10.5 Analysis Model: Rigid Object Under a Net torque 
305
Analysis Model   Rigid Object Under a Net Torque 
(
c
o
n
t
i
n
u
e
d
)
Example 10.4   Rotating Rod 
A uniform rod of length L and mass M is attached at one end to a frictionless pivot 
and is free to rotate about the pivot in the vertical plane as in Figure 10.12. The 
rod is released from rest in the horizontal position. What are the initial angular 
acceleration of the rod and the initial translational acceleration of its right end?
Conceptualize  Imagine what happens to the rod in Figure 10.12 when it is released. 
It rotates clockwise around the pivot at the left end.
Categorize  The rod is categorized as a rigid object under a net torque. The torque is 
due only to the gravitational force on the rod if the rotation axis is chosen to pass 
through the pivot in Figure 10.12. We cannot categorize the rod as a rigid object 
under constant angular acceleration because the torque exerted on the rod and therefore the angular acceleration of 
the rod vary with its angular position.
Analyze  The only force contributing to the torque about an axis through the pivot is the gravitational force Mg
S
exerted on the rod. (The force exerted by the pivot on the rod has zero torque about the pivot because its moment arm 
is zero.) To compute the torque on the rod, we assume the gravitational force acts at the center of mass of the rod as 
shown in Figure 10.12.
AM
SoLuTIon
L
Pivot
M
g
S
Figure 10.12 
(Example 10.4) A 
rod is free to rotate around a pivot at 
the left end. The gravitational force 
on the rod acts at its center of mass.
Write an expression for the magnitude of the net external 
torque due to the gravitational force about an axis through 
the pivot:
a
t
ext
5Mga
L
2
b
Use Equation 10.18 to obtain the angular acceleration of the 
rod, using the moment of inertia for the rod from Table 10.2:
(1)   a5 
a
t
ext
I
5
Mg
1
L/2
2
1
3
ML2
5
3g
2L
Use Equation 10.11 with r 5 L to find the initial translational 
acceleration of the right end of the rod:
a
t
La 5 
3
2
g
Finalize These values are the initial values of the angular and translational accelerations. Once the rod begins to 
rotate, the gravitational force is no longer perpendicular to the rod and the values of the two accelerations decrease, 
going to zero at the moment the rod passes through the vertical orientation.
What if we were to place a penny on the end of the rod and then release the rod? Would the penny stay in 
contact with the rod?
Answer  The result for the initial acceleration of a point on the end of the rod shows that a
t
g. An unsupported 
penny falls at acceleration g. So, if we place a penny on the end of the rod and then release the rod, the end of the 
rod falls faster than the penny does! The penny does not stay in contact with the rod. (Try this with a penny and a 
meterstick!)
WhAT IF?
continued
Examples: 
• a bicycle chain around the sprocket of a bicycle causes the rear wheel of the bicycle to rotate
• an electric dipole moment in an electric field rotates due to the electric force from the field  (Chapter 23)
• a magnetic dipole moment in a magnetic field rotates due to the magnetic force from the field  (Chapter 30)
• the armature of a motor rotates due to the torque exerted by a surrounding magnetic field (Chapter 31)
The question now is to find the location on the rod 
at which we can place a penny that will stay in contact 
as both begin to fall. To find the translational accelera-
tion of an arbitrary point on the rod at a distance r , L  
from the pivot point, we combine Equation (1) with 
Equation 10.11:
a
t
5ra5
3g
2L
r
Convert url pdf to word - Convert PDF to html files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
How to Convert PDF to HTML Webpage with C# PDF Conversion SDK
changing pdf to html; convert pdf into webpage
Convert url pdf to word - VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
PDF to HTML Webpage Converter SDK for VB.NET PDF to HTML Conversion
convert pdf to html file; convert pdf to webpage
306
chapter 10 Rotation of a Rigid Object About a Fixed Axis
▸ 10.4 
continued
Conceptual Example 10.5    Falling Smokestacks and Tumbling Blocks
When a tall smokestack falls over, it often breaks somewhere along its length before 
it hits the ground as shown in Figure 10.13. Why?
As the smokestack rotates around its base, each higher portion of the smokestack falls 
with a larger tangential acceleration than the portion below it according to Equation 
10.11. The angular acceleration increases as the smokestack tips farther. Eventu-
ally, higher portions of the smokestack experience an acceleration greater than the  
acceleration that could result from gravity alone; this situation is similar to that 
described in Example 10.4. That can happen only if these portions are being 
pulled downward by a force in addition to the gravitational force. The force that 
causes that to occur is the shear force from lower portions of the smokestack. Even-
tually, the shear force that provides this acceleration is greater than the smoke-
stack can withstand, and the smokestack breaks. The same thing happens with a tall tower of children’s toy blocks. 
Borrow some blocks from a child and build such a tower. Push it over and watch it come apart at some point before it 
strikes the floor.
SoLuTIon
Figure 10.13 
(Conceptual 
Example 10.5) A falling smoke-
stack breaks at some point along 
its length.
K
e
v
i
n
S
p
r
e
e
k
m
e
e
s
t
e
r
/
A
G
E
f
o
t
o
s
t
o
c
k
Example 10.6   Angular Acceleration of a Wheel 
A wheel of radius R, mass M, and moment of inertia I is mounted on a frictionless, 
horizontal axle as in Figure 10.14. A light cord wrapped around the wheel supports an 
object of mass m. When the wheel is released, the object accelerates downward, the cord 
unwraps off the wheel, and the wheel rotates with an angular acceleration. Find expres-
sions for the angular acceleration of the wheel, the translational acceleration of the 
object, and the tension in the cord.
Conceptualize  Imagine that the object is a bucket in an 
old-fashioned water well. It is tied to a cord that passes 
around a cylinder equipped with a crank for raising the 
bucket. After the bucket has been raised, the system is 
released and the bucket accelerates downward while the 
cord unwinds off the cylinder.
Categorize  We apply two analysis models here. The object 
is modeled as a particle under a net force. The wheel is mod-
eled as a rigid object under a net torque.
Analyze  The magnitude of the torque acting on the wheel about its axis of rotation is t 5 TR, where T is the force 
exerted by the cord on the rim of the wheel. (The gravitational force exerted by the Earth on the wheel and the 
AM
SoLuTIon
M
R
m
mg
S
T
S
T
S
O
Figure 10.14 
(Example 10.6) 
An object hangs from a cord 
wrapped around a wheel.
For the penny to stay in contact with the rod, the limiting 
case is that the translational acceleration must be equal 
to that due to gravity:
a
t
5g5
3g
2L
r
r5
2
3
L
Therefore, a penny placed closer to the pivot than two-
thirds of the length of the rod stays in contact with the 
falling rod, but a penny farther out than this point loses 
contact.
C# PDF url edit Library: insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.
Keep Microsoft Office Word, Excel and PowerPoint links in PDF document. Enable users to copy and paste PDF link. Help to extract and search url in PDF file.
convert pdf to html code for email; convert pdf to web form
VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net
Keep Microsoft Office Word, Excel and PowerPoint links in PDF document. Make PDF link open in a new window, blank page or tab. Edit PDF url in preview without
convert pdf to html5; convert pdf to url link
10.6 calculation of Moments of Inertia 
307
normal force exerted by the axle on the wheel both pass through the axis of rotation and therefore produce no 
torque.)
From the rigid object under a net torque model, write 
Equation 10.18:
o
t
ext
Ia
Solve for a and substitute the net torque:
(1)   a5
a
t
ext
I
5
TR
I
From the particle under a net force model, apply New-
ton’s second law to the motion of the object, taking the 
downward direction to be positive:
o
F
y
mg 2 T 5 ma
Solve for the acceleration a:
(2)   a5
mg2T
m
Use this fact together with Equations (1) and (2):
(3)   a5Ra5
TR2
I
5
mg2T
m
Solve for the tension T:
(4)   T 5 
mg
11
1
mR2/I
2
Substitute Equation (4) into Equation (2) and solve for a:
(5)   a 5 
g
11
1
I/mR2
2
Use a 5 Ra and Equation (5) to solve for a:
a5
a
R
5
g
R1
1
I/mR
2
Equations (1) and (2) have three unknowns: a, a, and T. Because the object and wheel are connected by a cord that 
does not slip, the translational acceleration of the suspended object is equal to the tangential acceleration of a point 
on the wheel’s rim. Therefore, the angular acceleration a of the wheel and the translational acceleration of the object 
are related by a 5 Ra.
Finalize We finalize this problem by imagining the behavior of the system in some extreme limits.
What if the wheel were to become very massive so that I becomes very large? What happens to the accel-
eration a of the object and the tension T?
Answer  If the wheel becomes infinitely massive, we can imagine that the object of mass m will simply hang from the 
cord without causing the wheel to rotate.
We can show that mathematically by taking the limit I S `. Equation (5) then becomes
a5
g
11
1
I/mR2
2
  0
which agrees with our conceptual conclusion that the object will hang at rest. Also, Equation (4) becomes
T5
mg
111mR2/I2
  mg
which is consistent because the object simply hangs at rest in equilibrium between the gravitational force and the ten-
sion in the string.
WhAT IF?
▸ 10.6 
continued
10.6 Calculation of Moments of Inertia
The moment of inertia of a system of discrete particles can be calculated in a 
straightforward way with Equation 10.19. We can evaluate the moment of iner-
tia of a continuous rigid object by imagining the object to be divided into many 
small elements, each of which has mass Dm
i
. We use the definition I 5 o
r
i
2 Dm
i
C#: How to Open a File from a URL (HTTP, FTP) in HTML5 Viewer
PDF to svg, C#.NET convert PDF to text, C#.NET convert PDF to images VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel C# HTML5 Viewer: Open a File from a URL.
how to convert pdf to html code; how to convert pdf to html email
VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
VB.NET Tutorial for How to Convert PDF to Word (.docx) Document in VB.NET. using RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF; Convert PDF to Word Document in VB.NET Demo Code.
convert pdf to web form; embed pdf into webpage
308
chapter 10 Rotation of a Rigid Object About a Fixed Axis
and take the limit of this sum as Dm
i
S 0. In this limit, the sum becomes an inte-
gral over the volume of the object:
I5 lim
Dm
i
S
0
a
i
r
i
2
Dm
i
5
3
r
2
dm 
(10.20)
It is usually easier to calculate moments of inertia in terms of the volume of 
the elements rather than their mass, and we can easily make that change by using 
Equation 1.1, r ; m/V, where r is the density of the object and V is its volume. From 
this equation, the mass of a small element is dm 5 r dV. Substituting this result into 
Equation 10.20 gives
I5
3
rr
2
dV 
(10.21)
If the object is homogeneous, r is constant and the integral can be evaluated for a 
known geometry. If r is not constant, its variation with position must be known to 
complete the integration.
The density given by r 5 m/V sometimes is referred to as volumetric mass density 
because it represents mass per unit volume. Often we use other ways of express-
ing density. For instance, when dealing with a sheet of uniform thickness t, we can 
define a surface mass density s 5 rt, which represents mass per unit area. Finally, when 
mass is distributed along a rod of uniform cross-sectional area A, we sometimes use 
linear mass density l 5 M/L 5 rA, which is the mass per unit length.
Moment of inertia 
of a rigid object
Example 10.7   Uniform Rigid Rod
Calculate the moment of inertia of a uniform thin rod of length L and mass M (Fig. 
10.15) about an axis perpendicular to the rod (the y9 axis) and passing through its 
center of mass.
Conceptualize  Imagine twirling the rod in Fig-
ure 10.15 with your fingers around its midpoint. 
If you have a meterstick handy, use it to simulate 
the spinning of a thin rod and feel the resistance it 
offers to being spun.
Categorize  This example is a substitution problem, using the definition of moment of inertia in Equation 10.20. As 
with any integration problem, the solution involves reducing the integrand to a single variable.
The shaded length element dx9 in Figure 10.15 has a mass dm equal to the mass per unit length l multiplied by dx9.
SoLuTIon
L
x
O
x
dx
y
y
Figure 10.15 
(Example 10.7) 
A uniform rigid rod of length L
The moment of inertia about the 
y9 axis is less than that about the y 
axis. The latter axis is examined in 
Example 10.9.
Express dm in terms of dx9:
dm5ldxr5
M
L
dxr
Substitute this expression into Equation 10.20, with
r2 5 (x9)2:
I
yr
5
3
r2 dm5
3
L/2
2L/2
1
xr
22
M
L
dxr5
M
L
3
L/2
2L/2
1
xr
22
dxr
5
M
L
c
1
xr
23
3
d
L/2
2L/2
5
1
12
ML2
Check this result in Table 10.2.
Example 10.8   Uniform Solid Cylinder
A uniform solid cylinder has a radius R, mass M, and length L. Calculate its moment of inertia about its central axis 
(the z axis in Fig. 10.16).
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
C#.NET PDF SDK - Convert PDF to Word in C#.NET. C#.NET DLLs and Demo Code: Convert PDF to Word Document in C#.NET Project. Add necessary references:
how to add pdf to website; convert pdf to webpage
VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
PDF to Text. Convert PDF to JPEG. Convert PDF to Png to PDF. Image: Remove Image from PDF Page. Image Link: Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit Bookmark. Metadata: Edit, Delete
convert pdf to html form; online pdf to html converter
10.6 calculation of Moments of Inertia 
309
Conceptualize  To simulate this situation, imagine twirling a can of 
frozen juice around its central axis. Don’t twirl a nonfrozen can of 
vegetable soup; it is not a rigid object! The liquid is able to move rela-
tive to the metal can.
Categorize  This example is a substitution problem, using the defini-
tion of moment of inertia. As with Example 10.7, we must reduce the 
integrand to a single variable.
It is convenient to divide the cylinder into many cylindrical shells, 
each having radius r, thickness dr, and length L as shown in Figure 
10.16. The density of the cylinder is r. The volume dV of each shell is 
its cross-sectional area multiplied by its length: dV 5 L dA 5 L(2prdr.
SoLuTIon
L
dr
z
r
R
Figure 10.16 
(Exam-
ple 10.8) Calculating I 
about the z axis for a  
uniform solid cylinder.
Express dm in terms of dr:
dm 5 r dV 5 rL(2prdr
Substitute this expression into Equation 10.20:
I
z
5
3
r2 dm5
3
r2
3
rL
1
2pr
2
dr
4
52prL 
3
R
0
r3 dr5
1
2
prLR4
Use the total volume pR2L of the cylinder to express  
its density:
r5
M
V
5
M
pR2L
Substitute this value into the expression for I
z
:
I
z
5
1
2
pa
M
pR2L
bLR5
1
2
MR2
Check this result in Table 10.2.
What if the length of the cylinder in Figure 10.16 is increased to 2L, while the mass M and radius R are 
held fixed? How does that change the moment of inertia of the cylinder?
Answer  Notice that the result for the moment of inertia of a cylinder does not depend on L, the length of the cylinder. 
It applies equally well to a long cylinder and a flat disk having the same mass M and radius R. Therefore, the moment 
of inertia of the cylinder is not affected by how the mass is distributed along its length.
WhAT IF?
The calculation of moments of inertia of an object about an arbitrary axis can be 
cumbersome, even for a highly symmetric object. Fortunately, use of an important 
theorem, called the parallel-axis theorem, often simplifies the calculation.
To generate the parallel-axis theorem, suppose the object in Figure 10.17a on 
page 310 rotates about the z axis. The moment of inertia does not depend on how 
the mass is distributed along the z axis; as we found in Example 10.8, the moment 
of inertia of a cylinder is independent of its length. Imagine collapsing the three-
dimensional object into a planar object as in Figure 10.17b. In this imaginary pro-
cess, all mass moves parallel to the z axis until it lies in the xy plane. The coordinates 
of the object’s center of mass are now x
CM
y
CM
, and z
CM
5 0. Let the mass element 
dm have coordinates (xy, 0) as shown in the view down the z axis in Figure 10.17c. 
Because this element is a distance r5
!
x2 1y2
from the z axis, the moment of 
inertia of the entire object about the z axis is
I5
3
r2 dm5
3
1
x2 1y2
2
dm
We can relate the coordinates xy of the mass element dm to the coordinates of 
this same element located in a coordinate system having the object’s center of mass 
as its origin. If the coordinates of the center of mass are x
CM
y
CM
, and z
CM
5 0 
in the original coordinate system centered on O, we see from Figure 10.17c that  
▸ 10.8 
continued
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
Able to render and convert PDF document to/from supported document package offers robust APIs for editing PDF document hyperlink (url), which provide
how to convert pdf to html code; conversion pdf to html
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
NET extract PDF pages, VB.NET comment annotate PDF, VB.NET delete PDF pages, VB.NET convert PDF to SVG. Able to load PDF document from file formats and url.
create html email from pdf; convert pdf into html
310
chapter 10 Rotation of a Rigid Object About a Fixed Axis
the relationships between the unprimed and primed coordinates are x 5 x9 1 x
CM
 
y 5 y9 1 y
CM
, and z 5 z9 5 0. Therefore,
I5
3
31
xr1x
CM
22
1
1
yr1y
CM
22
4
dm
5
3
31
xr
22
1
1
yr
22
4
dm12x
CM
3
xdm12y
CM
3
yrdm1
1
x
CM
21y
CM
22
3
dm
The first integral is, by definition, the moment of inertia I
CM
about an axis that is 
parallel to the z axis and passes through the center of mass. The second two inte-
grals are zero because, by definition of the center of mass, e x9 dm 5 e y9 dm 5 0. 
The last integral is simply MD2 because e dm M and D2 5 x
CM
2 1 y
CM
2. Therefore, 
we conclude that
I 5 
CM
MD2 
(10.22)
Parallel-axis theorem 
Axis through
CM
x
y
z
Rotation
axis
O
a
Axis through
CM
x
y
z
Rotation
axis
b
Figure 10.17 
(a) An arbitrarily shaped rigid object. The origin of the coordinate system is not at 
the center of mass of the object. Imagine the object rotating about the z axis. (b) All mass elements 
of the object are collapsed parallel to the z axis to form a planar object. (c) An arbitrary mass element 
dm is indicated in blue in this view down the z axis. The parallel axis theorem can be used with the 
geometry shown to determine the moment of inertia of the original object around the z axis.
y
y
x, y
dm
O
D
r
x
x
CM
y
y
CM
x
CM
x
CM
,
y
CM 
x
c
y
x
Example 10.9   Applying the Parallel-Axis Theorem
Consider once again the uniform rigid rod of mass M and length L shown in Figure 10.15. Find the moment of inertia 
of the rod about an axis perpendicular to the rod through one end (the y axis in Fig. 10.15).
Conceptualize  Imagine twirling the rod around an endpoint rather than the midpoint. If you have a meterstick 
handy, try it and notice the degree of difficulty in rotating it around the end compared with rotating it around the 
center.
Categorize  This example is a substitution problem, involving the parallel-axis theorem.
Intuitively, we expect the moment of inertia to be greater than the result I
CM
5
1
12
ML2 from Example 10.7 because 
there is mass up to a distance of L away from the rotation axis, whereas the farthest distance in Example 10.7 was only 
L/2. The distance between the center-of-mass axis and the y axis is D 5 L/2.
SoLuTIon
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
provides C# users abilities to view, annotate, convert and create NET package offers robust APIs for editing PDF document hyperlink (url) and quick
converting pdf to html format; convert pdf into web page
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
csv to PDF, C#.NET convert PDF to svg, C#.NET convert PDF to text, C#.NET convert PDF to images Able to load PDF document from file formats and url in ASP
how to convert pdf into html code; convert pdf into webpage
10.7 Rotational Kinetic energy 
311
Use the parallel-axis theorem:
I5I
CM
1MD5
1
12
ML2 1Ma
L
2
b
2
5
1
3
ML2
Check this result in Table 10.2.
10.7 Rotational Kinetic Energy
After investigating the role of forces in our study of translational motion, we turned 
our attention to approaches involving energy. We do the same thing in our current 
study of rotational motion.
In Chapter 7, we defined the kinetic energy of an object as the energy associated 
with its motion through space. An object rotating about a fixed axis remains station-
ary in space, so there is no kinetic energy associated with translational motion. The 
individual particles making up the rotating object, however, are moving through 
space; they follow circular paths. Consequently, there is kinetic energy associated 
with rotational motion.
Let us consider an object as a system of particles and assume it rotates about a 
fixed z axis with an angular speed v. Figure 10.18 shows the rotating object and 
identifies one particle on the object located at a distance r
i
from the rotation axis. 
If the mass of the ith particle is m
i
and its tangential speed is v
i
, its kinetic energy is
K
i
5
1
2
m
i
v
i
2
To proceed further, recall that although every particle in the rigid object has the 
same angular speed v, the individual tangential speeds depend on the distance r
i
from the axis of rotation according to Equation 10.10. The total kinetic energy of the 
rotating rigid object is the sum of the kinetic energies of the individual particles:
K
R
5
a
i
K
i
5
a
i
1
2
m
i
v
i
5
1
2
a
i
m
i
r
i
2v2
We can write this expression in the form
K
R
5
1
2
a
a
i
m
i
r
i
2
bv
2
(10.23)
where we have factored v2 from the sum because it is common to every particle. 
We recognize the quantity in parentheses as the moment of inertia of the object, 
introduced in Section 10.5.
Therefore, Equation 10.23 can be written
K
R
5
1
2
Iv2 
(10.24)
Although we commonly refer to the quantity 
1
2
Iv2 as rotational kinetic energy, 
it is not a new form of energy. It is ordinary kinetic energy because it is derived 
from a sum over individual kinetic energies of the particles contained in the rigid 
object. The mathematical form of the kinetic energy given by Equation 10.24 is 
convenient when we are dealing with rotational motion, provided we know how to 
calculate I.
uick Quiz 10.6 A section of hollow pipe and a solid cylinder have the same 
radius, mass, and length. They both rotate about their long central axes with 
the same angular speed. Which object has the higher rotational kinetic energy? 
(a) The hollow pipe does. (b) The solid cylinder does. (c) They have the same 
rotational kinetic energy. (d) It is impossible to determine.
WWRotational kinetic energy
m
i
r
i
axis
O
v
v
i
S
Figure 10.18 
A rigid object 
rotating about the z axis with 
angular speed v. The kinetic 
energy of the particle of mass m
i
is 
1
2
m
i
v
i
2. The total kinetic energy of 
the object is called its rotational 
kinetic energy.
▸ 10.9 
continued
312
Chapter 10 Rotation of a Rigid Object About a Fixed Axis
Example 10.10   An Unusual Baton
Four tiny spheres are fastened to the ends of two rods of 
negligible mass lying in the xy plane to form an unusual 
baton (Fig. 10.19). We shall assume the radii of the spheres 
are small compared with the dimensions of the rods.
(A)  If the system rotates about the y axis (Fig. 10.19a) 
with an angular speed v, find the moment of inertia and 
the rotational kinetic energy of the system about this axis.
Conceptualize  Figure 10.19 is a pictorial representation 
that helps conceptualize the system of spheres and how 
it spins. Model the spheres as particles.
Categorize  This example is a substitution problem 
because it is a straightforward application of the defini-
tions discussed in this section.
Solution
b
y
b
b
x
a
a
a
M
M
m
m
x
y
a
a
b
b
m
M
M
m
Figure 10.19 
(Example 10.10) Four spheres form an unusual 
baton. (a) The baton is rotated about the y axis. (b) The baton is 
rotated about the z axis.
Apply Equation 10.19 to the system:
I
y
5
a
i
m
i
r
i
5Ma1Ma5
2Ma2
Evaluate the rotational kinetic energy using 
Equation10.24:
K
R
51
2
I
y
v51
2
1
2Ma2
2
vMa2v2
That the two spheres of mass m do not enter into this result makes sense because they have no motion about the axis 
of rotation; hence, they have no rotational kinetic energy. By similar logic, we expect the moment of inertia about the 
x axis to be I
x
5 2mb2 with a rotational kinetic energy about that axis of K
R
mb2v2.
(B)  Suppose the system rotates in the xy plane about an axis (the z axis) through the center of the baton (Fig. 10.19b). 
Calculate the moment of inertia and rotational kinetic energy about this axis.
Solution
Apply Equation 10.19 for this new rotation axis:
I
z
5
a
i
m
i
r
i
5Ma1Ma1
mb1mb5 2Ma2  1 2mb2
Evaluate the rotational kinetic energy using 
Equation10.24:
K
R
5
1
2
I
z
v5
1
2
1
2Ma12mb2
2
v5 (Ma2 1 mb2)v2
Comparing the results for parts (A) and (B), we conclude that the moment of inertia and therefore the rotational 
kinetic energy associated with a given angular speed depend on the axis of rotation. In part (B), we expect the result to 
include all four spheres and distances because all four spheres are rotating in the xy plane. Based on the work–kinetic 
energy theorem, the smaller rotational kinetic energy in part (A) than in part (B) indicates it would require less work 
to set the system into rotation about the y axis than about the z axis.
What if the mass M is much larger than m? How do the answers to parts (A) and (B) compare?
Answer  If M .. m, then m can be neglected and the moment of inertia and the rotational kinetic energy in part (B) 
become
I
z
5 2Ma2 and K
R
Ma2v2
which are the same as the answers in part (A). If the masses m of the two tan spheres in Figure 10.19 are negligible, 
these spheres can be removed from the figure and rotations about the y and z axes are equivalent.
What iF?
10.8 Energy Considerations in Rotational Motion
Having introduced rotational kinetic energy in Section 10.7, let us now see how an 
energy approach can be useful in solving rotational problems. We begin by consid-
ering the relationship between the torque acting on a rigid object and its resulting 
10.8 energy considerations in Rotational Motion 
313
rotational motion so as to generate expressions for power and a rotational analog 
to the work–kinetic energy theorem. Consider the rigid object pivoted at O in Fig-
ure 10.20. Suppose a single external force F
S
is applied at P, where F
S
lies in the 
plane of the page. The work done on the object by F
S
as its point of application 
rotates through an infinitesimal distance ds 5 r du is
dWF
S
?ds
S
5
1
F sin f
2
r du
where F sin f is the tangential component of F
S
, or, in other words, the component 
of the force along the displacement. Notice that the radial component vector of F
S
does no work on the object because it is perpendicular to the displacement of  
the point of application of F
S
.
Because the magnitude of the torque due to F
S
about an axis through O is 
defined as rF sin f by Equation 10.14, we can write the work done for the infinitesi-
mal rotation as
dW 5 t d
(10.25)
The rate at which work is being done by F
S
as the object rotates about the fixed axis 
through the angle du in a time interval dt is
dW
dt
5t 
du
dt
Because dW/dt is the instantaneous power P (see Section 8.5) delivered by the force 
and du/dt 5 v, this expression reduces to
P5
dW
dt
5tv 
(10.26)
This equation is analogous to P 5 Fv in the case of translational motion, and Equa-
tion 10.25 is analogous to dW 5 F
x
dx.
In studying translational motion, we have seen that models based on an energy 
approach can be extremely useful in describing a system’s behavior. From what we 
learned of translational motion, we expect that when a symmetric object rotates 
about a fixed axis, the work done by external forces equals the change in the rota-
tional energy of the object.
To prove that fact, let us begin with the rigid object under a net torque model, 
whose mathematical representation is o t
ext
Ia. Using the chain rule from calcu-
lus, we can express the net torque as
a
t
ext
5Ia5I 
dv
dt
5I 
dv
du
du
dt
5I 
dv
du
v
Rearranging this expression and noting that o t
ext
du 5 dW gives
o
t
ext
du 5 dW 5 Idv
Integrating this expression, we obtain for the work W done by the net external force 
acting on a rotating system
W5
3
v
f
v
i
Idv5
1
2
Iv
f
2
2
1
2
Iv
i
2
(10.27)
where the angular speed changes from v
i
to v
f
. Equation 10.27 is the work–kinetic 
energy theorem for rotational motion. Similar to the work–kinetic energy theorem 
in translational motion (Section 7.5), this theorem states that the net work done by 
external forces in rotating a symmetric rigid object about a fixed axis equals the 
change in the object’s rotational energy.
This theorem is a form of the nonisolated system (energy) model discussed in 
Chapter 8. Work is done on the system of the rigid object, which represents a trans-
fer of energy across the boundary of the system that appears as an increase in the 
object’s rotational kinetic energy.
WW Power delivered to a rotating 
rigid object
WW Work–kinetic energy theorem 
for rotational motion
O
P
r
d
u
f
F
S
d
s
S
Figure 10.20 
A rigid object 
rotates about an axis through O 
under the action of an external 
force F
S
applied at P.
314
chapter 10 Rotation of a Rigid Object About a Fixed Axis
In general, we can combine this theorem with the translational form of the work–
kinetic energy theorem from Chapter 7. Therefore, the net work done by external 
forces on an object is the change in its total kinetic energy, which is the sum of the 
translational and rotational kinetic energies. For example, when a pitcher throws a 
baseball, the work done by the pitcher’s hands appears as kinetic energy associated 
with the ball moving through space as well as rotational kinetic energy associated 
with the spinning of the ball.
In addition to the work–kinetic energy theorem, other energy principles can 
also be applied to rotational situations. For example, if a system involving rotating 
objects is isolated and no nonconservative forces act within the system, the isolated 
system model and the principle of conservation of mechanical energy can be used 
to analyze the system as in Example 10.11 below. In general, Equation 8.2, the con-
servation of energy equation, applies to rotational situations, with the recognition 
that the change in kinetic energy ∆K will include changes in both translational and 
rotational kinetic energies.
Finally, in some situations an energy approach does not provide enough infor-
mation to solve the problem and it must be combined with a momentum approach. 
Such a case is illustrated in Example 10.14 in Section 10.9.
Table 10.3 lists the various equations we have discussed pertaining to rotational 
motion together with the analogous expressions for translational motion. Notice 
the similar mathematical forms of the equations. The last two equations in the left-
hand column of Table 10.3, involving angular momentum L, are discussed in Chap-
ter 11 and are included here only for the sake of completeness.
Table 10.3
Useful Equations in Rotational and Translational Motion
Rotational Motion About a Fixed Axis 
Translational Motion
Angular speed v 5 du/dt 
Translational speed v 5 dx/dt
Angular acceleration a 5 dv/dt 
Translational acceleration a 5 dv/dt
Net torque ot
ext
I
Net force oF  5 ma
If 
v
f
5 v
i
1 at
If 
v
f
v
i
at
a 5 constant 
u
f
5 u
i
1 v
i
t 1 1
2
at2 
a 5 constant 
x
f
x
i
v
i
t 1 1
2
at2
v
f
2 5 v
i
2 1 2a(u
f
2 u
i
v
f
2 5 v
i
2 1 2a(x
f
x
i
)
Work W 5  
3
u
f
u
i
d
Work W 5  
3
x
f
x
i
F
x
dx
Rotational kinetic energy K
R
1
2
Iv2 
Kinetic energy K 5 1
2
mv2
Power P 5 tv 
Power P 5 Fv
Angular momentum L 5 I
Linear momentum p 5 mv
Net torque ot 5 dL/dt 
Net force oF 5 dp/dt
Example 10.11   Rotating Rod Revisited 
A uniform rod of length L and mass M is free to rotate on a frictionless pin passing 
through one end (Fig 10.21). The rod is released from rest in the horizontal position.
(A) What is its angular speed when the rod reaches its lowest position?
Conceptualize  Consider Figure 10.21 and imagine the rod rotating downward 
through a quarter turn about the pivot at the left end. Also look back at Example 
10.8. This physical situation is the same.
Categorize  As mentioned in Example 10.4, the angular acceleration of the rod is 
not constant. Therefore, the kinematic equations for rotation (Section 10.2) can-
AM
SoLuTIon
CM
L/2
O
Figure 10.21 
(Example 10.11) 
A uniform rigid rod pivoted at O 
rotates in a vertical plane under the 
action of the gravitational force.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested