mvc display pdf in browser : Export pdf to html software SDK cloud windows wpf asp.net class doc-3-pdf-67a5de9fa89738da0c6835ef457b5878-original45-part294

problems 
415
potential energy of the object–ring system when the 
object is at A. (b) Calculate the gravitational potential 
energy of the system when the object is at B. (c) Calcu-
late the speed of the object as it passes through B.
64. A spacecraft of mass 1.00 3 104 kg is in a circular orbit 
at an altitude of 500 km above the Earth’s surface. Mis-
sion Control wants to fire the engines in a direction 
tangent to the orbit so as to put the spacecraft in an 
elliptical orbit around the Earth with an apogee of 
2.00 3 104 km, measured from the Earth’s center. How 
much energy must be used from the fuel to achieve 
this orbit? (Assume that all the fuel energy goes into 
increasing the orbital energy. This model will give a 
lower limit to the required energy because some of the 
energy from the fuel will appear as internal energy in 
the hot exhaust gases and engine parts.)
65. Review. As an astronaut, you observe a small planet 
to be spherical. After landing on the planet, you set 
off, walking always straight ahead, and find yourself 
returning to your spacecraft from the opposite side 
after completing a lap of 25.0 km. You hold a hammer 
and a falcon feather at a height of 1.40 m, release them, 
and observe that they fall together to the surface in 
29.2 s. Determine the mass of the planet.
66. A certain quaternary star system consists of three stars, 
each of mass m, moving in the same circular orbit 
of radius r about a central star of mass M. The stars 
orbit in the same sense and are positioned one-third 
of a revolution apart from one another. Show that the 
period of each of the three stars is given by
T52p
Å
r3
G1M1m/"3
2
67. Studies of the relationship of the Sun to our galaxy—
the Milky Way—have revealed that the Sun is located 
near the outer edge of the galactic disc, about 30 000 ly  
(1 ly5 9.463 1015 m) from the center. The Sun has 
an orbital speed of approximately 250 km/s around 
the galactic center. (a)What is the period of the Sun’s 
galactic motion? (b)What is the order of magnitude of 
the mass of the Milky Way galaxy? (c) Suppose the gal-
axy is made mostly of stars of which the Sun is typical. 
What is the order of magnitude of the number of stars 
in the Milky Way?
68. Review. Two identical hard spheres, each of mass m 
and radius r, are released from rest in otherwise empty 
space with their centers separated by the distance R. 
They are allowed to collide under the influence of 
their gravitational attraction. (a) Show that the mag-
nitude of the impulse received by each sphere before 
they make contact is given by [Gm3(1/2r 2 1/R)]1/2. 
(b) What If? Find the magnitude of the impulse each 
receives during their contact if they collide elastically.
69. The maximum distance from the Earth to the Sun (at 
aphelion) is 1.521 3 1011 m, and the distance of closest 
approach (at perihelion) is 1.471 3 1011 m. The Earth’s 
orbital speed at perihelion is 3.027 3 104 m/s. Deter-
mine (a) the Earth’s orbital speed at aphelion and the 
kinetic and potential energies of the Earth–Sun system 
AMT
S
S
ity of 2M. (c) Write an equation from the other model 
and solve it for speed v
1
in terms of speed v
2
when the 
spheres collide. (d) Combine the two equations to find 
the two speeds v
1
and v
2
when the spheres collide.
61. Two hypothetical planets of masses m
1
and m
2
and 
radii r
1
and r
2
, respectively, are nearly at rest when they 
are an infinite distance apart. Because of their gravi-
tational attraction, they head toward each other on a 
collision course. (a) When their center-to-center separa-
tion is d, find expressions for the speed of each planet 
and for their relative speed. (b) Find the kinetic ener-
gy of each planet just before they collide, taking m
1
 
2.00 3 1024 kg, m
2
5 8.00 3 1024 kg, r
1
5 3.00 3 106 m,  
and r
2
5 5.00 3 106 m. Note: Both the energy and mo-
mentum of the isolated two-planet system are constant.
62. (a) Show that the rate of change of the free-fall accel-
eration with vertical position near the Earth’s surface is
dg
dr
52
2GM
E
R
E
3
This rate of change with position is called a gradient
(b)Assuming h is small in comparison to the radius of 
the Earth, show that the difference in free-fall accel-
eration between two points separated by vertical dis-
tance h is
0
Dg
0
5
2GM
E
h
R
E
3
(c) Evaluate this difference for h 5 6.00 m, a typical 
height for a two-story building.
63. A ring of matter is a familiar structure in planetary and 
stellar astronomy. Examples include Saturn’s rings and 
a ring nebula. Consider a uniform ring of mass 2.36 3  
1020kg and radius 1.00 3 108 m. An object of mass  
1 000 kg is placed at a point A on the axis of the ring, 
2.00 3 108m from the center of the ring (Fig. P13.63). 
When the object is released, the attraction of the ring 
makes the object move along the axis toward the cen-
ter of the ring (point B). (a)Calculate the gravitational 
M
AMT
A
B
Figure P13.63
N
A
S
A
Export pdf to html - Convert PDF to html files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
How to Convert PDF to HTML Webpage with C# PDF Conversion SDK
how to change pdf to html format; to html
Export pdf to html - VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
PDF to HTML Webpage Converter SDK for VB.NET PDF to HTML Conversion
convert pdf to url online; convert pdf to html code
416
chapter 13 Universal Gravitation
particles, isolated from the rest of the Universe. (a) Find 
the magnitude of the acceleration a
rel
with which each 
starts to move relative to the other as a function of m. 
Evaluate the acceleration (b)for m 5 5.00kg, (c) for m 5  
2 000 kg, and (d) for m 5 2.00 3 1024 kg. (e) Describe 
the pattern of variation of a
rel
with m.
77. As thermonuclear fusion proceeds in its core, the Sun 
loses mass at a rate of 3.64 3 109 kg/s. During the  
5 000-yr period of recorded history, by how much has 
the length of the year changed due to the loss of mass 
from the Sun? Suggestions: Assume the Earth’s orbit is 
circular. No external torque acts on the Earth–Sun 
system, so the angular momentum of the Earth is 
constant.
Challenge Problems
78. The Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) 
spacecraft has a special orbit, located between the 
Earth and the Sun along the line joining them, and 
it is always close enough to the Earth to transmit data 
easily. Both objects exert gravitational forces on the 
observatory. It moves around the Sun in a near-circular  
orbit that is smaller than the Earth’s circular orbit. Its 
period, however, is not less than 1 yr but just equal to  
1 yr. Show that its distance from the Earth must be  
1.48 3 109 m. In 1772, Joseph Louis Lagrange deter-
mined theoretically the special location allowing this 
orbit. Suggestions: Use data that are precise to four dig-
its. The mass of the Earth is 5.974 3 1024 kg. You will 
not be able to easily solve the equation you generate; 
instead, use a computer to verify that 1.48 3 109 m is 
the correct value.
79. The oldest artificial satellite still in orbit is Vanguard I, 
launched March 3, 1958. Its mass is 1.60 kg. Neglecting 
atmospheric drag, the satellite would still be in its ini-
tial orbit, with a minimum distance from the center of 
the Earth of 7.02 Mm and a speed at this perigee point 
of 8.23km/s. For this orbit, find (a) the total energy of  
the satellite–Earth system and (b) the magnitude of 
the angular momentum of the satellite. (c) At apo-
gee, find the satellite’s speed and its distance from the 
center of the Earth. (d) Find the semimajor axis of its 
orbit. (e) Determine its period.
80. A spacecraft is approaching Mars after a long trip 
from the Earth. Its velocity is such that it is traveling 
along a parabolic trajectory under the influence of the 
gravitational force from Mars. The distance of closest 
approach will be 300 km above the Martian surface. At 
this point of closest approach, the engines will be fired 
to slow down the spacecraft and place it in a circular 
orbit 300 km above the surface. (a) By what percentage 
must the speed of the spacecraft be reduced to achieve 
the desired orbit? (b) How would the answer to part 
(a) change if the distance of closest approach and the 
desired circular orbit altitude were 600 km instead of 
300 km? (Note: The energy of the spacecraft–Mars sys-
tem for a parabolic orbit is E 5 0.)
(b) at perihelion and (c) at aphelion. (d) Is the total 
energy of the system constant? Explain. Ignore the 
effect of the Moon and other planets.
70. Many people assume air resistance acting on a mov-
ing object will always make the object slow down. It 
can, however, actually be responsible for making the 
object speed up. Consider a 100-kg Earth satellite in 
a circular orbit at an altitude of 200 km. A small force 
of air resistance makes the satellite drop into a circu-
lar orbit with an altitude of 100 km. (a) Calculate the 
satellite’s initial speed. (b) Calculate its final speed 
in this process. (c) Calculate the initial energy of the  
satellite–Earth system. (d) Calculate the final energy 
of the system. (e) Show that the system has lost 
mechanical energy and find the amount of the loss 
due to friction. (f) What force makes the satellite’s 
speed increase? Hint: You will find a free-body dia-
gram useful in explaining your answer.
71. X-ray pulses from Cygnus X-1, the first black hole to 
be identified and a celestial x-ray source, have been 
recorded during high-altitude rocket flights. The sig-
nals can be interpreted as originating when a blob 
of ionized matter orbits a black hole with a period of  
5.0 ms. If the blob is in a circular orbit about a black 
hole whose mass is 20M
Sun
, what is the orbit radius?
72. Show that the minimum period for a satellite in orbit 
around a spherical planet of uniform density r is
T
min
5
Å
3p
Gr
independent of the planet’s radius.
73. Astronomers detect a distant meteoroid moving along 
a straight line that, if extended, would pass at a dis-
tance 3R
E
from the center of the Earth, where R
E
is the 
Earth’s radius. What minimum speed must the meteor-
oid have if it is not to collide with the Earth?
74. Two stars of masses M and 
m, separated by a distance 
d, revolve in circular orbits 
about their center of mass 
(Fig. P13.74). Show that each 
star has a period given by
T25
4p2d3
G
1
M1m
2
75. Two identical particles, each 
of mass 1 000 kg, are coast-
ing in free space along the same path, one in front of 
the other by 20.0 m. At the instant their separation 
distance has this value, each particle has precisely the 
same velocity of 800
i
^
m/s. What are their precise veloc-
ities when they are 2.00 m apart?
76. Consider an object of mass m, not necessarily small  
compared with the mass of the Earth, released at a dis-
tance of 1.20 3 107 m from the center of the Earth. 
Assume the Earth and the object behave as a pair of 
Q/C
S
S
M
CM
r
1
r
2
d
m
v
2
S
v
1
S
Figure P13.74
S
Online Convert PDF to HTML5 files. Best free online PDF html
Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF file to HTML. Then just wait until the conversion from PDF to HTML is complete and download the file.
convert pdf to html for online; convert pdf to web page
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to other
Create PDF from RTF. Create PDF from Text. PDF Export. Convert PDF to Word (.docx). Convert PDF to Tiff. Convert PDF to HTML. Convert PDF to SVG. Convert PDF to
converting pdf to html; convert pdf to html with
Fish congregate around a reef in 
Hawaii searching for food. How do 
fish such as the lined butterflyfish 
(Chaetodon lineolatus) at the upper 
left control their movements up and 
down in the water? We’ll find out in 
this chapter.  
(Vlad61/Shutterstock.com) 
14.1 Pressure
14.2 Variation of Pressure  
with Depth
14.3 Pressure Measurements
14.4 Buoyant Forces and 
Archimedes’s Principle
14.5 Fluid Dynamics
14.6 Bernoulli’s Equation
14.7 Other Applications  
of Fluid Dynamics
c h a p p t t e r 
14
Fluid Mechanics
417
Matter is normally classified as being in one of three states: solid, liquid, or gas. From 
everyday experience we know that a solid has a definite volume and shape, a liquid has a 
definite volume but no definite shape, and an unconfined gas has neither a definite volume 
nor a definite shape. These descriptions help us picture the states of matter, but they are 
somewhat artificial. For example, asphalt and plastics are normally considered solids, but 
over long time intervals they tend to flow like liquids. Likewise, most substances can be a 
solid, a liquid, or a gas (or a combination of any of these three), depending on the tempera-
ture and pressure. In general, the time interval required for a particular substance to change 
its shape in response to an external force determines whether we treat the substance as a 
solid, a liquid, or a gas.
fluid is a collection of molecules that are randomly arranged and held together by 
weak cohesive forces and by forces exerted by the walls of a container. Both liquids and 
gases are fluids.
In our treatment of the mechanics of fluids, we’ll be applying principles and analysis 
models that we have already discussed. First, we consider the mechanics of a fluid at rest, 
that is, fluid statics, and then study fluids in motion, that is, fluid dynamics.
14.1 Pressure
Fluids do not sustain shearing stresses or tensile stresses such as those discussed in 
Chapter 12; therefore, the only stress that can be exerted on an object submerged in 
a static fluid is one that tends to compress the object from all sides. In other words, 
the force exerted by a static fluid on an object is always perpendicular to the surfaces 
of the object as shown in Figure 14.1. We discussed this situation in Section 12.4.
At any point on the surface of 
the object, the force exerted by 
the fluid is perpendicular to the 
surface of the object.
Figure 14.1 
The forces exerted 
by a fluid on the surfaces of a sub-
merged object.
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF with VB.NET WPF PDF Viewer
PDF from RTF. Create PDF from Text. PDF Export. Convert PDF to Word (.docx). Convert PDF to Tiff. Convert PDF to HTML. Convert PDF to
pdf to html conversion; convert pdf to html code online
C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
Support to convert multi-page PDF file to multi-page Tiff file. Able to export PDF document to HTML file. Able to create convert PDF to SVG file.
changing pdf to html; converter pdf to html
418
chapter 14 Fluid Mechanics
Find the volume of the water filling the mattress:
V 5 (2.00 m)(2.00 m)(0.300 m) 5 1.20 m3
Use Equation 1.1 and the density of fresh water (see 
Table 14.1) to find the mass of the water bed:
M 5 rV 5 (1 000 kg/m3)(1.20 m3) 5 1.20 3 103 kg
Find the weight of the bed:
Mg 5 (1.20 3 103 kg)(9.80 m/s2) 5  1.18 3 104 N
The pressure in a fluid can be measured with the device pictured in Figure 14.2. 
The device consists of an evacuated cylinder that encloses a light piston connected 
to a spring. As the device is submerged in a fluid, the fluid presses on the top of 
the piston and compresses the spring until the inward force exerted by the fluid 
is balanced by the outward force exerted by the spring. The fluid pressure can be 
measured directly if the spring is calibrated in advance. If F is the magnitude of the 
force exerted on the piston and A is the surface area of the piston, the pressure P of 
the fluid at the level to which the device has been submerged is defined as the ratio 
of the force to the area:
P;
F
A
(14.1)
Pressure is a scalar quantity because it is proportional to the magnitude of the force 
on the piston.
If the pressure varies over an area, the infinitesimal force dF on an infinitesimal 
surface element of area dA is
dF 5 P dA 
(14.2)
where P is the pressure at the location of the area dA. To calculate the total force 
exerted on a surface of a container, we must integrate Equation 14.2 over the surface.
The units of pressure are newtons per square meter (N/m2) in the SI system. 
Another name for the SI unit of pressure is the pascal (Pa):
1 Pa ; 1 N/m2 
(14.3)
For a tactile demonstration of the definition of pressure, hold a tack between 
your thumb and forefinger, with the point of the tack on your thumb and the 
head of the tack on your forefinger. Now gently press your thumb and forefinger 
together. Your thumb will begin to feel pain immediately while your forefinger will 
not. The tack is exerting the same force on both your thumb and forefinger, but 
the pressure on your thumb is much larger because of the small area over which 
the force is applied.
uick Quiz 14.1  Suppose you are standing directly behind someone who steps 
back and accidentally stomps on your foot with the heel of one shoe. Would you 
be better off if that person were (a) a large, male professional basketball player 
wearing sneakers or (b) a petite woman wearing spike-heeled shoes?
Vacuum
A
F
S
Figure 14.2 
A simple device for 
measuring the pressure exerted 
by a fluid.
Pitfall Prevention 14.1
Force and Pressure Equations 
14.1 and 14.2 make a clear distinc-
tion between force and pressure. 
Another important distinction 
is that force is a vector and pressure 
is a scalar. There is no direction 
associated with pressure, but the 
direction of the force associated 
with the pressure is perpendicular 
to the surface on which the pres-
sure acts.
Example 14.1   The Water Bed
The mattress of a water bed is 2.00 m long by 2.00 m wide and 30.0 cm deep.
(A)  Find the weight of the water in the mattress.
Conceptualize  Think about carrying a jug of water and how heavy it is. Now imagine a sample of water the size of a 
water bed. We expect the weight to be relatively large.
Categorize  This example is a substitution problem.
Solution
which is approximately 2 650 lb. (A regular bed, including mattress, box spring, and metal frame, weighs approximately 
300 lb.) Because this load is so great, it is best to place a water bed in the basement or on a sturdy, well- supported floor.
VB.NET PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file
PDF Export. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: PDF Export. Conversion of PDF to Html5. For how to convert PDF to HTML document in VB.NET application, a
attach pdf to html; adding pdf to html
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to
Create PDF from CSV. Create PDF from RTF. Create PDF from Text. PDF Export. Convert PDF to Word (.docx). Convert PDF to Tiff. Convert PDF to HTML. Convert PDF to
best website to convert pdf to word online; convert pdf into html code
14.2 Variation of pressure with Depth 
419
(B)  Find the pressure exerted by the water bed on the floor when the bed rests in its normal position. Assume the 
entire lower surface of the bed makes contact with the floor.
Solution
When the water bed is in its normal position, the area in 
contact with the floor is 4.00 m2. Use Equation 14.1 to 
find the pressure:
P5
1.183104 N
4.00 m2
5
2.943103 Pa
What if the water bed is replaced by a 300-lb regular bed that is supported by four legs? Each leg has a 
circular cross section of radius 2.00 cm. What pressure does this bed exert on the floor?
Answer  The weight of the regular bed is distributed over four circular cross sections at the bottom of the legs. There-
fore, the pressure is
P5
F
A
5
mg
41pr22
5
300 lb
4p10.020 0 m22
a
1 N
0.225 lb
b
52.65310
5
Pa
This result is almost 100 times larger than the pressure due to the water bed! The weight of the regular bed, even 
though it is much less than the weight of the water bed, is applied over the very small area of the four legs. The high 
pressure on the floor at the feet of a regular bed could cause dents in wood floors or permanently crush carpet pile.
What iF?
14.2 Variation of Pressure with Depth
As divers well know, water pressure increases with depth. Likewise, atmospheric 
pressure decreases with increasing altitude; for this reason, aircraft flying at high 
altitudes must have pressurized cabins for the comfort of the passengers.
We now show how the pressure in a liquid increases with depth. As Equation 1.1 
describes, the density of a substance is defined as its mass per unit volume; Table 
14.1 lists the densities of various substances. These values vary slightly with temper-
ature because the volume of a substance is dependent on temperature (as shown in 
Chapter 19). Under standard conditions (at 08C and at atmospheric pressure), the 
densities of gases are about 
1
1 000
the densities of solids and liquids. This difference 
in densities implies that the average molecular spacing in a gas under these condi-
tions is about ten times greater than that in a solid or liquid.
Table 14.1
Densities of Some Common Substances at Standard 
Temperature (08C) and Pressure (Atmospheric)
Substance 
r (kg/m3
Substance 
r (kg/m3)
Air 
1.29 
Air (at 20°C and 
atmospheric pressure) 
1.20
Aluminum 
2.70 3 103
Benzene 
0.879 3 103
Brass 
8.4 3 103
Copper 
8.92 3 103
Ethyl alcohol 
0.806 3 103
Fresh water 
1.00 3 103
Glycerin 
1.26 3 103
Gold 
19.3 3 103
Helium gas 
1.79 3 1021
Hydrogen gas 
8.99 3 1022
Ice 
0.917 3 103
Iron 
7.86 3 103
Lead 
11.3 3 103
Mercury 
13.6 3 103
Nitrogen gas 
1.25
Oak 
0.710 3 103
Osmium 
22.6 3 103
Oxygen gas 
1.43
Pine 
0.373 3 103
Platinum 
21.4 3 103
Seawater 
1.03 3 103
Silver 
10.5 3 103
Tin 
7.30 3 103
Uranium 
19.1 3 103
▸ 14.1 
continued
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to view, annotate, convert and print PDF in
Create PDF from CSV. Create PDF from RTF. Create PDF from Text. PDF Export. Convert PDF to Word (.docx). Convert PDF to Tiff. Convert PDF to HTML. Convert PDF to
convert pdf to html link; convert pdf into web page
VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to
PDF from RTF. Create PDF from Text. PDF Export. Convert PDF to Word (.docx). Convert PDF to Tiff. Convert PDF to HTML. Convert PDF to
online pdf to html converter; embed pdf into web page
420
chapter 14 Fluid Mechanics
Figure 14.4 
(a) Diagram of 
a hydraulic press. (b) A vehicle 
undergoing repair is supported  
by a hydraulic lift in a garage.
A
1
x
1
x
2
F
1
S
F
2
S
Because the increase in 
pressure is the same on 
the two sides, a small
force F
1
at the left 
produces a much greater 
force F
2
at the right.
a
S
S
A
2
b
S
a
m
J
o
r
d
a
s
h
/
D
i
g
i
t
a
l
V
i
s
i
o
n
/
G
e
t
t
y
I
m
a
g
e
s
Now consider a liquid of density r at rest as shown in Figure 14.3. We assume r 
is uniform throughout the liquid, which means the liquid is incompressible. Let us 
select a parcel of the liquid contained within an imaginary block of cross-sectional 
area A extending from depth d to depth d 1 h. The liquid external to our parcel 
exerts forces at all points on the surface of the parcel, perpendicular to the surface. 
The pressure exerted by the liquid on the bottom face of the parcel is P, and the pres-
sure on the top face is P
0
. Therefore, the upward force exerted by the outside fluid on 
the bottom of the parcel has a magnitude PA, and the downward force exerted on the 
top has a magnitude P
0
A. The mass of liquid in the parcel is M 5 rV5 rAh; therefore, 
the weight of the liquid in the parcel is Mg 5 rAhg. Because the parcel is at rest and 
remains at rest, it can be modeled as a particle in equilibrium, so that the net force 
acting on it must be zero. Choosing upward to be the positive y direction, we see that
a
F
S
5PA j
^
2P
0
A j
^
2Mg j
^
50 
or
PA 2 P
0
A 2 rAhg 5 0 
P 5 P
0
1 rgh 
(14.4)
That is, the pressure P at a depth h below a point in the liquid at which the pressure 
is P
0
is greater by an amount rgh. If the liquid is open to the atmosphere and P
0
is 
the pressure at the surface of the liquid, then P
0
is atmospheric pressure. In our 
calculations and working of end-of-chapter problems, we usually take atmospheric 
pressure to be
P
0
5 1.00 atm 5 1.013 3 105 Pa 
Equation 14.4 implies that the pressure is the same at all points having the same 
depth, independent of the shape of the container.
Because the pressure in a fluid depends on depth and on the value of P
0
, any 
increase in pressure at the surface must be transmitted to every other point in the 
fluid. This concept was first recognized by French scientist Blaise Pascal (1623–
1662) and is called Pascal’s law: a change in the pressure applied to a fluid is trans-
mitted undiminished to every point of the fluid and to the walls of the container.
An important application of Pascal’s law is the hydraulic press illustrated 
in Figure 14.4a. A force of magnitude F
1
is applied to a small piston of surface 
area A
1
. The pressure is transmitted through an incompressible liquid to a larger 
piston of surface area A
2
. Because the pressure must be the same on both sides,  
P 5 F
1
/A
1
5 F
2
/A
2
. Therefore, the force F
2
is greater than the force F
1
by a factor of  
A
2
/A
1
. By designing a hydraulic press with appropriate areas A
1
and A
2
, a large out-
Variation of pressure 
with depth
Pascal’s law 
-Mg
PAj
-P
0
Aj
d
d + h 
ˆ
ˆ
j
ˆ
The parcel of fluid is in 
equilibrium, so the net 
force on it is zero.
Figure 14.3 
A parcel of fluid in a 
larger volume of fluid is singled out.
14.2 Variation of pressure with Depth 
421
put force can be applied by means of a small input force. Hydraulic brakes, car lifts, 
hydraulic jacks, and forklifts all make use of this principle (Fig. 14.4b).
Because liquid is neither added to nor removed from the system, the volume of liq-
uid pushed down on the left in Figure 14.4a as the piston moves downward through a 
displacement Dx
1
equals the volume of liquid pushed up on the right as the right pis-
ton moves upward through a displacement Dx
2
. That is, A
1
Dx
1
A
2
Dx
2
; therefore, 
A
2
/A
1
5 Dx
1
/Dx
2
. We have already shown that A
2
/A
1
F
2
/F
1
. Therefore, F
2
/F
1
Dx
1
/Dx
2
, so F
1
Dx
1
F
2
Dx
2
. Each side of this equation is the work done by the force 
on its respective piston. Therefore, the work done by F
S
1
on the input piston equals 
the work done by F
S
2
on the output piston, as it must to conserve energy. (The process 
can be modeled as a special case of the nonisolated system model: the nonisolated 
system in steady state. There is energy transfer into and out of the system, but these 
energy transfers balance, so that there is no net change in the  energy of the system.)
uick Quiz 14.2  The pressure at the bottom of a filled glass of water (r 5  
1 000 kg/m3) is P. The water is poured out, and the glass is filled with ethyl alco-
hol (r 5 806 kg/m3). What is the pressure at the bottom of the glass? (a)smaller 
than P   (b) equal to P   (c) larger than   (d) indeterminate
Example 14.2   The Car Lift
In a car lift used in a service station, compressed air exerts a force on a small piston that has a circular cross section of 
radius 5.00 cm. This pressure is transmitted by a liquid to a piston that has a radius of 15.0 cm. 
(A) What force must the compressed air exert to lift a car weighing 13 300 N?
Conceptualize  Review the material just discussed about Pascal’s law to understand the operation of a car lift.
Categorize  This example is a substitution problem.
Solution
Solve F
1
/A
1
F
2
/A
2
for F
1
:
F
1
5 a
A
1
A
2
bF
2
5
p
1
5.0031022 m
22
p
1
15.031022 m
22
1
1.333104 N
2
5  1.48 3 103 N
Use Equation 14.1 to find the air pressure that produces 
this force:
Solution
P5
F
1
A
1
5
1.483103 N
p
1
5.0031022 m
22
 1.88 3 105 Pa
This pressure is approximately twice atmospheric pressure.
Example 14.3   A Pain in Your Ear
Estimate the force exerted on your eardrum due to the water when you are swimming at the bottom of a pool that is 
5.0m deep.
Conceptualize  As you descend in the water, the pressure increases. You may have noticed this increased pressure in 
your ears while diving in a swimming pool, a lake, or the ocean. We can find the pressure difference exerted on the 
Solution
(B) What air pressure produces this force?
continued
422
chapter 14 Fluid Mechanics
eardrum from the depth given in the problem; then, after estimating the ear drum’s surface area, we can determine 
the net force the water exerts on it.
Categorize  This example is a substitution problem.
The air inside the middle ear is normally at atmospheric pressure P
0
. Therefore, to find the net force on the eardrum, 
we must consider the difference between the total pressure at the bottom of the pool and atmospheric pressure. Let’s 
estimate the surface area of the eardrum to be approximately 1 cm2 5 1 3 1024 m2.
Use Equation 14.4 to find this pressure 
difference:
P
bot
P
0
5 rgh
5 (1.00 3 103 kg/m3)(9.80 m/s2)(5.0 m) 5 4.9 3 104 Pa
Use Equation 14.1 to find the magnitude of the 
net force on the ear:
F 5 (P
bot
P
0
)A 5 (4.9 3 104 Pa)(1 3 1024 m2) <  5 N
Because a force of this magnitude on the eardrum is extremely uncomfortable, swimmers often “pop their ears” while 
under water, an action that pushes air from the lungs into the middle ear. Using this technique equalizes the pressure 
on the two sides of the eardrum and relieves the discomfort.
Example 14.4   The Force on a Dam
Water is filled to a height H behind a dam of width w (Fig. 14.5). Determine the 
resultant force exerted by the water on the dam.
Conceptualize  Because pressure varies with depth, we cannot calculate the 
force simply by multiplying the area by the pressure. As the pressure in the water 
increases with depth, the force on the adjacent portion of the dam also increases.
Categorize  Because of the variation of pressure with depth, we must use integra-
tion to solve this example, so we categorize it as an analysis problem.
Analyze  Let’s imagine a vertical y axis, with y 5 0 at the bottom of the dam. We 
divide the face of the dam into narrow horizontal strips at a distance y above the 
bottom, such as the red strip in Figure 14.5. The pressure on each such strip is 
due only to the water; atmospheric pressure acts on both sides of the dam.
Solution
O
dy
y
h
w
H
y
x
Figure 14.5 
(Example 14.4) Water 
exerts a force on a dam.
Use Equation 14.4 to calculate the pressure due to the 
water at the depth h:
P 5 rgh 5 rg(H 2 y)
Use Equation 14.2 to find the force exerted on the 
shaded strip of area dA 5 w dy:
dF 5 P dA 5 rg(H 2 y)w dy
Integrate to find the total force on the dam:
F5
3
P dA5
3
H
0
rg
1
H2y
2
w dy5
1
2
rgwH
2
Finalize  Notice that the thickness of the dam shown in Figure 14.5 increases with depth. This design accounts for the 
greater force the water exerts on the dam at greater depths.
What if you were asked to find this force without using calculus? How could you determine its value?
Answer  We know from Equation 14.4 that pressure varies linearly with depth. Therefore, the average pressure due to 
the water over the face of the dam is the average of the pressure at the top and the pressure at the bottom:
P
avg
5
P
top
1P
bottom
2
5
01rgH
2
5
1
2
rgH
What iF?
▸ 14.3 
continued
14.4 Buoyant Forces and archimedes’s principle 
423
14.3 Pressure Measurements
During the weather report on a television news program, the barometric pressure is 
often provided. This reading is the current local pressure of the atmosphere, which 
varies over a small range from the standard value provided earlier. How is this pres-
sure measured?
One instrument used to measure atmospheric pressure is the common barom-
eter, invented by Evangelista Torricelli (1608–1647). A long tube closed at one end 
is filled with mercury and then inverted into a dish of mercury (Fig. 14.6a). The 
closed end of the tube is nearly a vacuum, so the pressure at the top of the mer-
cury column can be taken as zero. In Figure 14.6a, the pressure at point A, due 
to the column of mercury, must equal the pressure at point B, due to the atmo-
sphere. If that were not the case, there would be a net force that would move mer-
cury from one point to the other until equilibrium is established. Therefore, P
0
r
Hg
gh, where r
Hg
is the density of the mercury and h is the height of the mercury 
column. As atmospheric pressure varies, the height of the mercury column varies, 
so the height can be calibrated to measure atmospheric pressure. Let us determine 
the height of a mercury column for one atmosphere of pressure, P
0
5 1 atm 5  
1.013 3 105 Pa:
P
0
5r
Hg
gh h5
P
0
r
Hg
g
5
1.0133105 Pa
1
13.63103 kg/m3
21
9.80 m/s2
2
50.760 m
Based on such a calculation, one atmosphere of pressure is defined to be the pres-
sure equivalent of a column of mercury that is exactly 0.760 0 m in height at 08C.
A device for measuring the pressure of a gas contained in a vessel is the open-
tube manometer illustrated in Figure 14.6b. One end of a U-shaped tube containing 
a liquid is open to the atmosphere, and the other end is connected to a container of 
gas at pressure P. In an equilibrium situation, the pressures at points A and B must 
be the same (otherwise, the curved portion of the liquid would experience a net 
force and would accelerate), and the pressure at A is the unknown pressure of the 
gas. Therefore, equating the unknown pressure P to the pressure at point B, we see 
that P 5 P
0
1 rgh. Again, we can calibrate the height h to the pressure P.
The difference in the pressures in each part of Figure 14.6 (that is, P 2 P
0
) is 
equal to rgh. The pressure P is called the absolute pressure, and the difference 
P2 P
0
is called the gauge pressure. For example, the pressure you measure in your 
bicycle tire is gauge pressure.
uick Quiz 14.3  Several common barometers are built, with a variety of fluids. 
For which of the following fluids will the column of fluid in the barometer be 
the highest? (a) mercury   (b) water   (c) ethyl alcohol   (d) benzene
14.4 Buoyant Forces and Archimedes’s Principle
Have you ever tried to push a beach ball down under water (Fig. 14.7a, p. 424)? It 
is extremely difficult to do because of the large upward force exerted by the water 
on the ball. The upward force exerted by a fluid on any immersed object is called 
The total force on the dam is equal to the product of the average pressure and the area of the face of the dam:
F5P
avg
A5
11
2
rgH
21
Hw
2
5
1
2
rgwH2
which is the same result we obtained using calculus.
a
P = 0
P
P
0
P
0
A B
h
h
A
B
b
Figure 14.6 
Two devices for 
measuring pressure: (a) a mercury 
barometer and (b) an open-tube 
manometer.
▸ 14.4 
continued
424
chapter 14 Fluid Mechanics
buoyant force. We can determine the magnitude of a buoyant force by applying 
some logic. Imagine a beach ball–sized parcel of water beneath the water surface 
as in Figure 14.7b. Because this parcel is in equilibrium, there must be an upward 
force that balances the downward gravitational force on the parcel. This upward 
force is the buoyant force, and its magnitude is equal to the weight of the water in 
the parcel. The buoyant force is the resultant force on the parcel due to all forces 
applied by the fluid surrounding the parcel.
Now imagine replacing the beach ball–sized parcel of water with a beach ball 
of the same size. The net force applied by the fluid surrounding the beach ball is 
the same, regardless of whether it is applied to a beach ball or to a parcel of water. 
Consequently, the magnitude of the buoyant force on an object always equals the 
weight of the fluid displaced by the object. This statement is known as Archime-
des’s principle.
With the beach ball under water, the buoyant force, equal to the weight of a 
beach ball–sized parcel of water, is much larger than the weight of the beach ball. 
Therefore, there is a large net upward force, which explains why it is so hard to hold 
the beach ball under the water. Note that Archimedes’s principle does not refer to 
the makeup of the object experiencing the buoyant force. The object’s composition 
is not a factor in the buoyant force because the buoyant force is exerted by the sur-
rounding fluid.
To better understand the origin of the buoyant force, consider a cube of solid 
material immersed in a liquid as in Figure 14.8. According to Equation 14.4, the 
pressure P
bot
at the bottom of the cube is greater than the pressure P
top
at the top 
by an amount  r
fluid
gh, where h is the height of the cube and r
fluid
is the density of 
the fluid. The pressure at the bottom of the cube causes an upward force equal to 
P
bot
A, where A is the area of the bottom face. The pressure at the top of the cube 
causes a downward force equal to P
top
A. The resultant of these two forces is the 
buoyant force B
S
with magnitude
B 5 (P
bot
P
top
)A 5 (r
fluid
gh)
B 5 r
fluid
gV
disp
(14.5)
where V
disp
Ah is the volume of the fluid displaced by the cube. Because the prod-
uct r
fluid
V
disp
is equal to the mass of fluid displaced by the object,
B 5 Mg 
where Mg is the weight of the fluid displaced by the cube. This result is consistent 
with our initial statement about Archimedes’s principle above, based on the discus-
sion of the beach ball.
Under normal conditions, the weight of a fish in the opening photograph for 
this chapter is slightly greater than the buoyant force on the fish. Hence, the fish 
would sink if it did not have some mechanism for adjusting the buoyant force. The 
a
b
The buoyant force 
on a beach ball that 
replaces this parcel 
of water is exactly the 
same as the buoyant 
force on the parcel.
B
S
F
g
S
S
Figure 14.7 
(a) A swimmer pushes a beach ball under water. (b) The forces on a beach ball–sized 
parcel of water.
Archimedes
Greek Mathematician, Physicist, and 
Engineer (c. 287–212 BC)
Archimedes was perhaps the greatest 
scientist of antiquity. He was the first 
to compute accurately the ratio of a 
circle’s circumference to its diameter, 
and he also showed how to calcu-
late the volume and surface area of 
spheres, cylinders, and other geometric 
shapes. He is well known for discover-
ing the nature of the buoyant force and 
was also a gifted inventor. One of his 
practical inventions, still in use today, 
is Archimedes’s screw, an inclined, 
rotating, coiled tube used originally to 
lift water from the holds of ships. He 
also invented the catapult and devised 
systems of levers, pulleys, and weights 
for raising heavy loads. Such inventions 
were successfully used to defend his 
native city, Syracuse, during a two-year 
siege by Romans.
.
i
S
t
o
c
k
p
h
o
t
o
.
c
o
m
/
H
u
l
t
o
n
A
r
c
h
i
v
e
B
S
F
g
S
h
The buoyant force on the 
cube is the resultant of the 
forces exerted on its top and 
bottom faces by the liquid.
Figure 14.8 
The external forces 
acting on an immersed cube are 
the gravitational force F
S
g
and the 
buoyant force B
S
.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested