mvc display pdf in browser : How to convert pdf file to html software control cloud windows azure web page class doc-3-pdf-67a5de9fa89738da0c6835ef457b5878-original44-part293

13.6 energy considerations in planetary and Satellite Motion 
405
Equations 13.21 and 13.22 can be applied to objects projected from any planet. 
That is, in general, the escape speed from the surface of any planet of mass M and 
radius R is
v
esc
5
Å
2GM
R
(13.23)
Escape speeds for the planets, the Moon, and the Sun are provided in Table 13.3. 
The values vary from 2.3 km/s for the Moon to about 618 km/s for the Sun. These 
results, together with some ideas from the kinetic theory of gases (see Chapter 21), 
explain why some planets have atmospheres and others do not. As we shall see later, 
at a given temperature the average kinetic energy of a gas molecule depends only 
on the mass of the molecule. Lighter molecules, such as hydrogen and helium, have 
a higher average speed than heavier molecules at the same temperature. When the 
average speed of the lighter molecules is not much less than the escape speed of a 
planet, a significant fraction of them have a chance to escape.
This mechanism also explains why the Earth does not retain hydrogen mole-
cules and helium atoms in its atmosphere but does retain heavier molecules, such 
as oxygen and nitrogen. On the other hand, the very large escape speed for Jupiter 
enables that planet to retain hydrogen, the primary constituent of its atmosphere.
Black Holes
In Example 11.7, we briefly described a rare event called a supernova, the cata-
strophic explosion of a very massive star. The material that remains in the central 
core of such an object continues to collapse, and the core’s ultimate fate depends 
on its mass. If the core has a mass less than 1.4 times the mass of our Sun, it gradu-
ally cools down and ends its life as a white dwarf star. If the core’s mass is greater 
than this value, however, it may collapse further due to gravitational forces. What 
WW Escape speed from the sur-
face of a planet of mass 
M
and radius 
R
Conceptualize  Imagine projecting the spacecraft from the Earth’s surface so that it moves farther and farther away, 
traveling more and more slowly, with its speed approaching zero. Its speed will never reach zero, however, so the object 
will never turn around and come back.
Categorize  This example is a substitution problem.
SoluTion
Use Equation 13.22 to find the escape speed:
v
esc
5
Å
2GM
E
R
E
5
Å
216.674310211 N
#
m2/kg2215.9731024 kg2
6.373106 m
  1.12 3 104 m/s
Evaluate the kinetic energy of the spacecraft 
from Equation 7.16:
K51
2
mv2
esc
51
2
1
5.003103 kg
21
1.123104 m/s
22
  3.13 3 1011 J
The calculated escape speed corresponds to about 25 000 mi/h. The kinetic energy of the spacecraft is equivalent to 
the energy released by the combustion of about 2 300 gal of gasoline.
What if you want to launch a 1 000-kg spacecraft at the escape speed? How much energy would that 
require?
Answer  In Equation 13.22, the mass of the object moving with the escape speed does not appear. Therefore, the 
escape speed for the 1 000-kg spacecraft is the same as that for the 5 000-kg spacecraft. The only change in the kinetic 
energy is due to the mass, so the 1 000-kg spacecraft requires one-fifth of the energy of the 5 000-kg spacecraft:
K5
1
5
1
3.1331011 J
2
56.2531010 J
WhaT iF?
▸ 13.8 
continued
Table 13.3
Escape 
Speeds from the Surfaces 
of the Planets, Moon,  
and Sun
Planet 
v
esc
(km/s)
Mercury 
4.3
Venus 
10.3
Earth 
11.2
Mars 
5.0
Jupiter 
60
Saturn 
36
Uranus 
22
Neptune 
24
Moon 
2.3
Sun 
618
How to convert pdf file to html - Convert PDF to html files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
How to Convert PDF to HTML Webpage with C# PDF Conversion SDK
convert pdf to html open source; change pdf to html
How to convert pdf file to html - VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
PDF to HTML Webpage Converter SDK for VB.NET PDF to HTML Conversion
convert pdf to html; convert pdf to html file
406
chapter 13 Universal Gravitation
remains is a neutron star, discussed in Example 11.7, in which the mass of a star is 
compressed to a radius of about 10 km. (On the Earth, a teaspoon of this material 
would weigh about 5 billion tons!)
An even more unusual star death may occur when the core has a mass greater 
than about three solar masses. The collapse may continue until the star becomes 
a very small object in space, commonly referred to as a black hole. In effect, black 
holes are remains of stars that have collapsed under their own gravitational force. If 
an object such as a spacecraft comes close to a black hole, the object experiences an 
extremely strong gravitational force and is trapped forever.
The escape speed for a black hole is very high because of the concentration of 
the star’s mass into a sphere of very small radius (see Eq. 13.23). If the escape speed 
exceeds the speed of light c, radiation from the object (such as visible light) cannot 
escape and the object appears to be black (hence the origin of the terminology 
“black hole”). The critical radius R
S
at which the escape speed is c is called the 
Schwarzschild radius (Fig. 13.15). The imaginary surface of a sphere of this radius 
surrounding the black hole is called the event horizon, which is the limit of how 
close you can approach the black hole and hope to escape.
There is evidence that supermassive black holes exist at the centers of galaxies, 
with masses very much larger than the Sun. (There is strong evidence of a super-
massive black hole of mass 2–3 million solar masses at the center of our galaxy.)
Dark Matter
Equation (1) in Example 13.5 shows that the speed of an object in orbit around the 
Earth decreases as the object is moved farther away from the Earth:
v5
Å
GM
E
r
(13.24)
Using data in Table 13.2 to find the speeds of planets in their orbits around the 
Sun, we find the same behavior for the planets. Figure 13.16 shows this behavior for 
the eight planets of our solar system. The theoretical prediction of the planet speed 
as a function of distance from the Sun is shown by the red-brown curve, using Equa-
tion 13.24 with the mass of the Earth replaced by the mass of the Sun. Data for the 
individual planets lie right on this curve. This behavior results from the vast major-
ity of the mass of the solar system being concentrated in a small space, i.e., the Sun.
Extending this concept further, we might expect the same behavior in a galaxy. 
Much of the visible galactic mass, including that of a supermassive black hole, is 
near the central core of a galaxy. The opening photograph for this chapter shows 
the central core of the Whirlpool galaxy as a very bright area surrounded by the 
“arms” of the galaxy, which contain material in orbit around the central core. Based 
on this distribution of matter in the galaxy, the speed of an object in the outer part 
of the galaxy would be smaller than that for objects closer to the center, just like for 
the planets of the solar system.
That is not what is observed, however. Figure 13.17 shows the results of measure-
ments of the speeds of objects in the Andromeda galaxy as a function of distance 
from the galaxy’s center.4 The red-brown curve shows the expected speeds for these 
objects if they were traveling in circular orbits around the mass concentrated in the 
central core. The data for the individual objects in the galaxy shown by the black 
dots are all well above the theoretical curve. These data, as well as an extensive 
amount of data taken over the past half century, show that for objects outside the 
central core of the galaxy, the curve of speed versus distance from the center of the 
galaxy is approximately flat rather than decreasing at larger distances. Therefore, 
these objects (including our own Solar System in the Milky Way) are rotating faster 
than can be accounted for by gravity due to the visible galaxy! This surprising 
4V. C. Rubin and W. K. Ford, “Rotation of the Andromeda Nebula from a Spectroscopic Survey of Emission Regions,” 
Astrophysical Journal 159: 379–403 (1970).
Event
horizon
Black
hole
R
S
Any event occurring within the  
event horizon is invisible to an 
outside observer.
Figure 13.15 
A black hole. The 
distance R
S
equals the Schwarzs-
child radius.
Mercury
(km/s)
(10
12 
m)
Venus
Earth
Mars
Jupiter
Saturn
Uranus
2
0
20
40
4
Neptune
Figure 13.16 
The orbital speed 
v as a function of distance r from 
the Sun for the eight planets of 
the solar system. The theoretical 
curve is in red-brown, and the data 
points for the planets are in black.
Online Convert PDF to HTML5 files. Best free online PDF html
Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF file to HTML. Just upload your file by clicking on the blue button or drag-and-drop your pdf file into the drop area.
converter pdf to html; embed pdf into webpage
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Convert smooth lines to curves. Detect and merge image fragments. Flatten visible layers. VB.NET Demo Code to Optimize An Exist PDF File in Visual C#.NET Project
convert pdf to html form; convert pdf into html code
Summary 
407
result means that there must be additional mass in a more extended distribution, 
causing these objects to orbit so fast, and has led scientists to propose the existence 
of dark matter. This matter is proposed to exist in a large halo around each galaxy 
(with a radius up to 10 times as large as the visible galaxy’s radius). Because it is not 
luminous (i.e., does not emit electromagnetic radiation) it must be either very cold 
or electrically neutral. Therefore, we cannot “see” dark matter, except through its 
gravitational effects.
The proposed existence of dark matter is also implied by earlier observations 
made on larger gravitationally bound structures known as galaxy clusters.5 These 
observations show that the orbital speeds of galaxies in a cluster are, on average, 
too large to be explained by the luminous matter in the cluster alone. The speeds 
of the individual galaxies are so high, they suggest that there is 50 times as much 
dark matter in galaxy clusters as in the galaxies themselves!
Why doesn’t dark matter affect the orbital speeds of planets like it does those 
of a galaxy? It seems that a solar system is too small a structure to contain enough 
dark matter to affect the behavior of orbital speeds. A galaxy or galaxy cluster, on 
the other hand, contains huge amounts of dark matter, resulting in the surprising 
behavior.
What, though, is dark matter? At this time, no one knows. One theory claims 
that dark matter is based on a particle called a weakly interacting massive particle, 
or WIMP. If this theory is correct, calculations show that about 200 WIMPs pass 
through a human body at any given time. The new Large Hadron Collider in Europe 
(see Chapter 46) is the first particle accelerator with enough energy to possibly gen-
erate and detect the existence of WIMPs, which has generated much current interest 
in dark matter. Keeping an eye on this research in the future should be exciting.
5F. Zwicky, “On the Masses of Nebulae and of Clusters of Nebulae,” Astrophysical Journal 86: 217–246 (1937).
(km/s)
(1019
m)
20
40
60
80
0
200
400
600
Central
core
Figure 13.17 
The orbital speed 
v of a galaxy object as a function 
of distance r from the center of 
the central core of the Androm-
eda galaxy. The theoretical curve 
is in red-brown, and the data 
points for the galaxy objects are 
in black. No data are provided 
on the left because the behavior 
inside the central core of the gal-
axy is more complicated.
Summary
Definitions
The gravitational field at a point in space is defined as the gravitational force F
S
g
experienced by any test particle 
located at that point divided by the mass m
0
of the test particle:
g
S
;
F
S
g
m
0
(13.7)
Concepts and Principles
Newton’s law of universal gravitation states that the 
gravitational force of attraction between any two par-
ticles of masses m
1
and m
2
separated by a distance r has 
the magnitude
F
g
5G 
m
1
m
2
r2
(13.1)
where G 5 6.674 3 10211 N ? m2/kg2 is the universal 
gravitational constant. This equation enables us to 
calculate the force of attraction between masses under 
many circumstances.
An object at a distance h above the Earth’s surface 
experiences a gravitational force of magnitude mg
where g is the free-fall acceleration at that elevation:
g5
GM
E
r2
5
GM
E
1
R
E
1h
22
(13.6)
In this expression, M
E
is the mass of the Earth and R
E
is its radius. Therefore, the weight of an object 
decreases as the object moves away from the Earth’s 
surface.
VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
Professional VB.NET PDF file merging SDK support Visual Studio .NET. Merge PDF without size limitation. Append one PDF file to the end of another one in VB.NET.
embed pdf into website; best website to convert pdf to word
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
Application. Best and professional adobe PDF file splitting SDK for Visual Studio .NET. outputOps); Divide PDF File into Two Using C#.
embed pdf into web page; convert pdf to web page online
408
chapter 13 Universal Gravitation
Kepler’s laws of planetary motion state:
1. All planets move in elliptical orbits with the Sun 
at one focus.
2. The radius vector drawn from the Sun to a planet 
sweeps out equal areas in equal time intervals.
3. The square of the orbital period of any planet is 
proportional to the cube of the semimajor axis of 
the elliptical orbit.
Kepler’s third law can be expressed as
Ta
4p2
GM
S
ba3 
(13.11)
where M
S
is the mass of the Sun and a is the semimajor 
axis. For a circular orbit, a can be replaced in Equation 
13.11 by the radius r. Most planets have nearly circular 
orbits around the Sun.
The gravitational potential energy associated with a 
system of two particles of mass m
1
and m
2
separated by 
a distance r is
U52
Gm
1
m
2
r
(13.15)
where U is taken to be zero as r S `.
If an isolated system consists of an object of mass m 
moving with a speed v in the vicinity of a massive object 
of mass M, the total energy E of the system is the sum 
of the kinetic and potential energies:
E51
2
mv2
GMm
r
(13.16)
The total energy of the system is a constant of the 
motion. If the object moves in an elliptical orbit of 
semimajor axis a around the massive object and  
M .. m, the total energy of the system is
E52
GMm
2a
(13.20)
For a circular orbit, this same equation applies with  
a 5 r.
The escape speed for an object projected from the 
surface of a planet of mass M and radius R is
v
esc
5
Å
2GM
R
(13.23)
Analysis Model for Problem Solving
Particle in a Field (Gravitational) A source particle with some mass establishes a gravitational 
field g
S
throughout space. When a particle of mass m is placed in that field, it experiences a gravita-
tional force given by
F
S
g
5mg
S
(5.5)
m
g
S
F
mg
S
S
true? (a) No force acts on the satellite. (b) The satellite 
moves at constant speed and hence doesn’t accelerate. 
(c)The satellite has an acceleration directed away from 
the Earth. (d) The satellite has an acceleration directed 
toward the Earth. (e) Work is done on the satellite by 
the gravitational force.
4. Suppose the gravitational acceleration at the surface 
of a certain moon A of Jupiter is 2 m/s2. Moon B has 
twice the mass and twice the radius of moon A. What 
is the gravitational acceleration at its surface? Neglect 
the gravitational acceleration due to Jupiter. (a) 8 m/s2 
(b) 4 m/s2 (c) 2 m/s2 (d) 1 m/s2 (e) 0.5 m/s2
1. A system consists of five particles. How many terms 
appear in the expression for the total gravitational 
potential energy of the system? (a) 4 (b) 5 (c) 10 (d) 20 
(e) 25
2. Rank the following quantities of energy from largest to 
smallest. State if any are equal. (a) the absolute value 
of the average potential energy of the Sun–Earth sys-
tem (b)the average kinetic energy of the Earth in its 
orbital motion relative to the Sun (c) the absolute value 
of the total energy of the Sun–Earth system
3. A satellite moves in a circular orbit at a constant speed 
around the Earth. Which of the following statements is 
Objective Questions
1. 
denotes answer available in Student Solutions Manual/Study Guide
VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.
Convert PDF to Tiff; C#: Convert PDF to HTML; C#: Convert PDF to Jpeg; C# File: Compress PDF; C# File: Merge PDF; C# File: Split PDF;
convert pdf to html format; convert pdf to web pages
VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
Professional VB.NET PDF file splitting SDK for Visual Studio and .NET framework 2.0. Split PDF file into two or multiple files in ASP.NET webpage online.
converting pdfs to html; convert pdf fillable form to html
conceptual Questions 
409
September (autumnal) equinox (which contains the 
summer solstice) longer than the interval from the 
September to the March equinox rather than being 
equal to that interval? Choose one of the following 
reasons. (a)They are really the same, but the Earth 
spins faster during the “summer” interval, so the 
days are shorter. (b) Over the “summer” interval, the 
Earth moves slower because it is farther from the Sun. 
(c) Over the March-to-September interval, the Earth 
moves slower because it is closer to the Sun. (d)The 
Earth has less kinetic energy when it is warmer. 
(e)The Earth has less orbital angular momentum 
when it is warmer.
9. Rank the magnitudes of the following gravitational 
forces from largest to smallest. If two forces are equal, 
show their equality in your list. (a) the force exerted by 
a 2-kg object on a 3-kg object 1 m away (b) the force 
exerted by a 2-kg object on a 9-kg object 1 m away  
(c) the force exerted by a 2-kg object on a 9-kg object  
2 m away (d) the force exerted by a 9-kg object on a 
2-kg object 2 m away (e) the force exerted by a 4-kg 
object on another 4-kg object 2 m away
10. The gravitational force exerted on an astronaut on 
the Earth’s surface is 650 N directed downward. When 
she is in the space station in orbit around the Earth, 
is the gravitational force on her (a) larger, (b) exactly 
the same, (c)smaller, (d) nearly but not exactly zero, or  
(e) exactly zero?
11. Halley’s comet has a period of approximately 76 years, 
and it moves in an elliptical orbit in which its distance 
from the Sun at closest approach is a small fraction of 
its maximum distance. Estimate the comet’s maximum 
distance from the Sun in astronomical units (AUs) 
(the distance from the Earth to the Sun). (a) 6 AU  
(b) 12 AU (c) 20 AU (d) 28 AU (e) 35 AU
5. Imagine that nitrogen and other atmospheric gases 
were more soluble in water so that the atmosphere of 
the Earth is entirely absorbed by the oceans. Atmo-
spheric pressure would then be zero, and outer space 
would start at the planet’s surface. Would the Earth 
then have a gravitational field? (a) Yes, and at the sur-
face it would be larger in magnitude than 9.8 N/kg. 
(b) Yes, and it would be essentially the same as the 
current value. (c) Yes, and it would be somewhat less 
than 9.8 N/kg. (d) Yes, and it would be much less than  
9.8 N/kg. (e) No, it would not.
6. An object of mass m is located on the surface of a 
spherical planet of mass M and radius R. The escape 
speed from the planet does not depend on which 
of the following? (a) M (b) m (c) the density of the 
planet (d) R (e) the acceleration due to gravity on 
that planet
7. A satellite originally moves in a circular orbit of radius 
R around the Earth. Suppose it is moved into a circu-
lar orbit of radius 4R. (i) What does the force exerted 
on the satellite then become? (a) eight times larger  
(b) four times larger (c) one-half as large (d) one-
eighth as large (e)one-sixteenth as large (ii) What 
happens to the satellite’s speed? Choose from the 
same possibilities (a) through (e). (iii)What hap-
pens to its period? Choose from the same possibilities  
(a) through (e).
8. The vernal equinox and the autumnal equinox are 
associated with two points 180° apart in the Earth’s 
orbit. That is, the Earth is on precisely opposite sides 
of the Sun when it passes through these two points. 
From the vernal equinox, 185.4 days elapse before 
the autumnal equinox. Only 179.8days elapse from 
the autumnal equinox until the next vernal equinox. 
Why is the interval from the March (vernal) to the 
Conceptual Questions
1. 
denotes answer available in Student Solutions Manual/Study Guide
1. Each Voyager spacecraft was accelerated toward escape 
speed from the Sun by the gravitational force exerted by 
Jupiter on the spacecraft. (a) Is the gravitational force 
a conservative or a nonconservative force? (b) Does the 
interaction of the spacecraft with Jupiter meet the defi-
nition of an elastic collision? (c) How could the space-
craft be moving faster after the collision?
2. In his 1798 experiment, Cavendish was said to have 
“weighed the Earth.” Explain this statement.
3. Why don’t we put a geosynchronous weather satellite in 
orbit around the 45th parallel? Wouldn’t such a satel-
lite be more useful in the United States than one in 
orbit around the equator?
4. (a) Explain why the force exerted on a particle by a 
uniform sphere must be directed toward the center 
of the sphere. (b) Would this statement be true if the 
mass distribution of the sphere were not spherically 
symmetric? Explain.
5. (a) At what position in its elliptical orbit is the speed of 
a planet a maximum? (b) At what position is the speed 
a minimum?
6. You are given the mass and radius of planet X. How 
would you calculate the free-fall acceleration on this 
planet’s surface?
7. (a) If a hole could be dug to the center of the Earth, 
would the force on an object of mass m still obey Equa-
tion 13.1 there? (b) What do you think the force on m 
would be at the center of the Earth?
8. Explain why it takes more fuel for a spacecraft to travel 
from the Earth to the Moon than for the return trip. 
Estimate the difference.
9. A satellite in low-Earth orbit is not truly traveling 
through a vacuum. Rather, it moves through very thin 
air. Does the resulting air friction cause the satellite to 
slow down?
C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
All object data. File attachment. Hidden layer content. Convert smooth lines to curves. Flatten visible layers. C#.NET DLLs: Compress PDF Document.
convert pdf to html code c#; converting pdf to html format
C# PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.
Professional C#.NET PDF SDK for merging PDF file merging in Visual Studio .NET. Append one PDF file to the end of another and save to a single PDF file.
how to change pdf to html; convert pdf table to html
410
chapter 13 Universal Gravitation
magnitude of the gravitational force exerted by one 
particle on the other?
8. Why is the following situation impossible? The centers of two 
homogeneous spheres are 1.00 m apart. The spheres 
are each made of the same element from the peri- 
odic table. The gravitational force between the spheres 
is 1.00N.
9. Two objects attract each other with a gravitational 
force of magnitude 1.00 3 1028 N when separated by 
20.0 cm. If the total mass of the two objects is 5.00 kg, 
what is the mass of each?
10. Review. A student proposes to study the gravita-
tional force by suspending two 100.0-kg spherical 
objects at the lower ends of cables from the ceiling 
of a tall cathedral and measuring the deflection of 
the cables from the vertical. The 45.00-m-long cables 
are attached to the ceiling 1.000 m apart. The first 
object is suspended, and its position is carefully mea-
sured. The second object is suspended, and the two 
objects attract each other gravitationally. By what dis-
tance has the first object moved horizontally from its 
initial position due to the gravitational attraction to 
the other object? Suggestion: Keep in mind that this 
distance will be very small and make appropriate 
approximations.
Section 13.2 Free-Fall acceleration and  
the Gravitational Force
11. When a falling meteoroid is at a distance above the 
Earth’s surface of 3.00 times the Earth’s radius, what is 
its acceleration due to the Earth’s gravitation?
12. The free-fall acceleration on the surface of the Moon 
is about one-sixth that on the surface of the Earth. 
The radius of the Moon is about 0.250R
E
(R
E
5 Earth’s 
radius5 6.373 106 m). Find the ratio of their average 
densities, r
Moon
/r
Earth
.
13. Review. Miranda, a satellite of Uranus, is shown in Fig-
ure P13.13a. It can be modeled as a sphere of radius 
242 km and mass 6.68 3 1019 kg. (a) Find the free-fall 
acceleration on its surface. (b) A cliff on Miranda is 
5.00 km high. It appears on the limb at the 11 o’clock 
position in Figure P13.13a and is magnified in Figure 
P13.13b. If a devotee of extreme sports runs horizon-
tally off the top of the cliff at 8.50 m/s, for what time 
interval is he in flight? (c) How far from the base of the 
vertical cliff does he strike the icy surface of Miranda? 
(d) What will be his vector impact velocity?
W
M
W
Section 13.1 newton’s law of universal Gravitation
Problem 12 in Chapter 1 can also be assigned with this 
section.
1. In introductory physics laboratories, a typical Caven-
dish balance for measuring the gravitational constant 
G uses lead spheres with masses of 1.50 kg and 15.0 g 
whose centers are separated by about 4.50 cm. Calcu-
late the gravitational force between these spheres, treat-
ing each as a particle located at the sphere’s center.
2. Determine the order of magnitude of the gravitational 
force that you exert on another person 2 m away. In 
your solution, state the quantities you measure or esti-
mate and their values.
3. A 200-kg object and a 500-kg object are separated by 
4.00m. (a) Find the net gravitational force exerted 
by these objects on a 50.0-kg object placed midway 
between them. (b) At what position (other than an infi-
nitely remote one) can the 50.0-kg object be placed so 
as to experience a net force of zero from the other two 
objects?
4. During a solar eclipse, the Moon, the Earth, and the 
Sun all lie on the same line, with the Moon between 
the Earth and the Sun. (a) What force is exerted by 
the Sun on the Moon? (b) What force is exerted by the 
Earth on the Moon? (c) What force is exerted by the 
Sun on the Earth? (d) Compare the answers to parts 
(a) and (b). Why doesn’t the Sun capture the Moon 
away from the Earth?
5. Two ocean liners, each with a mass of 40 000 metric 
tons, are moving on parallel courses 100 m apart. What 
is the magnitude of the acceleration of one of the lin-
ers toward the other due to their mutual gravitational 
attraction? Model the ships as particles.
6. Three uniform spheres of 
masses m
1
5 2.00 kg, m
2
4.00kg, and m
3
5 6.00 kg 
are placed at the corners of 
a right triangle as shown in 
Figure P13.6. Calculate the 
resultant gravitational force 
on the object of mass m
2
assuming the spheres are 
isolated from the rest of the 
Universe.
7. Two identical isolated particles, each of mass 2.00 kg, 
are separated by a distance of 30.0 cm. What is the 
M
W
Q/C
y
m
1
(0, 3.00) m
x
O
m
3
m
2
(–
4.00, 0) m
F
32
S
F
12
S
Figure P13.6
W
Problems
The problems found in this  
chapter may be assigned 
online in Enhanced WebAssign
1.
 straightforward; 
2. 
intermediate;  
3. 
challenging
1.
full solution available in the Student 
Solutions Manual/Study Guide
AMT
Analysis Model tutorial available in 
Enhanced WebAssign
GP
Guided Problem
M
Master It tutorial available in Enhanced 
WebAssign
W
Watch It video solution available in 
Enhanced WebAssign
BIO
Q/C
S
problems 
411
tional fields acting on the occupants in the nose of the 
ship and on those in the rear of the ship, farthest from 
the black hole? (This difference in accelerations grows 
rapidly as the ship approaches the black hole. It puts 
the body of the ship under extreme tension and even-
tually tears it apart.)
10.0 km
100 m
Black hole
Figure P13.16
Section 13.4 Kepler’s laws and the Motion of Planets
17. An artificial satellite circles the Earth in a circular orbit 
at a location where the acceleration due to gravity is  
9.00 m/s2. Determine the orbital period of the satellite.
18. Io, a satellite of Jupiter, has an orbital period of 1.77 days  
and an orbital radius of 4.22 3 105 km. From these 
data, determine the mass of Jupiter.
19. A minimum-energy transfer orbit to an outer planet 
consists of putting a spacecraft on an elliptical trajec-
tory with the departure planet corresponding to the 
perihelion of the ellipse, or the closest point to the Sun, 
and the arrival planet at the aphelion, or the farthest 
point from the Sun. (a) Use Kepler’s third law to calcu-
late how long it would take to go from Earth to Mars on 
such an orbit as shown in Figure P13.19. (b) Can such 
an orbit be undertaken at any time? Explain.
Sun
Earth orbit
Mars orbit
Transfer orbit
Arrival at
Mars
Launch from
the Earth
S
0
in the x direction, a distance b from 
the x axis (Fig. P13.20). (a) Does the particle possess any 
angular momentum about the origin? (b) Explain why 
the amount of its angular momentum should change or 
should stay constant. (c) Show that Kepler’s second law 
is satisfied by showing that the two shaded triangles in 
the figure have the same area when t
D
t
C
t
B
t
A
.
Q/C
Q/C
S
Section 13.3  analysis Model: Particle in a Field (Gravitational)
14. (a) Compute the vector gravitational field at a point P 
on the perpendicular bisector of the line joining two 
objects of equal mass separated by a distance 2a as 
shown in Figure P13.14. (b) Explain physically why the 
field should approach zero as r S 0. (c) Prove math-
ematically that the answer to part (a) behaves in this 
way. (d)Explain physically why the magnitude of the 
field should approach 2GM/r2 as r S `. (e) Prove math-
ematically that the answer to part (a) behaves correctly 
in this limit.
a
M
M
P
r
a
Figure P13.14
15. Three objects of equal mass are located at three cor-
ners of a square of edge length , as shown in Figure 
P13.15. Find the magnitude and direction of the gravi-
tational field at the fourth corner due to these objects.
O
x
y
m
m
m
Figure P13.15
16. A spacecraft in the shape of a long cylinder has a length 
of 100 m, and its mass with occupants is 1 000 kg.  
It has strayed too close to a black hole having a mass 
100 times that of the Sun (Fig. P13.16). The nose of 
the spacecraft points toward the black hole, and the 
distance between the nose and the center of the black 
hole is 10.0 km. (a) Determine the total force on the 
spacecraft. (b) What is the difference in the gravita-
Q/C
S
S
AMT
W
a
b
Figure P13.13
N
A
S
A
/
J
P
L
x
y
b
O
m
v
0
S
A
B
C
D
Figure P13.20
412
chapter 13 Universal Gravitation
21. Plaskett’s binary system consists of two stars that revolve 
in a circular orbit about a center of mass midway between 
them. This statement implies that the masses of the two 
stars are equal (Fig. P13.21). Assume the orbital speed 
of each star is 0v
S
0 5 220 km/s and the orbital period 
of each is 14.4 days. Find the mass M of each star. (For 
comparison, the mass of our Sun is 1.99 3 1030 kg.)
M
M
CM
v
S
v
S
Figure P13.21
22. Two planets X and Y travel counterclockwise in circu-
lar orbits about a star as shown in Figure P13.22. The 
radii of their orbits are in the ratio 3:1. At one moment, 
they are aligned as shown in Figure P13.22a, making a 
straight line with the star. During the next five years, 
the angular displacement of planet X is 90.0° as shown 
in Figure P13.22b. What is the angular displacement of 
planet Y at this moment?
X
Y
X
a
b
Y
Figure P13.22
23. Comet Halley (Fig. P13.23) approaches the Sun to 
within 0.570 AU, and its orbital period is 75.6 yr. (AU is 
the symbol for astronomical unit, where 1 AU 5 1.50 3 
1011 m is the mean Earth–Sun distance.) How far from 
the Sun will Halley’s comet travel before it starts its 
return journey?
Sun
0.570 AU
2a
x
Figure P13.23 
(Orbit is not drawn 
to scale.)
24. The Explorer VIII satellite, placed into orbit November 3,  
1960, to investigate the ionosphere, had the following 
M
W
orbit parameters: perigee, 459 km; apogee, 2 289 km 
(both distances above the Earth’s surface); period, 
112.7 min. Find the ratio v
p
/v
a
of the speed at perigee to 
that at apogee.
25. Use Kepler’s third law to determine how many days it 
takes a spacecraft to travel in an elliptical orbit from a 
point 6 670 km from the Earth’s center to the Moon, 
385 000 km from the Earth’s center.
26. Neutron stars are extremely dense objects formed from 
the remnants of supernova explosions. Many rotate 
very rapidly. Suppose the mass of a certain spherical 
neutron star is twice the mass of the Sun and its radius 
is 10.0 km. Determine the greatest possible angular 
speed it can have so that the matter at the surface of 
the star on its equator is just held in orbit by the gravi-
tational force.
27. A synchronous satellite, which always remains above 
the same point on a planet’s equator, is put in orbit 
around Jupiter to study that planet’s famous red spot. 
Jupiter rotates once every 9.84 h. Use the data of Table 
13.2 to find the altitude of the satellite above the sur-
face of the planet.
28. (a) Given that the period of the Moon’s orbit about the 
Earth is 27.32 days and the nearly constant distance 
between the center of the Earth and the center of the 
Moon is 3.84 3 108 m, use Equation 13.11 to calculate 
the mass of the Earth. (b) Why is the value you calcu-
late a bit too large?
29. Suppose the Sun’s gravity were switched off. The plan-
ets would leave their orbits and fly away in straight lines 
as described by Newton’s first law. (a) Would Mercury 
ever be farther from the Sun than Pluto? (b) If so, find 
how long it would take Mercury to achieve this passage. 
If not, give a convincing argument that Pluto is always 
farther from the Sun than is Mercury.
Section 13.5  Gravitational Potential Energy
Note: In Problems 30 through 50, assume U 5 0 at r 5 `.
30. A satellite in Earth orbit has a mass of 100 kg and is 
at an altitude of 2.00 3 106 m. (a) What is the poten-
tial energy of the satellite–Earth system? (b) What is 
the magnitude of the gravitational force exerted by the 
Earth on the satellite? (c) What If? What force, if any, 
does the satellite exert on the Earth?
31. How much work is done by the Moon’s gravitational 
field on a 1 000-kg meteor as it comes in from outer 
space and impacts on the Moon’s surface?
32. How much energy is required to move a 1 000-kg 
object from the Earth’s surface to an altitude twice the 
Earth’s radius?
33. After the Sun exhausts its nuclear fuel, its ultimate fate 
will be to collapse to a white dwarf state. In this state, 
it would have approximately the same mass as it has 
now, but its radius would be equal to the radius of the 
Earth. Calculate (a) the average density of the white 
dwarf, (b) the surface free-fall acceleration, and (c) the 
W
Q/C
Q/C
W
problems 
413
sphere will produce only a beautiful meteor shower. The 
astronaut finds that the density of the spherical asteroid 
is equal to the average density of the Earth. To ensure its 
pulverization, she incorporates into the explosives the 
rocket fuel and oxidizer intended for her return journey. 
What maximum radius can the asteroid have for her to 
be able to leave it entirely simply by jumping straight up? 
On Earth she can jump to a height of 0.500 m.
42. Derive an expression for the work required to move an 
Earth satellite of mass m from a circular orbit of radius 
2R
to one of radius 3R
E
.
43. (a) Determine the amount of work that must be done 
on a 100-kg payload to elevate it to a height of 1 000 km 
above the Earth’s surface. (b) Determine the amount 
of additional work that is required to put the payload 
into circular orbit at this elevation.
44. (a) What is the minimum speed, relative to the Sun, 
necessary for a spacecraft to escape the solar system if 
it starts at the Earth’s orbit? (b) Voyager 1 achieved a 
maximum speed of 125 000 km/h on its way to pho-
tograph Jupiter. Beyond what distance from the Sun is 
this speed sufficient to escape the solar system?
45. A satellite of mass 200 kg is placed into Earth orbit 
at a height of 200 km above the surface. (a) Assum-
ing a circular orbit, how long does the satellite take to 
complete one orbit? (b) What is the satellite’s speed?  
(c) Starting from the satellite on the Earth’s surface, 
what is the minimum energy input necessary to place 
this satellite in orbit? Ignore air resistance but include 
the effect of the planet’s daily rotation.
46. A satellite of mass m, originally on the surface of 
the Earth, is placed into Earth orbit at an altitude h.  
(a) Assuming a circular orbit, how long does the sat-
ellite take to complete one orbit? (b) What is the sat-
ellite’s speed? (c) What is the minimum energy input 
necessary to place this satellite in orbit? Ignore air 
resistance but include the effect of the planet’s daily 
rotation. Represent the mass and radius of the Earth as 
M
E
and R
E
, respectively.
47. Ganymede is the largest of Jupiter’s moons. Consider 
a rocket on the surface of Ganymede, at the point far-
thest from the planet (Fig. P13.47). Model the rocket as 
a particle. (a) Does the presence of Ganymede make 
Jupiter exert a larger, smaller, or same size force on the 
rocket compared with the force it would exert if Gany-
mede were not interposed? (b) Determine the escape 
speed for the rocket from the planet–satellite system. 
The radius of Ganymede is 2.643 106m, and its mass 
S
W
S
Q/C
gravitational potential energy associated with a 1.00-kg  
object at the surface of the white dwarf.
34. An object is released from rest at an altitude h above the 
surface of the Earth. (a) Show that its speed at a distance 
r from the Earth’s center, where R
E
r # R
E
h, is
v5
Å
2GM
E
a
1
r
2
1
R
E
1h
b
(b) Assume the release altitude is 500 km. Perform the 
integral
Dt5
3
f
i
dt52
3
f
i
dr
v
to find the time of fall as the object moves from the 
release point to the Earth’s surface. The negative sign 
appears because the object is moving opposite to the 
radial direction, so its speed is v 5 2dr/dt. Perform the 
integral numerically.
35. A system consists of three particles, each of mass 5.00g, 
located at the corners of an equilateral triangle with 
sides of 30.0 cm. (a) Calculate the potential energy 
of the system. (b) Assume the particles are released 
simultaneously. Describe the subsequent motion of 
each. Will any collisions take place? Explain.
Section 13.6  Energy Considerations in Planetary  
and Satellite Motion
36. A space probe is fired as a projectile from the Earth’s 
surface with an initial speed of 2.00 3 104 m/s. What will 
its speed be when it is very far from the Earth? Ignore 
atmospheric friction and the rotation of the Earth.
37. A 500-kg satellite is in a circular orbit at an altitude of 
500 km above the Earth’s surface. Because of air fric-
tion, the satellite eventually falls to the Earth’s surface, 
where it hits the ground with a speed of 2.00 km/s. How 
much energy was transformed into internal energy by 
means of air friction?
38. A “treetop satellite” moves in a circular orbit just above 
the surface of a planet, assumed to offer no air resis-
tance. Show that its orbital speed v and the escape speed 
from the planet are related by the expression v
esc
5!2
v.
39. A 1 000-kg satellite orbits the Earth at a constant alti-
tude of 100 km. (a) How much energy must be added 
to the system to move the satellite into a circular orbit 
with altitude 200 km? What are the changes in the sys-
tem’s (b)kinetic energy and (c) potential energy?
40. A comet of mass 1.20 3 1010 kg moves in an elliptical 
orbit around the Sun. Its distance from the Sun ranges 
between 0.500 AU and 50.0 AU. (a) What is the eccen-
tricity of its orbit? (b) What is its period? (c) At aphelion, 
what is the potential energy of the comet–Sun system?  
Note: 1 AU 5 one astronomical unit 5 the average dis-
tance from the Sun to the Earth 5 1.496 3 1011 m.
41. An asteroid is on a collision course with Earth. An astro-
naut lands on the rock to bury explosive charges that 
will blow the asteroid apart. Most of the small fragments 
will miss the Earth, and those that fall into the atmo-
Q/C
M
AMT
S
W
Q/C
Ganymede
v
S
Jupiter
Figure P13.56
57. (a) A space vehicle is launched vertically upward from 
the Earth’s surface with an initial speed of 8.76 km/s, 
which is less than the escape speed of 11.2 km/s. What 
maximum height does it attain? (b) A meteoroid falls 
toward the Earth. It is essentially at rest with respect to 
the Earth when it is at a height of 2.51 3 107 m above 
the Earth’s surface. With what speed does the meteor-
ite (a meteoroid that survives to impact the Earth’s sur-
face) strike the Earth?
58. (a) A space vehicle is launched vertically upward from 
the Earth’s surface with an initial speed of v
i
that is 
comparable to but less than the escape speed v
esc
. What 
maximum height does it attain? (b) A meteoroid falls 
toward the Earth. It is essentially at rest with respect 
to the Earth when it is at a height h above the Earth’s 
surface. With what speed does the meteorite (a meteor-
oid that survives to impact the Earth’s surface) strike 
the Earth? (c) What If? Assume a baseball is tossed up 
with an initial speed that is very small compared to the 
escape speed. Show that the result from part (a) is con-
sistent with Equation 4.12.
59. Assume you are agile enough to run across a horizon-
tal surface at 8.50 m/s, independently of the value of 
the gravitational field. What would be (a) the radius 
and (b)the mass of an airless spherical asteroid of 
uniform density 1.10 3 103 kg/m3 on which you could 
launch yourself into orbit by running? (c) What would 
be your period? (d) Would your running significantly 
affect the rotation of the asteroid? Explain.
60. Two spheres having masses M and 2M and radii and 
3R, respectively, are simultaneously released from 
rest when the distance between their centers is 12R. 
Assume the two spheres interact only with each other 
and we wish to find the speeds with which they collide. 
(a) What two isolated system models are appropriate for 
this system? (b) Write an equation from one of the mod-
els and solve it for v
S
1
, the velocity of the sphere of mass 
M at any time after release in terms of v
S
2
, the veloc-
S
Q/C
GP
S
is 1.495 3 1023 kg. The distance between Jupiter and 
Ganymede is 1.071 3 109 m, and the mass of Jupiter is 
1.90 3 1027 kg. Ignore the motion of Jupiter and Gany-
mede as they revolve about their center of mass.
48. A satellite moves around the Earth in a circular orbit 
of radius r. (a) What is the speed v
i
of the satellite?  
(b) Suddenly, an explosion breaks the satellite into 
two pieces, with masses m and 4m. Immediately after 
the explosion, the smaller piece of mass m is stationary 
with respect to the Earth and falls directly toward the 
Earth. What is the speed of the larger piece immedi-
ately after the explosion? (c)Because of the increase in 
its speed, this larger piece now moves in a new ellipti-
cal orbit. Find its distance away from the center of the 
Earth when it reaches the other end of the ellipse.
49. At the Earth’s surface, a projectile is launched straight 
up at a speed of 10.0 km/s. To what height will it rise? 
Ignore air resistance.
additional Problems
50. A rocket is fired straight up through the atmosphere 
from the South Pole, burning out at an altitude of  
250 km when traveling at 6.00 km/s. (a) What maxi-
mum distance from the Earth’s surface does it travel 
before falling back to the Earth? (b) Would its maxi-
mum distance from the surface be larger if the same 
rocket were fired with the same fuel load from a launch 
site on the equator? Why or why not?
51. Review. A cylindrical habitat in space 6.00 km in diam-
eter and 30.0 km long has been proposed (by G. K. 
O’Neill, 1974). Such a habitat would have cities, land, 
and lakes on the inside surface and air and clouds in 
the center. They would all be held in place by rotation 
of the cylinder about its long axis. How fast would the 
cylinder have to rotate to imitate the Earth’s gravita-
tional field at the walls of the cylinder?
52. Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 surveyed the surface of Jupiter’s 
moon Io and photographed active volcanoes spewing 
liquid sulfur to heights of 70 km above the surface of 
this moon. Find the speed with which the liquid sul-
fur left the volcano. Io’s mass is 8.9 3 1022 kg, and its 
radius is 1 820 km.
53. A satellite is in a circular orbit around the Earth at an 
altitude of 2.80 3 106 m. Find (a) the period of the 
orbit, (b) the speed of the satellite, and (c) the accel-
eration of the satellite.
54. Why is the following situation impossible? A spacecraft is 
launched into a circular orbit around the Earth and 
circles the Earth once an hour.
55. Let Dg
M
represent the difference in the gravitational 
fields produced by the Moon at the points on the 
Earth’s surface nearest to and farthest from the Moon. 
Find the fraction Dg
M
/g, where g is the Earth’s gravi-
tational field. (This difference is responsible for the 
occurrence of the lunar tides on the Earth.)
56. A sleeping area for a long space voyage consists of two 
cabins each connected by a cable to a central hub as 
shown in Figure P13.56. The cabins are set spinning 
S
Q/C
W
M
Q/C
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested