Solving
Isolated System (Momentum).  The total momentum of an 
isolated system (no external forces) is conserved regardless of 
the nature of the forces between the members of the system:
Dp
S
tot
50 
(9.41)
The system may be isolated in terms of momentum but 
nonisolated in terms of energy, as in the case of inelastic 
collisions.
Nonisolated System (Momentum).  If a sys-
tem interacts with its environment in the sense 
that there is an external force on the system, 
the behavior of the system is described by the 
impulse–momentum theorem:
Dp
S
tot
I
S
(9.40)
Momentum
System
boundary
Impulse
The change in the total 
momentum of the system 
is equal to the total 
impulse on the system.
Momentum
System
boundary
If no external forces act on the 
system, the total momentum of 
the system is constant.
Objective Questions 
281
1. You are standing on a saucer-shaped sled at rest in the 
middle of a frictionless ice rink. Your lab partner throws 
you a heavy Frisbee. You take different actions in succes-
sive experimental trials. Rank the following situations 
according to your final speed from largest to smallest. 
If your final speed is the same in two cases, give them 
equal rank. (a)You catch the Frisbee and hold onto it. 
(b) You catch the Frisbee and throw it back to your part-
ner. (c) You bobble the catch, just touching the Frisbee 
so that it continues in its original direction more slowly. 
(d) You catch the Frisbee and throw it so that it moves 
vertically upward above your head. (e) You catch the Fris-
bee and set it down so that it remains at rest on the ice.
2. A boxcar at a rail yard is set into motion at the top of 
a hump. The car rolls down quietly and without fric-
tion onto a straight, level track where it couples with 
a flatcar of smaller mass, originally at rest, so that the 
two cars then roll together without friction. Consider 
the two cars as a system from the moment of release of 
the boxcar until both are rolling together. Answer the 
following questions yes or no. (a) Is mechanical energy 
of the system conserved? (b) Is momentum of the sys-
tem conserved? Next, consider only the process of the 
boxcar gaining speed as it rolls down the hump. For 
the boxcar and the Earth as a system, (c) is mechani-
cal energy conserved? (d) Is momentum conserved? 
Finally, consider the two cars as a system as the boxcar 
is slowing down in the coupling process. (e) Is mechan-
ical energy of this system conserved? (f) Is momentum 
of this system conserved?
3. A massive tractor is rolling down a country road. In 
a perfectly inelastic collision, a small sports car runs 
into the machine from behind. (i) Which vehicle expe-
riences a change in momentum of larger magnitude?  
(a) The car does. (b) The tractor does. (c) Their 
momentum changes are the same size. (d) It could be 
either vehicle. (ii) Which vehicle experiences a larger 
change in kinetic energy? (a)The car does. (b) The 
tractor does. (c) Their kinetic energy changes are the 
same size. (d) It could be either vehicle.
4. A 2-kg object moving to the right with a speed of 4 m/s 
makes a head-on, elastic collision with a 1-kg object 
that is initially at rest. The velocity of the 1-kg object 
after the collision is (a) greater than 4 m/s, (b) less 
than 4 m/s, (c)equal to 4 m/s, (d) zero, or (e) impos-
sible to say based on the information provided.
5. A 5-kg cart moving to the right with a speed of 6 m/s 
collides with a concrete wall and rebounds with a speed 
of 2m/s. What is the change in momentum of the cart? 
(a) 0 (b) 40 kg ? m/s (c) 240 kg ? m/s (d) 230 kg ? m/s  
(e)210kg ? m/s
6. A 57.0-g tennis ball is traveling straight at a player at 
21.0m/s. The player volleys the ball straight back at 
25.0m/s. If the ball remains in contact with the racket 
for 0.060 0 s, what average force acts on the ball?  
(a) 22.6 N (b)32.5 N (c) 43.7 N (d) 72.1 N (e) 102 N
7. The momentum of an object is increased by a factor 
of 4 in magnitude. By what factor is its kinetic energy 
changed? (a) 16 (b) 8 (c) 4 (d) 2 (e) 1
8. The kinetic energy of an object is increased by a factor 
of 4. By what factor is the magnitude of its momentum 
changed? (a) 16 (b) 8 (c) 4 (d) 2 (e) 1
9. If two particles have equal momenta, are their kinetic 
energies equal? (a) yes, always (b) no, never (c) no, 
except when their speeds are the same (d) yes, as long 
as they move along parallel lines
10. If two particles have equal kinetic energies, are their 
momenta equal? (a) yes, always (b) no, never (c) yes, 
as long as their masses are equal (d) yes, if both their 
masses and directions of motion are the same (e) yes, 
as long as they move along parallel lines
11. A 10.0-g bullet is fired into a 200-g block of wood at rest 
on a horizontal surface. After impact, the block slides 
8.00 m before coming to rest. If the coefficient of fric-
tion between the block and the surface is 0.400, what 
is the speed of the bullet before impact? (a) 106 m/s  
(b) 166 m/s (c) 226 m/s (d) 286 m/s (e) none of those 
answers is correct
12. Two particles of different mass start from rest. The same 
net force acts on both of them as they move over equal 
distances. How do their final kinetic energies compare? 
(a)The particle of larger mass has more kinetic energy. 
(b)The particle of smaller mass has more kinetic 
energy. (c) The particles have equal kinetic energies. 
(d) Either particle might have more kinetic energy.
13. Two particles of different mass start from rest. The 
same net force acts on both of them as they move over 
equal distances. How do the magnitudes of their final 
momenta compare? (a) The particle of larger mass 
has more momentum. (b) The particle of smaller 
mass has more momentum. (c) The particles have 
equal momenta. (d) Either particle might have more 
momentum.
14. A basketball is tossed up into the air, falls freely, and 
bounces from the wooden floor. From the moment 
after the player releases it until the ball reaches the 
top of its bounce, what is the smallest system for which 
momentum is conserved? (a) the ball (b) the ball plus 
player (c) the ball plus floor (d) the ball plus the Earth 
(e) momentum is not conserved for any system
15. A 3-kg object moving to the right on a frictionless, 
horizontal surface with a speed of 2 m/s collides head-
on and sticks to a 2-kg object that is initially moving 
to the left with a speed of 4 m/s. After the collision, 
which statement is true? (a) The kinetic energy of the 
system is 20 J. (b) The momentum of the system is  
14 kg ? m/s. (c) The kinetic energy of the system is 
greater than 5 J but less than 20 J. (d) The momentum 
of the system is 22 kg ? m/s. (e) The momentum of the 
system is less than the momentum of the system before 
the collision.
Objective Questions
1. 
denotes answer available in Student Solutions Manual/Study Guide
282
Chapter 9 Linear Momentum and Collisions
what is the speed of the combined car and truck after 
the collision? (a) v (b) v/2 (c) v/3 (d) 2v (e) None of 
those answers is correct.
18. A head-on, elastic collision occurs between two billiard 
balls of equal mass. If a red ball is traveling to the right 
with speed v and a blue ball is traveling to the left with 
speed 3v before the collision, what statement is true 
concerning their velocities subsequent to the collision? 
Neglect any effects of spin. (a) The red ball travels to 
the left with speed v, while the blue ball travels to the 
right with speed 3v. (b) The red ball travels to the left 
with speed v, while the blue ball continues to move to 
the left with a speed 2v. (c) The red ball travels to the 
left with speed 3v, while the blue ball travels to the 
right with speed v. (d) Their final velocities cannot be 
determined because momentum is not conserved in 
the collision. (e) The velocities cannot be determined 
without knowing the mass of each ball.
16. A ball is suspended by a string 
that is tied to a fixed point 
above a wooden block stand-
ing on end. The ball is pulled 
back as shown in Figure 
OQ9.16 and released. In trial 
A, the ball rebounds elasti-
cally from the block. In trial B, 
two-sided tape causes the ball 
to stick to the block. In which 
case is the ball more likely to 
knock the block over? (a) It is 
more likely in trial A. (b) It is more likely in trial B.  
(c) It makes no difference. (d) It could be either case, 
depending on other factors.
17. A car of mass m traveling at speed v crashes into the 
rear of a truck of mass 2m that is at rest and in neutral 
at an intersection. If the collision is perfectly inelastic, 
L
m
u
Figure oQ9.16
Conceptual Questions
1. 
denotes answer available in Student Solutions Manual/Study Guide
1. An airbag in an automobile inflates when a collision 
occurs, which protects the passenger from serious 
injury (see the photo on page 254). Why does the air-
bag soften the blow? Discuss the physics involved in 
this dramatic photograph.
2. In golf, novice players are often advised to be sure to 
“follow through” with their swing. Why does this advice 
make the ball travel a longer distance? If a shot is taken 
near the green, very little follow-through is required. 
Why?
3. An open box slides across a frictionless, icy surface of 
a frozen lake. What happens to the speed of the box as 
water from a rain shower falls vertically downward into 
the box? Explain.
4. While in motion, a pitched baseball carries kinetic 
energy and momentum. (a) Can we say that it carries a 
force that it can exert on any object it strikes? (b) Can  
the baseball deliver more kinetic energy to the bat 
and batter than the ball carries initially? (c) Can the 
baseball deliver to the bat and batter more momentum 
than the ball carries initially? Explain each of your 
answers.
5. You are standing perfectly still and then take a step for-
ward. Before the step, your momentum was zero, but 
afterward you have some momentum. Is the principle 
of conservation of momentum violated in this case? 
Explain your answer.
6. A sharpshooter fires a rifle while standing with the 
butt of the gun against her shoulder. If the forward 
momentum of a bullet is the same as the backward 
momentum of the gun, why isn’t it as dangerous to be 
hit by the gun as by the bullet?
7. Two students hold a large bed sheet vertically between 
them. A third student, who happens to be the star 
pitcher on the school baseball team, throws a raw egg 
at the center of the sheet. Explain why the egg does 
not break when it hits the sheet, regardless of its initial 
speed.
8. A juggler juggles three balls in a continuous cycle. Any 
one ball is in contact with one of his hands for one 
fifth of the time. (a) Describe the motion of the center 
of mass of the three balls. (b) What average force does 
the juggler exert on one ball while he is touching it?
9. (a) Does the center of mass of a rocket in free space 
accelerate? Explain. (b) Can the speed of a rocket 
exceed the exhaust speed of the fuel? Explain.
10. On the subject of the following positions, state your 
own view and argue to support it. (a) The best theory 
of motion is that force causes acceleration. (b) The true 
measure of a force’s effectiveness is the work it does, and 
the best theory of motion is that work done on an object 
changes its energy. (c) The true measure of a force’s 
effect is impulse, and the best theory of motion is that 
impulse imparted to an object changes its momentum.
11. Does a larger net force exerted on an object always pro-
duce a larger change in the momentum of the object 
compared with a smaller net force? Explain.
12. Does a larger net force always produce a larger change 
in kinetic energy than a smaller net force? Explain.
13. A bomb, initially at rest, explodes into several pieces. 
(a)Is linear momentum of the system (the bomb 
before the explosion, the pieces after the explosion) 
conserved? Explain. (b) Is kinetic energy of the system 
conserved? Explain.
problems 
283
energy of the boy–girl system? (c) Is the momentum 
of the boy–girl system conserved in the pushing-apart 
process? If so, explain how that is possible consider-
ing (d) there are large forces acting and (e) there is no 
motion beforehand and plenty of motion afterward.
9. In research in cardiology and exercise physiology, it is 
often important to know the mass of blood pumped by 
a person’s heart in one stroke. This information can be 
obtained by means of a ballistocardiograph. The instru-
ment works as follows. The subject lies on a horizontal 
pallet floating on a film of air. Friction on the pallet is 
negligible. Initially, the momentum of the system is zero. 
When the heart beats, it expels a mass m of blood into 
the aorta with speed v, and the body and platform move 
in the opposite direction with speed V. The blood veloc-
ity can be determined independently (e.g., by observ-
ing the Doppler shift of ultrasound). Assume that it is  
50.0 cm/s in one typical trial. The mass of the subject 
plus the pallet is 54.0 kg. The pallet moves 6.00 3 10–5 m  
in 0.160 s after one heartbeat. Calculate the mass of 
blood that leaves the heart. Assume that the mass of 
blood is negligible compared with the total mass of the 
person. (This simplified example illustrates the prin-
ciple of ballistocardiography, but in practice a more 
sophisticated model of heart function is used.)
10. When you jump straight up as high as you can, what is 
the order of magnitude of the maximum recoil speed 
that you give to the Earth? Model the Earth as a per-
fectly solid object. In your solution, state the physical 
quantities you take as data and the values you measure 
or estimate for them.
11. Two blocks of masses m and 
3m are placed on a friction-
less, horizontal surface. A 
light spring is attached to the 
more massive block, and the 
blocks are pushed together 
with the spring between 
them (Fig. P9.11). A cord 
initially holding the blocks 
together is burned; after that 
happens, the block of mass 
3m moves to the right with a 
speed of 2.00 m/s. (a) What 
is the velocity of the block of 
mass m? (b)Find the system’s original elastic potential 
energy, taking m 5 0.350 kg. (c) Is the original energy 
BIO
Before
m
3m
a
After
2.00 m/s
m
3m
v
S
b
Figure P9.11
Q/C
W
Section 9.1 linear Momentum
1. A particle of mass m moves with momentum of magni-
tude p. (a) Show that the kinetic energy of the particle 
is K 5 p2/2m. (b) Express the magnitude of the parti-
cle’s momentum in terms of its kinetic energy and mass.
2. An object has a kinetic energy of 275 J and a momen-
tum of magnitude 25.0 kg ? m/s. Find the speed and 
mass of the object.
3. At one instant, a 17.5-kg sled is moving over a horizontal 
surface of snow at 3.50 m/s. After 8.75 s has elapsed, the 
sled stops. Use a momentum approach to find the aver-
age friction force acting on the sled while it was moving.
4. A 3.00-kg particle has a velocity of 
1
3.00
i
^
24.00
j
^
2
m/s. 
(a) Find its x and y components of momentum. (b) Find 
the magnitude and direction of its momentum.
5. A baseball approaches home plate at a speed of 45.0 m/s,  
moving horizontally just before being hit by a bat. The 
batter hits a pop-up such that after hitting the bat, the 
baseball is moving at 55.0 m/s straight up. The ball has 
a mass of 145 g and is in contact with the bat for 2.00 ms.  
What is the average vector force the ball exerts on the 
bat during their interaction?
Section 9.2 analysis Model: Isolated System (Momentum)
6. A 45.0-kg girl is standing on a 150-kg plank. Both are 
originally at rest on a frozen lake that constitutes a fric-
tionless, flat surface. The girl begins to walk along the 
plank at a constant velocity of 1.50
i
^
m/s relative to the 
plank. (a)What is the velocity of the plank relative to 
the ice surface? (b)What is the girl’s velocity relative to 
the ice surface?
7. A girl of mass m
g
is standing on a plank of mass m
p
. Both  
are originally at rest on a frozen lake that constitutes a 
frictionless, flat surface. The girl begins to walk along 
the plank at a constant velocity v
gp
to the right relative to  
the plank. (The subscript gp denotes the girl relative to 
plank.) (a) What is the velocity v
pi
of the plank relative 
to the surface of the ice? (b) What is the girl’s velocity 
v
gi
relative to the ice surface?
8. A 65.0-kg boy and his 40.0-kg sister, both wearing roller 
blades, face each other at rest. The girl pushes the boy 
hard, sending him backward with velocity 2.90 m/s  
toward the west. Ignore friction. (a) Describe the sub-
sequent motion of the girl. (b) How much potential 
energy in the girl’s body is converted into mechanical 
S
M
S
Q/C
Problems
The problems found in this  
chapter may be assigned 
online in Enhanced WebAssign
1.
 straightforward; 
2. 
intermediate;  
3. 
challenging
1.
full solution available in the Student 
Solutions Manual/Study Guide
AMT
Analysis Model tutorial available in 
Enhanced WebAssign
GP
Guided Problem
M
Master It tutorial available in Enhanced 
WebAssign
W
Watch It video solution available in 
Enhanced WebAssign
BIO
Q/C
S
284
Chapter 9 Linear Momentum and Collisions
(c) what is the acceleration of the car? Express the accel-
eration as a multiple of the acceleration due to gravity.
18. A tennis player receives a shot with the ball (0.060 0 kg)  
traveling horizontally at 20.0 m/s and returns the shot 
with the ball traveling horizontally at 40.0 m/s in the 
opposite direction. (a) What is the impulse delivered 
to the ball by the tennis racket? (b) Some work is done 
on the system of the ball and some energy appears in 
the ball as an increase in internal energy during the 
collision between the ball and the racket. What is the 
sum W 2 DE
int
for the ball?
19. The magnitude of the net 
force exerted in the x direc-
tion on a 2.50-kg particle 
varies in time as shown in 
Figure P9.19. Find (a) the 
impulse of the force over 
the 5.00-s time interval, 
(b) the final velocity the 
particle attains if it is origi-
nally at rest, (c) its final 
velocity if its original veloc-
ity is 22.00
i
^
m/s, and (d) the average force exerted on 
the particle for the time interval between 0 and 5.00 s.
20. Review. A force platform is a tool used to analyze the per-
formance of athletes by measuring the vertical force 
the athlete exerts on the ground as a function of time. 
Starting from rest, a 65.0-kg athlete jumps down onto 
the platform from a height of 0.600 m. While she is in 
contact with the platform during the time interval 0 , 
t , 0.800 s, the force she exerts on it is described by the 
function
F 5 9 2002 11 500t2
where F is in newtons and t is in seconds. (a) What im-
pulse did the athlete receive from the platform? (b) With  
what speed did she reach the platform? (c) With what 
speed did she leave it? (d) To what height did she jump 
upon leaving the platform?
21. Water falls without splashing at a rate of 0.250 L/s from 
a height of 2.60 m into a 0.750-kg bucket on a scale. If 
the bucket is originally empty, what does the scale read 
in newtons 3.00 s after water starts to accumulate in it?
Section 9.4 Collisions in one Dimension
22. A 1 200-kg car traveling initially at v
Ci
5 25.0 m/s in an 
easterly direction crashes into the back of a 9 000-kg 
truck moving in the same direction at v
Ti
5 20.0 m/s 
(Fig. P9.22). The velocity of the car immediately after 
the collision is v
Cf
5 18.0 m/s to the east. (a) What is 
the velocity of the truck immediately after the colli-
AMT
4
F (N)
3
2
1
0
1
2
3
4
5
t (s)
Figure P9.19
Q/C
in the spring or in the cord? (d) Explain your answer 
to part (c). (e) Is the momentum of the system con-
served in the bursting-apart process? Explain how that 
is possible considering (f) there are large forces acting 
and (g) there is no motion beforehand and plenty of 
motion afterward?
Section 9.3 analysis Model: Nonisolated System 
(Momentum)
12. A man claims that he can hold onto a 12.0-kg child in a 
head-on collision as long as he has his seat belt on. 
Consider this man in a collision in which he is in one 
of two identical cars each traveling toward the other at 
60.0 mi/h relative to the ground. The car in which he 
rides is brought to rest in 0.10 s. (a) Find the magni-
tude of the average force needed to hold onto the 
child. (b) Based on your result to part (a), is the man’s 
claim valid? (c) What does the answer to this problem 
say about laws requiring the use of proper safety 
devices such as seat belts and special toddler seats?
13. An estimated force–
time curve for a baseball 
struck by a bat is shown 
in Figure P9.13. From 
this curve, determine 
(a) the magnitude of the 
impulse delivered to the 
ball and (b) the average 
force exerted on the ball.
14. Review. After a 0.300-kg rubber ball is dropped from 
a height of 1.75 m, it bounces off a concrete floor and 
rebounds to a height of 1.50 m. (a) Determine the 
magnitude and direction of the impulse delivered to 
the ball by the floor. (b) Estimate the time the ball is 
in contact with the floor and use this estimate to calcu-
late the average force the floor exerts on the ball.
15. A glider of mass m is free to slide along a horizontal 
air track. It is pushed against a launcher at one end 
of the track. Model the launcher as a light spring of 
force constant k compressed by a distance x. The glider 
is released from rest. (a) Show that the glider attains a 
speed of v 5 x(k/m)1/2. (b) Show that the magnitude 
of the impulse imparted to the glider is given by the 
expression I5 x(km)1/2. (c) Is more work done on a cart 
with a large or a small mass?
16. In a slow-pitch softball game, a 0.200-kg softball crosses 
the plate at 15.0 m/s at an angle of 45.0° below the hor-
izontal. The batter hits the ball toward center field, giv-
ing it a velocity of 40.0 m/s at 30.0° above the horizontal.  
(a) Determine the impulse delivered to the ball. (b) If  
the force on the ball increases linearly for 4.00 ms, 
holds constant for 20.0 ms, and then decreases linearly 
to zero in another 4.00 ms, what is the maximum force 
on the ball? 
17. The front 1.20 m of a 1 400-kg car is designed as a 
“crumple zone” that collapses to absorb the shock of a 
collision. If a car traveling 25.0 m/s stops uniformly in 
1.20 m, (a) how long does the collision last, (b) what 
is the magnitude of the average force on the car, and  
Q/C
0
5000
10000
15000
20000
0
1
2
(ms)
(N)
F
max
= 18000 N
Figure P9.13
W
S
Q/C
M
Before
After
v
Ci
S
v
Ti
S
v
Cf
S
v
Tf
S
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested