mvc display pdf in browser : Convert pdf to html5 Library application API .net html azure sharepoint doc-3-pdf-67a5de9fa89738da0c6835ef457b5878-original49-part298

15.2 analysis Model: particle in Simple harmonic Motion 
455
uick Quiz 15.4  An object of mass m is hung from a spring and set into oscilla-
tion. The period of the oscillation is measured and recorded as T. The object 
of mass m is removed and replaced with an object of mass 2m. When this object 
is set into oscillation, what is the period of the motion? (a) 2T   (b) !2
T   (c) T   
(d) T/!2
(e) T/2
Equation 15.6 describes simple harmonic motion of a particle in general. Let’s 
now see how to evaluate the constants of the motion. The angular frequency v is 
evaluated using Equation 15.9. The constants A and f are evaluated from the ini-
tial conditions, that is, the state of the oscillator at t 5 0.
Suppose a block is set into motion by pulling it from equilibrium by a distance A 
and releasing it from rest at t 5 0 as in Figure 15.6. We must then require our solu-
tions for x(t) and v(t) (Eqs. 15.6 and 15.15) to obey the initial conditions that x(0) 5 
A and v(0) 5 0:
x(0) 5 A cos f 5 A
v(0) 5 2vA sin f 5 0 
These conditions are met if f 5 0, giving x 5 A cos vt as our solution. To check this 
solution, notice that it satisfies the condition that x(0) 5 A because cos 0 5 1.
The position, velocity, and acceleration of the block versus time are plotted in 
Figure 15.7a for this special case. The acceleration reaches extreme values of 7v2A 
when the position has extreme values of 6A. Furthermore, the velocity has extreme 
values of 6vA, which both occur at x 5 0. Hence, the quantitative solution agrees 
with our qualitative description of this system.
Let’s consider another possibility. Suppose the system is oscillating and we define 
t 5 0 as the instant the block passes through the unstretched position of the spring 
while moving to the right (Fig. 15.8). In this case, our solutions for x(t) and v(t) 
must obey the initial conditions that x(0) 5 0 and v(0) 5 v
i
:
x(0) 5 A cos f 5 0 
v(0) 5 2vA sin f 5 v
i
The first of these conditions tells us that f 5 6p/2. With these choices for f, the 
second condition tells us that A 5 7v
i
/v. Because the initial velocity is positive and 
the amplitude must be positive, we must have f 5 2p/2. Hence, the solution is
x5
v
i
v
cos avt2
p
2
The graphs of position, velocity, and acceleration versus time for this choice of t 5 0 
are shown in Figure 15.7b. Notice that these curves are the same as those in Figure 
b
c
a
T
A
x
x
i
t
t
t
v
v
i
a
v
max
a
max
Figure 15.5 
Graphical repre-
sentation of simple harmonic 
motion. (a)Position versus time. 
(b) Velocity versus time. (c) Accel-
eration versus time. Notice that at 
any specified time the velocity is 
908 out of phase with the position 
and the acceleration is 1808 out of 
phase with the position.
T
2
T
2
T
x
3T
2
v
T
2
T
a
3T
2
T
T
2
3T
2
T
2
T
x
t
3T
2
T
v
t
3T
2
T
2
T
a
t
t
t
t
3T
2
a
b
Figure 15.7 
(a) Position, velocity, and acceleration versus time for the block in Figure 15.6 under 
the initial conditions that at t 5 0, x(0) 5 A, and v(0) 5 0. (b) Position, velocity, and acceleration ver-
sus time for the block in Figure 15.8 under the initial conditions that at t 5 0, x(0) 5 0, and v(0) 5 v
i
.
Figure 15.6 
A block–spring 
system that begins its motion from 
rest with the block at x 5 A at t 5 0.
A
m
x
= 0
t
= 0
x
A
v
= 0
Figure 15.8 
The block–spring 
system is undergoing oscillation, 
and t 5 0 is defined at an instant 
when the block passes through the 
equilibrium position x 5 0 and is 
moving to the right with speed v
i
.
m
x
= 0
t
= 0
x
= 0
v
v
i
v
i
S
Convert pdf to html5 - Convert PDF to html files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
How to Convert PDF to HTML Webpage with C# PDF Conversion SDK
embed pdf into html; convert pdf to html format
Convert pdf to html5 - VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
PDF to HTML Webpage Converter SDK for VB.NET PDF to HTML Conversion
best pdf to html converter online; convert pdf to html code c#
456
chapter 15 Oscillatory Motion
Example 15.1   A Block–Spring System 
A 200-g block connected to a light spring for which the force constant is 5.00 N/m is free to oscillate on a frictionless, 
horizontal surface. The block is displaced 5.00 cm from equilibrium and released from rest as in Figure 15.6.
(A)  Find the period of its motion.
Conceptualize  Study Figure 15.6 and imagine the block moving back and forth in simple harmonic motion once it 
is released. Set up an experimental model in the vertical direction by hanging a heavy object such as a stapler from a 
strong rubber band.
Categorize  The block is modeled as a particle in simple harmonic motion. 
Analyze 
AM
SOluTiON
Use Equation 15.9 to find the angular frequency of the 
block–spring system:
v5
Å
k
m
5
Å
5.00 N/m
20031023 kg
55.00 rad/s
Use Equation 15.13 to find the period of the system:
T5
2p
v
5
2p
5.00 rad/s
5
1.26 s
(B)  Determine the maximum speed of the block.
SOluTiON
(C)  What is the maximum acceleration of the block?
Use Equation 15.17 to find v
max
:
v
max
5 vA 5 (5.00 rad/s)(5.00 3 1022 m) 5   0.250 m/s
15.7a, but shifted to the right by one-fourth of a cycle. This shift is described math-
ematically by the phase constant f 5 2p/2, which is one-fourth of a full cycle of 2p.
Analysis Model   Particle in Simple Harmonic Motion
Imagine an object that is subject to a force that is proportional to the negative of 
the object’s position, 5 2kx. Such a force equation is known as Hooke’s law, and it 
describes the force applied to an object attached to an ideal spring. The parameter 
k in Hooke’s law is called the spring constant or the force constant. The position of an 
object acted on by a force described by Hooke’s law is given by
x(t) 5 A cos (vt 1 f) 
(15.6)
where A is the amplitude of the motion, v is the angular frequency, and f is the phase constant. The values of A and 
f depend on the initial position and initial velocity of the particle.
The period of the oscillation of the particle is
T5
2p
v
52p
Å
m
k
(15.13)
and the inverse of the period is the frequency.
Examples: 
• a bungee jumper hangs from a bungee cord and oscillates up and down
• a guitar string vibrates back and forth in a standing wave, with each element of the string moving in simple har-
monic motion (Chapter 18)
• a piston in a gasoline engine oscillates up and down within the cylinder of the engine (Chapter 22)
• an atom in a diatomic molecule vibrates back and forth as if it is connected by a spring to the other atom in the 
molecule (Chapter 43)
x
A
–A
t
T
Online Convert PDF to HTML5 files. Best free online PDF html
Online PDF to HTML5 Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF file to HTML. Just upload your file by clicking on the blue button
convert pdf to website; convert pdf to website html
XDoc.HTML5 Viewer for .NET, Zero Footprint AJAX Document Image
View, Convert, Edit, Sign Documents and Images. Online Demo See the HTML5 Viewer SDK for .NET in powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image to
convert pdf to webpage; how to convert pdf to html code
15.2 analysis Model: particle in Simple harmonic Motion 
457
SOluTiON
Use Equation 15.18 to find a
max
:
a
max
5 v2A 5 (5.00 rad/s)2(5.00 3 1022 m) 5   1.25 m/s2
(D)  Express the position, velocity, and acceleration as functions of time in SI units.
SOluTiON
Find the phase constant from the initial condition that  
x 5 A at t 5 0:
x(0) 5 A cos f 5 A   S   f 5 0
Use Equation 15.6 to write an expression for x(t):
x 5 A cos (vt 1 f) 5   0.050 0 cos 5.00t
Use Equation 15.15 to write an expression for v(t):
v 5 2vA sin (vt 1 f) 5   20.250 sin 5.00t
Use Equation 15.16 to write an expression for a(t):
a 5 2v2A cos (vt 1 f) 5   21.25 cos 5.00t
Finalize Consider part (a) of Figure 15.7, which shows the graphical representations of the motion of the block in this 
problem. Make sure that the mathematical representations found above in part (D) are consistent with these graphi-
cal representations.
What if the block were released from the same initial position, x
i
5 5.00 cm, but with an initial velocity of  
v
i
5 20.100 m/s? Which parts of the solution change, and what are the new answers for those that do change?
Answers  Part (A) does not change because the period is independent of how the oscillator is set into motion. Parts 
(B), (C), and (D) will change.
WHAT iF?
Write position and velocity expressions for the initial 
conditions:
(1)    x(0) 5 A cos f 5 x
i
(2)    v(0) 5 2vA sin f 5 v
i
Divide Equation (2) by Equation (1) to find the phase 
constant:
2vA sin f
A cos f
5
v
i
x
i
tan f52
v
i
vx
i
52
20.100 m/s
1
5.00 rad/s
21
0.050 0 m
2
50.400
f 5 tan21 (0.400) 5 0.121p
Use Equation (1) to find A:
A5
x
i
cos f
5
0.050 0 m
cos 
1
0.121p
2
50.053 9 m
Find the new maximum speed:
v
max
5 vA 5 (5.00 rad/s)(5.39 3 1022 m) 5 0.269 m/s
Find the new magnitude of the maximum acceleration:
a
max
5 v2A 5 (5.00 rad/s)2(5.39 3 1022 m) 5 1.35 m/s2
Find new expressions for position, velocity, and accelera-
tion in SI units:
x 5 0.053 9 cos (5.00t 1 0.121p)
v 5 20.269 sin (5.00t 1 0.121p)
a 5 21.35 cos (5.00t 1 0.121p)
As we saw in Chapters 7 and 8, many problems are easier to solve using an energy approach rather than one based on 
variables of motion. This particular What If? is easier to solve from an energy approach. Therefore, we shall investigate 
the energy of the simple harmonic oscillator in the next section.
▸ 15.1 
continued
Example 15.2   Watch Out for Potholes! 
A car with a mass of 1 300 kg is constructed so that its frame is supported by four springs. Each spring has a force con-
stant of 20 000 N/m. Two people riding in the car have a combined mass of 160 kg. Find the frequency of vibration of 
the car after it is driven over a pothole in the road.
AM
continued
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer. 3. Export To HTML5. Export and convert PDF to HTML5 file. 4. Export To DOCX.
convert pdf to html email; convert fillable pdf to html
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to
C# PDF - Convert PDF Online with C#.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer. 3. Export To HTML5. Export and convert PDF to HTML5 file. 4. Export To DOCX. Export PDF to DOCX document
online pdf to html converter; online convert pdf to html
458
chapter 15 Oscillatory Motion
Conceptualize  Think about your experiences with automobiles. When you sit in a car, it moves downward a small dis-
tance because your weight is compressing the springs further. If you push down on the front bumper and release it, 
the front of the car oscillates a few times.
Categorize  We imagine the car as being supported by a single spring and model the car as a particle in simple harmonic 
motion.
Analyze  First, let’s determine the effective spring constant of the four springs combined. For a given extension x of 
the springs, the combined force on the car is the sum of the forces from the individual springs.
SOluTiON
Find an expression for the total force on the car:
F
total
o
(2kx) 5 2
a
o
k
b
x
Evaluate the effective spring constant:
k
eff
o
k 5 4 3 20 000 N/m 5 80 000 N/m
Use Equation 15.14 to find the frequency of vibration:
f5
1
2pÅ
k
eff
m
5
1
2pÅ
80 000 N/m
1 460 kg
5 1.18 Hz
In this expression, x has been factored from the sum because it is the same for all four springs. The effective spring 
constant for the combined springs is the sum of the individual spring constants.
Finalize  The mass we used here is that of the car plus the people because that is the total mass that is oscillating. Also 
notice that we have explored only up-and-down motion of the car. If an oscillation is established in which the car rocks 
back and forth such that the front end goes up when the back end goes down, the frequency will be different.
Suppose the car stops on the side of the road and the two people exit the car. One of them pushes down-
ward on the car and releases it so that it oscillates vertically. Is the frequency of the oscillation the same as the value 
we just calculated?
Answer  The suspension system of the car is the same, but the mass that is oscillating is smaller: it no longer includes 
the mass of the two people. Therefore, the frequency should be higher. Let’s calculate the new frequency, taking the 
mass to be 1 300 kg:
f5
1
2pÅ
k
eff
m
5
1
2pÅ
80 000 N/m
1 300 kg
51.25 Hz
As predicted, the new frequency is a bit higher.
WHAT iF?
▸ 15.2 
continued
15.3 Energy of the Simple Harmonic Oscillator
As we have done before, after studying the the motion of an object modeled as a 
particle in a new situation and investigating the forces involved in influencing that 
motion, we turn our attention to energy. Let us examine the mechanical energy 
of a system in which a particle undergoes simple harmonic motion, such as the 
block–spring system illustrated in Figure 15.1. Because the surface is frictionless, 
the system is isolated and we expect the total mechanical energy of the system to 
be constant. We assume a massless spring, so the kinetic energy of the system cor-
responds only to that of the block. We can use Equation 15.15 to express the kinetic 
energy of the block as
K5
1
2
mv25
1
2
mv2A2 sin2 
1
vt1f
2
(15.19)
The elastic potential energy stored in the spring for any elongation x is given by 
1
2
kx2 (see Eq. 7.22). Using Equation 15.6 gives
U5
1
2
kx5
1
2
kA2 cos2 
1
vt1f
2
(15.20)
Kinetic energy of a simple  
harmonic oscillator
Potential energy of a simple  
harmonic oscillator
XDoc.HTML5 Viewer, Create Web Doc & Image Viewer in C#.NET
RasterEdge. PRODUCTS: ONLINE DEMOS: Online HTML5 Document Viewer; Online XDoc.PDF Demo▶: Convert PDF to Word; Convert PDF to Tiff; Convert PDF to HTML;
how to convert pdf to html code; convert pdf to webpage
VB.NET PDF- HTML5 PDF Viewer for VB.NET Project
Convert PDF Online in HTML5 PDF Viewer. With RasterEdge VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer, users can directly convert and export PDF to Tiff
best pdf to html converter; export pdf to html
15.3 energy of the Simple harmonic Oscillator 
459
We see that K and U are always positive quantities or zero. Because v2 5 k/m, we can 
express the total mechanical energy of the simple harmonic oscillator as
E5K1U5
1
2
kA23sin2 1vt1f1cos2 1vt1f24
From the identity sin2 u 1 cos2 u 5 1, we see that the quantity in square brackets is 
unity. Therefore, this equation reduces to
E5
1
2
kA2 
(15.21)
That is, the total mechanical energy of a simple harmonic oscillator is a constant of 
the motion and is proportional to the square of the amplitude. The total mechani-
cal energy is equal to the maximum potential energy stored in the spring when x 5 
6A because v 5 0 at these points and there is no kinetic energy. At the equilibrium 
position, where U 5 0 because x 5 0, the total energy, all in the form of kinetic 
energy, is again 
1
2
kA2.
Plots of the kinetic and potential energies versus time appear in Figure 15.9a, 
where we have taken f 5 0. At all times, the sum of the kinetic and potential ener-
gies is a constant equal to 
1
2
kA2, the total energy of the system.
The variations of K and U with the position x of the block are plotted in Figure 
15.9b. Energy is continuously being transformed between potential energy stored 
in the spring and kinetic energy of the block.
Figure 15.10 on page 460 illustrates the position, velocity, acceleration, kinetic 
energy, and potential energy of the block–spring system for one full period of the 
motion. Most of the ideas discussed so far are incorporated in this important fig-
ure. Study it carefully.
Finally, we can obtain the velocity of the block at an arbitrary position by express-
ing the total energy of the system at some arbitrary position x as
E5K1U5
1
2
mv21
1
2
kx25
1
2
kA2 
v56
Å
k
m
1
A22x2
2
56v"A22x2
(15.22)
When you check Equation 15.22 to see whether it agrees with known cases, you 
find that it verifies that the speed is a maximum at x 5 0 and is zero at the turning 
points x 5 6A.
You may wonder why we are spending so much time studying simple harmonic 
oscillators. We do so because they are good models of a wide variety of physical 
phenomena. For example, recall the Lennard–Jones potential discussed in Exam-
ple 7.9. This complicated function describes the forces holding atoms together. 
Figure 15.11a on page 460 shows that for small displacements from the equilibrium  
WW Total energy of a simple  
harmonic oscillator
WW Velocity as a function  
of position for a simple har-
monic oscillator
U =
kx2
K =   mv2
1
2
1
2
KU
A
x
–A
O
KU
1
2
kA2
1
2
kA2
U
K
T
t
T
2
a
b
In either plot, notice that 
+ U = constant.
Figure 15.9 
(a) Kinetic energy 
and potential energy versus time 
for a simple harmonic oscillator 
with f 5 0. (b)Kinetic energy and 
potential energy versus position 
for a simple harmonic oscillator.
VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.
RasterEdge. PRODUCTS: ONLINE DEMOS: Online HTML5 Document Viewer; Online XDoc.PDF Demo▶: Convert PDF to Word; Convert PDF to Tiff; Convert PDF to HTML;
add pdf to website; convert pdf to web link
C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
C# PDF - Convert PDF to JPEG in C#.NET. C#.NET PDF to JPEG Converting & Conversion Control. Convert PDF to JPEG Using C#.NET. Add necessary references:
how to convert pdf file to html document; convert pdf to html5 open source
460
chapter 15 Oscillatory Motion
position, the potential energy curve for this function approximates a parabola, 
which represents the potential energy function for a simple harmonic oscillator. 
Therefore, we can model the complex atomic binding forces as being due to tiny 
springs as depicted in Figure 15.11b.
The ideas presented in this chapter apply not only to block–spring systems and 
atoms, but also to a wide range of situations that include bungee jumping, playing 
a musical instrument, and viewing the light emitted by a laser. You will see more 
examples of simple harmonic oscillators as you work through this book.
r
U
b
Figure 15.11 
(a) If the atoms in a molecule 
do not move too far from their equilibrium 
positions, a graph of potential energy versus 
separation distance between atoms is similar 
to the graph of potential energy versus posi-
tion for a simple harmonic oscillator (dashed 
black curve). (b) The forces between atoms 
in a solid can be modeled by imagining 
springs between neighboring atoms.
t
x
v
t
x
v
a
K
U
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
-v
2
A
A
0
0
-A
0
A
-vA
0
T
4
T
vA
0
–A
A
Potential
energy
Total
energy
Kinetic
energy
%
0
50
100
%
0
50
100
%
0
50
100
%
0
50
100
%
0
50
100
%
0
50
100
a
c
e
f
b
d
x
a
max
S
a
max
S
v
max
S
v
max
S
-v
2
A
v
2
A
-v
2
x
T
2
3T
4
a
max
S
v
S
x
kA
2
1
2
kA
2
1
2
kA
2
1
2
kA
2
1
2
kA
2
1
2
1
2
mv
2
1
2
kx
2
Figure 15.10 
(a) through (e) Several instants in the simple harmonic motion for a block–spring system. Energy bar graphs show the distri-
bution of the energy of the system at each instant. The parameters in the table at the right refer to the block–spring system, assuming at t 5 0, 
x 5 A; hence, x 5 A cos vt. For these five special instants, one of the types of energy is zero. (f) An arbitrary point in the motion of the oscilla-
tor. The system possesses both kinetic energy and potential energy at this instant as shown in the bar graph.
Example 15.3   Oscillations on a Horizontal Surface 
A 0.500-kg cart connected to a light spring for which the force constant is 20.0 N/m oscillates on a frictionless, hori-
zontal air track.
(A)  Calculate the maximum speed of the cart if the amplitude of the motion is 3.00 cm.
Conceptualize  The system oscillates in exactly the same way as the block in Figure 15.10, so use that figure in your 
mental image of the motion.
AM
SOluTiON
15.3 energy of the Simple harmonic Oscillator 
461
Categorize  The cart is modeled as a particle in simple harmonic motion.
Analyze  Use Equation 15.21 to express the total energy 
of the oscillator system and equate it to the kinetic 
energy of the system when the cart is at x 5 0:
E5
1
2
kA5
1
2
mv
max
 
Evaluate the elastic potential energy at x 5 0.020 0 m:
U5
1
2
kx5
1
2
1
20.0 N/m
21
0.0200 m
22
5
4.0031023 J
Solve for the maximum speed and substitute numerical 
values:
v
max
5
Å
k
m
A5
Å
20.0 N/m
0.500 kg
1
0.030 0 m
2
5
0.190 m/s
Use the result of part (B) to evaluate the kinetic energy 
at x 5 0.020 0 m:
K5
1
2
mv5
1
2
1
0.500 kg
21
0.141 m/s
22
5
5.0031023 J
Use Equation 15.22 to evaluate the velocity:
v56
Å
k
m
1
A2x2
2
56
Å
20.0 N/m
0.500 kg
310.030 0 m22 10.020 0 m224
  60.141 m/s
(B)  What is the velocity of the cart when the position is 2.00 cm?
SOluTiON
Finalize The sum of the kinetic and potential energies in part (C) is equal to the total energy, which can be found 
from Equation 15.21. That must be true for any position of the cart.
The cart in this example could have been set into motion by releasing the cart from rest at x 5 3.00 cm. 
What if the cart were released from the same position, but with an initial velocity of v 5 20.100 m/s? What are the new 
amplitude and maximum speed of the cart?
Answer  This question is of the same type we asked at the end of Example 15.1, but here we apply an energy approach.
WHAT iF?
The positive and negative signs indicate that the cart could be moving to either the right or the left at this instant.
(C)  Compute the kinetic and potential energies of the system when the position of the cart is 2.00 cm.
SOluTiON
First calculate the total energy of the system at t 5 0:
E5
1
2
mv1
1
2
kx2 
5
1
2
1
0.500 kg
21
20.100 m/s
22
1
1
2
1
20.0 N/m
21
0.030 0 m
22
5 1.15 3 1022 J
Equate this total energy to the potential energy of the 
system when the cart is at the endpoint of the motion:
E5
1
2
kA
2
Solve for the amplitude A:
A5
Å
2E
k
5
Å
2
1
1.1531022 J
2
20.0 N/m
50.033 9 m
Equate the total energy to the kinetic energy of the sys-
tem when the cart is at the equilibrium position:
E5
1
2
mv2
max
Solve for the maximum speed:
v
max
5
Å
2E
m
5
Å
211.1531022 J2
0.500 kg
50.214 m/s
The amplitude and maximum velocity are larger than the previous values because the cart was given an initial velocity 
at t 5 0.
▸ 15.3 
continued
462
chapter 15 Oscillatory Motion
Lamp
A
A
Screen
Turntable
The ball rotates like 
a particle in uniform 
circular motion.
The ball’s shadow moves 
like a particle in simple 
harmonic motion.
Figure 15.13 
An experimen-
tal setup for demonstrating the 
connection between a particle in 
simple harmonic motion and a 
corresponding particle in uniform 
circular motion.
15.4  Comparing Simple Harmonic Motion  
with Uniform Circular Motion
Some common devices in everyday life exhibit a relationship between oscillatory 
motion and circular motion. For example, consider the drive mechanism for a non-
electric sewing machine in Figure 15.12. The operator of the machine places her 
feet on the treadle and rocks them back and forth. This oscillatory motion causes 
the large wheel at the right to undergo circular motion. The red drive belt seen in 
the photograph transfers this circular motion to the sewing machine mechanism 
(above the photo) and eventually results in the oscillatory motion of the sewing 
needle. In this section, we explore this interesting relationship between these two 
types of motion.
Figure 15.13 is a view of an experimental arrangement that shows this relation-
ship. A ball is attached to the rim of a turntable of radius A, which is illuminated 
from above by a lamp. The ball casts a shadow on a screen. As the turntable rotates 
with constant angular speed, the shadow of the ball moves back and forth in simple 
harmonic motion.
Consider a particle located at point P on the circumference of a circle of radius 
A as in Figure 15.14a, with the line OP making an angle f with the x axis at t 5 
0. We call this circle a reference circle for comparing simple harmonic motion with 
uniform circular motion, and we choose the position of P at t 5 0 as our reference 
position. If the particle moves along the circle with constant angular speed v until 
OP makes an angle u with the x axis as in Figure 15.14b, at some time t . 0 the angle 
between OP and the x axis is u 5 vt 1 f. As the particle moves along the circle, the 
projection of P on the x axis, labeled point Q, moves back and forth along the x axis 
between the limits x 5 6A.
Notice that points P and Q always have the same x coordinate. From the right 
triangle OPQ, we see that this x coordinate is
x
1
t
2
5A cos 
1
vt1f
2
(15.23)
This expression is the same as Equation 15.6 and shows that the point Q moves 
with simple harmonic motion along the x axis. Therefore, the motion of an object 
described by the analysis model of a particle in simple harmonic motion along a 
straight line can be represented by the projection of an object that can be modeled 
as a particle in uniform circular motion along a diameter of a reference circle.
This geometric interpretation shows that the time interval for one complete rev-
olution of the point P on the reference circle is equal to the period of motion T for 
simple harmonic motion between x 5 6A. Therefore, the angular speed v of P is 
the same as the angular frequency v of simple harmonic motion along the x axis 
Figure 15.12 
The bottom of a treadle-style sewing machine from the early twentieth century. The 
treadle is the wide, flat foot pedal with the metal grillwork.
The oscillation of the treadle 
causes circular motion of the 
drive wheel, eventually 
resulting in additional up 
and down motion—of the 
sewing needle.
The back edge of 
the treadle goes up 
and down as one’s 
feet rock the treadle.
J
o
h
n
W
.
J
e
w
e
t
t
,
J
r
.
15.4 comparing Simple harmonic Motion with Uniform circular Motion 
463
(which is why we use the same symbol). The phase constant f for simple harmonic 
motion corresponds to the initial angle OP makes with the x axis. The radius A of 
the reference circle equals the amplitude of the simple harmonic motion.
Because the relationship between linear and angular speed for circular motion 
is v 5 rv (see Eq. 10.10), the particle moving on the reference circle of radius A has 
a velocity of magnitude vA. From the geometry in Figure 15.14c, we see that the x 
component of this velocity is 2vA sin(vt 1 f). By definition, point Q has a velocity 
given by dx/dt. Differentiating Equation 15.23 with respect to time, we find that the 
velocity of Q is the same as the x component of the velocity of P.
The acceleration of P on the reference circle is directed radially inward toward 
O and has a magnitude v2/A 5 v2A. From the geometry in Figure 15.14d, we see 
that the x component of this acceleration is 2v2A cos(vt 1 f). This value is also the 
acceleration of the projected point Q along the x axis, as you can verify by taking 
the second derivative of Equation 15.23.
uick Quiz 15.5  Figure 15.15 shows the position of an object in uniform circular 
motion at t 5 0. A light shines from above and projects a shadow of the object 
on a screen below the circular motion. What are the correct values for the ampli-
tude and phase constant (relative to an x axis to the right) of the simple harmonic 
motion of the shadow? (a) 0.50 m and 0 (b) 1.00 m and 0 (c)0.50 m and p  
(d) 1.00 m and p
v
P
P
x
Q
O
A
y
t = 0
t+
O
P
v
x
v
x
Q
O
y
x
y
x
y
x
A
P
Q
O
y
x
a
x
a
x
f
f
u
u
v
v = vA
a = 
2
A
v
S
a
S
A particle is at 
point P at t = 0.
At a later time t, the x 
coordinates of points P 
and Q are equal and are 
given by Equation 15.23.
The x component of 
the velocity of P equals 
the velocity of Q.
The x component of the 
acceleration of P equals 
the acceleration of Q.
a
b
c
d
Figure 15.14 
Relationship between the uniform circular motion of a point P and the simple harmonic motion of a point Q. A particle at P 
moves in a circle of radius A with constant angular speed v. 
Ball
Screen
Turntable
0.50 m
Lamp
Figure 15.15 
(Quick Quiz 
15.5) An object moves in circular 
motion, casting a shadow on the 
screen below. Its position at an 
instant of time is shown.
Example 15.4   Circular Motion with Constant Angular Speed 
The ball in Figure 15.13 rotates counterclockwise in a circle of radius 3.00 m with a constant angular speed of 
8.00rad/s. At t 5 0, its shadow has an x coordinate of 2.00 m and is moving to the right.
(A)  Determine the x coordinate of the shadow as a function of time in SI units.
Conceptualize  Be sure you understand the relationship between circular motion of the ball and simple harmonic 
motion of its shadow as described in Figure 15.13. Notice that the shadow is not at is maximum position at t 5 0.
Categorize  The ball on the turntable is a particle in uniform circular motion. The shadow is modeled as a particle in simple 
harmonic motion.
AM
SOluTiON
continued
464
chapter 15 Oscillatory Motion
15.5 The Pendulum
The simple pendulum is another mechanical system that exhibits periodic motion. 
It consists of a particle-like bob of mass m suspended by a light string of length L 
that is fixed at the upper end as shown in Figure 15.16. The motion occurs in the 
vertical plane and is driven by the gravitational force. We shall show that, provided 
the angle u is small (less than about 108), the motion is very close to that of a simple 
harmonic oscillator.
The forces acting on the bob are the force T
S
exerted by the string and the gravi-
tational force mg
S
. The tangential component mg sin u of the gravitational force 
always acts toward u 5 0, opposite the displacement of the bob from the lowest posi-
tion. Therefore, the tangential component is a restoring force, and we can apply 
Newton’s second law for motion in the tangential direction:
F
t
5ma
t
  2mg sin u5m 
d
2
s
dt
2
where the negative sign indicates that the tangential force acts toward the equilib-
rium (vertical) position and s is the bob’s position measured along the arc. We have 
expressed the tangential acceleration as the second derivative of the position s.  
Because s 5 Lu (Eq. 10.1a with r 5 L) and L is constant, this equation reduces to
d2u
dt2
52
g
L
sin u 
Figure 15.16 
A simple 
pendulum.
L
s
m
g sin
m
m
g cos
u
u
u
u
T
S
mg
S
When u is small, a simple 
pendulum's motion can be 
modeled as simple harmonic 
motion about the equilibrium 
position u = 0.
Analyze Use Equation 15.23 to write an expression for 
the x coordinate of the rotating ball:
x5A cos 
1
vt1f
2
Solve for the phase constant:
f5cos21 a
x
A
b2vt
Substitute numerical values for the initial conditions:
f5cos21 a
2.00 m
3.00 m
b205648.28560.841 rad
If we were to take f 5 10.841 rad as our answer, the shadow would be moving to the left at t 5 0. Because the shadow 
is moving to the right at t 5 0, we must choose f 5 20.841 rad.
Write the x coordinate as a function of time:
x 5   3.00 cos (8.00t 2 0.841)
(B)  Find the x components of the shadow’s velocity and acceleration at any time t.
SOluTiON
Differentiate the x coordinate with respect to time to 
find the velocity at any time in m/s:
v
x
5
dx
dt
5
1
23.00 m
21
8.00 rad/s
2
sin 
1
8.00t20.841
2
5   224.0 sin (8.00t 2 0.841)
Differentiate the velocity with respect to time to find 
the acceleration at any time in m/s2:
a
x
5
dv
x
dt
5
1
224.0 m/s
21
8.00 rad/s
2
cos 
1
8.00t20.841
2
  2192 cos (8.00t 2 0.841)
Finalize These results are equally valid for the ball moving in uniform circular motion and the shadow moving in 
simple harmonic motion. Notice that the value of the phase constant puts the ball in the fourth quadrant of the xy 
coordinate system of Figure 15.14, which is consistent with the shadow having a positive value for x and moving toward 
the right.
▸ 15.4 
continued
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested