18.3 analysis Model: Waves Under Boundary conditions 
545
string, which in turn causes a change in the wavelength. This altered wavelength results in the string vibrating in its 
fifth normal mode rather than the second.
Categorize  The hanging sphere is modeled as a particle in equilibrium. One of the forces acting on it is the buoyant 
force from the water. We also apply the waves under boundary conditions model to the string.
a
Å
T
1
m
f5
n
2
2LÅ
T
2
m
S
15
n
1
n
2
Å
T
1
T
2
Solve for T
2
:
T
2
5
a
n
1
n
2
b
2
T
1
5
a
n
1
n
2
b
2
mg
Substitute this result into Equation (1):
(2)   B5mg2
a
n
1
n
2
b
2
mg5mg
c
12
a
n
1
n
2
b
2
d
The desired quantity, the radius of the sphere, will appear in the expression for the buoyant force B. Before proceed-
ing in this direction, however, we must evaluate T
2
from the information about the standing wave.
Finalize  Notice that only certain radii of the sphere will result in the string vibrating in a normal mode; the speed of 
waves on the string must be changed to a value such that the length of the string is an integer multiple of half wave-
lengths. This limitation is a feature of the quantization that was introduced earlier in this chapter: the sphere radii that 
cause the string to vibrate in a normal mode are quantized.
Using Equation 14.5, express the buoyant force in terms 
of the radius of the sphere:
B5r
water
gV
sphere
5r
water
g
14
3
pr3
2
Solve for the radius of the sphere and substitute from 
Equation (2):
r5
a
3B
4pr
water
g
b
1/3
5
e
3m
4pr
water
c
12
a
n
1
n
2
b
2
df
1/3
Substitute numerical values:
re
312.00 kg2
4p
1
1 000 kg/m3
2
c12a
2
5
b
2
df
1/3
5 0.073 7 m 5 
7.37 cm
▸ 18.4 
continued
Conversion pdf to html - Convert PDF to html files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
How to Convert PDF to HTML Webpage with C# PDF Conversion SDK
convert pdf to html open source; attach pdf to html
Conversion pdf to html - VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
PDF to HTML Webpage Converter SDK for VB.NET PDF to HTML Conversion
to html; how to convert pdf to html email
546
chapter 18 Superposition and Standing Waves
1Strictly speaking, the open end of an air column is not exactly a displacement antinode. A compression reaching 
an open end does not reflect until it passes beyond the end. For a tube of circular cross section, an end correction 
equal to approximately 0.6R, where R is the tube’s radius, must be added to the length of the air column. Hence, the 
effective length of the air column is longer than the true length L. We ignore this end correction in this discussion.
When the blade vibrates at one of
the natural frequencies of the
string, large-amplitude standing
waves are created.
Figure 18.12 
Standing waves are 
set up in a string when one end is 
connected to a vibrating blade.
18.4 Resonance
We have seen that a system such as a taut string is capable of oscillating in one or 
more normal modes of oscillation. Suppose we drive such a string with a vibrating 
blade as in Figure 18.12. We find that if a periodic force is applied to such a system, 
the amplitude of the resulting motion of the string is greatest when the frequency 
of the applied force is equal to one of the natural frequencies of the system. This 
phenomenon, known as resonance, was discussed in Section 15.7 with regard to a 
simple harmonic oscillator. Although a block–spring system or a simple pendulum 
has only one natural frequency, standing-wave systems have a whole set of natural 
frequencies, such as that given by Equation 18.6 for a string. Because an oscillat-
ing system exhibits a large amplitude when driven at any of its natural frequencies, 
these frequencies are often referred to as resonance frequencies.
Consider the string in Figure 18.12 again. The fixed end is a node, and the end 
connected to the blade is very nearly a node because the amplitude of the blade’s 
motion is small compared with that of the elements of the string. As the blade oscil-
lates, transverse waves sent down the string are reflected from the fixed end. As 
we learned in Section 18.3, the string has natural frequencies that are determined 
by its length, tension, and linear mass density (see Eq. 18.6). When the frequency 
of the blade equals one of the natural frequencies of the string, standing waves 
are produced and the string oscillates with a large amplitude. In this resonance 
case, the wave generated by the oscillating blade is in phase with the reflected wave 
and the string absorbs energy from the blade. If the string is driven at a frequency 
that is not one of its natural frequencies, the oscillations are of low amplitude and 
exhibit no stable pattern.
Resonance is very important in the excitation of musical instruments based on 
air columns. We shall discuss this application of resonance in Section 18.5.
18.5 Standing Waves in Air Columns
The waves under boundary conditions model can also be applied to sound waves in 
a column of air such as that inside an organ pipe or a clarinet. Standing waves in 
this case are the result of interference between longitudinal sound waves traveling 
in opposite directions.
In a pipe closed at one end, the closed end is a displacement node because the 
rigid barrier at this end does not allow longitudinal motion of the air. Because the 
pressure wave is 90° out of phase with the displacement wave (see Section 17.1),  
the closed end of an air column corresponds to a pressure antinode (that is, a 
point of maximum pressure variation).
The open end of an air column is approximately a displacement antinode1 and 
a pressure node. We can understand why no pressure variation occurs at an open 
end by noting that the end of the air column is open to the atmosphere; therefore, 
the pressure at this end must remain constant at atmospheric pressure.
You may wonder how a sound wave can reflect from an open end because there 
may not appear to be a change in the medium at this point: the medium through 
which the sound wave moves is air both inside and outside the pipe. Sound can be 
represented as a pressure wave, however, and a compression region of the sound 
wave is constrained by the sides of the pipe as long as the region is inside the pipe. 
As the compression region exits at the open end of the pipe, the constraint of the 
pipe is removed and the compressed air is free to expand into the atmosphere. 
Therefore, there is a change in the character of the medium between the inside 
Online Convert PDF to HTML5 files. Best free online PDF html
area. Then just wait until the conversion from PDF to HTML is complete and download the file. The perfect conversion tool. Your HTML
converting pdf into html; convert pdf table to html
C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
C#.NET PDF to HTML Conversion. Using provided C# code example, fast conversion from PDF to HTML can be achieved. C#.NET PDF to SVG Conversion.
how to convert pdf to html; how to convert pdf into html code
18.5 Standing Waves in air columns 
547
of the pipe and the outside even though there is no change in the material of the 
medium. This change in character is sufficient to allow some reflection.
With the boundary conditions of nodes or antinodes at the ends of the air col-
umn, we have a set of normal modes of oscillation as is the case for the string fixed 
at both ends. Therefore, the air column has quantized frequencies.
The first three normal modes of oscillation of a pipe open at both ends are 
shown in Figure 18.13a. Notice that both ends are displacement antinodes (approx-
imately). In the first normal mode, the standing wave extends between two adjacent 
antinodes, which is a distance of half a wavelength. Therefore, the wavelength is 
twice the length of the pipe, and the fundamental frequency is f
1
v/2L. As Figure 
18.13a shows, the frequencies of the higher harmonics are 2f
1
, 3f
1
, . . . .
In a pipe open at both ends, the natural frequencies of oscillation form a har-
monic series that includes all integral multiples of the fundamental frequency.
Because all harmonics are present and because the fundamental frequency is given 
by the same expression as that for a string (see Eq. 18.5), we can express the natural 
frequencies of oscillation as
f
n
5n 
v
2L
n 5 1, 2, 3, . . .  
(18.8)
Despite the similarity between Equations 18.5 and 18.8, you must remember that v 
in Equation 18.5 is the speed of waves on the string, whereas v in Equation 18.8 is 
the speed of sound in air.
If a pipe is closed at one end and open at the other, the closed end is a displace-
ment node (see Fig. 18.13b). In this case, the standing wave for the fundamental 
mode extends from an antinode to the adjacent node, which is one-fourth of a wave-
length. Hence, the wavelength for the first normal mode is 4L, and the fundamental  
natural frequencies of a pipe 
WWopen at both ends
Third harmonic
L
First harmonic
Second harmonic
First harmonic
Third harmonic
Fifth harmonic
A
A
N
A
A
A
N
N
A
A
A
A
N
N
N
1
5 2L
f
1
5 — 5 —
v
1
v
2L
l
l
2
L
f
2
5 — 5 2f
1
v
L
l
3
5 — L
f
3
5 — 5 3f
1
3v
2L
2
3
l
L
A
N
A
N
A
N
A
A
N
N
A
N
3
5 — L
f
3
5 — 5 3f
1
3v
4L
4
3
l
5
5 — L
f
5
5 — 5 5f
1
5v
4L
4
5
l
1
5 4L
f
1
5 — 5 —
v
1
v
4L
l
l
In a pipe open at both ends, the 
ends are displacement antinodes 
and the harmonic series contains 
all integer multiples of the 
fundamental.
In a pipe closed at one end, the 
open end is a displacement 
antinode and the closed end is 
a node. The harmonic series 
contains only odd integer 
multiples of the fundamental.
a
b
Figure 18.13 
Graphical  
representations of the motion of 
elements of air in standing lon-
gitudinal waves in (a)a column 
open at both ends and (b) a col-
umn closed at one end.
Pitfall Prevention 18.3
Sound Waves in Air Are lon-
gitudinal, not Transverse The 
standing longitudinal waves are 
drawn as transverse waves in Fig-
ure 18.13. Because they are in the 
same direction as the propaga-
tion, it is difficult to draw longitu-
dinal displacements. Therefore, it 
is best to interpret the red-brown 
curves in Figure 18.13 as a graphi-
cal representation of the waves 
(our diagrams of string waves are 
pictorial representations), with 
the vertical axis representing the 
horizontal displacement s(xt) of 
the elements of the medium.
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
XDoc.PDF SDK for .NET. RasterEdge XDoc.PDF for .NET is a professional .NET PDF solution that provides complete and advanced PDF document processing features.
convert from pdf to html; converting pdfs to html
VB.NET PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file
Conversion of PDF to Html5. For how to convert PDF to HTML document in VB.NET application, a simple and easy VB.NET sample code is given on this page for you
best pdf to html converter; convert pdf to html with
548
chapter 18 Superposition and Standing Waves
frequency is f
1
v/4L. As Figure 18.13b shows, the higher-frequency waves that sat-
isfy our conditions are those that have a node at the closed end and an antinode at 
the open end; hence, the higher harmonics have frequencies 3f
1
, 5f
1
, . . . .
In a pipe closed at one end, the natural frequencies of oscillation form a har-
monic series that includes only odd integral multiples of the fundamental 
frequency.
We express this result mathematically as
f
n
5n 
v
4L
n 5 1, 3, 5, . . . 
(18.9)
It is interesting to investigate what happens to the frequencies of instruments 
based on air columns and strings during a concert as the temperature rises. The 
sound emitted by a flute, for example, becomes sharp (increases in frequency) 
as the flute warms up because the speed of sound increases in the increasingly 
warmer air inside the flute (consider Eq. 18.8). The sound produced by a violin 
becomes flat (decreases in frequency) as the strings thermally expand because the 
expansion causes their tension to decrease (see Eq. 18.6).
Musical instruments based on air columns are generally excited by resonance. 
The air column is presented with a sound wave that is rich in many frequencies. The 
air column then responds with a large-amplitude oscillation to the frequencies that 
match the quantized frequencies in its set of harmonics. In many woodwind instru-
ments, the initial rich sound is provided by a vibrating reed. In brass instruments, 
this excitation is provided by the sound coming from the vibration of the player’s 
lips. In a flute, the initial excitation comes from blowing over an edge at the mouth-
piece of the instrument in a manner similar to blowing across the opening of a bot-
tle with a narrow neck. The sound of the air rushing across the bottle opening has 
many frequencies, including one that sets the air cavity in the bottle into resonance.
uick Quiz 18.4  A pipe open at both ends resonates at a fundamental frequency 
f
open
. When one end is covered and the pipe is again made to resonate, the  
fundamental frequency is f
closed
. Which of the following expressions describes 
how these two resonant frequencies compare? (a) f
closed
f
open
(b)f
closed
1
2
f
open
(c) f
closed
5 2f
open
(d) f
closed
3
2
f
open
uick Quiz 18.5  Balboa Park in San Diego has an outdoor organ. When the air 
temperature increases, the fundamental frequency of one of the organ pipes  
(a) stays the same, (b) goes down, (c) goes up, or (d) is impossible to determine.
natural frequencies of 
a pipe closed at one end  
and open at the other
Find the frequency of the first harmonic of the culvert, 
modeling it as an air column open at both ends:
f
1
5
v
2L
5
343 m/s
2
1
1.23 m
2
 139 Hz
Find the next harmonics by multiplying by integers:
f
2
5 2f
1
5   279 Hz
f
3
5 3f
1
5   418 Hz 
Example 18.5   Wind in a Culvert
A section of drainage culvert 1.23 m in length makes a howling noise when the wind blows across its open ends.
(A)  Determine the frequencies of the first three harmonics of the culvert if it is cylindrical in shape and open at 
both ends. Take v 5 343 m/s as the speed of sound in air.
Conceptualize  The sound of the wind blowing across the end of the pipe contains many frequencies, and the culvert 
responds to the sound by vibrating at the natural frequencies of the air column.
Categorize  This example is a relatively simple substitution problem.
SoluTIon
C# Windows Viewer - Image and Document Conversion & Rendering in
CSV Document Conversion. RasterEdge Windows Viewer SDK provides how to convert TIFF: Convert to PDF. Convert to Various Images. PDF Document Conversion.
convert pdf to webpage; create html email from pdf
C# WinForms Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
PDF Conversion. • Convert PDF to Microsoft Office Word (.docx). • Convert PDF to Tiff image (.tif, .tiff). • Convert PDF to HTML (.htm, .html).
convert pdf into html online; how to convert pdf into html
18.5 Standing Waves in air columns 
549
Find the frequency of the first harmonic of the culvert, 
modeling it as an air column closed at one end:
f
1
5
v
4L
5
343 m/s
4
1
1.23 m
2
 69.7 Hz
Find the next two harmonics by multiplying by odd 
integers:
f
3
5 3f
1
5   209 Hz
f
5
5 5f
1
  349 Hz
(B)  What are the three lowest natural frequencies of the culvert if it is blocked at one end?
SoluTIon
Example 18.6   Measuring the Frequency of a Tuning Fork 
A simple apparatus for demonstrating resonance in an air col-
umn is depicted in Figure 18.14. A vertical pipe open at both 
ends is partially submerged in water, and a tuning fork vibrat-
ing at an unknown frequency is placed near the top of the pipe. 
The length L of the air column can be adjusted by moving the 
pipe vertically. The sound waves generated by the fork are rein-
forced when L corresponds to one of the resonance frequen-
cies of the pipe. For a certain pipe, the smallest value of L for 
which a peak occurs in the sound intensity is 9.00 cm.
(A)  What is the frequency of the tuning fork?
Conceptualize  Sound waves from the tuning fork enter the 
pipe at its upper end. Although the pipe is open at its lower 
end to allow the water to enter, the water’s surface acts like a 
barrier. The waves reflect from the water surface and combine 
with those moving downward to form a standing wave.
Categorize Because of the reflection of the sound waves from the water surface, we can model the pipe as open at 
the upper end and closed at the lower end. Therefore, we can apply the waves under boundary conditions model to this 
situation.
Analyze
AM
SoluTIon
?
First
resonance
Second
resonance
(third
harmonic)
Third
resonance
(fifth
harmonic)
/4
3 /4
5 /4
l
l
l
L
Water
a
b
Figure 18.14 
(Example 18.6) (a) Apparatus for dem-
onstrating the resonance of sound waves in a pipe closed 
at one end. The length L of the air column is varied by 
moving the pipe vertically while it is partially submerged 
in water. (b) The first three normal modes of the system 
shown in (a).
Use Equation 18.9 to find the fundamental frequency 
for L 5 0.090 0 m:
f
1
5
v
4L
5
343 m/s
4
1
0.090 0  m
2
5 953 Hz
Use Equation 16.12 to find the wavelength of the sound 
wave from the tuning fork:
l5
v
f
5
343 m/s
953 Hz
50.360 m
Notice from Figure 18.14b that the length of the air col-
umn for the second resonance is 3l/4:
L 5 3l/4 5  0.270 m
Notice from Figure 18.14b that the length of the air col-
umn for the third resonance is 5l/4:
L 5 5l/4 5  0.450 m
Because the tuning fork causes the air column to resonate at this frequency, this frequency must also be that of the 
tuning fork.
(B)  What are the values of L for the next two resonance conditions?
SoluTIon
▸ 18.5 
continued
Finalize Consider how this problem differs from the preceding example. In the culvert, the length was fixed and the 
air column was presented with a mixture of many frequencies. The pipe in this example is presented with one single 
frequency from the tuning fork, and the length of the pipe is varied until resonance is achieved.
C# Word - Word Conversion in C#.NET
And detailed C# demo codes for these conversions are offered below. C# Demo Codes for Word Conversions. Word to PDF Conversion. PDF to Word Conversion.
pdf to html converter; convert pdf into webpage
C# powerpoint - PowerPoint Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
And detailed C# demo codes for these conversions are offered below. C# Demo Codes for PowerPoint Conversions. PowerPoint to PDF Conversion.
embed pdf to website; convert pdf to web form
550
chapter 18 Superposition and Standing Waves
01
11
21
02
31
12
1
1.59
2.14
2.30
2.65
2.92
41
22
03
51
32
61
3.16
3.50
3.60
3.65
4.06
4.15
Elements of the medium moving 
out of the page at an instant of time.
Elements of the medium moving 
into the page at an instant of time.
Below each pattern 
is a factor by which 
the frequency of the 
mode is larger than 
that of the 01 mode. 
The frequencies of 
oscillation do not 
form a harmonic 
series because these 
factors are not 
integers.
Figure 18.16 
Representation 
of some of the normal modes 
possible in a circular membrane 
fixed at its perimeter. The pair of 
numbers above each pattern cor-
responds to the number of radial 
nodes and the number of circular 
nodes, respectively. In each dia-
gram, elements of the membrane 
on either side of a nodal line move 
in opposite directions, as indicated 
by the colors. (Adapted from T. D. 
Rossing, The Science of Sound, 3rd 
ed., Reading, Massachusetts, Addison-
Wesley Publishing Co., 2001)
18.6 Standing Waves in Rods and Membranes
Standing waves can also be set up in rods and membranes. A rod clamped in the 
middle and stroked parallel to the rod at one end oscillates as depicted in Figure 
18.15a. The oscillations of the elements of the rod are longitudinal, and so the red-
brown curves in Figure 18.15 represent longitudinal displacements of various parts 
of the rod. For clarity, the displacements have been drawn in the transverse direc-
tion as they were for air columns. The midpoint is a displacement node because it 
is fixed by the clamp, whereas the ends are displacement antinodes because they 
are free to oscillate. The oscillations in this setup are analogous to those in a pipe 
open at both ends. The red-brown lines in Figure 18.15a represent the first normal 
mode, for which the wavelength is 2L and the frequency is f 5 v/2L, where v is the 
speed of longitudinal waves in the rod. Other normal modes may be excited by 
clamping the rod at different points. For example, the second normal mode (Fig. 
18.15b) is excited by clamping the rod a distance L/4 away from one end.
It is also possible to set up transverse standing waves in rods. Musical instru-
ments that depend on transverse standing waves in rods or bars include triangles, 
marimbas, xylophones, glockenspiels, chimes, and vibraphones. Other devices that 
make sounds from vibrating bars include music boxes and wind chimes.
Two-dimensional oscillations can be set up in a flexible membrane stretched 
over a circular hoop such as that in a drumhead. As the membrane is struck at 
some point, waves that arrive at the fixed boundary are reflected many times. The 
resulting sound is not harmonic because the standing waves have frequencies that 
are not related by integer multiples. Without this relationship, the sound may be 
more correctly described as noise rather than as music. The production of noise 
is in contrast to the situation in wind and stringed instruments, which produce 
sounds that we describe as musical.
Some possible normal modes of oscillation for a two-dimensional circular mem-
brane are shown in Figure 18.16. Whereas nodes are points in one-dimensional 
standing waves on strings and in air columns, a two-dimensional oscillator has 
curves along which there is no displacement of the elements of the medium. The 
lowest normal mode, which has a frequency f
1
, contains only one nodal curve; this 
curve runs around the outer edge of the membrane. The other possible normal 
modes show additional nodal curves that are circles and straight lines across the 
diameter of the membrane.
18.7 Beats: Interference in Time
The interference phenomena we have studied so far involve the superposition of 
two or more waves having the same frequency. Because the amplitude of the oscil-
b
N
A
A
L
4
A
N
l
2
L 
f
2
5
5 2f
1
v
L
Figure 18.15 
Normal-mode 
longitudinal vibrations of a rod 
of length L (a) clamped at the 
middle to produce the first nor-
mal mode and (b)clamped at 
a distance L/4 from one end to 
produce the second normal mode. 
Notice that the red-brown curves 
are graphical representations of 
oscillations parallel to the rod 
(longitudinal waves).
A
N
A
L
f
1
5
v
v
2L
l
1
l
1
5 2L 
a
18.7 Beats: Interference in time 
551
y
y
t
t
b
a
Figure 18.17 
Beats are formed 
by the combination of two waves 
of slightly different frequencies. 
(a) The individual waves. (b) The 
combined wave. The envelope 
wave (dashed line) represents the 
beating of the combined sounds.
lation of elements of the medium varies with the position in space of the element 
in such a wave, we refer to the phenomenon as spatial interference. Standing waves in 
strings and pipes are common examples of spatial interference.
Now let’s consider another type of interference, one that results from the super-
position of two waves having slightly different frequencies. In this case, when the two 
waves are observed at a point in space, they are periodically in and out of phase. 
That is, there is a temporal (time) alternation between constructive and destructive 
interference. As a consequence, we refer to this phenomenon as interference in time 
or temporal interference. For example, if two tuning forks of slightly different frequen-
cies are struck, one hears a sound of periodically varying amplitude. This phenom-
enon is called beating.
Beating is the periodic variation in amplitude at a given point due to the 
superposition of two waves having slightly different frequencies.
The number of amplitude maxima one hears per second, or the beat frequency, 
equals the difference in frequency between the two sources as we shall show below. 
The maximum beat frequency that the human ear can detect is about 20 beats/s. 
When the beat frequency exceeds this value, the beats blend indistinguishably with 
the sounds producing them.
Consider two sound waves of equal amplitude and slightly different frequencies 
f
1
and f
2
traveling through a medium. We use equations similar to Equation 16.13 to 
represent the wave functions for these two waves at a point that we identify as x 5 0.  
We also choose the phase angle in Equation 16.13 as f 5 p/2:
y
1
5A sin 
a
p
2
2v
1
t
b
5A cos 
1
2pf
1
t
2
y
2
5A sin a
p
2
2v
2
tb5A cos 
1
2pf
2
t
2
Using the superposition principle, we find that the resultant wave function at this 
point is
y 5 y
1
y
2
A (cos 2pf
1
t 1 cos 2pf
2
t)
The trigonometric identity
cos a1cos b52 cos a
a2b
2
b cos a
a1b
2
b
allows us to write the expression for y as
yc2A cos 2pa
f
1
2f
2
2
btd cos 2pa
f
1
1f
2
2
bt 
(18.10)
Graphs of the individual waves and the resultant wave are shown in Figure 18.17. 
From the factors in Equation 18.10, we see that the resultant wave has an effective 
WWDefinition of beating
WW Resultant of two waves of 
different frequencies but 
equal amplitude
552
chapter 18 Superposition and Standing Waves
Analyze  Set up a ratio of the fundamental frequencies 
of the two strings using Equation 18.5:
f
2
f
1
5
1
v
2
/2L
2
1v
1
/2L2
5
v
2
v
1
Use Equation 16.18 to substitute for the wave speeds on 
the strings:
f
2
f
1
5
"T
2
/m
"T
1
/m
5
Å
T
2
T
1
Incorporate that the tension in one string is 1.0% larger 
than the other; that is, T
2
5 1.010T
1
:
f
2
f
1
5
Å
1.010T
1
T
1
51.005
Solve for the frequency of the tightened string:
f
2
5 1.005f
1
5 1.005(440 Hz) 5 442 Hz
Finalize  Notice that a 1.0% mistuning in tension leads to an easily audible beat frequency of 2 Hz. A piano tuner can 
use beats to tune a stringed instrument by “beating” a note against a reference tone of known frequency. The tuner 
can then adjust the string tension until the frequency of the sound it emits equals the frequency of the reference 
tone. The tuner does so by tightening or loosening the string until the beats produced by it and the reference source 
become too infrequent to notice.
Find the beat frequency using Equation 18.12:
f
beat
5 442 Hz 2 440 Hz 5   2 Hz
frequency equal to the average frequency (f
1
f
2
)/2. This wave is multiplied by an 
envelope wave given by the expression in the square brackets:
y
envelope
52A cos 2pa
f
1
2f
2
2
bt 
(18.11)
That is, the amplitude and therefore the intensity of the resultant sound vary 
in time. The dashed black line in Figure 18.17b is a graphical representation of 
the envelope wave in Equation 18.11 and is a sine wave varying with frequency  
(f
1
f
2
)/2.
A maximum in the amplitude of the resultant sound wave is detected whenever
cos 2pa
f
1
2f
2
2
bt561
Hence, there are two maxima in each period of the envelope wave. Because the 
amplitude varies with frequency as (f
1
f
2
)/2, the number of beats per second, or 
the beat frequency f
beat
, is twice this value. That is,
f
beat
5
0
f
1
2f
2
0
(18.12)
For instance, if one tuning fork vibrates at 438 Hz and a second one vibrates at 
442 Hz, the resultant sound wave of the combination has a frequency of 440 Hz 
(the musical note A) and a beat frequency of 4 Hz. A listener would hear a 440-Hz 
sound wave go through an intensity maximum four times every second.
Beat frequency 
Example 18.7   The Mistuned Piano Strings 
Two identical piano strings of length 0.750 m are each tuned exactly to 440 Hz. The tension in one of the strings is 
then increased by 1.0%. If they are now struck, what is the beat frequency between the fundamentals of the two strings?
Conceptualize  As the tension in one of the strings is changed, its fundamental frequency changes. Therefore, when 
both strings are played, they will have different frequencies and beats will be heard.
Categorize  We must combine our understanding of the waves under boundary conditions model for strings with our new 
knowledge of beats.
AM
SoluTIon
18.8 Nonsinusoidal Wave patterns 
553
18.8 Nonsinusoidal Wave Patterns
It is relatively easy to distinguish the sounds coming from a violin and a saxophone 
even when they are both playing the same note. On the other hand, a person 
untrained in music may have difficulty distinguishing a note played on a clarinet 
from the same note played on an oboe. We can use the pattern of the sound waves 
from various sources to explain these effects.
When frequencies that are integer multiples of a fundamental frequency are 
combined to make a sound, the result is a musical sound. A listener can assign a 
pitch to the sound based on the fundamental frequency. Pitch is a psychological 
reaction to a sound that allows the listener to place the sound on a scale from low to 
high (bass to treble). Combinations of frequencies that are not integer multiples of 
a fundamental result in a noise rather than a musical sound. It is much harder for a 
listener to assign a pitch to a noise than to a musical sound.
The wave patterns produced by a musical instrument are the result of the super-
position of frequencies that are integer multiples of a fundamental. This superposi-
tion results in the corresponding richness of musical tones. The human perceptive 
response associated with various mixtures of harmonics is the quality or timbre of 
the sound. For instance, the sound of the trumpet is perceived to have a “brassy” 
quality (that is, we have learned to associate the adjective brassy with that sound); 
this quality enables us to distinguish the sound of the trumpet from that of the sax-
ophone, whose quality is perceived as “reedy.” The clarinet and oboe, however, both 
contain air columns excited by reeds; because of this similarity, they have similar 
mixtures of frequencies and it is more difficult for the human ear to distinguish 
them on the basis of their sound quality.
The sound wave patterns produced by the majority of musical instruments are 
nonsinusoidal. Characteristic patterns produced by a tuning fork, a flute, and a 
clarinet, each playing the same note, are shown in Figure 18.18. Each instrument 
has its own characteristic pattern. Notice, however, that despite the differences in 
the patterns, each pattern is periodic. This point is important for our analysis of 
these waves.
The problem of analyzing nonsinusoidal wave patterns appears at first sight to 
be a formidable task. If the wave pattern is periodic, however, it can be represented 
as closely as desired by the combination of a sufficiently large number of sinusoidal 
waves that form a harmonic series. In fact, we can represent any periodic function 
as a series of sine and cosine terms by using a mathematical technique based on 
Fourier’s theorem.2 The corresponding sum of terms that represents the periodic 
wave pattern is called a Fourier series. Let y(t) be any function that is periodic in 
time with period T such that y(t 1 T) 5 y(t). Fourier’s theorem states that this func-
tion can be written as
y(t) 5 
o
(A
n
sin 2pf
n
t 1 B
n
cos 2pf
n
t
(18.13)
where the lowest frequency is f
1
5 1/T. The higher frequencies are integer multiples 
of the fundamental, f
n
nf
1
, and the coefficients A
n
and B
n
represent the ampli-
tudes of the various waves. Figure 18.19 on page 554 represents a harmonic analysis 
of the wave patterns shown in Figure 18.18. Each bar in the graph represents one 
of the terms in the series in Equation 18.13 up to n 5 9. Notice that a struck tuning 
fork produces only one harmonic (the first), whereas the flute and clarinet produce 
the first harmonic and many higher ones.
Notice the variation in relative intensity of the various harmonics for the flute 
and the clarinet. In general, any musical sound consists of a fundamental fre-
quency f plus other frequencies that are integer multiples of f, all having different 
intensities.
WWFourier’s theorem
Pitfall Prevention 18.4
Pitch Versus Frequency Do not 
confuse the term pitch with fre-
quency. Frequency is the physical 
measurement of the number of 
oscillations per second. Pitch is a 
psychological reaction to sound 
that enables a person to place the 
sound on a scale from high to low 
or from treble to bass. Therefore, 
frequency is the stimulus and 
pitch is the response. Although 
pitch is related mostly (but not 
completely) to frequency, they are 
not the same. A phrase such as 
“the pitch of the sound” is incor-
rect because pitch is not a physical 
property of the sound.
Tuning fork
Flute
Clarinet
t
t
t
b
c
a
Figure 18.18 
Sound wave pat-
terns produced by (a) a tuning 
fork, (b)a flute, and (c) a clarinet, 
each at approximately the same 
frequency.
2 Developed by Jean Baptiste Joseph Fourier (1786–1830).
554
chapter 18 Superposition and Standing Waves
Square wave
5f
f
3f
f
3f
b
c
a
Waves of frequency f and 
3f are added to give the 
blue curve.
One more odd harmonic 
of frequency 5f is added 
to give the green curve.
The synthesis curve 
(red-brown) approaches 
closer to the square wave 
(black curve) when odd 
frequencies up to 9f are 
added.
Figure 18.20 
Fourier synthesis 
of a square wave, represented by 
the sum of odd multiples of the 
first harmonic, which has fre-
quency f.
We have discussed the analysis of a wave pattern using Fourier’s theorem. The 
analysis involves determining the coefficients of the harmonics in Equation 18.13 
from a knowledge of the wave pattern. The reverse process, called Fourier synthesis, 
can also be performed. In this process, the various harmonics are added together 
to form a resultant wave pattern. As an example of Fourier synthesis, consider the 
building of a square wave as shown in Figure 18.20. The symmetry of the square 
wave results in only odd multiples of the fundamental frequency combining in its 
synthesis. In Figure 18.20a, the blue curve shows the combination of f and 3f. In 
Figure 18.20b, we have added 5f to the combination and obtained the green curve. 
Notice how the general shape of the square wave is approximated, even though the 
upper and lower portions are not flat as they should be.
Figure 18.20c shows the result of adding odd frequencies up to 9f. This approxi-
mation (red-brown curve) to the square wave is better than the approximations 
in Figures 18.20a and 18.20b. To approximate the square wave as closely as pos-
sible, we must add all odd multiples of the fundamental frequency, up to infinite 
frequency.
Using modern technology, musical sounds can be generated electronically by 
mixing different amplitudes of any number of harmonics. These widely used elec-
tronic music synthesizers are capable of producing an infinite variety of musical 
tones.
R
e
l
a
t
i
v
e
i
n
t
e
n
s
i
t
y
Tuning
fork
1 2 3 4 5 6
R
e
l
a
t
i
v
e
i
n
t
e
n
s
i
t
y
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 8 9
7 8 8 9
Flute
R
e
l
a
t
i
v
e
i
n
t
e
n
s
i
t
y
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
Clarinet
Harmonics
Harmonics
Harmonics
a
b
c
Figure 18.19 
Harmonics of the wave patterns shown in Figure 18.18. Notice the variations in inten-
sity of the various harmonics. Parts (a), (b), and (c) correspond to those in Figure 18.18.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested