mvc display pdf in browser : Batch convert pdf to html control SDK platform web page wpf winforms web browser doc-3-pdf-67a5de9fa89738da0c6835ef457b5878-original4-part288

1.1 Standards of Length, Mass, and time 
5
has not been changed since that time because platinum–iridium is an unusually 
stable alloy. A duplicate of the Sèvres cylinder is kept at the National Institute of 
Standards and Technology (NIST) in Gaithersburg, Maryland (Fig. 1.1a). Table 1.2 
lists approximate values of the masses of various objects.
Time
Before 1967, the standard of time was defined in terms of the mean solar day. (A solar 
day is the time interval between successive appearances of the Sun at the highest point 
it reaches in the sky each day.) The fundamental unit of a second (s) was defined as 
11
60
211
60
211
24
2
of a mean solar day. This definition is based on the rotation of one planet, 
the Earth. Therefore, this motion does not provide a time standard that is universal.
In 1967, the second was redefined to take advantage of the high precision attain-
able in a device known as an atomic clock (Fig. 1.1b), which measures vibrations of 
cesium atoms. One second is now defined as 9 192 631 770 times the period of 
vibration of radiation from the cesium-133 atom.2 Approximate values of time 
intervals are presented in Table 1.3.
In addition to SI, another system of units, the U.S. customary system, is still used in 
the United States despite acceptance of SI by the rest of the world. In this system, 
the units of length, mass, and time are the foot (ft), slug, and second, respectively. 
In this book, we shall use SI units because they are almost universally accepted in 
science and industry. We shall make some limited use of U.S. customary units in 
the study of classical mechanics.
In addition to the fundamental SI units of meter, kilogram, and second, we can 
also use other units, such as millimeters and nanoseconds, where the prefixes milli- 
and nano- denote multipliers of the basic units based on various powers of ten. 
Prefixes for the various powers of ten and their abbreviations are listed in Table 1.4 
(page 6). For example, 1023 m is equivalent to 1 millimeter (mm), and 103 m corre-
sponds to 1 kilometer (km). Likewise, 1 kilogram (kg) is 103 grams (g), and 1 mega 
volt (MV) is 106 volts (V).
The variables length, time, and mass are examples of fundamental quantities. Most 
other variables are derived quantities, those that can be expressed as a mathematical 
combination of fundamental quantities. Common examples are area (a product of 
two lengths) and speed (a ratio of a length to a time interval).
2Period is defined as the time interval needed for one complete vibration.
Approximate Masses of 
Various Objects
Mass (kg)
Observable
Universe 
, 1052
Milky Way
galaxy 
, 1042
Sun 
1.99 3 1030
Earth 
5.98 3 1024
Moon 
7.36 3 1022
Shark 
, 103
Human 
, 102
Frog 
, 1021
Mosquito 
, 1025
Bacterium 
, 1 3 10215
Hydrogen atom 1.67 3 10227
Electron 
9.11 3 10231
Table 1.2
Approximate Values of 
Some Time Intervals
Time Interval (s)
Age of the Universe 
4 3 1017
Age of the Earth 
1.3 3 1017
Average age of a college student 
6.3 3 108
One year 
3.2 3 107
One day 
8.6 3 104
One class period 
3.0 3 103
Time interval between normal 
heartbeats 
8 3 1021
Period of audible sound waves 
, 1023
Period of typical radio waves 
, 1026
Period of vibration of an atom  
in a solid 
, 10213
Period of visible light waves 
, 10215
Duration of a nuclear collision 
, 10222
Time interval for light to cross  
a proton 
, 10224
Table 1.3
Figure 1.1 
(a) The National 
Standard Kilogram No. 20, an 
accurate copy of the International 
Standard Kilogram kept at Sèvres, 
France, is housed under a double 
bell jar in a vault at the National 
Institute of Standards and Tech-
nology. (b) A cesium fountain 
atomic clock. The clock will nei-
ther gain nor lose a second in 20 
million years.
a
R
e
p
r
o
d
u
c
e
d
w
i
t
h
p
e
r
m
i
s
s
i
o
n
o
f
t
h
e
B
I
P
M
,
w
h
i
c
h
r
e
t
a
i
n
s
f
u
l
l
i
n
t
e
r
n
a
t
i
o
n
a
l
l
y
p
r
o
t
e
c
t
e
d
c
o
p
y
r
i
g
h
t
.
b
A
P
P
h
o
t
o
/
F
o
c
k
e
S
t
r
a
n
g
m
a
n
n
Batch convert pdf to html - Convert PDF to html files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
How to Convert PDF to HTML Webpage with C# PDF Conversion SDK
how to convert pdf file to html document; convert pdf to html5
Batch convert pdf to html - VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
PDF to HTML Webpage Converter SDK for VB.NET PDF to HTML Conversion
to html; pdf to web converter
6
chapter 1 physics and Measurement
Another example of a derived quantity is density. The density r (Greek letter 
rho) of any substance is defined as its mass per unit volume:
r;
m
V
(1.1)
In terms of fundamental quantities, density is a ratio of a mass to a product of three 
lengths. Aluminum, for example, has a density of 2.70 3 103 kg/m3, and iron has a 
density of 7.86 3 103 kg/m3. An extreme difference in density can be imagined by 
thinking about holding a 10-centimeter (cm) cube of Styrofoam in one hand and a 
10-cm cube of lead in the other. See Table 14.1 in Chapter 14 for densities of several 
materials.
uick Quiz 1.1 In a machine shop, two cams are produced, one of aluminum 
and one of iron. Both cams have the same mass. Which cam is larger? (a)The 
aluminum cam is larger. (b) The iron cam is larger. (c) Both cams have the 
same size.
1.2 Matter and Model Building
If physicists cannot interact with some phenomenon directly, they often imagine 
model for a physical system that is related to the phenomenon. For example, we 
cannot interact directly with atoms because they are too small. Therefore, we build 
a mental model of an atom based on a system of a nucleus and one or more elec-
trons outside the nucleus. Once we have identified the physical components of the 
model, we make predictions about its behavior based on the interactions among 
the components of the system or the interaction between the system and the envi-
ronment outside the system.
As an example, consider the behavior of matter. A sample of solid gold is shown 
at the top of Figure 1.2. Is this sample nothing but wall-to-wall gold, with no empty 
space? If the sample is cut in half, the two pieces still retain their chemical iden-
tity as solid gold. What if the pieces are cut again and again, indefinitely? Will the 
smaller and smaller pieces always be gold? Such questions can be traced to early 
Greek philosophers. Two of them—Leucippus and his student Democritus—could 
not accept the idea that such cuttings could go on forever. They developed a model 
for matter by speculating that the process ultimately must end when it produces a 
particle that can no longer be cut. In Greek, atomos means “not sliceable.” From this 
Greek term comes our English word atom.
The Greek model of the structure of matter was that all ordinary matter consists 
of atoms, as suggested in the middle of Figure 1.2. Beyond that, no additional struc-
ture was specified in the model; atoms acted as small particles that interacted with 
one another, but internal structure of the atom was not a part of the model.
A table of the letters in the  
Greek alphabet is provided  
on the back endpaper  
of this book.
Prefixes for Powers of Ten
Power 
Prefix 
Abbreviation 
Power 
Prefix 
Abbreviation
10224 
yocto 
103   
kilo 
k
10221 
zepto 
106   
mega 
M
10218 
atto 
109   
giga 
G
10215 
femto 
1012 
tera 
T
10212 
pico 
1015 
peta 
P
1029   
nano 
1018 
exa 
E
1026   
micro 
1021 
zetta 
Z
1023   
milli 
1024 
yotta 
Y
1022   
centi 
c
1021   
deci 
d
Table 1.4
Figure 1.2 
Levels of organization 
in matter.
At the center 
of each atom 
is a nucleus.
Inside the 
nucleus are 
protons 
(orange) and 
neutrons 
(gray).
Protons and 
neutrons are 
composed of 
quarks. The 
quark 
composition 
of a proton is 
shown here.
u
u
d
D
o
n
F
a
r
r
a
l
l
/
P
h
o
t
o
d
i
s
c
/
G
e
t
t
y
I
m
a
g
e
s
VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.
C# HTML Document Viewer for Sharepoint, C# HTML Document Viewer for Azure, C# HTML Document Viewer NET components to batch convert adobe PDF files to
convert pdf into html file; how to add pdf to website
C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
NET. .NET library to batch convert PDF files to jpg image files. High quality jpeg file can be exported from PDF in .NET framework.
convert pdf to web page online; change pdf to html
1.3 Dimensional analysis 
7
In 1897, J. J. Thomson identified the electron as a charged particle and as a 
constituent of the atom. This led to the first atomic model that contained internal 
structure. We shall discuss this model in Chapter 42.
Following the discovery of the nucleus in 1911, an atomic model was developed in 
which each atom is made up of electrons surrounding a central nucleus. A nucleus 
of gold is shown in Figure 1.2. This model leads, however, to a new question: Does 
the nucleus have structure? That is, is the nucleus a single particle or a collection of 
particles? By the early 1930s, a model evolved that described two basic entities in the 
nucleus: protons and neutrons. The proton carries a positive electric charge, and a 
specific chemical element is identified by the number of protons in its nucleus. This 
number is called the atomic number of the element. For instance, the nucleus of a 
hydrogen atom contains one proton (so the atomic number of hydrogen is 1), the 
nucleus of a helium atom contains two protons (atomic number 2), and the nucleus 
of a uranium atom contains 92 protons (atomic number 92). In addition to atomic 
number, a second number—mass number, defined as the number of protons plus 
neutrons in a nucleus—characterizes atoms. The atomic number of a specific ele-
ment never varies (i.e., the number of protons does not vary), but the mass number 
can vary (i.e., the number of neutrons varies).
Is that, however, where the process of breaking down stops? Protons, neutrons, 
and a host of other exotic particles are now known to be composed of six different 
varieties of particles called quarks, which have been given the names of up, down, 
strange, charmed, bottom, and top. The up, charmed, and top quarks have electric 
charges of 1
2
3
that of the proton, whereas the down, strange, and bottom quarks 
have charges of 2
1
3
that of the proton. The proton consists of two up quarks and 
one down quark as shown at the bottom of Figure 1.2 and labeled u and d. This 
structure predicts the correct charge for the proton. Likewise, the neutron consists 
of two down quarks and one up quark, giving a net charge of zero.
You should develop a process of building models as you study physics. In this 
study, you will be challenged with many mathematical problems to solve. One of 
the most important problem-solving techniques is to build a model for the prob-
lem: identify a system of physical components for the problem and make predic-
tions of the behavior of the system based on the interactions among its components 
or the interaction between the system and its surrounding environment.
1.3 Dimensional Analysis
In physics, the word dimension denotes the physical nature of a quantity. The dis-
tance between two points, for example, can be measured in feet, meters, or fur-
longs, which are all different ways of expressing the dimension of length.
The symbols we use in this book to specify the dimensions of length, mass, and time 
are L, M, and T, respectively.3 We shall often use brackets [ ] to denote the dimensions 
of a physical quantity. For example, the symbol we use for speed in this book is v, and 
in our notation, the dimensions of speed are written [v] 5 L/T. As another example, 
the dimensions of area A are [A] 5 L2. The dimensions and units of area, volume, 
speed, and acceleration are listed in Table 1.5. The dimensions of other quantities, 
such as force and energy, will be described as they are introduced in the text.
3The dimensions of a quantity will be symbolized by a capitalized, nonitalic letter such as L or T. The algebraic symbol 
for the quantity itself will be an italicized letter such as L for the length of an object or  for time.
Table 1.5
Dimensions and Units of Four Derived Quantities
Quantity 
Area (A) 
Volume (V) 
Speed (v) 
Acceleration (a)
Dimensions 
L2 
L3 
L/T 
L/T2
SI units 
m2 
m3 
m/s 
m/s2
U.S. customary units 
ft2 
ft3 
ft/s 
ft/s2
VB.NET PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in vb.
NET control to batch convert PDF documents to Tiff format in Visual Basic. Qualified Tiff files are exported with high resolution in VB.NET.
embed pdf into webpage; how to convert pdf into html code
C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net
Studio .NET project. Powerful .NET control to batch convert PDF documents to tiff format in Visual C# .NET program. Free library are
convert pdf into html code; how to convert pdf to html email
8
chapter 1 physics and Measurement
In many situations, you may have to check a specific equation to see if it matches 
your expectations. A useful procedure for doing that, called dimensional analysis, 
can be used because dimensions can be treated as algebraic quantities. For exam-
ple, quantities can be added or subtracted only if they have the same dimensions. 
Furthermore, the terms on both sides of an equation must have the same dimen-
sions. By following these simple rules, you can use dimensional analysis to deter-
mine whether an expression has the correct form. Any relationship can be correct 
only if the dimensions on both sides of the equation are the same.
To illustrate this procedure, suppose you are interested in an equation for the 
position x of a car at a time t if the car starts from rest at 5 0 and moves with con-
stant acceleration a. The correct expression for this situation is x5
1
2
at2 as we show 
in Chapter 2. The quantity x on the left side has the dimension of length. For the 
equation to be dimensionally correct, the quantity on the right side must also have 
the dimension of length. We can perform a dimensional check by substituting the 
dimensions for acceleration, L/T2 (Table 1.5), and time, T, into the equation. That 
is, the dimensional form of the equation x5
1
2
at2 is
L5
L
T
2
#
T2
5L
The dimensions of time cancel as shown, leaving the dimension of length on the 
right-hand side to match that on the left.
A more general procedure using dimensional analysis is to set up an expression 
of the form
x ~ antm
where n and m are exponents that must be determined and the symbol ~ indicates 
a proportionality. This relationship is correct only if the dimensions of both sides 
are the same. Because the dimension of the left side is length, the dimension of the 
right side must also be length. That is,
3
antm
4
5L5L1T0
Because the dimensions of acceleration are L/T2 and the dimension of time is T, 
we have
1
L/T
22n
T
m
5L
1
T
0
  
1
L
n
T
m22n2
5L
1
T
0
The exponents of L and T must be the same on both sides of the equation. From 
the exponents of L, we see immediately that n 5 1. From the exponents of T, we see 
that m 2 2n 5 0, which, once we substitute for n, gives us m 5 2. Returning to our 
original expression x ~ antm, we conclude that x ~ at2 .
uick Quiz 1.2 True or False: Dimensional analysis can give you the numerical 
value of constants of proportionality that may appear in an algebraic expression.
Pitfall Prevention 1.2
Symbols for Quantities Some 
quantities have a small number 
of symbols that represent them. 
For example, the symbol for time 
is almost always t. Other quanti-
ties might have various symbols 
depending on the usage. Length 
may be described with symbols 
such as x, y, and z (for position); 
r (for radius); ab, and c (for the 
legs of a right triangle); , (for the 
length of an object); d (for a dis-
tance); h (for a height); and  
so forth.
Identify the dimensions of v from Table 1.5:
3
v
4
5
L
T
Example 1.1   Analysis of an Equation
Show that the expression v 5 at, where v represents speed, a acceleration, and t   an instant of time, is dimensionally correct.
SoLution
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
Batch convert PDF documents from multiple image formats, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff, Bitmap, .NET Graphics, and REImage.
convert pdf to web link; embed pdf into html
C# PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images in C#
ASP.NET application. An advanced .NET control able to batch convert PDF documents to image formats in C#.NET. Support exporting PDF
convert pdf to html email; convert pdf to webpage
1.4 conversion of Units 
9
1.4 Conversion of Units
Sometimes it is necessary to convert units from one measurement system to another 
or convert within a system (for example, from kilometers to meters). Conversion 
factors between SI and U.S. customary units of length are as follows:
1 mile 5 1 609 m 5 1.609 km 
1 ft 5 0.304 8 m 5 30.48 cm
1 m 5 39.37 in. 5 3.281 ft 
1 in. 5 0.025 4 m 5 2.54 cm (exactly)
A more complete list of conversion factors can be found in Appendix A.
Like dimensions, units can be treated as algebraic quantities that can can-
cel each other. For example, suppose we wish to convert 15.0 in. to centimeters. 
Because 1in. is defined as exactly 2.54 cm, we find that
15.0 in.5
1
15.0 in.
2
a
2.54 cm
1 in.
b
538.1 cm
where the ratio in parentheses is equal to 1. We express 1 as 2.54 cm/1 in. (rather 
than 1 in./2.54 cm) so that the unit “inch” in the denominator cancels with the unit 
in the original quantity. The remaining unit is the centimeter, our desired result.
1.4 
Pitfall Prevention 1.3
Always include units When per-
forming calculations with numeri-
cal values, include the units for 
every quantity and carry the units 
through the entire calculation. 
Avoid the temptation to drop the 
units early and then attach the 
expected units once you have an 
answer. By including the units in 
every step, you can detect errors if 
the units for the answer turn out 
to be incorrect.
Write an expression for a with a dimensionless constant 
of proportionality k:
a 5 krnvm
Substitute the dimensions of a, r, and v:
L
T2
5Ln a
L
T
b
m
5
Ln1m
Tm
Equate the exponents of L and T so that the dimen-
sional equation is balanced:
n 1 m 5 1 and m 5 2
Solve the two equations for n:
n 5 21
Write the acceleration expression:
a5kr21 v2 5k 
v2
r
In Section 4.4 on uniform circular motion, we show that k 5 1 if a consistent set of units is used. The constant k would 
not equal 1 if, for example, v were in km/h and you wanted a in m/s2 .
Example 1.2   Analysis of a Power Law
Suppose we are told that the acceleration a of a particle moving with uniform speed v in a circle of radius r is propor-
tional to some power of r, say rn, and some power of v, say m. Determine the values of n and m and write the simplest 
form of an equation for the acceleration.
SoLution
Identify the dimensions of a from Table 1.5 and multiply 
by the dimensions of t:
3
at
4
5
L
T2
T
5
L
T
Therefore, v 5 at is dimensionally correct because we have the same dimensions on both sides. (If the expression were 
given as v 5 at2, it would be dimensionally incorrect. Try it and see!)
▸ 1.1 
continued
C# Create PDF from OpenOffice to convert odt, odp files to PDF in
SharePoint. A professional .NET PDF control able to batch convert multiple OpenOffice documents to PDF files in C#.NET. Convert OpenOffice
convert fillable pdf to html form; convert pdf to html with
VB.NET PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images
service, DNN (DotNetNuke), SharePoint. VB.NET components for batch convert high resolution images from PDF. Convert PDF documents to
how to convert pdf to html code; how to change pdf to html
10
chapter 1 physics and Measurement
1.5 Estimates and Order-of-Magnitude Calculations
Suppose someone asks you the number of bits of data on a typical musical com-
pact disc. In response, it is not generally expected that you would provide the exact 
number but rather an estimate, which may be expressed in scientific notation. The 
estimate may be made even more approximate by expressing it as an order of magni-
tude, which is a power of ten determined as follows:
1. Express the number in scientific notation, with the multiplier of the power 
of ten between 1 and 10 and a unit.
2. If the multiplier is less than 3.162 (the square root of 10), the order of mag-
nitude of the number is the power of 10 in the scientific notation. If the 
multiplier is greater than 3.162, the order of magnitude is one larger than 
the power of 10 in the scientific notation.
We use the symbol , for “is on the order of.” Use the procedure above to verify 
the orders of magnitude for the following lengths:
0.008 6 m , 1022 m  0.002 1 m , 1023 m  720 m , 103 m
uick Quiz 1.3 The distance between two cities is 100 mi. What is the number  
of kilometers between the two cities? (a) smaller than 100 (b) larger than 100  
(c) equal to 100
Convert meters in the speed to miles:
1
38.0 m
/s
2
a
1 mi
1 609 m
b52.3631022 mi/s
Convert seconds to hours:
1
2.3631022 mi/s
2
a
60 s
1 min
b a
60 min
1 h
b585.0 mi/h
The driver is indeed exceeding the speed limit and should slow down.
What if the driver were from outside the United States and is 
familiar with speeds measured in kilometers per hour? What is the speed of 
the car in km/h?
Answer We can convert our final answer to the appropriate units:
1
85.0 mi
/h
2
a
1.609 km
1 mi
b
5137 km/h
Figure 1.3 shows an automobile speedometer displaying speeds in both 
mi/h and km/h. Can you check the conversion we just performed using this 
photograph?
WhAt iF?
Figure 1.3 
The speedometer of a vehicle 
that shows speeds in both miles per hour 
and kilometers per hour.
©
C
e
n
g
a
g
e
L
e
a
r
n
i
n
g
/
E
d
D
o
d
d
Example 1.3   Is He Speeding?
On an interstate highway in a rural region of Wyoming, a car is traveling at a speed of 38.0 m/s. Is the driver exceeding 
the speed limit of 75.0 mi/h?
SoLution
VB.NET Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images
Able to create PDF from images in both .NET WinForms and ASP.NET application. Components to batch convert PDF documents in Visual Basic .NET class.
convert pdf to html; convert pdf form to html
VB.NET PDF - Convert CSV to PDF
HTML Document Viewer for Azure, C# HTML Document Viewer Free VB.NET RTF to PDF converter SDK for advanced .NET library which able to batch convert multiple RTF
convert pdf into webpage; converting pdf to html format
1.6 Significant Figures 
11
Usually, when an order-of-magnitude estimate is made, the results are reliable to 
within about a factor of 10. If a quantity increases in value by three orders of magni-
tude, its value increases by a factor of about 103 5 1 000.
Inaccuracies caused by guessing too low for one number are often canceled 
by other guesses that are too high. You will find that with practice your guessti-
mates become better and better. Estimation problems can be fun to work because 
you freely drop digits, venture reasonable approximations for unknown numbers, 
make simplifying assumptions, and turn the question around into something you 
can answer in your head or with minimal mathematical manipulation on paper. 
Because of the simplicity of these types of calculations, they can be performed on a 
small scrap of paper and are often called “back-of-the-envelope calculations.”
1.6 Significant Figures
When certain quantities are measured, the measured values are known only to 
within the limits of the experimental uncertainty. The value of this uncertainty 
can depend on various factors, such as the quality of the apparatus, the skill of 
the experimenter, and the number of measurements performed. The number of 
significant figures in a measurement can be used to express something about the 
uncertainty. The number of significant figures is related to the number of numeri-
cal digits used to express the measurement, as we discuss below.
As an example of significant figures, suppose we are asked to measure the radius 
of a compact disc using a meterstick as a measuring instrument. Let us assume the 
accuracy to which we can measure the radius of the disc is 60.1 cm. Because of 
the uncertainty of 60.1 cm, if the radius is measured to be 6.0 cm, we can claim 
only that its radius lies somewhere between 5.9 cm and 6.1 cm. In this case, we 
say that the measured value of 6.0 cm has two significant figures. Note that the  
1 yr
a
400 days
1 yr
b
a
25 h
1 day
b
a
60 min
1 h
b
563105 min
Find the approximate number of minutes in a year:
Find the approximate number of minutes in a 70-year 
lifetime:
number of minutes 5 (70 yr)(6 3 105 min/yr)
 
5 4 3 107 min
Find the approximate number of breaths in a lifetime:
number of breaths  5 (10 breaths/min)(4 3 107 min)
5 4 3 108 breaths
Therefore, a person takes on the order of 109 breaths in a lifetime. Notice how much simpler it is in the first calculation 
above to multiply 400 3 25 than it is to work with the more accurate 365 3 24.
What if the average lifetime were estimated as 80 years instead of 70? Would that change our final estimate?
Answer We could claim that (80 yr)(6 3 105 min/yr) 5 5 3 107 min, so our final estimate should be 5 3 108 breaths. 
This answer is still on the order of 109 breaths, so an order-of-magnitude estimate would be unchanged.
WhAt iF?
Example 1.4   Breaths in a Lifetime
Estimate the number of breaths taken during an average human lifetime.
We start by guessing that the typical human lifetime is about 70 years. Think about the average number of breaths that 
a person takes in 1 min. This number varies depending on whether the person is exercising, sleeping, angry, serene, 
and so forth. To the nearest order of magnitude, we shall choose 10 breaths per minute as our estimate. (This estimate 
is certainly closer to the true average value than an estimate of 1 breath per minute or 100 breaths per minute.)
SoLution
12
chapter 1 physics and Measurement
significant figures include the first estimated digit. Therefore, we could write the radius as  
(6.0 6 0.1) cm.
Zeros may or may not be significant figures. Those used to position the decimal 
point in such numbers as 0.03 and 0.007 5 are not significant. Therefore, there are 
one and two significant figures, respectively, in these two values. When the zeros 
come after other digits, however, there is the possibility of misinterpretation. For 
example, suppose the mass of an object is given as 1 500 g. This value is ambigu-
ous because we do not know whether the last two zeros are being used to locate the 
decimal point or whether they represent significant figures in the measurement. To 
remove this ambiguity, it is common to use scientific notation to indicate the number 
of significant figures. In this case, we would express the mass as 1.5 3 103g if there 
are two significant figures in the measured value, 1.50 3 103 g if there are three sig-
nificant figures, and 1.500 3 103 g if there are four. The same rule holds for numbers 
less than 1, so 2.3 3 1024 has two significant figures (and therefore could be written 
0.000 23) and 2.30 3 1024 has three significant figures (also written as 0.000 230).
In problem solving, we often combine quantities mathematically through mul-
tiplication, division, addition, subtraction, and so forth. When doing so, you must 
make sure that the result has the appropriate number of significant figures. A good 
rule of thumb to use in determining the number of significant figures that can be 
claimed in a multiplication or a division is as follows:
When multiplying several quantities, the number of significant figures in the 
final answer is the same as the number of significant figures in the quantity hav-
ing the smallest number of significant figures. The same rule applies to division.
Let’s apply this rule to find the area of the compact disc whose radius we mea-
sured above. Using the equation for the area of a circle,
A5pr25p
1
6.0 cm
22
51.13102 cm2
If you perform this calculation on your calculator, you will likely see 
113.097 335 5. It should be clear that you don’t want to keep all of these digits, but 
you might be tempted to report the result as 113 cm2. This result is not justified 
because it has three significant figures, whereas the radius only has two. Therefore, 
we must report the result with only two significant figures as shown above.
For addition and subtraction, you must consider the number of decimal places 
when you are determining how many significant figures to report:
When numbers are added or subtracted, the number of decimal places in the 
result should equal the smallest number of decimal places of any term in the 
sum or difference.
As an example of this rule, consider the sum
23.2 1 5.174 5 28.4
Notice that we do not report the answer as 28.374 because the lowest number of 
decimal places is one, for 23.2. Therefore, our answer must have only one decimal 
place.
The rule for addition and subtraction can often result in answers that have a dif-
ferent number of significant figures than the quantities with which you start. For 
example, consider these operations that satisfy the rule:
1.000 1 1 0.000 3 5 1.000 4
1.002 2 0.998 5 0.004
In the first example, the result has five significant figures even though one of 
the terms, 0.000 3, has only one significant figure. Similarly, in the second calcu-
lation, the result has only one significant figure even though the numbers being 
subtracted have four and three, respectively.
Pitfall Prevention 1.4
Read Carefully Notice that the 
rule for addition and subtraction 
is different from that for multipli-
cation and division. For addition 
and subtraction, the important 
consideration is the number of 
decimal places, not the number of 
significant figures.
Summary 
13
In this book, most of the numerical examples and end-of-chapter problems 
will yield answers having three significant figures. When carrying out estima-
tion calculations, we shall typically work with a single significant figure.
If the number of significant figures in the result of a calculation must be reduced, 
there is a general rule for rounding numbers: the last digit retained is increased by 
1 if the last digit dropped is greater than 5. (For example, 1.346 becomes 1.35.) 
If the last digit dropped is less than 5, the last digit retained remains as it is. (For 
example, 1.343 becomes 1.34.) If the last digit dropped is equal to 5, the remaining 
digit should be rounded to the nearest even number. (This rule helps avoid accu-
mulation of errors in long arithmetic processes.)
A technique for avoiding error accumulation is to delay the rounding of num-
bers in a long calculation until you have the final result. Wait until you are ready to 
copy the final answer from your calculator before rounding to the correct number 
of significant figures. In this book, we display numerical values rounded off to two 
or three significant figures. This occasionally makes some mathematical manipula-
tions look odd or incorrect. For instance, looking ahead to Example 3.5 on page 69, 
you will see the operation 217.7 km 1 34.6 km 5 17.0 km. This looks like an incor-
rect subtraction, but that is only because we have rounded the numbers 17.7 km and 
34.6 km for display. If all digits in these two intermediate numbers are retained and 
the rounding is only performed on the final number, the correct three-digit result 
of 17.0 km is obtained.
WW Significant figure guidelines 
used in this book
Pitfall Prevention 1.5
Symbolic Solutions When solving 
problems, it is very useful to per-
form the solution completely in 
algebraic form and wait until the 
very end to enter numerical values 
into the final symbolic expres-
sion. This method will save many 
calculator keystrokes, especially if 
some quantities cancel so that you 
never have to enter their values 
into your calculator! In addition, 
you will only need to round once, 
on the final result.
Summary
Definitions
The three fundamental physical quantities of 
mechanics are length, mass, and time, which in the SI 
system have the units meter (m), kilogram (kg), and 
second (s), respectively. These fundamental quantities 
cannot be defined in terms of more basic quantities.
The density of a substance is defined as its mass per 
unit volume:
r;
m
V
(1.1)
Example 1.5   Installing a Carpet
A carpet is to be installed in a rectangular room whose length is measured to be 12.71 m and whose width is measured 
to be 3.46 m. Find the area of the room.
If you multiply 12.71 m by 3.46 m on your calculator, you will see an answer of 43.976 6 m2. How many of these num-
bers should you claim? Our rule of thumb for multiplication tells us that you can claim only the number of significant 
figures in your answer as are present in the measured quantity having the lowest number of significant figures. In this 
example, the lowest number of significant figures is three in 3.46 m, so we should express our final answer as 44.0 m2.
SoLution
continued
14
chapter 1 physics and Measurement
1. One student uses a meterstick to measure the thick-
ness of a textbook and obtains 4.3 cm 6 0.1 cm. Other 
students measure the thickness with vernier calipers 
and obtain four different measurements: (a) 4.32 cm  
6 0.01cm, (b)4.31cm 6 0.01 cm, (c) 4.24 cm 6 0.01 cm,  
and (d)4.43cm 6 0.01 cm. Which of these four mea-
surements, if any, agree with that obtained by the first 
student?
2. A house is advertised as having 1 420 square feet under 
its roof. What is its area in square meters? (a) 4 660 m2 
(b)432m2 (c) 158 m2 (d) 132 m2 (e) 40.2 m2
3. Answer each question yes or no. Must two quantities 
have the same dimensions (a) if you are adding them? 
(b) If you are multiplying them? (c) If you are subtract-
ing them? (d)If you are dividing them? (e) If you are 
equating them?
4. The price of gasoline at a particular station is 1.5 euros 
per liter. An American student can use 33 euros to buy 
gasoline. Knowing that 4 quarts make a gallon and that  
1 liter is close to 1 quart, she quickly reasons that she 
can buy how many gallons of gasoline? (a) less than  
1 gallon (b) about 5gallons (c) about 8 gallons (d) more  
than 10 gallons
5. Rank the following five quantities in order from the 
largest to the smallest. If two of the quantities are equal, 
give them equal rank in your list. (a) 0.032 kg (b) 15 g  
(c) 2.7 3 105mg (d) 4.1 3 1028 Gg (e) 2.7 3 108 mg
6. What is the sum of the measured values 21.4 s 1 15 s 1  
17.17 s 1 4.00 3 s? (a) 57.573 s (b) 57.57 s (c) 57.6 s  
(d) 58 s (e) 60 s
7. Which of the following is the best estimate for the mass 
of all the people living on the Earth? (a) 2 3 108 kg  
(b) 1 3 109 kg (c) 2 3 1010 kg (d) 3 3 1011 kg  
(e) 4 3 1012kg
8. (a) If an equation is dimensionally correct, does that 
mean that the equation must be true? (b) If an equa-
tion is not dimensionally correct, does that mean that 
the equation cannot be true?
9. Newton’s second law of motion (Chapter 5) says that the 
mass of an object times its acceleration is equal to the 
net force on the object. Which of the following gives 
the correct units for force? (a) kg ? m/s2 (b) kg ? m2/s2 
(c) kg/m?s2 (d) kg ? m2/s (e) none of those answers
10. A calculator displays a result as 1.365 248 0 3 107 kg. 
The estimated uncertainty in the result is 62%. How 
many digits should be included as significant when the 
result is written down? (a) zero (b) one (c) two (d) three 
(e) four
Objective Questions
1. 
denotes answer available in Student Solutions Manual/Study Guide
Conceptual Questions
1. 
denotes answer available in Student Solutions Manual/Study Guide
1. Suppose the three fundamental standards of the met-
ric system were length, density, and time rather than 
length, mass, and time. The standard of density in this 
system is to be defined as that of water. What consid-
erations about water would you need to address to 
make sure that the standard of density is as accurate as 
possible?
2. Why is the metric system of units considered superior 
to most other systems of units?
3. What natural phenomena could serve as alternative 
time standards?
4. Express the following quantities using the prefixes given 
in Table 1.4. (a) 3 3 1024 m (b) 5 3 1025 s (c) 72 3 102 g
Concepts and Principles
When you compute a result from several measured 
numbers, each of which has a certain accuracy, you 
should give the result with the correct number of sig-
nificant figures.
When multiplying several quantities, the number of 
significant  figures in the final answer is the same as the 
number of significant figures in the quantity having 
the smallest number of significant figures. The same 
rule applies to division.
When numbers are added or subtracted, the number 
of decimal places in the result should equal the small-
est number of decimal places of any term in the sum or 
difference.
The method of dimensional analysis is very power-
ful in solving physics problems. Dimensions can be 
treated as algebraic quantities. By making estimates 
and performing order-of-magnitude calculations, you 
should be able to approximate the answer to a prob-
lem when there is not enough information available to 
specify an exact solution completely.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested