11.4 Analysis Model: Isolated System (Angular Momentum) 
345
Find the total moment of inertia about the z axis 
through O for the modified system:
I5
1
12
M,1m
f
d1m
d
a
,
2
b
2
5
,2
4
a
M
3
1m
d
b1m
f
d2
Find the net torque exerted on the system about an axis 
through O:
a
t
ext
5t
f
1t
d
5m
f
gd cos u2
1
2
m
d
g, cos u
Find the new angular acceleration of the system:
a5
a
t
ext
I
5
1
m
f
d2
1
2
m
d
,
2
g cos u
1
,2/4
2
31
M/3
2
1m
d
4
1m
f
d2
Find the required position of the father by setting a 5 0:
a5
1
m
f
d2
1
2
m
d
,
2
g cos u
1
,2/4
231
M/3
2
1m
d
4
1m
f
d2
50
m
f
d2
1
2
m
d
,50    d5a
m
d
m
f
b
,
2
The seesaw is balanced when the angular acceleration is zero. In this situation, both father and daughter can push off 
the ground and rise to the highest possible point.
11.4  Analysis Model: Isolated System  
(Angular Momentum)
In Chapter 9, we found that the total linear momentum of a system of particles 
remains constant if the system is isolated, that is, if the net external force acting 
on the system is zero. We have an analogous conservation law in rotational motion:
The total angular momentum of a system is constant in both magnitude and 
direction if the net external torque acting on the system is zero, that is, if the 
system is isolated.
This statement is often called2 the principle of conservation of angular momentum 
and is the basis of the angular momentum version of the isolated system model. 
This principle follows directly from Equation 11.13, which indicates that if
a
t
S
ext
5
dL
S
tot
dt
50 
(11.17)
then
DL
S
tot
50 
(11.18)
Equation 11.18 can be written as
L
S
tot
5constant
or
L
S
i
L
S
f
For an isolated system consisting of a small number of particles, we write this conser-
vation law as L
S
tot
5 g L
S
n
5 constant, where the index n denotes the nth particle in 
the system.
If an isolated rotating system is deformable so that its mass undergoes redistri-
bution in some way, the system’s moment of inertia changes. Because the magni-
tude of the angular momentum of the system is L 5 Iv (Eq. 11.14), conservation 
WW Conservation of angular 
momentum 
2The most general conservation of angular momentum equation is Equation 11.13, which describes how the system 
interacts with its environment.
In the rare case that the father and daughter have the same mass, the father is located at the end of the seesaw, d 5 ,/2.
▸ 11.6 
continued
Answer  The angular acceleration of the system should decrease if the system is more balanced.
Create html email from pdf - Convert PDF to html files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
How to Convert PDF to HTML Webpage with C# PDF Conversion SDK
pdf to html converter online; convert pdf to html link
Create html email from pdf - VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
PDF to HTML Webpage Converter SDK for VB.NET PDF to HTML Conversion
how to convert pdf to html; add pdf to website
346
chapter 11 Angular Momentum
of angular momentum requires that the product of I and v must remain constant. 
Therefore, a change in I for an isolated system requires a change in v. In this case, 
we can express the principle of conservation of angular momentum as
I
i
v
i
I
f
v
f
5 constant 
(11.19)
This expression is valid both for rotation about a fixed axis and for rotation about 
an axis through the center of mass of a moving system as long as that axis remains 
fixed in direction. We require only that the net external torque be zero.
Many examples demonstrate conservation of angular momentum for a deform-
able system. You may have observed a figure skater spinning in the finale of a 
program (Fig. 11.10). The angular speed of the skater is large when his hands 
and feet are close to the trunk of his body. (Notice the skater’s hair!) Ignoring 
friction between skater and ice, there are no external torques on the skater. The 
moment of inertia of his body increases as his hands and feet are moved away 
from his body at the finish of the spin. According to the isolated system model for 
angular momentum, his angular speed must decrease. In a similar way, when div-
ers or acrobats wish to make several somersaults, they pull their hands and feet 
close to their bodies to rotate at a higher rate. In these cases, the external force 
due to gravity acts through the center of mass and hence exerts no torque about 
an axis through this point. Therefore, the angular momentum about the center 
of mass must be conserved; that is, I
i
v
i
I
f
v
f
. For example, when divers wish to 
double their angular speed, they must reduce their moment of inertia to half its 
initial value.
In Equation 11.18, we have a third version of the isolated system model. We can 
now state that the energy, linear momentum, and angular momentum of an iso-
lated system are all constant:
DE
system
5 0 (if there are no energy transfers across the system boundary)
Dp
S
tot
50 
(if the net external force on the system is zero)
DL
S
tot
50 
(if the net external torque on the system is zero)
A system may be isolated in terms of one of these quantities but not in terms of 
another. If a system is nonisolated in terms of momentum or angular momentum, 
it will often be non iso lated also in terms of energy because the system has a net 
force or torque on it and the net force or torque will do work on the system. We 
can, however, identify systems that are nonisolated in terms of energy but isolated 
in terms of momentum. For example, imagine pushing inward on a balloon (the 
system) between your hands. Work is done in compressing the balloon, so the sys-
tem is nonisolated in terms of energy, but there is zero net force on the system, so 
the system is isolated in terms of momentum. A similar statement could be made 
about twisting the ends of a long, springy piece of metal with both hands. Work 
is done on the metal (the system), so energy is stored in the nonisolated system as 
elastic potential energy, but the net torque on the system is zero. Therefore, the 
system is isolated in terms of angular momentum. Other examples are collisions of 
macroscopic objects, which represent isolated systems in terms of momentum but 
nonisolated systems in terms of energy because of the output of energy from the 
system by mechanical waves (sound).
uick Quiz 11.4  A competitive diver leaves the diving board and falls toward 
the water with her body straight and rotating slowly. She pulls her arms and 
legs into a tight tuck position. What happens to her rotational kinetic energy? 
(a) It increases. (b) It decreases. (c) It stays the same. (d) It is impossible to 
determine. 
Figure 11.10 
Angular momen-
tum is conserved as Russian 
gold medalist Evgeni Plushenko 
performs during the Turin 2006 
Winter Olympic Games. 
When his arms and legs are close 
to his body, the skater’s moment 
of inertia is small and his angular 
speed is large.
C
l
i
v
e
R
o
s
e
/
G
e
t
t
y
I
m
a
g
e
s
To slow down for the finish of his 
spin, the skater moves his arms 
and legs outward, increasing his 
moment of inertia.
A
l
B
e
l
l
o
/
G
e
t
t
y
I
m
a
g
e
s
RasterEdge.com General FAQs for Products
or need additional assistance, please contact us via email (support@rasteredge dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
convert url pdf to word; how to convert pdf file to html document
.NET RasterEdge XDoc.PDF Purchase Details
PDF Create. PDF Print. License Agreement. Support Plans Each RasterEdge license comes with 1-year dedicated support (email, online chat) with 24-hour response
pdf to html conversion; convert pdf to html5
11.4 Analysis Model: Isolated System (Angular Momentum) 
347
Example 11.7   Formation of a Neutron Star 
A star rotates with a period of 30 days about an axis through its center. The period is the time interval required for a 
point on the star’s equator to make one complete revolution around the axis of rotation. After the star undergoes a 
supernova explosion, the stellar core, which had a radius of 1.0 3 104 km, collapses into a neutron star of radius 3.0 km. 
Determine the period of rotation of the neutron star.
Conceptualize  The change in the neutron star’s motion is similar to that of the skater described earlier, but in the 
reverse direction. As the mass of the star moves closer to the rotation axis, we expect the star to spin faster.
Categorize  Let us assume that during the collapse of the stellar core, (1) no external torque acts on it, (2) it remains 
spherical with the same relative mass distribution, and (3) its mass remains constant. We categorize the star as an iso-
lated system in terms of angular momentum. We do not know the mass distribution of the star, but we have assumed the 
distribution is symmetric, so the moment of inertia can be expressed as kMR2, where k is some numerical constant. 
(From Table 10.2, for example, we see that k 5 2
5
for a solid sphere and k 5 2
3
for a spherical shell.)
Analyze  Let’s use the symbol T for the period, with T
i
being the initial period of the star and T
f
being the period of the 
neutron star. The star’s angular speed is given by v 5 2p/T.
AM
SoluTIon
From the isolated system model for angular 
momentum, write Equation 11.19 for the star:
I
i
v
i
I
f
v
f
Use v 5 2p/T to rewrite this equation in terms of 
the initial and final periods:
I
i
a
2p
T
i
b5I
f
a
2p
T
f
b
Substitute the moments of inertia in the preceding 
equation:
kMR
i
2a
2p
T
i
b5kMR
f
2a
2p
T
f
b
Solve for the final period of the star:
T
f
5
a
R
f
R
i
b
2
T
i
Analysis Model   Isolated System (Angular Momentum)
Imagine a system rotates about 
an axis. If there is no net external 
torque on the system, there is no 
change in the angular momen-
tum of the system:
DL
S
tot
50 
(11.18)
Applying this law of conserva-
tion of angular momentum to a 
system whose moment of inertia 
changes gives
I
i
v
i
I
f
v
f
5 constant 
(11.19)
The angular momentum of the 
isolated system is constant.
Angular momentum
System
boundary
Examples: 
• after a supernova explosion, the core of a 
star collapses to a small radius and spins at a 
much higher rate
• the square of the orbital period of a planet is 
proportional to the cube of its semimajor axis; 
Kepler’s third law  (Chapter 13)
• in atomic transitions, selection rules on the 
quantum numbers must be obeyed in order to 
conserve angular momentum (Chapter 42)
• in beta decay of a radioactive nucleus, a neu-
trino must be emitted in order to conserve 
angular momentum (Chapter 44)
Substitute numerical values:
T
f
5a
3.0 km
1.03104 km
b
2
1
30 days
2
52.731026 days5 0.23 s
Finalize  The neutron star does indeed rotate faster after it collapses, as predicted. It moves very fast, in fact, rotating 
about four times each second!
VB.NET Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF
HTML Document Viewer for Azure, C# HTML Document Viewer Create searchable and scanned PDF files from Excel in VB Excel to PDF document free online without email.
best pdf to html converter; convert pdf into html code
VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to
PDF in VB.NET, VB.NET convert PDF to HTML, VB.NET convert PDF to Word, VB.NET extract text from Create PDF file from PowerPoint free online without email.
pdf to html; convert pdf to web pages
348
chapter 11 Angular Momentum
Therefore, the kinetic energy of the system increases. The student must perform muscular activity to move herself 
closer to the center of rotation, so this extra kinetic energy comes from potential energy stored in the student’s body 
from previous meals. The system is isolated in terms of energy, but a transformation process within the system changes 
potential energy to kinetic energy.
Find the initial moment of inertia I
i
of the 
system (student plus platform) about the 
axis of rotation:
I
i
5I
pi
1I
si
51
2
MR1mR2
Find the moment of inertia of the system 
when the student walks to the position r , R:
I
f
5I
pf
1I
sf
5
1
2
MR1mr2
Write Equation 11.19 for the system:
I
i
v
i
I
f
v
f
Substitute the moments of inertia:
11
2
MR1mR2
2
v
i
5
11
2
MR1mr2
2
v
f
Solve for the final angular speed:
v
f
5 a
1
2
MR1mR2
1
2
MR1mr2
bv
i
Substitute numerical values:
v
f
5 c
1
2
1
100 kg
21
2.0 m
22
1
1
60 kg
21
2.0 m
22
1
2
1
100 kg
21
2.0 m
22
1
1
60 kg
21
0.50 m
22
d
1
2.0 rad/s
2
 4.1 rad/s
Finalize  As expected, the angular speed increases. The fastest that this system could spin would be when the stu-
dent moves to the center of the platform. Do this calculation to show that this maximum angular speed is 4.4 rad/s. 
Notice that the activity described in this problem is dangerous as discussed with regard to the Coriolis force in  
Section 6.3.
What if you measured the kinetic energy of the system before and after the student walks inward? Are the 
initial kinetic energy and the final kinetic energy the same?
Answer  You may be tempted to say yes because the system is isolated. Remember, however, that energy can be trans-
formed among several forms, so we have to handle an energy question carefully.
WhAT IF?
Find the initial kinetic energy:
K
i
5
1
2
I
i
v
i
5
1
2
1
440 kg
#
m2
21
2.0 rad/s
22
5880 J
Find the final kinetic energy:
K
f
5
1
2
I
f
v
f
5
1
2
1
215 kg
#
m2
21
4.1 rad/s
22
51.803103 J
Example 11.8   The Merry-Go-Round 
A horizontal platform in the shape of a circular disk rotates freely in a horizon-
tal plane about a frictionless, vertical axle (Fig. 11.11). The platform has a mass 
M 5 100 kg and a radius R 5 2.0 m. A student whose mass is m 5 60 kg walks 
slowly from the rim of the disk toward its center. If the angular speed of the system 
is 2.0rad/s when the student is at the rim, what is the angular speed when she 
reaches a point r 5 0.50 m from the center?
Conceptualize  The speed change here is similar to those of the spinning skater 
and the neutron star in preceding discussions. This problem is different because 
part of the moment of inertia of the system changes (that of the student) while 
part remains fixed (that of the platform).
Categorize  Because the platform rotates on a frictionless axle, we identify the 
system of the student and the platform as an isolated system in terms of angular 
momentum.
Analyze  Let us denote the moment of inertia of the platform as I
p
and that of the student as I
s
. We model the student 
as a particle.
AM
SoluTIon
R
M
m
Figure 11.11 
(Example 11.8) As 
the student walks toward the center 
of the rotating platform, the angu-
lar speed of the system increases 
because the angular momentum of 
the system remains constant.
VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
PDF in VB.NET, VB.NET convert PDF to HTML, VB.NET Easy to create searchable and scanned PDF files from Word. Free online Word to PDF converter without email.
converting pdf to html email; convert pdf to website
About RasterEdge.com - A Professional Image Solution Provider
Email to: support@rasteredge.com. We are dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image to pdf files and components for
convert pdf to html form; converting pdf into html
11.4 Analysis Model: Isolated System (Angular Momentum) 
349
Example 11.9   Disk and Stick Collision 
A 2.0-kg disk traveling at 3.0 m/s strikes a 1.0-kg stick of length 4.0 m that is lying flat 
on nearly frictionless ice as shown in the overhead view of Figure 11.12a. The disk 
strikes at the endpoint of the stick, at a distance r 5 2.0 m from the stick’s center. 
Assume the collision is elastic and the disk does not deviate from its original line of 
motion. Find the translational speed of the disk, the translational speed of the stick, 
and the angular speed of the stick after the collision. The moment of inertia of the 
stick about its center of mass is 1.33 kg ? m2.
Conceptualize  Examine Figure 11.12a and imagine what 
happens after the disk hits the stick. Figure 11.12b shows 
what you might expect: the disk continues to move at a slower 
speed, and the stick is in both translational and rotational 
motion. We assume the disk does not deviate from its origi-
nal line of motion because the force exerted by the stick on 
the disk is parallel to the original path of the disk.
Categorize  Because the ice is frictionless, the disk and stick 
form an isolated system in terms of momentum and angular momentum. Ignoring the sound made in the collision, we also 
model the system as an isolated system in terms of energy. In addition, because the collision is assumed to be elastic, the 
kinetic energy of the system is constant.
Analyze  First notice that we have three unknowns, so we need three equations to solve simultaneously.
AM
SoluTIon
After
Before
v
a
b
v
df
S
v
s
S
r
v
di
S
Figure 11.12 
(Example 
11.9) Overhead view of 
a disk striking a stick 
in an elastic collision. 
(a)Before the collision, 
the disk moves toward the 
stick. (b) The collision 
causes the stick to rotate 
and move to the right.
Apply the isolated system model for momentum to 
the system and then rearrange the result:
Dp
S
tot
50   S   
1
m
d
v
df
1m
s
v
s
2
2m
d
v
di
50
(1)   m
d
(v
di
v
df
) 5 m
s
v
s
Apply the isolated system model for angular momen-
tum to the system and rearrange the result. Use an 
axis passing through the center of the stick as the 
rotation axis so that the path of the disk is a distance 
r 5 2.0 m from the rotation axis:
DL
S
tot
50   S   
1
2rm
d
v
df
1Iv
2
2
1
2rm
d
v
di
2
50
(2)   2rm
d
(v
di
v
df
) 5 Iv
Apply the isolated system model for energy to the 
system, rearrange the equation, and factor the com-
bination of terms related to the disk:
DK50   S   
11
2
m
d
v
df
1
1
2
m
s
v
s
11
2
Iv2
2
21
2
m
d
v
di
50
(3)   m
d
(v
di
v
df
)(v
di
v
df
) 5 m
s
v
s
2 1 Iv2
Multiply Equation (1) by r and add to Equation (2):
rm
d
(v
di
v
df
) 5 rm
s
v
s
2rm
d
(v
di
v
df
) 5 Iv
0 5 rm
s
v
s
Iv
Solve for v:
(4)   v52
rm
s
v
s
I
Divide Equation (3) by Equation (1):
m
d
1v
di
2v
df
21v
di
1v
df
2
m
d
1v
di
2v
df
2
5
m
s
v
s
1Iv2
m
s
v
s
(5)   v
di
1v
df
5v
s
1
Iv
2
m
s
v
s
Substitute Equation (4) into Equation (5):
(6)   v
di
1v
df
5v
s
a
11
r2m
s
I
b
Substitute v
df
from Equation (1) into 
Equation(6):
v
di
1
a
v
di
2
m
s
m
d
v
s
b
5v
s
a
11
r2m
s
I
b
continued
C# Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF in C#
Create searchable and scanned PDF files from Excel. Export PDF from Excel with cell border or no border. Free online Excel to PDF converter without email.
converting pdfs to html; conversion pdf to html
C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF
documents. Easy to create searchable and scanned PDF files from PowerPoint. application. Free online PowerPoint to PDF converter without email. C#
convert url pdf to word; pdf to html converter
350
chapter 11 Angular Momentum
11.5 The Motion of Gyroscopes and Tops
An unusual and fascinating type of motion you have probably observed is that of a 
top spinning about its axis of symmetry as shown in Figure 11.13a. If the top spins 
rapidly, the symmetry axis rotates about the z axis, sweeping out a cone (see Fig. 
11.13b). The motion of the symmetry axis about the vertical—known as preces-
sional motion—is usually slow relative to the spinning motion of the top.
It is quite natural to wonder why the top does not fall over. Because the center 
of mass is not directly above the pivot point O, a net torque is acting on the top 
about an axis passing through O, a torque resulting from the gravitational force 
Mg
S
. The top would certainly fall over if it were not spinning. Because it is spin-
ning, however, it has an angular momentum L
S
directed along its symmetry axis. 
We shall show that this symmetry axis moves about the z axis (precessional motion 
occurs) because the torque produces a change in the direction of the symmetry axis. 
This illustration is an excellent example of the importance of the vector nature of 
angular momentum.
The essential features of precessional motion can be illustrated by considering 
the simple gyroscope shown in Figure 11.14a. The two forces acting on the gyro-
scope are shown in Figure 11.14b: the downward gravitational force Mg
S
and the 
normal force n
S
acting upward at the pivot point O. The normal force produces no 
torque about an axis passing through the pivot because its moment arm through 
that point is zero. The gravitational force, however, produces a torque t
S
r
S
3Mg
S
about an axis passing through O, where the direction of t
S
is perpendicular to the 
plane formed by r
S
and Mg
S
. By necessity, the vector t
S
lies in a horizontal xy plane 
Table 11.1
Comparison of Values in Example 11.9 Before and After the Collision
v (m/s) 
v (rad/s) 
p (kg ? m/s) 
L (kg ? m2/s) 
K
trans
(J) 
K
rot
(J)
Before
Disk 
3.0 
— 
6.0 
212 
9.0 
Stick 
0
Total for system 
— 
— 
6.0 
212 
9.0 
0
After
Disk 
2.3 
— 
4.7 
29.3 
5.4 
Stick 
1.3 
22.0 
1.3 
22.7 
0.9 
2.7
Total for system 
— 
— 
6.0 
212 
6.3 
2.7
Note: Linear momentum, angular momentum, and total kinetic energy of the system are all conserved.
Solve for v
s
and substitute numerical 
values:
v
s
5
2v
di
11
1
m
s
/m
d
2
1
1
r2m
s
/I
2
2
1
3.0 m/s
2
11
1
1.0 kg/2.0 kg
2
1
31
2.0 m
221
1.0 kg
2
/1.33 kg
#
m2
4
5  1.3 m/s
Substitute numerical values into 
Equation(4):
v52
1
2.0 m
21
1.0 kg
21
1.3 m/s
2
1.33 kg
#
m2
5
22.0 rad/s
Solve Equation (1) for v
df
and substitute 
numerical values:
v
df
5v
di
2
m
s
m
d
v
s
53.0 m/s2
1.0 kg
2.0 kg
1
1.3 m/s
2
5
2.3 m/s
Finalize  These values seem reasonable. The disk is moving more slowly after the collision than it was before the col-
lision, and the stick has a small translational speed. Table 11.1 summarizes the initial and final values of variables for 
the disk and the stick, and it verifies the conservation of linear momentum, angular momentum, and kinetic energy 
for the isolated system.
▸ 11.9 
continued
C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
class. Easy to create searchable and scanned PDF files from Word. bookmark. Free online Word to PDF converter without email. C#
convert pdf to web; change pdf to html format
RasterEdge Product Refund Policy
send back RasterEdge Software Refund Agreement that we will email to you We are dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
convert pdf to html file; convert from pdf to html
11.5 the Motion of Gyroscopes and tops 
351
perpendicular to the angular momentum vector. The net torque and angular 
momentum of the gyroscope are related through Equation 11.13:
a
t
S
ext
5
dL
S
dt
This expression shows that in the infinitesimal time interval dt, the nonzero torque 
produces a change in angular momentum dL
S
, a change that is in the same direc-
tion as t
S
. Therefore, like the torque vector, dL
S
must also be perpendicular to L
S
Figure 11.14c illustrates the resulting precessional motion of the symmetry axis of 
the gyroscope. In a time interval dt, the change in angular momentum is dL
S
L
S
f
L
S
i
5t
S
dt. Because dL
S
is perpendicular to L
S
, the magnitude of L
S
does not 
change 
10
L
S
i
0
5
0
L
S
f
02
. Rather, what is changing is the direction of L
S
. Because the 
change in angular momentum dL
S
is in the direction of t
S
, which lies in the xy plane, 
the gyroscope undergoes precessional motion.
To simplify the description of the system, we assume the total angular momen-
tum of the precessing wheel is the sum of the angular momentum Iv
S
due to the 
spinning and the angular momentum due to the motion of the center of mass 
about the pivot. In our treatment, we shall neglect the contribution from the center- 
of-mass motion and take the total angular momentum to be simply Iv
S
. In practice, 
this approximation is good if v
S
is made very large.
The vector diagram in Figure 11.14c shows that in the time interval dt, the angu-
lar momentum vector rotates through an angle df, which is also the angle through 
which the gyroscope axle rotates. From the vector triangle formed by the vectors 
L
S
i
L
S
f
, and dL
S
, we see that
df5
dL
L
5
a
t
ext
dt
L
5
1Mgr
CM
dt
L
Dividing through by dt and using the relationship L 5 Iv, we find that the rate at 
which the axle rotates about the vertical axis is
v
p
5
df
dt
5
Mgr
CM
Iv
(11.20)
f
d
f
O
O
M
i
O
z
y
x
r
CM
y
n
S
L
S
g
S
L
f
S
a
b
c
The gravitational force        in the 
negative z direction produces a 
torque on the gyroscope in the 
positive y direction about the pivot.
Mg
S
The torque results in a change in angular 
momentum       in a direction parallel to the 
torque vector. The gyroscope axle sweeps 
out an angle df in a time interval dt.
L
S
d
L
S
L
S
i
L
S
d
t
S
t
S
Figure 11.14 
(a) A spinning gyroscope is placed on a pivot at the right end. (b) Diagram for the 
spinning gyroscope showing forces, torque, and angular momentum. (c) Overhead view (looking 
down the z axis) of the gyroscope’s initial and final angular momentum vectors for an infinitesimal 
time interval dt.
y
x
x
z
b
a
L
S
L
S
f
L
S
i
L
S
n
S
r
S
g
S
S
The right-hand rule indicates 
that   
  
    
  
         is 
in the xy plane.          
F
S
Mg
S
S
r
S
r
S
The direction of ∆   
is parallel 
to that of     in      .
S
L
S
a
Figure 11.13 
Precessional 
motion of a top spinning about 
its symmetry axis. (a) The only 
external forces acting on the top 
are the normal force n
S
and the 
gravitational force Mg
S
. The direc-
tion of the angular momentum 
L
S
is along the axis of symmetry. 
(b)Because L
S
f
5DL
S
L
S
i
, the 
top precesses about the z axis.
352
chapter 11 Angular Momentum
The angular speed v
p
is called the precessional frequency. This result is valid 
only when v
p
,, v. Otherwise, a much more complicated motion is involved. As 
you can see from Equation 11.20, the condition v
p
,, v is met when v is large, 
that is, when the wheel spins rapidly. Furthermore, notice that the precessional 
frequency decreases as v increases, that is, as the wheel spins faster about its axis 
of symmetry.
As an example of the usefulness of gyroscopes, suppose you are in a spacecraft in 
deep space and you need to alter your trajectory. To fire the engines in the correct 
direction, you need to turn the spacecraft. How, though, do you turn a spacecraft 
in empty space? One way is to have small rocket engines that fire perpendicularly 
out the side of the spacecraft, providing a torque around its center of mass. Such a 
setup is desirable, and many spacecraft have such rockets.
Let us consider another method, however, that does not require the consump-
tion of rocket fuel. Suppose the spacecraft carries a gyroscope that is not rotating 
as in Figure 11.15a. In this case, the angular momentum of the spacecraft about its 
center of mass is zero. Suppose the gyroscope is set into rotation, giving the gyro-
scope a nonzero angular momentum. There is no external torque on the isolated 
system (spacecraft and gyroscope), so the angular momentum of this system must 
remain zero according to the isolated system (angular momentum) model. The 
zero value can be satisfied if the spacecraft rotates in the direction opposite that 
of the gyroscope so that the angular momentum vectors of the gyroscope and the 
spacecraft cancel, resulting in no angular momentum of the system. The result of 
rotating the gyroscope, as in Figure 11.15b, is that the spacecraft turns around! By 
including three gyroscopes with mutually perpendicular axles, any desired rota-
tion in space can be achieved.
This effect created an undesirable situation with the Voyager 2 spacecraft during 
its flight. The spacecraft carried a tape recorder whose reels rotated at high speeds. 
Each time the tape recorder was turned on, the reels acted as gyroscopes and the 
spacecraft started an undesirable rotation in the opposite direction. This rotation 
had to be counteracted by Mission Control by using the sideward-firing jets to stop 
the rotation!
Figure 11.15 
(a) A spacecraft 
carries a gyroscope that is not 
spinning. (b) The gyroscope is set 
into rotation.
a
When the gyroscope
turns counterclockwise,
the spacecraft turns 
clockwise.
b
Summary
Definitions
Given two vectors A
S
and B
S
, the vec-
tor product 
A
S
B
S
is a vector C
S
having a 
magnitude
C 5 AB sin u 
(11.3)
where u is the angle between A
S
and B
S
. The 
direction of the vector C
S
A
S
B
S
is per-
pendicular to the plane formed by A
S
and B
S
and this direction is determined by the right-
hand rule.
The torque t
S
on a particle due to a force F
S
about an axis 
through the origin in an inertial frame is defined to be
t
S
r
S
F
S
(11.1)
The angular momentum L
S
about an axis through the origin 
of a particle having linear momentum p
S
5mv
S
is
L
S
r
S
3p
S
(11.10)
where r
S
is the vector position of the particle relative to the origin.
following questions. (iii) In this process, is the mechan-
ical energy of the mouse–turntable system constant? 
(iv) Is the momentum of the system constant? (v) Is the 
angular momentum of the system constant?
3. Let us name three perpendicular directions as right, 
up, and toward you as you might name them when 
you are facing a television screen that lies in a vertical 
plane. Unit vectors for these directions are r^, u^, and t^,  
respectively. Consider the quantity (23u^ 32t
^
). (i) Is 
the magnitude of this vector (a) 6, (b) 3, (c) 2, or (d) 0?  
(ii) Is the direction of this vector (a) down, (b) toward 
you, (c) up, (d) away from you, or (e) left?
4. Let the four compass directions north, east, south, 
and west be represented by unit vectors n^, e^, s^, and w^, 
respectively. Vertically up and down are represented as 
u^ and d
^
. Let us also identify unit vectors that are half-
way between these directions such as ne for northeast. 
Rank the magnitudes of the following cross products 
from largest to smallest. If any are equal in magnitude  
l
1. An ice skater starts a spin with her arms stretched out 
to the sides. She balances on the tip of one skate to 
turn without friction. She then pulls her arms in so that 
her moment of inertia decreases by a factor of 2. In the 
process of her doing so, what happens to her kinetic 
energy? (a)It increases by a factor of 4. (b) It increases 
by a factor of 2. (c) It remains constant. (d) It decreases 
by a factor of 2. (e)It decreases by a factor of 4.
2. A pet mouse sleeps near the eastern edge of a station-
ary, horizontal turntable that is supported by a friction-
less, vertical axle through its center. The mouse wakes 
up and starts to walk north on the turntable. (i) As it 
takes its first steps, what is the direction of the mouse’s 
displacement relative to the stationary ground below? 
(a) north (b) south (c) no displacement. (ii) In this 
process, the spot on the turntable where the mouse 
had been snoozing undergoes a displacement in what 
direction relative to the ground below? (a)north  
(b) south (c) no displacement. Answer yes or no for the 
Objective Questions 
353
continued
The z component of angular momentum of a rigid object rotating about a fixed z axis is
L
z
5I
(11.14)
where I is the moment of inertia of the object about the axis of rotation and v is its angular speed.
Concepts and Principles
Analysis Models for Problem Solving
Angular momentum
System
boundary
External
torque
The rate of change in the 
angular momentum of the 
nonisolated system is equal 
to the net external torque 
on the system.
Nonisolated System (Angular Momentum). If a sys-
tem interacts with its environment in the sense that 
there is an external torque on the system, the net exter-
nal torque acting on a system is equal to the time rate 
of change of its angular momentum:
a
t
S
ext
5
dL
S
tot
dt
(11.13)
The angular momentum of the 
isolated system is constant.
Angular momentum
System
boundary
Isolated System (Angular Momentum). If a system 
experiences no external torque from the environ-
ment, the total angular momentum of the system is 
conserved:
DL
S
tot
50 
(11.18)
Applying this law of conservation of angular momen-
tum to a system whose moment of inertia changes gives
I
i
v
i
I
f
v
f
5 constant 
(11.19)
Objective Questions
1. 
denotes answer available in Student Solutions Manual/Study Guide
354
chapter 11 Angular Momentum
they walk, what happens to the angular speed of the 
turntable? (a) It increases. (b) It decreases. (c) It stays 
constant. Consider the ponies–turntable system in this 
process and answer yes or no for the following ques-
tions. (ii) Is the mechanical energy of the system con-
served? (iii) Is the momentum of the system conserved? 
(iv) Is the angular momentum of the system conserved?
8. Consider an isolated system moving through empty 
space. The system consists of objects that interact with 
each other and can change location with respect to 
one another. Which of the following quantities can 
change in time? (a)The angular momentum of the sys-
tem. (b)The linear momentum of the system. (c)Both 
the angular momentum and linear momentum of the 
system. (d)Neither the angular momentum nor linear 
momentum of the system.
or are equal to zero, show that in your ranking.  
(a) n^ 3n^ (b) w^ 3ne (c) u^ 3ne (d) n^ 3nw (e) n^ 3e^ 
5. Answer yes or no to the following questions. (a) Is it 
possible to calculate the torque acting on a rigid object 
without specifying an axis of rotation? (b) Is the torque 
independent of the location of the axis of rotation?
6. Vector A
S
is in the negative y direction, and vector B
S
is in 
the negative x direction. (i) What is the direction of  A
S
B
S
? (a)no direction because it is a scalar (b) x (c) 2y  
(d) z (e)2z (ii) What is the direction of B
S
A
S
Choose from the same possibilities (a) through (e).
7. Two ponies of equal mass are initially at diametrically 
opposite points on the rim of a large horizontal turn-
table that is turning freely on a frictionless, vertical 
axle through its center. The ponies simultaneously start 
walking toward each other across the turntable. (i) As 
l
l
l
1. Stars originate as large bodies of slowly rotating gas. 
Because of gravity, these clumps of gas slowly decrease 
in size. What happens to the angular speed of a star as 
it shrinks? Explain.
2. A scientist arriving at a hotel asks a bellhop to carry 
a heavy suitcase. When the bellhop rounds a corner, 
the suitcase suddenly swings away from him for some 
unknown reason. The alarmed bellhop drops the suit-
case and runs away. What might be in the suitcase?
3. Why does a long pole help a tightrope walker stay 
balanced?
4. Two children are playing with a roll of paper towels. 
One child holds the roll between the index fingers 
of her hands so that it is free to rotate, and the sec-
ond child pulls at constant speed on the free end of 
the paper towels. As the child pulls the paper towels, 
the radius of the roll of remaining towels decreases.  
(a) How does the torque on the roll change with time? 
(b) How does the angular speed of the roll change 
in time? (c) If the child suddenly jerks the end paper 
towel with a large force, is the towel more likely to 
break from the others when it is being pulled from a 
nearly full roll or from a nearly empty roll?
5. Both torque and work are products of force and dis-
placement. How are they different? Do they have the 
same units?
6. In some motorcycle races, the riders drive over small 
hills and the motorcycle becomes airborne for a short 
time interval. If the motorcycle racer keeps the throttle 
open while leaving the hill and going into the air, the 
motorcycle tends to nose upward. Why?
7. If the torque acting on a particle about an axis through 
a certain origin is zero, what can you say about its angu-
lar momentum about that axis?
8. A ball is thrown in such a way that it does not spin 
about its own axis. Does this statement imply that the 
angular momentum is zero about an arbitrary axis? 
Explain.
9. If global warming continues over the next one hun-
dred years, it is likely that some polar ice will melt and 
the water will be distributed closer to the equator.  
(a) How would that change the moment of inertia of 
the Earth? (b) Would the duration of the day (one rev-
olution) increase or decrease?
10. A cat usually lands on its feet regardless of the position 
from which it is dropped. A slow-motion film of a cat 
falling shows that the upper half of its body twists in 
one direction while the lower half twists in the oppo-
site direction. (See Fig. CQ11.10.) Why does this type of 
rotation occur?
Figure CQ11.10
A
g
e
n
c
e
N
a
t
u
r
e
/
P
h
o
t
o
R
e
s
e
a
r
c
h
e
r
s
,
I
n
c
.
11. In Chapters 7 and 8, we made use of energy bar charts 
to analyze physical situations. Why have we not used 
bar charts for angular momentum in this chapter?
1. 
denotes answer available in Student Solutions Manual/Study Guide
Conceptual Questions
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested