mvc display pdf in browser : Converting pdf to html email software Library dll windows .net asp.net web forms doc-3-pdf-67a5de9fa89738da0c6835ef457b5878-original39-part287

problems 
355
Section 11.1 The Vector Product and Torque
1. Given M
S
52
i
^
23
j
^
1k
^
and N
S
54
i
^
15
j
^
22k
^
, calcu-
late the vector product M
S
3N
S
.
2. The displacement vectors 42.0 cm at 15.08 and 23.0 cm  
at 65.08 both start from the origin and form two sides 
of a parallelogram. Both angles are measured coun-
terclockwise from the x axis. (a) Find the area of 
the parallelogram. (b)Find the length of its longer 
diagonal.
3. Two vectors are given by A
S
5
i
^
12
j
^
and B
S
522
i
^
13
j
^
.  
Find (a) A
S
B
S
and (b) the angle between A
S
and B
S
.
4. Use the definition of the vector product and the defini-
tions of the unit vectors 
i
^
, 
j
^
, and k
^
to prove Equations 
11.7. You may assume the x axis points to the right, the 
y axis up, and the z axis horizontally toward you (not 
away from you). This choice is said to make the coordi-
nate system a right-handed system.
5. Calculate the net torque (magnitude and direction) on 
the beam in Figure P11.5 about (a) an axis through O 
perpendicular to the page and (b) an axis through C 
perpendicular to the page.
C
4.0 m
2.0 m
45°
30 N
10 N
20°
30°
25 N
O
Figure P11.5
6. Two vectors are given by these expressions: A
S
23
i
^
1
7
j
^
24k
^
and B
S
56
i
^
210
j
^
19k
^
. Evaluate the quanti-
ties (a) cos21[A
S
?
B
S
/AB] and (b) sin21[0A
S
3B
S
0/AB].  
(c) Which give(s) the angle between the vectors?
7. If 0A
S
B
S
0
A
S
?
B
S
, what is the angle between A
S
and B
S
?
8. A particle is located at the vector position r
S
5
1
4.00
i
^
16.00
j
^
2
m, and a force exerted on it is given by 
F
S
5
1
3.00
i
^
12.00
j
^
2
N. (a) What is the torque acting on 
the particle about the origin? (b) Can there be another 
point about which the torque caused by this force on 
this particle will be in the opposite direction and half 
as large in magnitude? (c) Can there be more than 
one such point? (d) Can such a point lie on the y axis?  
(e) Can more than one such point lie on the y axis?  
(f) Determine the position vector of one such point.
W
M
S
Q/C
9. Two forces F
S
1
and F
S
2
act along the two sides of an equi-
lateral triangle as shown in Figure P11.9. Point O is the 
intersection of the altitudes of the triangle. (a) Find  
a third force F
S
3
to be applied at B and along BC that 
will make the total torque zero about the point O.  
(b) What If? Will the total torque change if F
S
3
is 
applied not at B but at any other point along BC?
A
C
D
O
B
F
1
S
F
2
S
F
3
S
Figure P11.9
10. A student claims that he has found a vector A
S
such 
that 12
i
^
23
j
^
14k
^
2
A
S
5
1
4
i
^
13
j
^
2k
^
2
. (a) Do you 
believe this claim? (b) Explain why or why not.
Section 11.2  Analysis Model: nonisolated System  
(Angular Momentum)
11. A light, rigid rod of length , 5 1.00m joins two par-
ticles, with masses m
1
5 4.00 kg and m
2
5 3.00kg, at its 
ends. The combination rotates in the xy plane about a 
pivot through the center of the rod (Fig. P11.11). Deter-
mine the angular momentum of the system about the 
origin when the speed of each particle is 5.00 m/s.
x
y
m
1
m
2
,
v
S
v
S
Figure P11.11
12. A 1.50-kg particle moves in the xy plane with a veloc-
ity of v
S
5
1
4.20
i
^
23.60
j
^
2 m/s. Determine the angular 
momentum of the particle about the origin when its 
position vector is r
S
11.50
i
^
12.20
j
^
2 m.
13. A particle of mass m moves in the xy plane with a velocity 
of v
S
5v
x
i
^
1v
y
j
^
. Determine the angular momentum  
Q/C
M
W
S
Problems
The problems found in this  
chapter may be assigned 
online in Enhanced WebAssign
1.
 straightforward; 
2. 
intermediate;  
3. 
challenging
1.
full solution available in the Student 
Solutions Manual/Study Guide
AMT
Analysis Model tutorial available in 
Enhanced WebAssign
GP
Guided Problem
M
Master It tutorial available in Enhanced 
WebAssign
W
Watch It video solution available in 
Enhanced WebAssign
BIO
Q/C
S
Converting pdf to html email - Convert PDF to html files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
How to Convert PDF to HTML Webpage with C# PDF Conversion SDK
adding pdf to html page; convert pdf to html with images
Converting pdf to html email - VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
PDF to HTML Webpage Converter SDK for VB.NET PDF to HTML Conversion
convert pdf to html for online; changing pdf to html
356
chapter 11 Angular Momentum
18. A counterweight of mass m 5 4.00 kg is attached to 
a light cord that is wound around a pulley as in Fig-
ure P11.18. The pulley is a thin hoop of radius R5  
8.00 cm and mass M 5 2.00kg. The spokes have neg-
ligible mass. (a)What is the magnitude of the net 
torque on the system about the axle of the pulley? 
(b)When the counterweight has a speed v, the pulley 
has an angular speed v 5 v/R. Determine the mag-
nitude of the total angular momentum of the system 
about the axle of the pulley. (c) Using your result from 
part (b) and t
S
5dL
S
/dt, calculate the acceleration of 
the counterweight.
m
R
M
Figure P11.18
19. The position vector of a particle of mass 2.00 kg as 
a function of time is given by r
S
5
1
6.00
i
^
15.00t
j
^
2
, 
where r
S
is in meters and t is in seconds. Determine the 
angular momentum of the particle about the origin as 
a function of time.
20. A 5.00-kg particle starts from the origin at time zero. 
Its velocity as a function of time is given by
v
S
56t2
i
^
12t
j
^
where v
S
is in meters per second and t is in seconds. 
(a)Find its position as a function of time. (b) Describe 
its motion qualitatively. Find (c) its acceleration as a 
function of time, (d) the net force exerted on the par-
ticle as a function of time, (e) the net torque about the 
origin exerted on the particle as a function of time,  
(f) the angular momentum of the particle as a func-
tion of time, (g) the kinetic energy of the particle as a 
function of time, and (h) the power injected into the 
system of the particle as a function of time.
21. A ball having mass m is fas-
tened at the end of a flagpole 
that is connected to the side 
of a tall building at point P as 
shown in Figure P11.21. The 
length of the flagpole is ,, and 
it makes an angle u with the x 
axis. The ball becomes loose 
and starts to fall with accelera-
tion 2g
j
^
. (a)Determine the 
angular momentum of the 
ball about point P as a function of time. (b) For what 
physical reason does the angular momentum change? 
(c) What is the rate of change of the angular momen-
tum of the ball about point P?
W
AMT
M
Q/C
m
P
u
Figure P11.21
Q/C
S
of the particle about the origin when its position vector 
is r
S
5x
i
^
1y
j
^
.
14. Heading straight toward the summit of Pike’s Peak, an 
airplane of mass 12 000 kg flies over the plains of Kan-
sas at nearly constant altitude 4.30 km with constant 
velocity 175m/s west. (a) What is the airplane’s vector 
angular momentum relative to a wheat farmer on the 
ground directly below the airplane? (b) Does this value 
change as the airplane continues its motion along a 
straight line? (c) What If? What is its angular momen-
tum relative to the summit of Pike’s Peak?
15. Review. A projectile of mass m is launched with an ini-
tial velocity v
S
i
making an angle u with the horizontal as 
shown in Figure P11.15. The projectile moves in the 
gravitational field of the Earth. Find the angular 
momentum of the projectile about the origin (a) when 
the projectile is at the origin, (b) when it is at the high-
est point of its trajectory, and (c) just before it hits the 
ground. (d) What torque causes its angular momen-
tum to change?
O
R
v
xi
i
u
m
y
x
v
i
S
v
2
S
v
1
S
=
Figure P11.15
16. Review. A conical pendulum consists 
of a bob of mass m in motion in a cir-
cular path in a horizontal plane as 
shown in Figure P11.16. During the 
motion, the supporting wire of length 
, maintains a constant angle u with 
the vertical. Show that the magnitude 
of the angular momentum of the bob 
about the vertical dashed line is
L5a
m2g,3 sin4 u
cos u
b
1/2
17. A particle of mass m moves in a circle of radius R at a 
constant speed v as shown in Figure P11.17. The motion 
begins at point Q at time t 5 0. Determine the angular 
momentum of the particle about the axis perpendicu-
lar to the page through point P as a function of time.
Q/C
S
m
u
Figure P11.16
S
S
m
R
y
x
Q
P
v
S
Figure P11.17 
Problems 17 and 32.
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
batch converting PDF documents in C#.NET program. Convert PDF to multiple MS Word formats such as .doc and .docx. Create editable Word file online without email
convert pdf to html5 open source; convert pdf to web form
About RasterEdge.com - A Professional Image Solution Provider
Email to: support@rasteredge.com. controls, PDF document, image to pdf files and components for capturing, viewing, processing, converting, compressing and
add pdf to website; how to convert pdf to html
problems 
357
the ring. (a)What angular momentum does the space 
station acquire? (b) For what time interval must the 
rockets be fired if each exerts a thrust of 125 N?
Figure P11.29 
Problems 29 and 40.
Section 11.4  Analysis Model: Isolated System  
(Angular Momentum)
30. A disk with moment of inertia I
1
rotates about a fric-
tionless, vertical axle with angular speed v
i
. A second 
disk, this one having moment of inertia I
2
and initially 
not rotating, drops onto the first disk (Fig. P11.30). 
Because of friction between the surfaces, the two even-
tually reach the same angular speed v
f
. (a)Calculate 
v
f
. (b) Calculate the ratio of the final to the initial 
rotational energy.
Before
After
I
2
I
1
v
i
S
v
f
S
Figure P11.30
31. A playground merry-go-round of radius R 5 2.00 m 
has a moment of inertia I 5 250 kg ? m2 and is rotating 
at 10.0rev/min about a frictionless, vertical axle. Fac-
ing the axle, a 25.0-kg child hops onto the merry-go-
round and manages to sit down on the edge. What is 
the new angular speed of the merry-go-round?
32. Figure P11.17 represents a small, flat puck with mass 
m 5 2.40 kg sliding on a frictionless, horizontal sur-
face. It is held in a circular orbit about a fixed axis by 
a rod with negligible mass and length R 5 1.50 m, piv-
oted at one end. Initially, the puck has a speed of v 5  
5.00 m/s. A 1.30-kg ball of putty is dropped verti-
cally onto the puck from a small distance above it and 
immediately sticks to the puck. (a) What is the new 
period of rotation? (b) Is the angular momentum of 
the puck–putty system about the axis of rotation con-
stant in this process? (c) Is the momentum of the sys-
tem constant in the process of the putty sticking to 
the puck? (d) Is the mechanical energy of the system 
constant in the process?
W
S
AMT
W
Q/C
Section 11.3  Angular Momentum of a Rotating Rigid object
22. A uniform solid sphere of radius r 5 0.500 m and mass 
m 5 15.0 kg turns counterclockwise about a vertical axis 
through its center. Find its vector angular momentum 
about this axis when its angular speed is 3.00 rad/s.
23. Big Ben (Fig. P10.49, page 328), the Parliament tower 
clock in London, has hour and minute hands with 
lengths of 2.70m and 4.50 m and masses of 60.0 kg 
and 100 kg, respectively. Calculate the total angular 
momentum of these hands about the center point. 
(You may model the hands as long, thin rods rotating 
about one end. Assume the hour and minute hands 
are rotating at a constant rate of one revolution per  
12 hours and 60 minutes, respectively.)
24. Show that the kinetic energy of an object rotating 
about a fixed axis with angular momentum L 5 Iv can 
be written as K 5 L2/2I.
25. A uniform solid disk of mass m 5 3.00 kg and radius 
r 5 0.200 m rotates about a fixed axis perpendicular 
to its face with angular frequency 6.00 rad/s. Calcu-
late the magnitude of the angular momentum of the 
disk when the axis of rotation (a) passes through its 
center of mass and (b)passes through a point midway 
between the center and the rim.
26. Model the Earth as a uniform sphere. (a) Calculate 
the angular momentum of the Earth due to its spin-
ning motion about its axis. (b) Calculate the angu-
lar momentum of the Earth due to its orbital motion 
about the Sun. (c) Explain why the answer in part (b) is 
larger than that in part (a) even though it takes signifi-
cantly longer for the Earth to go once around the Sun 
than to rotate once about its axis.
27. A particle of mass 0.400 kg is attached to the 100-cm 
mark of a meterstick of mass 0.100 kg. The meterstick 
rotates on the surface of a frictionless, horizontal 
table with an angular speed of 4.00 rad/s. Calculate 
the angular momentum of the system when the stick 
is pivoted about an axis (a)perpendicular to the table 
through the 50.0-cm mark and (b)perpendicular to 
the table through the 0-cm mark.
28. The distance between the centers of the wheels of a 
motorcycle is 155 cm. The center of mass of the motor-
cycle, including the rider, is 88.0 cm above the ground 
and halfway between the wheels. Assume the mass of 
each wheel is small compared with the body of the 
motorcycle. The engine drives the rear wheel only. 
What horizontal acceleration of the motorcycle will 
make the front wheel rise off the ground?
29. A space station is constructed in the shape of a hollow 
ring of mass 5.00 3 104 kg. Members of the crew walk 
on a deck formed by the inner surface of the outer 
cylindrical wall of the ring, with radius r 5 100 m. At 
rest when constructed, the ring is set rotating about 
its axis so that the people inside experience an effec-
tive free-fall acceleration equal to g. (See Fig. P11.29.) 
The rotation is achieved by firing two small rockets 
attached tangentially to opposite points on the rim of 
S
W
Q/C
M
AMT
VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
Create editable Word file online without email. Supports transfer from password protected PDF. The PDF to Word converting toolkit is a thread-safe VB.NET
convert pdf to url; convert pdf to html online
VB.NET Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF
Viewer, C# HTML Document Viewer for Sharepoint, C# HTML Document Viewer for Azure, C# HTML Document Viewer VB.NET Demo Code for Converting Excel to PDF.
best website to convert pdf to word; export pdf to html
358
chapter 11 Angular Momentum
the pucks stick together and rotate after the collision 
(Fig. P11.36b). (a) What is the angular momentum of 
the system relative to the center of mass? (b) What is 
the angular speed about the center of mass?
v
S
m
1
m
2
a
b
Figure P11.36
37. A wooden block of mass M resting on a frictionless, 
horizontal surface is attached to a rigid rod of length , 
and of negligible mass (Fig. P11.37). The rod is pivoted 
at the other end. A bullet of mass m traveling parallel 
to the horizontal surface and perpendicular to the rod 
with speed v hits the block and becomes embedded in 
it. (a) What is the angular momentum of the bullet–
block system about a vertical axis through the pivot? 
(b)What fraction of the original kinetic energy of the 
bullet is converted into internal energy in the system 
during the collision?
v
S
m
M
Figure P11.37
38. Review. A thin, uniform, rectangular signboard hangs 
vertically above the door of a shop. The sign is hinged 
to a stationary horizontal rod along its top edge. The 
mass of the sign is 2.40 kg, and its vertical dimension 
is 50.0 cm. The sign is swinging without friction, so it 
is a tempting target for children armed with snowballs. 
The maximum angular displacement of the sign is 
25.08 on both sides of the vertical. At a moment when 
the sign is vertical and moving to the left, a snowball 
of mass 400 g, traveling horizontally with a velocity of 
160 cm/s to the right, strikes perpendicularly at the 
lower edge of the sign and sticks there. (a) Calculate 
the angular speed of the sign immediately before the 
impact. (b) Calculate its angular speed immediately 
after the impact. (c) The spattered sign will swing up 
through what maximum angle?
39. A wad of sticky clay with mass m and velocity v
S
i
is fired 
at a solid cylinder of mass M and radius R (Fig.P11.39). 
The cylinder is initially at rest and is mounted on a 
fixed horizontal axle that runs through its center of 
mass. The line of motion of the projectile is perpendic-
ular to the axle and at a distance d , R from the cen-
ter. (a) Find the angular speed of the system just after 
the clay strikes and sticks to the surface of the cylin-
S
Q/C
S
33. A 60.0-kg woman stands at the western rim of a 
horizontal turntable having a moment of inertia of 
500kg?m2 and a radius of 2.00 m. The turntable is 
initially at rest and is free to rotate about a friction-
less, vertical axle through its center. The woman then 
starts walking around the rim clockwise (as viewed 
from above the system) at a constant speed of 1.50 m/s  
relative to the Earth. Consider the woman–turntable 
system as motion begins. (a)Is the mechanical energy 
of the system constant? (b) Is the momentum of the 
system constant? (c) Is the angular momentum of the 
system constant? (d) In what direction and with what 
angular speed does the turntable rotate? (e)How much 
chemical energy does the woman’s body convert into 
mechanical energy of the woman–turntable system as 
the woman sets herself and the turntable into motion?
34. A student sits on a freely rotating stool holding two 
dumbbells, each of mass 3.00 kg (Fig. P11.34). When 
his arms are extended horizontally (Fig. P11.34a), the 
dumbbells are 1.00 m from the axis of rotation and the 
student rotates with an angular speed of 0.750 rad/s. 
The moment of inertia of the student plus stool is  
3.00 kg · m2 and is assumed to be constant. The student 
pulls the dumbbells inward horizontally to a position 
0.300 m from the rotation axis (Fig.P11.34b). (a) Find 
the new angular speed of the student. (b) Find the 
kinetic energy of the rotating system before and after 
he pulls the dumbbells inward.
v
v
i
f
a
b
Figure P11.34
35. A uniform cylindrical turntable of radius 1.90 m and 
mass 30.0 kg rotates counterclockwise in a horizontal 
plane with an initial angular speed of 4p rad/s. The 
fixed turntable bearing is frictionless. A lump of clay 
of mass 2.25 kg and negligible size is dropped onto the 
turntable from a small distance above it and immedi-
ately sticks to the turntable at a point 1.80 m to the 
east of the axis. (a) Find the final angular speed of the 
clay and turntable. (b) Is the mechanical energy of  
the turntable–clay system constant in this process? 
Explain and use numerical results to verify your 
answer. (c) Is the momentum of the system constant in 
this process? Explain your answer.
36. A puck of mass m
1
5 80.0 g and radius r
1
5 4.00 cm 
glides across an air table at a speed of v
S
51.50 m/s as 
shown in Figure P11.36a. It makes a glancing collision 
with a second puck of radius r
2
5 6.00 cm and mass m
2
 
120 g (initially at rest) such that their rims just touch. 
Because their rims are coated with instant-acting glue, 
Q/C
M
W
Q/C
RasterEdge.com General FAQs for Products
assistance, please contact us via email (support@rasteredge PDF document, image to pdf files and for capturing, viewing, processing, converting, compressing and
convert pdf to web pages; convert pdf table to html
.NET RasterEdge XDoc.PDF Purchase Details
PDF Print. Have a Question Email us at. support@rasteredge.com. imaging controls and components for capturing, viewing, processing, converting, compressing and
convert pdf to html code for email; convert pdf to html code
problems 
359
of the spacecraft around the same axis is I
s
5 5.00 3 
105kg?m2. Neither the spacecraft nor the gyroscope 
is originally rotating. The gyroscope can be powered 
up in a negligible period of time to an angular speed 
of 100 rad/s. If the orientation of the spacecraft is to 
be changed by 30.08, for what time interval should the 
gyroscope be operated?
43. The angular momentum vector of a precessing gyro-
scope sweeps out a cone as shown in Figure P11.43. The 
angular speed of the tip of the angular momentum vec-
tor, called its precessional frequency, is given by v
p
t/L, where t is the magnitude of the torque on the gyro-
scope and L is the magnitude of its angular momen-
tum. In the motion called precession of the equinoxes, the 
Earth’s axis of rotation precesses about the perpendicu-
lar to its orbital plane with a period of 2.58 3 104 yr. 
Model the Earth as a uniform sphere and calculate the 
torque on the Earth that is causing this precession.
L
t
L
S
v
Figure P11.43 
A precessing 
angular momentum vector 
sweeps out a cone in space.
Additional Problems
44. A light rope passes over a light, 
frictionless pulley. One end is fas-
tened to a bunch of bananas of 
mass M, and a monkey of mass M 
clings to the other end (Fig. P11.44). 
The monkey climbs the rope in 
an attempt to reach the bananas.  
(a) Treating the system as consist-
ing of the monkey, bananas, rope, 
and pulley, find the net torque on 
the system about the pulley axis.  
(b) Using the result of part (a), 
determine the total angular momen-
tum about the pulley axis and describe the motion of 
the system. (c)Will the monkey reach the bananas?
45. Comet Halley moves about the Sun in an elliptical 
orbit, with its closest approach to the Sun being about 
0.590 AU and its greatest distance 35.0 AU (1 AU 5 the 
Earth–Sun distance). The angular momentum of the 
comet about the Sun is constant, and the gravitational 
force exerted by the Sun has zero moment arm. The 
comet’s speed at closest approach is 54.0 km/s. What is 
its speed when it is farthest from the Sun?
46. Review. Two boys are sliding toward each other on a 
frictionless, ice-covered parking lot. Jacob, mass 45.0 kg,  
is gliding to the right at 8.00 m/s, and Ethan, mass 
31.0kg, is gliding to the left at 11.0 m/s along the same 
M
M
Figure P11.44
Q/C
S
Q/C
der. (b) Is the mechanical energy of the clay–cylinder 
system constant in this process? Explain your answer.  
(c) Is the momentum of the clay–cylinder system con-
stant in this process? Explain your answer.
M
R
m
d
v
i
S
Figure P11.39
40. Why is the following situation impossible? A space station 
shaped like a giant wheel has a radius of r 5 100 m and 
a moment of inertia of 5.00 3 108 kg ? m2. A crew of 
150 people of average mass 65.0 kg is living on the rim, 
and the station’s rotation causes the crew to experience 
an apparent free-fall acceleration of g (Fig. P11.29).  
A research technician is assigned to perform an experi-
ment in which a ball is dropped at the rim of the station 
every 15 minutes and the time interval for the ball to 
drop a given distance is measured as a test to make sure 
the apparent value of g is correctly maintained. One 
evening, 100 average people move to the center of the 
station for a union meeting. The research technician, 
who has already been performing his experiment for an 
hour before the meeting, is disappointed that he cannot 
attend the meeting, and his mood sours even further by 
his boring experiment in which every time interval for 
the dropped ball is identical for the entire evening.
41. A 0.005 00-kg bullet traveling horizontally with speed  
1.00 3 103 m/s strikes an 18.0-kg door, embedding itself 
10.0 cm from the side opposite the hinges as shown in 
Figure P11.41. The 1.00-m wide door is free to swing 
on its frictionless hinges. (a) Before it hits the door, 
does the bullet have angular momentum relative to the 
door’s axis of rotation? (b) If so, evaluate this angu-
lar momentum. If not, explain why there is no angular 
momentum. (c) Is the mechanical energy of the bullet– 
door system constant during this collision? Answer 
without doing a calculation. (d)At what angular speed 
does the door swing open immediately after the colli-
sion? (e) Calculate the total energy of the bullet–door 
system and determine whether it is less than or equal 
to the kinetic energy of the bullet before the collision.
0.005 00 kg
18.0 kg
Hinge
Figure P11.41 
An overhead view of a bullet striking a door.
Section 11.5  The Motion of Gyroscopes and Tops
42. A spacecraft is in empty space. It carries on board a 
gyroscope with a moment of inertia of I
g
5 20.0 kg ? m2  
about the axis of the gyroscope. The moment of inertia 
Q/C
VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to
PDF in VB.NET, VB.NET convert PDF to HTML, VB.NET convert PDF to Word, VB.NET extract text from PDF VB.NET Demo Code for Converting PowerPoint to PDF.
converting pdf to html email; convert pdf into html online
RasterEdge Product Refund Policy
Refund Agreement that we will email to you. controls, PDF document, image to pdf files and for capturing, viewing, processing, converting, compressing and
create html email from pdf; pdf to html converters
360
chapter 11 Angular Momentum
Assuming m and d are known, find (a) the moment 
of inertia of the system of three particles about the 
pivot, (b) the torque acting on the system at t 5 0, 
(c) the angular acceleration of the system at t 5 0,  
(d) the linear acceleration of the particle labeled 3 at 
t 5 0, (e) the maximum kinetic energy of the system, 
(f) the maximum angular speed reached by the rod, 
(g) the maximum angular momentum of the system, 
and (h) the maximum speed reached by the particle 
labeled 2.
d
2d
3
m
m
m
P
d
3
1
2
Figure P11.49
50. Two children are playing on stools at a restaurant coun-
ter. Their feet do not reach the footrests, and the tops 
of the stools are free to rotate without friction on ped-
estals fixed to the floor. One of the children catches a 
tossed ball, in a process described by the equation
1
0.730 kg
#
m2
21
2.40
j
^
rad/s
2
1
1
0.120 kg
21
0.350
i
^
m
2
3
1
4.30
k
^
m/s
2
5
3
0.730 kg
#
m1
1
0.120 kg
21
0.350 m
224
v
S
(a) Solve the equation for the unknown v
S
. (b) Com-
plete the statement of the problem to which this 
equation applies. Your statement must include the 
given numerical information and specification of the 
unknown to be determined. (c) Could the equation 
equally well describe the other child throwing the ball? 
Explain your answer.
51. A projectile of mass m moves to the right with a speed v
i
(Fig. P11.51a). The projectile strikes and sticks to the end 
of a stationary rod of mass M, length d, pivoted about 
a frictionless axle perpendicular to the page through 
O (Fig. P11.51b). We wish to find the fractional change 
of kinetic energy in the system due to the collision.  
(a) What is the appropriate analysis model to describe 
the projectile and the rod? (b)What is the angular 
momentum of the system before the collision about an 
axis through O? (c)What is the moment of inertia of 
the system about an axis through O after the projectile 
sticks to the rod? (d)If the angular speed of the system 
after the collision is v, what is the angular momentum 
of the system after the collision? (e) Find the angular 
speed v after the collision in terms of the given quanti-
Q/C
S
GP
line. When they meet, they grab each other and hang 
on. (a) What is their velocity immediately thereafter? 
(b) What fraction of their original kinetic energy is 
still mechanical energy after their collision? That was 
so much fun that the boys repeat the collision with the 
same original velocities, this time moving along paral-
lel lines 1.20 m apart. At closest approach, they lock 
arms and start rotating about their common center of 
mass. Model the boys as particles and their arms as a 
cord that does not stretch. (c) Find the velocity of their 
center of mass. (d) Find their angular speed. (e) What 
fraction of their original kinetic energy is still mechani-
cal energy after they link arms? (f) Why are the answers 
to parts (b) and (e) so different?
47. We have all complained that there aren’t enough hours 
in a day. In an attempt to fix that, suppose all the peo-
ple in the world line up at the equator and all start 
running east at 2.50 m/s relative to the surface of the 
Earth. By how much does the length of a day increase? 
Assume the world population to be 7.00 3 109 people 
with an average mass of 55.0kg each and the Earth to 
be a solid homogeneous sphere. In addition, depend-
ing on the details of your solution, you may need to use 
the approximation 1/(1 2 x) < 11 x for small x.
48. A skateboarder with his board can be modeled as a 
particle of mass 76.0 kg, located at his center of mass, 
0.500m above the ground. As shown in Figure P11.48, 
the skateboarder starts from rest in a crouching posi-
tion at one lip of a half-pipe (point A). The half-pipe 
forms one half of a cylinder of radius 6.80 m with its 
axis horizontal. On his descent, the skateboarder moves 
without friction and maintains his crouch so that his 
center of mass moves through one quarter of a circle. 
(a) Find his speed at the bottom of the half-pipe (point 
B). (b) Find his angular momentum about the center 
of curvature at this point. (c)Immediately after passing 
point B, he stands up and raises his arms, lifting his 
center of gravity to 0.950 m above the concrete (point 
C). Explain why his angular momentum is constant in 
this maneuver, whereas the kinetic energy of his body 
is not constant. (d) Find his speed immediately after he 
stands up. (e) How much chemical energy in the skate-
boarder’s legs was converted into mechanical energy in 
the skateboarder–Earth system when he stood up?
A
B
C
Figure P11.48
49. A rigid, massless rod has three particles with equal 
masses attached to it as shown in Figure P11.49. The rod 
is free to rotate in a vertical plane about a frictionless 
axle perpendicular to the rod through the point P and 
is released from rest in the horizontal position at t 5 0.  
Q/C
S
O
d
M
m
O
v
v
i
S
a
b
Figure P11.51
XDoc.Converter for .NET Purchase information
Online Convert PDF to Html. SUPPORT: controls, PDF document, image to pdf files and components for capturing, viewing, processing, converting, compressing and
best pdf to html converter online; batch convert pdf to html
XDoc.HTML5 Viewer for .NET Purchase information
Online Convert PDF to Html. SUPPORT: controls, PDF document, image to pdf files and components for capturing, viewing, processing, converting, compressing and
convert pdf to html code c#; convert pdf to website html
problems 
361
of mass at speeds of 5.00 m/s. Treating the astronauts 
as particles, calculate (a) the magnitude of the angu-
lar momentum of the two-astronaut system and (b) the 
rotational energy of the system. By pulling on the rope, 
one astronaut shortens the distance between them to 
5.00 m. (c) What is the new angular momentum of 
the system? (d) What are the astronauts’ new speeds?  
(e) What is the new rotational energy of the system? 
(f) How much chemical potential energy in the body 
of the astronaut was converted to mechanical energy in 
the system when he shortened the rope?
56. Two astronauts (Fig. P11.55), each having a mass M
are connected by a rope of length d having negligible 
mass. They are isolated in space, orbiting their center 
of mass at speeds v. Treating the astronauts as particles, 
calculate (a)the magnitude of the angular momen-
tum of the two-astronaut system and (b) the rotational 
energy of the system. By pulling on the rope, one of the 
astronauts shortens the distance between them to d/2.  
(c) What is the new angular momentum of the system? 
(d) What are the astronauts’ new speeds? (e) What is 
the new rotational energy of the system? (f) How much 
chemical potential energy in the body of the astronaut 
was converted to mechanical energy in the system 
when he shortened the rope?
57. Native people throughout North and South America 
used a bola to hunt for birds and animals. A bola can 
consist of three stones, each with mass m, at the ends 
of three light cords, each with length ,. The other 
ends of the cords are tied together to form a Y. The 
hunter holds one stone and swings the other two above 
his head (FigureP11.57a). Both these stones move 
together in a horizontal circle of radius 2, with speed 
v
0
. At a moment when the horizontal component of 
their velocity is directed toward the quarry, the hunter 
releases the stone in his hand. As the bola flies through 
the air, the cords quickly take a stable arrangement 
with constant 120-degree angles between them (Fig. 
P11.57b). In the vertical direction, the bola is in free 
fall. Gravitational forces exerted by the Earth make 
the junction of the cords move with the downward 
acceleration g
S
. You may ignore the vertical motion as 
you proceed to describe the horizontal motion of the 
bola. In terms of m, ,, and v
0
, calculate (a) the mag-
nitude of the momentum of the bola at the moment 
of release and, after release, (b)the horizontal speed 
of the center of mass of the bola and (c) the angu-
lar momentum of the bola about its center of mass.  
(d) Find the angular speed of the bola about its center 
of mass after it has settled into its Y shape. Calculate  
S
Q/C
S
ties. (f)What is the kinetic energy of the system before 
the collision? (g)What is the kinetic energy of the sys-
tem after the collision? (h)Determine the fractional 
change of kinetic energy due to the collision.
52.A puck of mass m 5 50.0 g is attached to a taut cord pass-
ing through a small hole in a frictionless, horizontal 
surface (Fig. P11.52). The puck is initially orbiting with 
speed v
i
5 1.50m/s in a circle of radius r
i
5 0.300m. 
The cord is then slowly pulled from below, decreasing 
the radius of the circle to r 5 0.100 m. (a)What is the 
puck’s speed at the smaller radius? (b) Find the tension 
in the cord at the smaller radius. (c) How much work is 
done by the hand in pulling the cord so that the radius 
of the puck’s motion changes from 0.300 m to 0.100 m?
r
i
m
v
i
S
Figure P11.52 
Problems 52 and 53.
53. A puck of mass m is attached to a taut cord passing 
through a small hole in a frictionless, horizontal sur-
face (Fig. P11.52). The puck is initially orbiting with 
speed v
i
in a circle of radius r
i
. The cord is then slowly 
pulled from below, decreasing the radius of the circle 
to r. (a) What is the puck’s speed when the radius is r?  
(b) Find the tension in the cord as a function of r.  
(c) How much work is done by the hand in pulling the 
cord so that the radius of the puck’s motion changes 
from r
i
to r?
54. Why is the following situation impossible? A meteoroid strikes 
the Earth directly on the equator. At the time it lands, 
it is traveling exactly vertical and downward. Due to the 
impact, the time for the Earth to rotate once increases 
by 0.5 s, so the day is 0.5 s longer, undetectable to layper-
sons. After the impact, people on the Earth ignore the 
extra half-second each day and life goes on as normal. 
(Assume the density of the Earth is uniform.)
55. Two astronauts (Fig. P11.55), each having a mass of 
75.0kg, are connected by a 10.0-m rope of negligible 
mass. They are isolated in space, orbiting their center 
M
AMT
S
M
CM
d
Figure P11.55 
Problems 55 and 56.
Figure P11.57
,
,
,
m
m
m
b
a
362
chapter 11 Angular Momentum
rolling occurs. (c) Assume the coefficient of friction 
between disk and surface is m. What is the time inter-
val after setting the disk down before pure rolling 
motion begins? (d) How far does the disk travel before 
pure rolling begins?
M
Figure P11.61
62. In Example 11.9, we investigated an elastic collision 
between a disk and a stick lying on a frictionless sur-
face. Suppose everything is the same as in the example 
except that the collision is perfectly inelastic so that 
the disk adheres to the stick at the endpoint at which it 
strikes. Find (a) the speed of the center of mass of the 
system and (b)the angular speed of the system after 
the collision.
63. A solid cube of side 2a and mass M is sliding on a fric-
tionless surface with uniform velocity v
S
as shown in 
FigureP11.63a. It hits a small obstacle at the end of 
the table that causes the cube to tilt as shown in Fig-
ure P11.63b. Find the minimum value of the magni-
tude of v
S
such that the cube tips over and falls off the 
table. Note: The cube undergoes an inelastic collision 
at the edge.
v
S
2a
M
v
a
b
Figure P11.63
64. A solid cube of wood of side 2a and mass M is resting 
on a horizontal surface. The cube is constrained to 
rotate about a fixed axis AB (Fig. P11.64). A bullet of 
mass m and speed v is shot at the face opposite ABCD at 
a height of 4a/3. The bullet becomes embedded in the 
cube. Find the minimum value of v required to tip the 
cube so that it falls on face ABCD. Assume m ,, M.
m
2a
A
B
C
v
S
3
4a
D
Figure P11.64
S
S
the kinetic energy of the bola (e) at the instant of 
release and (f) in its stable Y shape. (g) Explain how 
the conservation laws apply to the bola as its configu-
ration changes. Robert Beichner suggested the idea 
for this problem.
58. A uniform rod of mass 300 g and length 50.0 cm 
rotates in a horizontal plane about a fixed, frictionless, 
vertical pin through its center. Two small, dense beads, 
each of mass m, are mounted on the rod so that they 
can slide without friction along its length. Initially, 
the beads are held by catches at positions 10.0 cm on 
each side of the center and the system is rotating at an 
angular speed of 36.0 rad/s. The catches are released 
simultaneously, and the beads slide outward along the 
rod. (a) Find an expression for the angular speed v
f
of 
the system at the instant the beads slide off the ends of 
the rod as it depends on m. (b) What are the maximum 
and the minimum possible values for v
f
and the values 
of m to which they correspond?
59. Global warming is a cause for concern because even 
small changes in the Earth’s temperature can have sig-
nificant consequences. For example, if the Earth’s polar 
ice caps were to melt entirely, the resulting additional 
water in the oceans would flood many coastal areas. 
Model the polar ice as having mass 2.30 3 1019 kg and 
forming two flat disks of radius 6.00 3 105 m. Assume 
the water spreads into an unbroken thin, spherical shell 
after it melts. Calculate the resulting change in the dura-
tion of one day both in seconds and as a percentage.
60. The puck in Figure P11.60 has a mass of 0.120 kg. The 
distance of the puck from the center of rotation is 
originally 40.0 cm, and the puck is sliding with a speed 
of 80.0 cm/s. The string is pulled downward 15.0 cm 
through the hole in the frictionless table. Determine 
the work done on the puck. (Suggestion: Consider the 
change of kinetic energy.)
F
S
i
v
S
O
R
Figure P11.60
Challenge Problems
61. A uniform solid disk of radius R is set into rotation 
with an angular speed v
i
about an axis through its cen-
ter. While still rotating at this speed, the disk is placed 
into contact with a horizontal surface and immedi-
ately released as shown in Figure P11.61. (a) What is 
the angular speed of the disk once pure rolling takes 
place? (b) Find the fractional change in kinetic energy 
from the moment the disk is set down until pure  
Q/C
S
Balanced Rock in Arches National 
Park, Utah, is a 3 000 000-kg  
boulder that has been in stable 
equilibrium for several millennia.  
It had a smaller companion nearby, 
called “Chip Off the Old Block,” 
that fell during the winter of 1975. 
Balanced Rock appeared in an 
early scene of the movie Indiana 
Jones and the Last Crusade. We will 
study the conditions under which 
an object is in equilibrium in this 
chapter. 
(John W. Jewett, Jr.)
12.1 Analysis Model: Rigid 
Object in Equilibrium
12.2 More on the Center of 
Gravity
12.3 Examples of Rigid Objects 
in Static Equilibrium
12.4 Elastic Properties of Solids
c h a p p t t e r 
12
Static equilibrium  
and elasticity
363
In Chapters 10 and 11, we studied the dynamics of rigid objects. Part of this chapter 
addresses the conditions under which a rigid object is in equilibrium. The term equilibrium 
implies that the object moves with both constant velocity and constant angular velocity 
relative to an observer in an inertial reference frame. We deal here only with the special 
case in which both of these velocities are equal to zero. In this case, the object is in what 
is called static equilibrium. Static equilibrium represents a common situation in engineering 
practice, and the principles it involves are of special interest to civil engineers, architects, 
and mechanical engineers. If you are an engineering student, you will undoubtedly take an 
advanced course in statics in the near future.
The last section of this chapter deals with how objects deform under load conditions. An 
elastic object returns to its original shape when the deforming forces are removed. Several 
elastic constants are defined, each corresponding to a different type of deformation.
12.1 Analysis Model: Rigid Object in Equilibrium
In Chapter 5, we discussed the particle in equilibrium model, in which a particle 
moves with constant velocity because the net force acting on it is zero. The situation 
with real (extended) objects is more complex because these objects often cannot be 
modeled as particles. For an extended object to be in equilibrium, a second condi-
tion must be satisfied. This second condition involves the rotational motion of the 
extended object.
364
chapter 12 Static equilibrium and elasticity
F
2
S
F
1
S
F
3
S
Figure 12.3 
(Quick Quiz 12.2) 
Three forces act on an object. 
Notice that the lines of action of 
all three forces pass through a 
common point.
Consider a single force F
S
acting on a rigid object as shown in Figure 12.1. Recall 
that the torque associated with the force F
S
about an axis through O is given by 
Equation 11.1:
t
S
r
S
F
S
The magnitude of t
S
is Fd (see Equation 10.14), where d is the moment arm shown 
in Figure 12.1. According to Equation 10.18, the net torque on a rigid object causes 
it to undergo an angular acceleration.
In this discussion, we investigate those rotational situations in which the angular 
acceleration of a rigid object is zero. Such an object is in rotational equilibrium. 
Because o t
ext
Ia for rotation about a fixed axis, the necessary condition for rota-
tional equilibrium is that the net torque about any axis must be zero. We now have 
two necessary conditions for equilibrium of a rigid object:
1. The net external force on the object must equal zero:
a
F
S
ext
50 
(12.1)
2. The net external torque on the object about any axis must be zero:
a
t
S
ext
50 
(12.2)
These conditions describe the rigid object in equilibrium analysis model. The first 
condition is a statement of translational equilibrium; it states that the translational 
acceleration of the object’s center of mass must be zero when viewed from an iner-
tial reference frame. The second condition is a statement of rotational equilibrium; 
it states that the angular acceleration about any axis must be zero. In the special 
case of static equilibrium, which is the main subject of this chapter, the object in 
equilibrium is at rest relative to the observer and so has no translational or angular 
speed (that is, v
CM
5 0 and v 5 0).
uick Quiz 12.1  Consider the object subject to the two forces of equal magnitude 
in Figure 12.2. Choose the correct statement with regard to this situation.  
(a) The object is in force equilibrium but not torque equilibrium. (b)The object 
is in torque equilibrium but not force equilibrium. (c) The object is in both 
force equilibrium and torque equilibrium. (d) The object is in neither force 
equilibrium nor torque equilibrium.
uick Quiz 12.2  Consider the object subject to the three forces in Figure 12.3. 
Choose the correct statement with regard to this situation. (a)The object is in 
force equilibrium but not torque equilibrium. (b) The object is in torque equi-
librium but not force equilibrium. (c) The object is in both force  equilibrium 
and torque equilibrium. (d) The object is in neither force equilibrium nor 
torque equilibrium.
The two vector expressions given by Equations 12.1 and 12.2 are equivalent, 
in general, to six scalar equations: three from the first condition for equilibrium 
and three from the second (corresponding to x, y, and z components). Hence, in a 
complex system involving several forces acting in various directions, you could be 
faced with solving a set of equations with many unknowns. Here, we restrict our 
discussion to situations in which all the forces lie in the xy plane. (Forces whose 
vector representations are in the same plane are said to be coplanar.) With this 
restriction, we must deal with only three scalar equations. Two come from balanc-
ing the forces in the x and y directions. The third comes from the torque equa-
tion, namely that the net torque about a perpendicular axis through any point in 
the xy plane must be zero. This perpendicular axis will necessarily be parallel to 
F
S
r
S
P
O
d
u
Figure 12.1 
A single force F
S
acts 
on a rigid object at the point P.
Pitfall Prevention 12.1
Zero Torque Zero net torque does 
not mean an absence of rotational 
motion. An object that is rotating 
at a constant angular speed can 
be under the influence of a net 
torque of zero. This possibility 
is analogous to the translational 
situation: zero net force does not 
mean an absence of translational 
motion.
F
S
d
d
CM
F
S
Figure 12.2 
(Quick Quiz 12.1) 
Two forces of equal magnitude are 
applied at equal distances from 
the center of mass of a rigid object.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested