Objective Questions 
555
Summary
The superposition principle speci-
fies that when two or more waves move 
through a medium, the value of the 
resultant wave function equals the alge-
braic sum of the values of the individual 
wave functions.
The phenomenon of beating is the periodic variation in intensity at 
a given point due to the superposition of two waves having slightly dif-
ferent frequencies. The beat frequency is
f
beat
5
0
f
1
2f
2
0
(18.12)
where f
1
and f
2
are the frequencies of the individual waves.
Standing waves are formed from the combination of two sinusoidal waves having the same frequency, amplitude, 
and wavelength but traveling in opposite directions. The resultant standing wave is described by the wave function
y 5 (2A sin kx) cos vt 
(18.1)
Hence, the amplitude of the standing wave is 2A, and the amplitude of the simple harmonic motion of any element  
of the medium varies according to its position as 2A sin kx. The points of zero amplitude (called nodes) occur at  
x 5 nl/2 (n 5 0, 1, 2, 3, . . .). The maximum amplitude points (called antinodes) occur at x 5 nl/4 (n 5 1, 3, 5, . . .). 
Adjacent antinodes are separated by a distance l/2. Adjacent nodes also are separated by a distance l/2.
Concepts and Principles
Analysis Models for Problem Solving
y
1
y
2
y
1
y
2
Destructive
interference
Constructive
interference
y
1
y
2
y
2
y
1
Waves in Interference. When two travel-
ing waves having equal frequencies super-
impose, the resultant wave is described by 
the principle of superposition and has an 
amplitude that depends on the phase angle 
f between the two waves. Constructive 
interference occurs when the two waves 
are in phase, corresponding to f 5 0, 2p, 
4p, . . . rad. Destructive interference occurs 
when the two waves are 180° out of phase, 
corresponding to f 5 p, 3p, 5p, . . . rad.
Waves Under Boundary 
Conditions. When a wave is 
subject to boundary condi-
tions, only certain natural 
frequencies are allowed; we 
say that the frequencies are 
quantized.
For waves on a string 
fixed at both ends, the natural frequencies are
f
n
5
n
2LÅ
T
m
n 5 1, 2, 3, . . . 
(18.6)
where T is the tension in the string and m is its linear mass density.
For sound waves with speed v in an air column of length L open 
at both ends, the natural frequencies are
f
n
5n 
v
2L
n 5 1, 2, 3, . . . 
(18.8)
If an air column is open at one end and closed at the other, 
only odd harmonics are present and the natural frequencies are
f
n
5n 
v
4L
n 5 1, 3, 5, . . . 
(18.9)
n 5 1
n 5 2
n 5 3
Objective Questions
1. 
denotes answer available in Student Solutions Manual/Study Guide
Pdf to html conversion - Convert PDF to html files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
How to Convert PDF to HTML Webpage with C# PDF Conversion SDK
convert pdf to web pages; changing pdf to html
Pdf to html conversion - VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
PDF to HTML Webpage Converter SDK for VB.NET PDF to HTML Conversion
change pdf to html; convert pdf to website html
556
chapter 18 Superposition and Standing Waves
forks has a frequency of 245 Hz, what is the frequency 
of the other tuning fork? (a) 240 Hz (b) 242.5 Hz  
(c) 247.5 Hz (d)250 Hz (e) More than one answer 
could be correct.
7. A tuning fork is known to vibrate with frequency  
262 Hz. When it is sounded along with a mandolin 
string, four beats are heard every second. Next, a bit of 
tape is put onto each tine of the tuning fork, and the 
tuning fork now produces five beats per second with 
the same mandolin string. What is the frequency of 
the string? (a) 257 Hz (b) 258 Hz (c) 262 Hz (d) 266 Hz  
(e) 267 Hz
8. An archer shoots an arrow horizontally from the center 
of the string of a bow held vertically. After the arrow 
leaves it, the string of the bow will vibrate as a superpo-
sition of what standing-wave harmonics? (a) It vibrates 
only in harmonic number 1, the fundamental. (b) It 
vibrates only in the second harmonic. (c) It vibrates 
only in the odd-numbered harmonics 1, 3, 5, 7, . . . .  
(d) It vibrates only in the even-numbered harmonics 2, 
4, 6, 8, . . . . (e) It vibrates in all harmonics.
9. As oppositely moving pulses of the same shape (one 
upward, one downward) on a string pass through each 
other, at one particular instant the string shows no dis-
placement from the equilibrium position at any point. 
What has happened to the energy carried by the pulses 
at this instant of time? (a) It was used up in producing 
the previous motion. (b)It is all potential energy. (c) It 
is all internal energy. (d) It is all kinetic energy. (e) The 
positive energy of one pulse adds to zero with the nega-
tive energy of the other pulse.
10. A standing wave having three nodes is set up in a string 
fixed at both ends. If the frequency of the wave is dou-
bled, how many antinodes will there be? (a) 2 (b) 3  
(c) 4 (d) 5 (e)6
11. Suppose all six equal-length strings of an acoustic 
guitar are played without fingering, that is, without 
being pressed down at any frets. What quantities are 
the same for all six strings? Choose all correct answers.  
(a) the fundamental frequency (b) the fundamental 
wavelength of the string wave (c) the fundamental 
wavelength of the sound emitted (d) the speed of the 
string wave (e) the speed of the sound emitted
12. Assume two identical sinusoidal waves are moving 
through the same medium in the same direction. 
Under what condition will the amplitude of the resul-
tant wave be greater than either of the two original 
waves? (a) in all cases (b)only if the waves have no dif-
ference in phase (c) only if the phase difference is less 
than 90° (d) only if the phase difference is less than 
120° (e) only if the phase difference is less than 180°
(a) From its original 
position, the sliding 
section is moved out by 
0.1 m. (b) Next it slides 
out an additional 0.1m.  
(c) It slides out still 
another 0.1 m. (d) It 
slides out 0.1 m more.
2. A string of length L
mass per unit length m, 
and tension T is vibrat-
ing at its fundamental 
frequency. (i) If the 
length of the string is 
doubled, with all other 
factors held constant, what is the effect on the funda-
mental frequency? (a) It becomes two times larger. (b) It  
becomes !2
times larger. (c) It is unchanged. (d) It 
becomes 1/!2
times as large. (e) It becomes one-half 
as large. (ii) If the mass per unit length is doubled, 
with all other factors held constant, what is the effect 
on the fundamental frequency? Choose from the same 
possibilities as in part (i). (iii) If the tension is doubled, 
with all other factors held constant, what is the effect 
on the fundamental frequency? Choose from the same 
possibilities as in part (i).
3. In Example 18.1, we investigated an oscillator at 1.3 kHz  
driving two identical side-by-side speakers. We found 
that a listener at point O hears sound with maximum 
intensity, whereas a listener at point P hears a mini-
mum. What is the intensity at P? (a) less than but close 
to the intensity at O (b) half the intensity at O (c) very 
low but not zero (d) zero (e) indeterminate
4. A series of pulses, each of amplitude 0.1 m, is sent down 
a string that is attached to a post at one end. The pulses 
are reflected at the post and travel back along the string 
without loss of amplitude. (i) What is the net displace-
ment at a point on the string where two pulses are cross-
ing? Assume the string is rigidly attached to the post.  
(a) 0.4 m (b) 0.3 m (c) 0.2 m (d) 0.1 m (e) 0 (ii) Next 
assume the end at which reflection occurs is free to slide 
up and down. Now what is the net displacement at a point 
on the string where two pulses are crossing? Choose your 
answer from the same possibilities as in part (i).
5. A flute has a length of 58.0 cm. If the speed of sound 
in air is 343 m/s, what is the fundamental frequency of 
the flute, assuming it is a tube closed at one end and 
open at the other? (a) 148 Hz (b) 296 Hz (c) 444 Hz  
(d) 591 Hz (e)none of those answers
6. When two tuning forks are sounded at the same time, 
a beat frequency of 5 Hz occurs. If one of the tuning 
r
1
r
2
Speaker
Receiver
Sliding section
Figure oQ18.1 
Objective 
Question 1 and Problem 6.
Conceptual Questions
1. 
denotes answer available in Student Solutions Manual/Study Guide
1. A crude model of the human throat is that of a pipe 
open at both ends with a vibrating source to introduce 
the sound into the pipe at one end. Assuming the 
vibrating source produces a range of frequencies, dis-
cuss the effect of changing the pipe’s length.
2. When two waves interfere constructively or destruc-
tively, is there any gain or loss in energy in the system 
of the waves? Explain.
3. Explain how a musical instrument such as a piano may 
be tuned by using the phenomenon of beats.
Online Convert PDF to HTML5 files. Best free online PDF html
This Visual C#.NET PDF to HTML conversion control component makes it extremely easy for C# developers to convert and transform a multi-page PDF document and
convert pdf into html file; embed pdf into web page
C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
C#.NET PDF to HTML Conversion. Using provided C# code example, fast conversion from PDF to HTML can be achieved. C#.NET PDF to SVG Conversion.
how to convert pdf file to html document; convert pdf to html online
problems 
557
6. An airplane mechanic notices that the sound from a 
twin-engine aircraft rapidly varies in loudness when 
both engines are running. What could be causing this 
variation from loud to soft?
7. Despite a reasonably steady hand, a person often spills 
his coffee when carrying it to his seat. Discuss reso-
nance as a possible cause of this difficulty and devise a 
means for preventing the spills.
8. A soft-drink bottle resonates as air is blown across its 
top. What happens to the resonance frequency as the 
level of fluid in the bottle decreases?
9. Does the phenomenon of wave interference apply only 
to sinusoidal waves?
3. Two waves on one string are described by the wave 
functions
y
1
5 3.0 cos (4.0x 2 1.6t)  y
2
5 4.0 sin (5.0x 2 2.0t)
where x and y are in centimeters and t is in seconds. 
Find the superposition of the waves y
1
y
2
at the points 
(a) x 5 1.00, t 5 1.00; (b) x 5 1.00, t 5 0.500; and (c) x 5  
0.500, t 5 0. Note: Remember that the arguments of the 
trigonometric functions are in radians.
4. Two pulses of different amplitudes approach each 
other, each having a speed of v 5 1.00 m/s. Figure 
P18.4 shows the positions of the pulses at time t 5 0.  
(a) Sketch the resultant wave at t 5 2.00 s, 4.00 s,  
5.00 s, and 6.00 s. (b) What If? If the pulse on the 
right is inverted so that it is upright, how would your 
sketches of the resultant wave change?
1.0
y (m)
x (m)
0.5
0.5
2
4
6
8
10
12 14
16
v
v
Figure P18.4
5. A tuning fork generates sound waves with a frequency 
of 246 Hz. The waves travel in opposite directions along 
a hallway, are reflected by end walls, and return. The 
hallway is 47.0 m long and the tuning fork is located 
14.0 m from one end. What is the phase difference  
W
4. What limits the amplitude of motion of a real vibrating 
system that is driven at one of its resonant frequencies?
5. A tuning fork by itself produces a faint sound. Explain 
how each of the following methods can be used to 
obtain a louder sound from it. Explain also any effect 
on the time interval for which the fork vibrates audibly. 
(a) holding the edge of a sheet of paper against one 
vibrating tine (b) pressing the handle of the tuning 
fork against a chalkboard or a tabletop (c) holding the 
tuning fork above a column of air of properly chosen 
length as in Example 18.6 (d) holding the tuning fork 
close to an open slot cut in a sheet of foam plastic or 
cardboard (with the slot similar in size and shape to 
one tine of the fork and the motion of the tines per-
pendicular to the sheet)
Note: Unless otherwise specified, assume the speed of 
sound in air is 343 m/s, its value at an air temperature 
of 20.0°C. At any other Celsius temperature T
C
, the 
speed of sound in air is described by
v5331 
Å
11
T
C
273
where v is in m/s and T is in °C.
Section 18.1  Analysis Model: Waves in Interference
1. Two waves are traveling in the same direction along a 
stretched string. The waves are 90.0° out of phase. Each 
wave has an amplitude of 4.00 cm. Find the amplitude 
of the resultant wave.
2. Two wave pulses A and B are moving in opposite direc-
tions, each with a speed v 5 2.00 cm/s. The amplitude 
of A is twice the amplitude of B. The pulses are shown 
in Figure P18.2 at t 5 0. Sketch the resultant wave at t 5  
1.00 s, 1.50 s, 2.00 s, 2.50 s, and 3.00 s.
W
Problems
The problems found in this  
chapter may be assigned 
online in Enhanced WebAssign
1.
 straightforward; 
2. 
intermediate;  
3. 
challenging
1.
full solution available in the Student 
Solutions Manual/Study Guide
AMT
Analysis Model tutorial available in 
Enhanced WebAssign
GP
Guided Problem
M
Master It tutorial available in Enhanced 
WebAssign
W
Watch It video solution available in 
Enhanced WebAssign
BIO
Q/C
S
4
y (cm)
x (cm)
2
2
4
6
8
10 12 2 14 4 16 18 20
A
B
v
v
Figure P18.2
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
XDoc.PDF SDK for .NET. RasterEdge XDoc.PDF for .NET is a professional .NET PDF solution that provides complete and advanced PDF document processing features.
convert pdf link to html; embed pdf into html
VB.NET PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file
Conversion of PDF to Html5. For how to convert PDF to HTML document in VB.NET application, a simple and easy VB.NET sample code is given on this page for you
how to change pdf to html format; convert pdf into html email
558
chapter 18 Superposition and Standing Waves
11. Two sinusoidal waves in a string are defined by the 
wave functions
y
1
5 2.00 sin (20.0x 2 32.0t)  y
2
5 2.00 sin (25.0x 2 40.0t)
where xy
1
, and y
2
are in centimeters and t is in sec-
onds. (a)What is the phase difference between these 
two waves at the point x 5 5.00 cm at t 5 2.00 s?  
(b) What is the positive x value closest to the origin for 
which the two phases differ by 6p at t 5 2.00 s? (At 
that location, the two waves add to zero.)
12. Two identical sinusoidal waves with wavelengths of  
3.00 m travel in the same direction at a speed of  
2.00 m/s. The second wave originates from the same 
point as the first, but at a later time. The amplitude 
of the resultant wave is the same as that of each of the 
two initial waves. Determine the minimum possible 
time interval between the starting moments of the two 
waves.
13. Two identical loudspeakers 10.0 m apart are driven 
by the same oscillator with a frequency of f 5 21.5 Hz 
(Fig.P18.13) in an area where the speed of sound is 
344m/s. (a) Show that a receiver at point A records 
a minimum in sound intensity from the two speak-
ers. (b) If the receiver is moved in the plane of the 
speakers, show that the path it should take so that the 
intensity remains at a minimum is along the hyperbola  
9x2 2 16y2 5 144 (shown in red-brown in Fig. P18.13). 
(c) Can the receiver remain at a minimum and move 
very far away from the two sources? If so, determine the 
limiting form of the path it must take. If not, explain 
how far it can go.
9.00 m 
10.0 m 
y
(x, y)
A
x
Figure P18.13
Section 18.2  Standing Waves
14. Two waves simultaneously present on a long string have 
a phase difference f between them so that a standing 
wave formed from their combination is described by
y
1
xt
2
52A sin 
a
kx1
f
2
b
cos 
a
vt2
f
2
b
(a) Despite the presence of the phase angle f, is it still 
true that the nodes are one-half wavelength apart? 
Explain. (b)Are the nodes different in any way from 
the way they would be if f were zero? Explain.
15. Two sinusoidal waves traveling in opposite directions 
interfere to produce a standing wave with the wave 
function
y 5 1.50 sin (0.400x) cos (200t)
M
Q/C
Q/C
W
between the reflected waves when they meet at the tun-
ing fork? The speed of sound in air is 343 m/s.
6. The acoustical system shown in Figure OQ18.1 is 
driven by a speaker emitting sound of frequency  
756 Hz. (a) If constructive interference occurs at a 
particular location of the sliding section, by what mini-
mum amount should the sliding section be moved 
upward so that destructive interference occurs instead? 
(b) What minimum distance from the original posi-
tion of the sliding section will again result in construc-
tive interference?
7. Two pulses traveling on the same string are described 
by
y
1
5
5
1
3x24t
22
12
y
2
5
25
1
3x14t26
22
12
(a) In which direction does each pulse travel? (b) At 
what instant do the two cancel everywhere? (c) At what 
point do the two pulses always cancel?
8. Two identical loudspeakers are placed on a wall 2.00 m 
apart. A listener stands 3.00 m from the wall directly 
in front of one of the speakers. A single oscillator is 
driving the speakers at a frequency of 300 Hz. (a) What  
is the phase difference in radians between the waves 
from the speakers when they reach the observer?  
(b) What If? What is the frequency closest to 300 Hz 
to which the oscillator may be adjusted such that the 
observer hears minimal sound?
9. Two traveling sinusoidal waves are described by the 
wave functions
y
1
5 5.00 sin [p(4.00x 2 1 200t)]
y
2
5 5.00 sin [p(4.00x 2 1 200t 2 0.250)]
where xy
1
, and y
2
are in meters and t is in seconds. 
(a)What is the amplitude of the resultant wave func-
tion y
1
y
2
? (b)What is the frequency of the resultant 
wave function?
10. Why is the following situation impossible? Two identical 
loudspeakers are driven by the same oscillator at fre-
quency 200 Hz. They are located on the ground a dis-
tance d 5 4.00 m from each other. Starting far from 
the speakers, a man walks straight toward the right-
hand speaker as shown in Figure P18.10. After passing 
through three minima in sound intensity, he walks to 
the next maximum and stops. Ignore any sound reflec-
tion from the ground.
AMT
M
x
d
Figure P18.10
C# Windows Viewer - Image and Document Conversion & Rendering in
CSV Document Conversion. RasterEdge Windows Viewer SDK provides how to convert TIFF: Convert to PDF. Convert to Various Images. PDF Document Conversion.
convert pdf to url link; pdf to web converter
C# Word - Word Conversion in C#.NET
And detailed C# demo codes for these conversions are offered below. C# Demo Codes for Word Conversions. Word to PDF Conversion. PDF to Word Conversion.
convert pdf to html file; convert pdf to html online for
problems 
559
entire length. A fret is provided for limiting vibration to 
just the lower two-thirds of the string. (a) If the string is 
pressed down at this fret and plucked, what is the new 
fundamental frequency? (b) What If? The guitarist can 
play a “natural harmonic” by gently touching the string 
at the location of this fret and plucking the string at 
about one-sixth of the way along its length from the 
other end. What frequency will be heard then?
23. The A string on a cello vibrates in its first normal mode 
with a frequency of 220 Hz. The vibrating segment 
is 70.0cm long and has a mass of 1.20 g. (a) Find the 
tension in the string. (b) Determine the frequency of 
vibration when the string vibrates in three segments.
24. A taut string has a length of 2.60 m and is fixed at 
both ends. (a) Find the wavelength of the fundamental 
mode of vibration of the string. (b) Can you find the 
frequency of this mode? Explain why or why not.
25. A certain vibrating string on a piano has a length of 
74.0cm and forms a standing wave having two anti-
nodes. (a) Which harmonic does this wave represent? 
(b) Determine the wavelength of this wave. (c) How 
many nodes are there in the wave pattern?
26. A string that is 30.0 cm long and has a mass per unit 
length of 9.00 3 1023 kg/m is stretched to a tension 
of 20.0 N. Find (a) the fundamental frequency and  
(b) the next three frequencies that could cause stand-
ing-wave patterns on the string.
27. In the arrangement shown in Figure P18.27, an object 
can be hung from a string (with linear mass density m 5  
0.002 00 kg/m) that passes over a light pulley. The 
string is connected to a vibrator (of constant frequency 
f), and the length of the string between point P and the 
pulley is L5 2.00 m. When the mass m of the object is 
either 16.0 kg or 25.0 kg, standing waves are observed; 
no standing waves are observed with any mass between 
these values, however. (a) What is the frequency of the 
vibrator? Note: The greater the tension in the string, 
the smaller the number of nodes in the standing wave. 
(b) What is the largest object mass for which standing 
waves could be observed?
L
P
Vibrator
m
m
Figure P18.27 
Problems 27 and 28.
28. In the arrangement shown in Figure P18.27, an object 
of mass m 5 5.00 kg hangs from a cord around a light 
pulley. The length of the cord between point P and the 
pulley is L 5 2.00 m. (a) When the vibrator is set to a 
frequency of 150 Hz, a standing wave with six loops is 
formed. What must be the linear mass density of the 
cord? (b) How many loops (if any) will result if m is 
changed to 45.0 kg? (c)  How many loops (if any) will 
result if m is changed to 10.0 kg?
W
W
AMT
M
where x and y are in meters and t is in seconds. Deter-
mine (a) the wavelength, (b) the frequency, and (c) the 
speed of the interfering waves.
16. Verify by direct substitution that the wave function for 
a standing wave given in Equation 18.1,
y 5 (2A sin kx) cos vt
is a solution of the general linear wave equation, Equa-
tion 16.27:
'2y
'x2
5
1
v2
'2y
't2
17. Two transverse sinusoidal waves combining in a 
medium are described by the wave functions
y
1
5 3.00 sin p(x 1 0.600t)  y
2
5 3.00 sin p(x 2 0.600t)
where xy
1
, and y
2
are in centimeters and t is in sec-
onds. Determine the maximum transverse position of 
an element of the medium at (a) x 5 0.250 cm, (b) x 5  
0.500 cm, and (c) x 5 1.50 cm. (d) Find the three small-
est values of x corresponding to antinodes.
18. A standing wave is described by the wave function
y56 sin a
p
2
xb cos 
1
100pt
2
where x and y are in meters and t is in seconds.  
(a) Prepare graphs showing y as a function of x for 
five instants: t 5 0, 5 ms, 10 ms, 15 ms, and 20 ms.  
(b) From the graph, identify the wavelength of the wave 
and explain how to do so. (c) From the graph, identify 
the frequency of the wave and explain how to do so.  
(d) From the equation, directly identify the wavelength 
of the wave and explain how to do so. (e) From the 
equation, directly identify the frequency and explain 
how to do so.
19. Two identical loudspeakers are driven in phase by a 
common oscillator at 800 Hz and face each other at 
a distance of 1.25 m. Locate the points along the line 
joining the two speakers where relative minima of 
sound pressure amplitude would be expected.
Section 18.3  Analysis Model: Waves  
under Boundary Conditions
20. A standing wave is established in a 120-cm-long string 
fixed at both ends. The string vibrates in four segments 
when driven at 120 Hz. (a) Determine the wavelength. 
(b) What is the fundamental frequency of the string?
21. A string with a mass m 5 8.00 g  
and a length L 5 5.00 m has 
one end attached to a wall; 
the other end is draped over a 
small, fixed pulley a distance 
d 5 4.00 m from the wall and 
attached to a hanging object 
with a mass M5 4.00kg as in 
Figure P18.21. If the horizon-
tal part of the string is plucked, what is the fundamen-
tal frequency of its vibration?
22. The 64.0-cm-long string of a guitar has a fundamen-
tal frequency of 330 Hz when it vibrates freely along its 
M
Q/C
M
M
d
Figure P18.21
C# powerpoint - PowerPoint Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
And detailed C# demo codes for these conversions are offered below. C# Demo Codes for PowerPoint Conversions. PowerPoint to PDF Conversion.
pdf to html converter online; convert pdf form to html
VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
As RasterEdge VB.NET PDF to Word converter library has its own PDF decoder, it can finish high-fidelity PDF to Word conversion without depending on other third
convert pdf to web link; convert pdf to html with images
560
chapter 18 Superposition and Standing Waves
sider a seiche produced in a farm pond. Suppose the 
pond is 9.15 m long and assume it has a uniform width 
and depth. You measure that a pulse produced at one 
end reaches the other end in 2.50 s. (a) What is the 
wave speed? (b) What should be the frequency of the 
ground motion during the earthquake to produce a 
seiche that is a standing wave with antinodes at each 
end of the pond and one node at the center?
36. High-frequency sound can 
be used to produce stand-
ing-wave vibrations in a 
wine glass. A standing-wave 
vibration in a wine glass is 
observed to have four nodes 
and four antinodes equally 
spaced around the 20.0-cm 
circumference of the rim 
of the glass. If transverse 
waves move around the glass 
at 900 m/s, an opera singer 
would have to produce a 
high harmonic with what frequency to shatter the glass 
with a resonant vibration as shown in Figure P18.36?
Section 18.5  Standing Waves in Air Columns
37. The windpipe of one typical whooping crane is 5.00 feet  
long. What is the fundamental resonant frequency of 
the bird’s trachea, modeled as a narrow pipe closed at 
one end? Assume a temperature of 37°C.
38. If a human ear canal can be thought of as resembling 
an organ pipe, closed at one end, that resonates at a 
fundamental frequency of 3 000 Hz, what is the length 
of the canal? Use a normal body temperature of  
37°C for your determination of the speed of sound in 
the canal.
39. Calculate the length of a pipe that has a fundamental 
frequency of 240 Hz assuming the pipe is (a) closed at 
one end and (b) open at both ends.
40. The overall length of a piccolo is 32.0 cm. The reso-
nating air column is open at both ends. (a) Find the 
frequency of the lowest note a piccolo can sound.  
(b) Opening holes in the side of a piccolo effectively 
shortens the length of the resonant column. Assume 
the highest note a piccolo can sound is 4 000 Hz. Find 
the distance between adjacent antinodes for this mode 
of vibration.
41. The fundamental frequency of an open organ pipe 
corresponds to middle C (261.6 Hz on the chromatic 
musical scale). The third resonance of a closed organ 
pipe has the same frequency. What is the length of  
(a) the open pipe and (b) the closed pipe?
42. The longest pipe on a certain organ is 4.88 m. What 
is the fundamental frequency (at 0.00°C) if the pipe 
is (a) closed at one end and (b) open at each end?  
(c) What will be the frequencies at 20.0°C?
43. An air column in a glass tube is open at one end and 
closed at the other by a movable piston. The air in the 
tube is warmed above room temperature, and a 384-Hz 
tuning fork is held at the open end. Resonance is heard 
BIO
BIO
W
29. Review. A sphere of mass M 5  
1.00 kg is supported by a 
string that passes over a pul-
ley at the end of a horizontal 
rod of length L 5 0.300 m  
(Fig. P18.29). The string 
makes an angle u 5 35.0° with 
the rod. The fundamental 
frequency of standing waves 
in the portion of the string 
above the rod is f5 60.0 Hz. 
Find the mass of the portion of the string above the rod.
30. Review. A sphere of mass M is supported by a string 
that passes over a pulley at the end of a horizontal rod 
of length L (Fig. P18.29). The string makes an angle u 
with the rod. The fundamental frequency of standing 
waves in the portion of the string above the rod is f. 
Find the mass of the portion of the string above the 
rod.
31. A violin string has a length of 0.350 m and is tuned to 
concert G, with f
G
5 392 Hz. (a) How far from the end 
of the string must the violinist place her finger to play 
concert A, with f
A
5 440 Hz? (b) If this position is to 
remain correct to one-half the width of a finger (that 
is, to within 0.600 cm), what is the maximum allowable 
percentage change in the string tension?
32. Review. A solid copper object hangs at the bottom of a 
steel wire of negligible mass. The top end of the wire 
is fixed. When the wire is struck, it emits sound with a 
fundamental frequency of 300 Hz. The copper object 
is then submerged in water so that half its volume is 
below the water line. Determine the new fundamental 
frequency.
33. A standing-wave pattern is observed in a thin wire with 
a length of 3.00 m. The wave function is
y 5 0.002 00 sin (px) cos (100pt)
where x and y are in meters and t is in seconds.  
(a) How many loops does this pattern exhibit? (b) What 
is the fundamental frequency of vibration of the wire?  
(c) What If? If the original frequency is held constant 
and the tension in the wire is increased by a factor of 9, 
how many loops are present in the new pattern?
Section 18.4  Resonance
34. The Bay of Fundy, Nova Scotia, has the highest tides 
in the world. Assume in midocean and at the mouth 
of the bay the Moon’s gravity gradient and the Earth’s 
rotation make the water surface oscillate with an ampli-
tude of a few centimeters and a period of 12 h 24 min. 
At the head of the bay, the amplitude is several meters. 
Assume the bay has a length of 210 km and a uniform 
depth of 36.1 m. The speed of long-wavelength water 
waves is given by v5 !gd
, where d is the water’s depth. 
Argue for or against the proposition that the tide is 
magnified by standing-wave resonance.
35. An earthquake can produce a seiche in a lake in which 
the water sloshes back and forth from end to end with 
remarkably large amplitude and long period. Con-
S
Q/C
L
M
u
Figure P18.29 
Problems 29 and 30.
Figure P18.36
S
t
e
v
e
B
r
o
n
s
t
e
i
n
/
S
t
o
n
e
/
G
e
t
t
y
I
m
a
g
e
s
problems 
561
51. Two adjacent natural frequencies of an organ pipe are 
determined to be 550 Hz and 650 Hz. Calculate (a) the 
fundamental frequency and (b) the length of this pipe.
52. Why is the following situation impossible? A student is lis-
tening to the sounds from an air column that is 0.730 m  
long. He doesn’t know if the column is open at both 
ends or open at only one end. He hears resonance 
from the air column at frequencies 235 Hz and 587 Hz.
53. A student uses an audio oscillator of adjustable fre-
quency to measure the depth of a water well. The 
student reports hearing two successive resonances at  
51.87 Hz and 59.85Hz. (a) How deep is the well?  
(b) How many antinodes are in the standing wave at 
51.87 Hz?
Section 18.6  Standing Waves in Rods and Membranes
54. An aluminum rod is clamped one-fourth of the way 
along its length and set into longitudinal vibration by 
a variable-frequency driving source. The lowest fre-
quency that produces resonance is 4 400 Hz. The speed 
of sound in an aluminum rod is 5 100 m/s. Determine 
the length of the rod.
55. An aluminum rod 1.60 m long is held at its center. It 
is stroked with a rosin-coated cloth to set up a longi-
tudinal vibration. The speed of sound in a thin rod 
of aluminum is 5 100 m/s. (a) What is the fundamen-
tal frequency of the waves established in the rod?  
(b) What harmonics are set up in the rod held in this 
manner? (c) What If? What would be the fundamental 
frequency if the rod were copper, in which the speed of 
sound is 3 560 m/s?
Section 18.7  Beats: Interference in Time
56. While attempting to tune the note C at 523 Hz, a piano 
tuner hears 2.00 beats/s between a reference oscillator 
and the string. (a) What are the possible frequencies 
of the string? (b) When she tightens the string slightly, 
she hears 3.00 beats/s. What is the frequency of the 
string now? (c)By what percentage should the piano 
tuner now change the tension in the string to bring it 
into tune?
57. In certain ranges of a piano keyboard, more than one 
string is tuned to the same note to provide extra loud-
ness. For example, the note at 110 Hz has two strings 
at this frequency. If one string slips from its nor-
mal tension of 600 N to 540 N, what beat frequency 
is heard when the hammer strikes the two strings 
simultaneously?
58. Review. Jane waits on a railroad platform while two 
trains approach from the same direction at equal 
speeds of 8.00m/s. Both trains are blowing their whis-
tles (which have the same frequency), and one train is 
some distance behind the other. After the first train 
passes Jane but before the second train passes her, 
she hears beats of frequency 4.00 Hz. What is the fre-
quency of the train whistles?
59. Review. A student holds a tuning fork oscillating at 
256Hz. He walks toward a wall at a constant speed 
of 1.33m/s. (a)What beat frequency does he observe 
AMT
M
W
M
M
when the piston is at a distance d
1
5 22.8 cm from the 
open end and again when it is at a distance d
2
5 68.3 cm 
from the open end. (a) What speed of sound is implied 
by these data? (b)How far from the open end will the 
piston be when the next resonance is heard?
44. A tuning fork with a frequency 
of f5 512 Hz is placed near the 
top of the tube shown in Figure 
P18.44. The water level is low-
ered so that the length L slowly 
increases from an initial value 
of 20.0 cm. Determine the next 
two values of L that correspond 
to resonant modes.
45. With a particular fingering, 
a flute produces a note with 
frequency 880 Hz at 20.0°C. 
The flute is open at both ends.  
(a) Find the air column length. 
(b) At the beginning of the 
halftime performance at a late-
season football game, the ambient temperature is 
25.00°C and the flutist has not had a chance to warm 
up her instrument. Find the frequency the flute pro-
duces under these conditions.
46. A shower stall has dimensions 86.0 cm 3 86.0 cm 3 
210cm. Assume the stall acts as a pipe closed at both 
ends, with nodes at opposite sides. Assume singing 
voices range from 130 Hz to 2 000 Hz and let the speed 
of sound in the hot air be 355 m/s. For someone sing-
ing in this shower, which frequencies would sound the 
richest (because of resonance)?
47. A glass tube (open at both ends) of length L is posi-
tioned near an audio speaker of frequency f 5 680 Hz. 
For what values of L will the tube resonate with the 
speaker?
48. A tunnel under a river is 2.00 km long. (a) At what fre-
quencies can the air in the tunnel resonate? (b) Explain 
whether it would be good to make a rule against blow-
ing your car horn when you are in the tunnel.
49. As shown in Figure P18.49, 
water is pumped into a tall, 
vertical cylinder at a volume 
flow rate R 5 1.00 L/min. 
The radius of the cylinder is 
r 5 5.00 cm, and at the open 
top of the cylinder a tuning 
fork is vibrating with a fre-
quency f 5 512 Hz. As the 
water rises, what time interval 
elapses between successive 
resonances?
50. As shown in Figure P18.49, 
water is pumped into a tall, 
vertical cylinder at a volume 
flow rate R. The radius of the cylinder is r, and at the 
open top of the cylinder a tuning fork is vibrating with 
a frequency f. As the water rises, what time interval 
elapses between successive resonances?
f
L
Valve
Figure P18.44
Q/C
f
R
r
Figure P18.49 
Problems 49 and 50.
S
562
chapter 18 Superposition and Standing Waves
66. A 2.00-m-long wire having a mass of 0.100 kg is fixed 
at both ends. The tension in the wire is maintained at 
20.0N. (a)What are the frequencies of the first three 
allowed modes of vibration? (b) If a node is observed at 
a point 0.400 m from one end, in what mode and with 
what frequency is it vibrating?
67. The fret closest to the bridge on a guitar is 21.4 cm 
from the bridge as shown in Figure P18.67. When the 
thinnest string is pressed down at this first fret, the 
string produces the highest frequency that can be 
played on that guitar, 2 349 Hz. The next lower note 
that is produced on the string has frequency 2 217 Hz. 
How far away from the first fret should the next fret 
be?
Bridge
Frets
21.4 cm
Figure P18.67
68. A string fixed at both ends and having a mass of 4.80g, 
a length of 2.00 m, and a tension of 48.0 N vibrates in 
its second (n 5 2) normal mode. (a) Is the wavelength 
in air of the sound emitted by this vibrating string 
larger or smaller than the wavelength of the wave on 
the string? (b) What is the ratio of the wavelength in 
air of the sound emitted by this vibrating string and 
the wavelength of the wave on the string?
69. A quartz watch contains a crystal oscillator in the form 
of a block of quartz that vibrates by contracting and 
expanding. An electric circuit feeds in energy to main-
tain the oscillation and also counts the voltage pulses 
to keep time. Two opposite faces of the block, 7.05 mm 
apart, are antinodes, moving alternately toward each 
other and away from each other. The plane halfway 
between these two faces is a node of the vibration. The 
speed of sound in quartz is equal to 3.70 3 103m/s. 
Find the frequency of the vibration.
70. Review. For the arrangement shown in Figure P18.70, 
the inclined plane and the small pulley are frictionless; 
the string supports the object of mass M at the bottom 
of the plane; and the string has mass m. The system 
is in equilibrium, and the vertical part of the string 
has a length h. We wish to study standing waves set up 
in the vertical section of the string. (a) What analysis 
model describes the object of mass M? (b) What analy-
sis model describes the waves on the vertical part of the 
Q/C
GP
between the tuning fork and its echo? (b) How fast 
must he walk away from the wall to observe a beat fre-
quency of 5.00 Hz?
Section 18.8  nonsinusoidal Wave Patterns
60. An A-major chord consists of the notes called A, C#, 
and E. It can be played on a piano by simultaneously 
striking strings with fundamental frequencies of 
440.00 Hz, 554.37 Hz, and 659.26 Hz. The rich con-
sonance of the chord is associated with near equality 
of the frequencies of some of the higher harmonics of 
the three tones. Consider the first five harmonics of 
each string and determine which harmonics show near 
equality.
61. Suppose a flutist plays a 523-Hz C note with first har-
monic displacement amplitude A
1
5 100 nm. From Fig-
ure 18.19b read, by proportion, the displacement ampli-
tudes of harmonics 2 through 7. Take these as the values 
A
2
through A
7
in the Fourier analysis of the sound and 
assume B
1
B
2
5 ??? 5 B
7
5 0. Construct a graph of 
the waveform of the sound. Your waveform will not look 
exactly like the flute waveform in Figure 18.18b because 
you simplify by ignoring cosine terms; nevertheless, it 
produces the same sensation to human hearing.
Additional Problems
62. A pipe open at both ends has a fundamental frequency 
of 300 Hz when the temperature is 0°C. (a) What is the 
length of the pipe? (b) What is the fundamental fre-
quency at a temperature of 30.0°C?
63. A string is 0.400 m long and has a mass per unit length 
of 9.00 3 10–3 kg/m. What must be the tension in the 
string if its second harmonic has the same frequency as 
the second resonance mode of a 1.75-m-long pipe open 
at one end?
64. Two strings are vibrating at the same frequency of 
150Hz. After the tension in one of the strings is 
decreased, an observer hears four beats each second 
when the strings vibrate together. Find the new fre-
quency in the adjusted string.
65. The ship in Figure P18.65 travels along a straight line 
parallel to the shore and a distance d 5 600 m from 
it. The ship’s radio receives simultaneous signals of the 
same frequency from antennas A and B, separated by 
a distance L 5 800m. The signals interfere construc-
tively at point C, which is equidistant from A and B. 
The signal goes through the first minimum at point D
which is directly outward from the shore from point B. 
Determine the wavelength of the radio waves.
M
d
L
C
D
A
B
Figure P18.65
M
h
u
Figure P18.75
©
A
r
e
n
a
P
a
l
/
T
o
p
h
a
m
/
T
h
e
I
m
a
g
e
W
o
r
k
s
.
R
e
p
r
o
d
u
c
e
d
b
y
p
e
r
m
i
s
s
i
o
n
.
76. A nylon string has mass 5.50 g and 
length L 5 86.0 cm. The lower end 
is tied to the floor, and the upper 
end is tied to a small set of wheels 
through a slot in a track on which 
the wheels move (Fig. P18.76). The 
wheels have a mass that is negli-
gible compared with that of the 
string, and they roll without fric-
tion on the track so that the upper 
end of the string is essentially free. 
At equilibrium, the string is vertical 
and motionless. When it is carrying a small-amplitude 
wave, you may assume the string is always under uni-
form tension 1.30 N. (a) Find the speed of transverse 
waves on the string. (b) The string’s vibration pos-
sibilities are a set of standing-wave states, each with 
a node at the fixed bottom end and an antinode at 
the free top end. Find the node–antinode distances 
for each of the three simplest states. (c)Find the fre-
quency of each of these states.
77. Two train whistles have identical frequencies of  
180 Hz. When one train is at rest in the station and 
the other is moving nearby, a commuter standing on 
the station platform hears beats with a frequency of 
2.00 beats/s when the whistles operate together. What 
L
d
L
Figure P18.72
73. Review. Consider the apparatus shown in Figure 18.11 
and described in Example 18.4. Suppose the number 
of antinodes in Figure 18.11b is an arbitrary value n. 
(a) Find an expression for the radius of the sphere in 
the water as a function of only n. (b) What is the mini-
mum allowed value of n for a sphere of nonzero size? 
(c) What is the radius of the largest sphere that will 
produce a standing wave on the string? (d) What hap-
pens if a larger sphere is used?
74. Review. The top end of a yo-yo string is held stationary. 
The yo-yo itself is much more massive than the string. It 
starts from rest and moves down with constant accelera-
tion 0.800 m/s2 as it unwinds from the string. The rub-
bing of the string against the edge of the yo-yo excites 
transverse standing-wave vibrations in the string. Both 
ends of the string are nodes even as the length of the 
string increases. Consider the instant 1.20 s after the 
motion begins from rest. (a) Show that the rate of change 
with time of the wavelength of the fundamental mode of 
oscillation is 1.92 m/s. (b) What if? Is the rate of change 
of the wavelength of the second harmonic also 1.92 m/s 
Q/C
Q/C
564
chapter 18 Superposition and Standing Waves
(b) Determine the amplitude and phase angle for this 
sinusoidal wave.
84. A flute is designed so that it produces a frequency of 
261.6Hz, middle C, when all the holes are covered and 
the temperature is 20.0°C. (a) Consider the flute as a 
pipe that is open at both ends. Find the length of the 
flute, assuming middle C is the fundamental. (b) A sec-
ond player, nearby in a colder room, also attempts to 
play middle C on an identical flute. A beat frequency 
of 3.00 Hz is heard when both flutes are playing. What 
is the temperature of the second room?
85. Review. A 12.0-kg object hangs in equilibrium from a 
string with a total length of L 5 5.00 m and a linear mass 
density of m 5 0.001 00 kg/m. The string is wrapped 
around two light, frictionless pulleys that are separated 
by a distance of d 5 2.00 m (Fig. P18.85a). (a) Deter-
mine the tension in the string. (b) At what frequency 
must the string between the pulleys vibrate to form the 
standing-wave pattern shown in Figure P18.85b?
g
S
m
d
m
d
a
b
Figure P18.85 
Problems 85 and 86.
86. Review. An object of mass m hangs in equilibrium 
from a string with a total length L and a linear mass 
density m. The string is wrapped around two light, 
frictionless pulleys that are separated by a distance d 
(Fig. P18.85a). (a)Determine the tension in the string.  
(b) At what frequency must the string between the pul-
leys vibrate to form the standing-wave pattern shown in 
Figure P18.85b?
Challenge Problems
87. Review. Consider the apparatus shown in Figure 
P18.87a, where the hanging object has mass M and the 
string is vibrating in its second harmonic. The vibrat-
ing blade at the left maintains a constant frequency. 
The wind begins to blow to the right, applying a con-
AMT
S
S
are the two possible speeds and directions the moving 
train can have?
78. Review. A loudspeaker at the front of a room and an 
identical loudspeaker at the rear of the room are being 
driven by the same oscillator at 456 Hz. A student 
walks at a uniform rate of 1.50 m/s along the length 
of the room. She hears a single tone repeatedly becom-
ing louder and softer. (a) Model these variations as 
beats between the Doppler-shifted sounds the student 
receives. Calculate the number of beats the student 
hears each second. (b) Model the two speakers as pro-
ducing a standing wave in the room and the student as 
walking between antinodes. Calculate the number of 
intensity maxima the student hears each second.
79. Review. Consider the copper object hanging from 
the steel wire in Problem 32. The top end of the wire 
is fixed. When the wire is struck, it emits sound with a 
fundamental frequency of 300 Hz. The copper object is 
then submerged in water. If the object can be positioned 
with any desired fraction of its volume submerged, what 
is the lowest possible new fundamental frequency?
80. Two wires are welded together end to end. The wires 
are made of the same material, but the diameter of one 
is twice that of the other. They are subjected to a ten-
sion of 4.60N. The thin wire has a length of 40.0 cm 
and a linear mass density of 2.00 g/m. The combina-
tion is fixed at both ends and vibrated in such a way 
that two antinodes are present, with the node between 
them being right at the weld. (a)What is the frequency 
of vibration? (b) What is the length of the thick wire?
81. A string of linear density 1.60 g/m is stretched between 
clamps 48.0 cm apart. The string does not stretch 
appreciably as the tension in it is steadily raised from 
15.0 N at t 5 0 to 25.0 N at t 5 3.50 s. Therefore, the 
tension as a function of time is given by the expression 
T 5 15.0 1 10.0t/3.50, where T is in newtons and t is 
in seconds. The string is vibrating in its fundamental 
mode throughout this process. Find the number of 
oscillations it completes during the 3.50-s interval.
82. A standing wave is set up in a string of variable length 
and tension by a vibrator of variable frequency. Both 
ends of the string are fixed. When the vibrator has a 
frequency f, in a string of length L and under tension 
Tn antinodes are set up in the string. (a) If the length 
of the string is doubled, by what factor should the fre-
quency be changed so that the same number of anti-
nodes is produced? (b) If the frequency and length are 
held constant, what tension will produce n 1 1 anti-
nodes? (c) If the frequency is tripled and the length of 
the string is halved, by what factor should the tension be 
changed so that twice as many antinodes are produced?
83. Two waves are described by the wave functions
y
1
(xt) 5 5.00 sin (2.00x 2 10.0t)
y
2
(xt) 5 10.0 cos (2.00x 2 10.0t)
where xy
1
, and y
2
are in meters and t is in seconds. 
(a)Show that the wave resulting from their super-
position can be expressed as a single sine function.  
M
S
M
M
F
S
a
b
Figure P18.87
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested