2.2 Instantaneous Velocity and Speed 
25
2.2 Instantaneous Velocity and Speed
Often we need to know the velocity of a particle at a particular instant in time t 
rather than the average velocity over a finite time interval Dt. In other words, you 
would like to be able to specify your velocity just as precisely as you can specify your 
position by noting what is happening at a specific clock reading, that is, at some 
specific instant. What does it mean to talk about how quickly something is mov-
ing if we “freeze time” and talk only about an individual instant? In the late 1600s, 
with the invention of calculus, scientists began to understand how to describe an 
object’s motion at any moment in time.
To see how that is done, consider Figure 2.3a (page 26), which is a reproduction 
of the graph in Figure 2.1b. What is the particle’s velocity at t 5 0? We have already 
discussed the average velocity for the interval during which the car moved from 
position A to position B (given by the slope of the blue line) and for the interval 
during which it moved from A to F (represented by the slope of the longer blue 
line and calculated in Example 2.1). The car starts out by moving to the right, which 
we defined to be the positive direction. Therefore, being positive, the value of the 
average velocity during the interval from A to B is more representative of the ini-
tial velocity than is the value of the average velocity during the interval from A to 
F, which we determined to be negative in Example 2.1. Now let us focus on the 
short blue line and slide point B to the left along the curve, toward point A, as in 
Figure 2.3b. The line between the points becomes steeper and steeper, and as the 
two points become extremely close together, the line becomes a tangent line to the 
curve, indicated by the green line in Figure 2.3b. The slope of this tangent line  
Use Equation 2.1 to find the displacement of the car:
Dx x
F
x
A
5 253 m 2 30 m 5  283 m
This result means that the car ends up 83 m in the negative direction (to the left, in this case) from where it started. 
This number has the correct units and is of the same order of magnitude as the supplied data. A quick look at Fig-
ure2.1a indicates that it is the correct answer.
Use Equation 2.2 to find the car’s average velocity:
v
x,avg
5
x
F
2x
A
t
F
2t
A
5
253 m230 m
50 s20 s
5
283 m
50 s
5 21.7 m/s
We cannot unambiguously find the average speed of the car from the data in Table 2.1 because we do not have infor-
mation about the positions of the car between the data points. If we adopt the assumption that the details of the car’s 
position are described by the curve in Figure 2.1b, the distance traveled is 22 m (from A to B) plus 105 m (from B to 
F), for a total of 127 m.
Use Equation 2.3 to find the car’s average speed: 
v
avg
5
127 m
50 s
 2.5 m/s
Notice that the average speed is positive, as it must be. Suppose the red-brown curve in Figure 2.1b were different so 
that between 0 s and 10 s it went from A up to 100 m and then came back down to B. The average speed of the car 
would change because the distance is different, but the average velocity would not change.
▸ 2.1 
continued
Consult Figure 2.1 to form a mental image of the car and its motion. We model the car as a particle. From the position–
time graph given in Figure 2.1b, notice that x
A
5 30 m at t
A
5 0 s and that x
F
5 253 m at t
F
5 50 s.
Solution
Best pdf to html converter online - Convert PDF to html files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
How to Convert PDF to HTML Webpage with C# PDF Conversion SDK
convert pdf to web; convert pdf to web page online
Best pdf to html converter online - VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
PDF to HTML Webpage Converter SDK for VB.NET PDF to HTML Conversion
converting pdf to html; pdf to html
26
chapter 2 Motion in One Dimension
Conceptual Example 2.2   The Velocity of Different Objects
Consider the following one-dimensional motions: (A) a ball thrown directly upward rises to a highest point and falls 
back into the thrower’s hand; (B) a race car starts from rest and speeds up to 100 m/s; and (C) a spacecraft drifts 
through space at constant velocity. Are there any points in the motion of these objects at which the instantaneous 
velocity has the same value as the average velocity over the entire motion? If so, identify the point(s).
represents the velocity of the car at point A. What we have done is determine the 
instantaneous velocity at that moment. In other words, the instantaneous velocity v
x
equals the limiting value of the ratio Dx/Dt as Dt approaches zero:1
v
x
;lim
Dt
S
0
Dx
Dt
(2.4)
In calculus notation, this limit is called the derivative of x with respect to t, written 
dx/dt:
v
x
;lim
Dt
S
0
Dx
Dt
5
dx
dt
(2.5)
The instantaneous velocity can be positive, negative, or zero. When the slope of the 
position–time graph is positive, such as at any time during the first 10 s in Figure 2.3, 
v
x
is positive and the car is moving toward larger values of x. After point B, v
x
is nega-
tive because the slope is negative and the car is moving toward smaller values of x. 
At point B, the slope and the instantaneous velocity are zero and the car is momen-
tarily at rest.
From here on, we use the word velocity to designate instantaneous velocity. When 
we are interested in average velocity, we shall always use the adjective average.
The instantaneous speed of a particle is defined as the magnitude of its instan-
taneous velocity. As with average speed, instantaneous speed has no direction asso-
ciated with it. For example, if one particle has an instantaneous velocity of 125 m/s 
along a given line and another particle has an instantaneous velocity of 225 m/s 
along the same line, both have a speed2 of 25 m/s.
uick Quiz 2.2 Are members of the highway patrol more interested in (a)your 
average speed or (b) your instantaneous speed as you drive?
instantaneous velocity 
x (m)
t (s)
50
40
30
20
10
0
60
20
0
-20
-40
-60
A
D
E
40
B
C
F
60
40
B
A
B
B
B
The blue line between 
positions 
A
and 
B
approaches the green 
tangent line as point 
B
is 
moved closer to point 
A
.
b
a
Figure 2.3 
(a) Graph representing the motion of the car in Figure 2.1. (b) An enlargement of the 
upper-left-hand corner of the graph.
1Notice that the displacement Dx also approaches zero as Dt approaches zero, so the ratio looks like 0/0. While this 
ratio may appear to be difficult to evaluate, the ratio does have a specific value. As Dx and Dt become smaller and 
smaller, the ratio Dx/Dt approaches a value equal to the slope of the line tangent to the x-versus-t curve.
2As with velocity, we drop the adjective for instantaneous speed. Speed means “instantaneous speed.”
Pitfall Prevention 2.3
instantaneous Speed and instan-
taneous Velocity In Pitfall Pre-
vention 2.1, we argued that the 
magnitude of the average velocity 
is not the average speed. The mag-
nitude of the instantaneous veloc-
ity, however, is the instantaneous 
speed. In an infinitesimal time 
interval, the magnitude of the dis-
placement is equal to the distance 
traveled by the particle.
Pitfall Prevention 2.2
Slopes of Graphs In any graph of 
physical data, the slope represents 
the ratio of the change in the 
quantity represented on the verti-
cal axis to the change in the quan-
tity represented on the horizontal 
axis. Remember that a slope has 
units (unless both axes have the 
same units). The units of slope in 
Figures 2.1b and 2.3 are meters 
per second, the units of velocity.
Online Convert PDF to HTML5 files. Best free online PDF html
Online PDF to HTML5 Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF file to HTML. Just upload your file by clicking on the blue button
convert pdf to html code c#; convert pdf form to web form
Purchase RasterEdge Product License Online
Converter XDoc.Converter for .NET. Best file conversions common business files, including Adobe PDF, Microsoft Word, Excel, PowerPoint, HTML, Open Office ODF
pdf to html conversion; convert pdf to html code for email
2.2 Instantaneous Velocity and Speed 
27
(A) The average velocity for the thrown ball is zero because the ball returns to the starting point; therefore, its displace-
ment is zero. There is one point at which the instantaneous velocity is zero: at the top of the motion.
(B) The car’s average velocity cannot be evaluated unambiguously with the information given, but it must have some 
value between 0 and 100 m/s. Because the car will have every instantaneous velocity between 0 and 100 m/s at some 
time during the interval, there must be some instant at which the instantaneous velocity is equal to the average veloc-
ity over the entire motion.
(C) Because the spacecraft’s instantaneous velocity is constant, its instantaneous velocity at any time and its average 
velocity over any time interval are the same.
Solution
3Simply to make it easier to read, we write the expression as x 5 24t 1 2t2 rather than as x 5 (24.00 m/s)t 1 (2.00 m/s2)t2.00. When an equation summarizes mea-
surements, consider its coefficients and exponents to have as many significant figures as other data quoted in a problem. Consider its coefficients to have the units 
required for dimensional consistency. When we start our clocks at t 5 0, we usually do not mean to limit the precision to a single digit. Consider any zero value in 
this book to have as many significant figures as you need.
In the first time interval, set t
i
t
A
5 0 and t
f
t
B
5 1 s 
and use Equation 2.1 to find the displacement:
Dx
ASB
x
f
x
i
x
B
x
A
5 [24(1) 1 2(1)2] 2 [24(0) 1 2(0)2] 5  22 m
For the second time interval (t 5 1 s to t 5 3 s), set t
i
5  
t
B
5 1 s and t
f
t
D
5 3 s:
Dx
BSD
x
f
x
i
x
D
x
B
5 [24(3) 1 2(3)2] 2 [24(1) 1 2(1)2] 5  18 m
These displacements can also be read directly from the position–time graph.
(B) Calculate the average velocity during these two time intervals.
▸ 2.2 
continued
Example 2.3   Average and Instantaneous Velocity
A particle moves along the x axis. Its position varies with time according to 
the expression x5 24t 1 2t2, where x is in meters and t is in seconds.3 The 
position–time graph for this motion is shown in Figure 2.4a. Because the 
position of the particle is given by a mathematical function, the motion of 
the particle is completely known, unlike that of the car in Figure 2.1. Notice 
that the particle moves in the negative x direction for the first second of 
motion, is momentarily at rest at the moment t 5 1 s, and moves in the posi-
tive x direction at times t . 1 s.
(A) Determine the displacement of the particle in the time intervals t 5 0 
to t 5 1 s and t 5 1 s to t 5 3 s.
From the graph in Figure 2.4a, form a mental representation of the par-
ticle’s motion. Keep in mind that the particle does not move in a curved 
path in space such as that shown by the red-brown curve in the graphical 
representation. The particle moves only along the x axis in one dimension as 
shown in Figure 2.4b. At t 5 0, is it moving to the right or to the left?
During the first time interval, the slope is negative and hence the aver-
age velocity is negative. Therefore, we know that the displacement between 
A and B must be a negative number having units of meters. Similarly, we 
expect the displacement between B and D to be positive.
Solution
continued
Figure 2.4 
(Example 2.3) (a) Position–
time graph for a particle having an x coor-
dinate that varies in time according to the 
expression x 5 24t 1 2t2. (b)The particle 
moves in one dimension along the x axis.
-4 -2
D
A
B
C
0
2
4
6
8
x
b
10
8
6
4
2
0
-2
-4
0
1
2
3
4
t (s)
x (m)
D
A
B
C
Slope = +4 m/s
Slope = -2 m/s
a
Online Convert PDF file to Tiff. Best free online PDF Tif
Online PDF to Tiff Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF File to Tiff. Just upload your file by clicking on the blue button
convert url pdf to word; online pdf to html converter
Online Convert PDF to Jpeg images. Best free online PDF JPEG
Online PDF to JPEG Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF File to JPG. Drag and drop your PDF in the box above and we'll convert the files for you.
convert pdf to html form; pdf to html converters
28
chapter 2 Motion in One Dimension
2.3 Analysis Model: Particle Under Constant Velocity
In Section 1.2 we discussed the importance of making models. A particularly 
important model used in the solution to physics problems is an analysis model. An 
analysis model is a common situation that occurs time and again when solving 
physics problems. Because it represents a common situation, it also represents a 
common type of problem that we have solved before. When you identify an analy-
sis model in a new problem, the solution to the new problem can be modeled 
after that of the previously-solved problem. Analysis models help us to recognize 
those common situations and guide us toward a solution to the problem. The form 
that an analysis model takes is a description of either (1) the behavior of some 
physical entity or (2) the interaction between that entity and the environment. 
When you encounter a new problem, you should identify the fundamental details 
of the problem and attempt to recognize which of the situations you have already 
seen that might be used as a model for the new problem. For example, suppose an 
automobile is moving along a straight freeway at a constant speed. Is it important 
that it is an automobile? Is it important that it is a freeway? If the answers to both 
questions are no, but the car moves in a straight line at constant speed, we model 
the automobile as a particle under constant velocity, which we will discuss in this sec-
tion. Once the problem has been modeled, it is no longer about an automobile.  
It is about a particle undergoing a certain type of motion, a motion that we have 
studied before.
This method is somewhat similar to the common practice in the legal profession 
of finding “legal precedents.” If a previously resolved case can be found that is very 
similar legally to the current one, it is used as a model and an argument is made in 
court to link them logically. The finding in the previous case can then be used to 
sway the finding in the current case. We will do something similar in physics. For 
a given problem, we search for a “physics precedent,” a model with which we are 
already familiar and that can be applied to the current problem.
All of the analysis models that we will develop are based on four fundamental 
simplification models. The first of the four is the particle model discussed in the 
introduction to this chapter. We will look at a particle under various behaviors 
and environmental interactions. Further analysis models are introduced in later 
chapters based on simplification models of a system, a rigid object, and a wave. Once 
Analysis model 
These values are the same as the slopes of the blue lines joining these points in Figure 2.4a.
(C) Find the instantaneous velocity of the particle at t 5 2.5 s.
Solution
In the second time interval, Dt 5 2 s:
v
x,avg 
1
B
S
D
2
5
Dx
B
S
D
Dt
5
8 m
2 s
5  14 m/s
Measure the slope of the green line at t 5 2.5 s (point 
C) in Figure 2.4a:
v
x
5
10 m2
1
24 m
2
3.8 s21.5 s
 16 m/s
Notice that this instantaneous velocity is on the same order of magnitude as our previous results, that is, a few meters 
per second. Is that what you would have expected?
▸ 2.3 
continued
In the first time interval, use Equation 2.2 with Dt 5  
t
f
t
i
t
B
t
A
5 1 s:
v
x,avg 
1
A
S
B
2
5
Dx
A
S
B
Dt
5
22 m
1 s
 22 m/s
Solution
Online Convert PDF to Text file. Best free online PDF txt
Online PDF to Text Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF to Text. Just upload your file by clicking on the blue button or drag
best pdf to html converter online; convert pdf to url
VB.NET PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in vb.
Best VB.NET adobe PDF to Tiff converter SDK for When converting PDF document to TIFF image using VB.NET TIFF image is regarded as the best image format for
convert pdf form to html form; best website to convert pdf to word
2.3 analysis Model: particle Under constant Velocity 
29
we have introduced these analysis models, we shall see that they appear again and 
again in different problem situations.
When solving a problem, you should avoid browsing through the chapter looking 
for an equation that contains the unknown variable that is requested in the problem. 
In many cases, the equation you find may have nothing to do with the problem you 
are attempting to solve. It is much better to take this first step: Identify the analysis 
model that is appropriate for the problem. To do so, think carefully about what is 
going on in the problem and match it to a situation you have seen before. Once the 
analysis model is identified, there are a small number of equations from which to 
choose that are appropriate for that model, sometimes only one equation. Therefore, 
the model tells you which equation(s) to use for the mathematical representation.
Let us use Equation 2.2 to build our first analysis model for solving problems. 
We imagine a particle moving with a constant velocity. The model of a particle 
under constant velocity can be applied in any situation in which an entity that can 
be modeled as a particle is moving with constant velocity. This situation occurs fre-
quently, so this model is important.
If the velocity of a particle is constant, its instantaneous velocity at any instant 
during a time interval is the same as the average velocity over the interval. That 
is, v
x
v
x,avg
. Therefore, Equation 2.2 gives us an equation to be used in the math-
ematical representation of this situation:
v
x
5
Dx
Dt
(2.6)
Remembering that Dx 5 x
f
x
i
, we see that v
x
5 (x
f
x
i
)/Dt, or
x
f
5 x
i
1 v
 
Dt
This equation tells us that the position of the particle is given by the sum of its origi-
nal position x
i
at time t 5 0 plus the displacement v
x
Dt that occurs during the time 
interval Dt. In practice, we usually choose the time at the beginning of the interval to 
be t
i
5 0 and the time at the end of the interval to be t
f
t, so our equation becomes
x
f
x
i
v
x
t (for constant v
x
(2.7)
Equations 2.6 and 2.7 are the primary equations used in the model of a particle under 
constant velocity. Whenever you have identified the analysis model in a problem to 
be the particle under constant velocity, you can immediately turn to these equations.
Figure 2.5 is a graphical representation of the particle under constant velocity. 
On this position–time graph, the slope of the line representing the motion is con-
stant and equal to the magnitude of the velocity. Equation 2.7, which is the equation 
of a straight line, is the mathematical representation of the particle under constant 
velocity model. The slope of the straight line is v
x
and the y intercept is x
i
in both 
representations.
Example 2.4 below shows an application of the particle under constant velocity 
model. Notice the analysis model icon 
AM
, which will be used to identify examples 
in which analysis models are employed in the solution. Because of the widespread 
benefits of using the analysis model approach, you will notice that a large number 
of the examples in the book will carry such an icon.
WW Position as a function ofW
time for the particle under 
constant velocity model
x
i
x
t
Slope =
=v
x
x
t
Figure 2.5 
Position–time graph 
for a particle under constant 
velocity. The value of the constant 
velocity is the slope of the line.
Example 2.4   Modeling a Runner as a Particle
A kinesiologist is studying the biomechanics of the human body. (Kinesiology is the study of the movement of the human 
body. Notice the connection to the word kinematics.) She determines the velocity of an experimental subject while he runs 
along a straight line at a constant rate. The kinesiologist starts the stopwatch at the moment the runner passes a given point 
and stops it after the runner has passed another point 20 m away. The time interval indicated on the stopwatch is 4.0 s.
(A) What is the runner’s velocity?
AM
continued
C# PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images in C#
Online C# Demo Codes for Converting PDF to Raster Images, .NET Graphics, and REImage in C#.NET Project. Best PDF converter SDK for Visual Studio .NET for
convert pdf to html5; how to convert pdf to html code
Online Convert PDF file to Word. Best free online PDF Conversion
Online PDF to Word Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF File to Word. Just upload your file by clicking on the blue button
convert pdf to html5 open source; add pdf to website
30
chapter 2 Motion in One Dimension
The mathematical manipulations for the particle under constant velocity stem 
from Equation 2.6 and its descendent, Equation 2.7. These equations can be used 
to solve for any variable in the equations that happens to be unknown if the other 
variables are known. For example, in part (B) of Example 2.4, we find the position 
when the velocity and the time are known. Similarly, if we know the velocity and the 
final position, we could use Equation 2.7 to find the time at which the runner is at 
this position.
A particle under constant velocity moves with a constant speed along a straight 
line. Now consider a particle moving with a constant speed through a distance d 
along a curved path. This situation can be represented with the model of a particle 
under constant speed. The primary equation for this model is Equation 2.3, with 
the average speed v
avg
replaced by the constant speed v:
v5
d
Dt
(2.8)
As an example, imagine a particle moving at a constant speed in a circular path. If 
the speed is 5.00 m/s and the radius of the path is 10.0 m, we can calculate the time 
interval required to complete one trip around the circle:
v5
d
Dt
Dt5
d
v
5
2pr
v
5
2p
1
10.0 m
2
5.00 m/s
512.6 s
▸ 2.4 
continued
Use Equation 2.7 and the velocity found in part (A) to 
find the position of the particle at time t 5 10 s:
x
f
x
i
v
x
t 5 0 1 (5.0 m/s)(10 s) 5   50 m
Is the result for part (A) a reasonable speed for a human? How does it compare to world-record speeds in 100-m and 
200-m sprints? Notice the value in part (B) is more than twice that of the 20-m position at which the stopwatch was 
stopped. Is this value consistent with the time of 10 s being more than twice the time of 4.0 s?
Having identified the model, we can use Equation 2.6 to 
find the constant velocity of the runner:
v
x
5
Dx
Dt
5
x
f
2x
i
Dt
5
20 m20
4.0 s
 5.0 m/s
(B) If the runner continues his motion after the stopwatch is stopped, what is his position after 10 s have passed?
Solution
We model the moving runner as a particle because the size of the runner and the movement of arms and legs are 
unnecessary details. Because the problem states that the subject runs at a constant rate, we can model him as a particle 
under constant velocity.
Solution
Analysis Model   Particle Under Constant Velocity
Examples:
• a meteoroid traveling through gravity-free 
space
• a car traveling at a constant speed on a straight 
highway
• a runner traveling at constant speed on a per-
fectly straight path
• an object moving at terminal speed through a 
viscous medium (Chapter 6)
Imagine a moving object that can be modeled as a particle.  
If it moves at a constant speed through a displacement Dx in a 
straight line in a time interval Dt, its constant velocity is 
v
x
5
Dx
Dt
(2.6)
The position of the particle as a function of time is given by 
x
f
x
i
v
x
t 
(2.7)
v
2.4 acceleration 
31
2.4 Acceleration
In Example 2.3, we worked with a common situation in which the velocity of a par-
ticle changes while the particle is moving. When the velocity of a particle changes 
with time, the particle is said to be accelerating. For example, the magnitude of a 
car’s velocity increases when you step on the gas and decreases when you apply the 
brakes. Let us see how to quantify acceleration.
Suppose an object that can be modeled as a particle moving along the x axis has 
an initial velocity v
xi
at time t
i
at position A and a final velocity v
xf
at time t
f
at position 
B as in Figure 2.6a. The red-brown curve in Figure 2.6b shows how the velocity var-
ies with time. The average acceleration a
x,avg
of the particle is defined as the change 
in velocity Dv
x
divided by the time interval Dt during which that change occurs:
a
x,avg
;
Dv
x
Dt
5
v
xf
2v
xi
t
f
2t
i
(2.9)
As with velocity, when the motion being analyzed is one dimensional, we can use 
positive and negative signs to indicate the direction of the acceleration. Because 
the dimensions of velocity are L/T and the dimension of time is T, acceleration 
has dimensions of length divided by time squared, or L/T2. The SI unit of accel-
eration is meters per second squared (m/s2). It might be easier to interpret these 
units if you think of them as meters per second per second. For example, suppose 
an object has an acceleration of 12 m/s2. You can interpret this value by forming 
a mental image of the object having a velocity that is along a straight line and is 
increasing by 2 m/s during every time interval of 1 s. If the object starts from rest, 
WWAverage acceleration
Analysis Model   Particle Under Constant Speed
Examples: 
• a planet traveling around a perfectly circular orbit
• a car traveling at a constant speed on a curved 
racetrack
• a runner traveling at constant speed on a curved path
• a charged particle moving through a uniform mag-
netic field (Chapter 29)
Imagine a moving object that can be modeled as a par-
ticle. If it moves at a constant speed through a distance d 
along a straight line or a curved path in a time interval 
Dt, its constant speed is 
v5
d
Dt
(2.8)
v
Figure 2.6 
(a) A car, modeled 
as a particle, moving along the 
x axis from A to B, has velocity 
v
xi
at t 5 t
i
and velocity v
xf
at t 5 
t
f
. (b) Velocity–time graph (red-
brown) for the particle moving in 
a straight line.
A
B
A
t
f
t
i
v
xi
v
xf
v
x
t
v
x
t
t
i
t
f
x
=v
xi
=v
xf
B
The car moves with 
different velocities at 
points 
A
and 
B
.
The slope of the green line is 
the instantaneous acceleration 
of the car at point 
B
(Eq. 2.10).
The slope of the blue 
line connecting 
A
and 
B
is the average 
acceleration of the car 
during the time interval 
t = t
f
t
i
(Eq. 2.9).
b
a
32
chapter 2 Motion in One Dimension
you should be able to picture it moving at a velocity of 12 m/s after 1 s, at 14 m/s 
after 2 s, and so on.
In some situations, the value of the average acceleration may be different over 
different time intervals. It is therefore useful to define the instantaneous accelera-
tion as the limit of the average acceleration as Dt approaches zero. This concept is 
analogous to the definition of instantaneous velocity discussed in Section 2.2. If we 
imagine that point A is brought closer and closer to point B in Figure 2.6a and we 
take the limit of Dv
x
/Dt as Dt approaches zero, we obtain the instantaneous accel-
eration at point B:
a
x
;lim
Dt
S
0
Dv
x
Dt
5
dv
x
dt
(2.10)
That is, the instantaneous acceleration equals the derivative of the velocity with 
respect to time, which by definition is the slope of the velocity–time graph. The 
slope of the green line in Figure 2.6b is equal to the instantaneous acceleration at 
point B. Notice that Figure 2.6b is a velocitytime graph, not a positiontime graph 
like Figures 2.1b, 2.3, 2.4, and 2.5. Therefore, we see that just as the velocity of a 
moving particle is the slope at a point on the particle’s xt graph, the acceleration 
of a particle is the slope at a point on the particle’s v
x
t graph. One can interpret 
the derivative of the velocity with respect to time as the time rate of change of veloc-
ity. If a
x
is positive, the acceleration is in the positive x direction; if a
x
is negative, the 
acceleration is in the negative x direction.
Figure 2.7 illustrates how an acceleration–time graph is related to a velocity– 
time graph. The acceleration at any time is the slope of the velocity–time graph at 
that time. Positive values of acceleration correspond to those points in Figure 2.7a 
where the velocity is increasing in the positive x direction. The acceleration reaches 
a maximum at time t
A
, when the slope of the velocity–time graph is a maximum. 
The acceleration then goes to zero at time t
B
, when the velocity is a maximum (that 
is, when the slope of the v
x
t graph is zero). The acceleration is negative when the 
velocity is decreasing in the positive x direction, and it reaches its most negative 
value at time t
C
.
uick Quiz 2.3 Make a velocity–time graph for the car in Figure 2.1a. Suppose the 
speed limit for the road on which the car is driving is 30 km/h. True or False? 
The car exceeds the speed limit at some time within the time interval 0 2 50 s.
instantaneous acceleration 
t
a
x
t
A
t
B
t
C
t
A
t
B
t
C
v
x
t
The acceleration at any time 
equals the slope of the line 
tangent to the curve of v
x
versus t at that time.
b
a
Figure 2.7 
(a) The velocity–time 
graph for a particle moving along 
the x axis. (b) The instantaneous 
acceleration can be obtained from 
the velocity–time graph.
For the case of motion in a straight line, the direction of the velocity of an object 
and the direction of its acceleration are related as follows. When the object’s veloc-
ity and acceleration are in the same direction, the object is speeding up. On the 
other hand, when the object’s velocity and acceleration are in opposite directions, 
the object is slowing down.
To help with this discussion of the signs of velocity and acceleration, we can 
relate the acceleration of an object to the total force exerted on the object. In Chap-
ter 5, we formally establish that the force on an object is proportional to the accel-
eration of the object:
F
x
a
x
(2.11)
This proportionality indicates that acceleration is caused by force. Further-
more, force and acceleration are both vectors, and the vectors are in the same 
direction. Therefore, let us think about the signs of velocity and acceleration by 
imagining a force applied to an object and causing it to accelerate. Let us assume 
the velocity and acceleration are in the same direction. This situation corresponds 
to an object that experiences a force acting in the same direction as its velocity. 
In this case, the object speeds up! Now suppose the velocity and acceleration are 
in opposite directions. In this situation, the object moves in some direction and 
experiences a force acting in the opposite direction. Therefore, the object slows 
2.4 acceleration 
33
Conceptual Example 2.5    Graphical Relationships Between 
x
v
x
, and 
a
x
The position of an object moving along the x axis varies with time as in Figure 2.8a. Graph the velocity versus time and 
the acceleration versus time for the object.
The velocity at any instant is the slope of the tangent 
to the xt graph at that instant. Between t 5 0 and t 5 
t
A
, the slope of the xt graph increases uniformly, so 
the velocity increases linearly as shown in Figure 2.8b. 
Between t
A
and t
B
, the slope of the xt graph is con-
stant, so the velocity remains constant. Between t
B
and 
t
D
, the slope of the xt graph decreases, so the value of 
the velocity in the v
x
t graph decreases. At t
D
, the slope 
of the xt graph is zero, so the velocity is zero at that 
instant. Between t
D
and t
E
, the slope of the xt graph 
and therefore the velocity are negative and decrease uni-
formly in this interval. In the interval t
E
to t
F
, the slope 
of the xt graph is still negative, and at t
F
it goes to zero. 
Finally, after t
F
, the slope of the xt graph is zero, mean-
ing that the object is at rest for t . t
F
.
The acceleration at any instant is the slope of the tan-
gent to the v
x
t graph at that instant. The graph of accel-
eration versus time for this object is shown in Figure 2.8c. 
The acceleration is constant and positive between 0 and 
t
A
, where the slope of the v
x
t graph is positive. It is zero 
between t
A
and t
B
and for t . t
F
because the slope of the 
v
x
t graph is zero at these times. It is negative between 
t
B
and t
E
because the slope of the v
x
graph is negative 
during this interval. Between t
E
and t
F
, the acceleration 
is positive like it is between 0 and t
A
, but higher in value 
because the slope of the v
x
t graph is steeper.
Notice that the sudden changes in acceleration shown in Figure 2.8c are unphysical. Such instantaneous changes 
cannot occur in reality.
Solution
x
t
F
t
E
t
D
t
C
t
B
t
A
t
F
t
E
t
D
t
C
t
B
t
t
A
t
t
t
F
t
E
t
B
t
A
v
x
a
x
a
b
c
Figure 2.8 
(Conceptual Example 2.5) (a) Position–time graph 
for an object moving along the x axis. (b) The velocity–time graph 
for the object is obtained by measuring the slope of the position–
time graph at each instant. (c) The acceleration–time graph for 
the object is obtained by measuring the slope of the velocity–time 
graph at each instant.
Pitfall Prevention 2.4
negative Acceleration Keep in 
mind that negative acceleration does 
not necessarily mean that an object is 
slowing down. If the acceleration is 
negative and the velocity is nega-
tive, the object is speeding up!
Pitfall Prevention 2.5
Deceleration The word deceleration 
has the common popular connota-
tion of slowing down. We will not 
use this word in this book because 
it confuses the definition we have 
given for negative acceleration.
down! It is very useful to equate the direction of the acceleration to the direction 
of a force because it is easier from our everyday experience to think about what 
effect a force will have on an object than to think only in terms of the direction of 
the acceleration.
uick Quiz 2.4 If a car is traveling eastward and slowing down, what is the direc-
tion of the force on the car that causes it to slow down? (a) eastward (b)west-
ward (c) neither eastward nor westward
From now on, we shall use the term acceleration to mean instantaneous accelera-
tion. When we mean average acceleration, we shall always use the adjective average.
Because v
x
dx/dt, the acceleration can also be written as
a
x
5
dv
x
dt
5
d
dt
a
dx
dt
b5
d2x
dt2
(2.12)
That is, in one-dimensional motion, the acceleration equals the second derivative of 
x with respect to time.
34
chapter 2 Motion in One Dimension
So far, we have evaluated the derivatives of a function by starting with the def-
inition of the function and then taking the limit of a specific ratio. If you are 
familiar with calculus, you should recognize that there are specific rules for taking 
Example 2.6   Average and Instantaneous Acceleration
The velocity of a particle moving along the x axis varies according to the expres-
sion v
x
5 402 5t2, where v
x
is in meters per second and t is in seconds.
(A) Find the average acceleration in the time interval t 5 0 to t 5 2.0 s.
Think about what the particle is doing from the 
mathematical representation. Is it moving at t 5 
0? In which direction? Does it speed up or slow 
down? Figure 2.9 is a v
x
t graph that was created 
from the velocity versus time expression given in 
the problem statement. Because the slope of the 
entire v
x
t curve is negative, we expect the accel-
eration to be negative.
Solution
Find the velocities at t
i
t
A
5 0 and t
f
t
B
5 2.0 s by 
substituting these values of t into the expression for the 
velocity:
v
xA
5 40 2 5t
A
2 5 40 2 5(0)2 5 140 m/s
v
xB
5 40 2 5t
B
2 5 40 2 5(2.0)2 5 120 m/s
Find the average acceleration in the specified time inter-
val Dt 5 t
B
t
A
5 2.0 s:
a
x,avg
5
v
xf
2v
xi
t
f
2t
i
5
v
xB
2v
xA
t
B
2t
A
5
20 m/s240 m/s
2.0 s20 s
  210 m/s2
The negative sign is consistent with our expectations: the average acceleration, represented by the slope of the blue 
line joining the initial and final points on the velocity–time graph, is negative.
(B) Determine the acceleration at t 5 2.0 s.
Solution
Knowing that the initial velocity at any time t is  
v
xi
5 40 2 5t2, find the velocity at any later time t 1 Dt:
v
xf
5 40 2 5(t 1 Dt)2 5 40 2 5t2 2 10Dt 2 5(Dt)2
Find the change in velocity over the time interval Dt:
Dv
x
v
xf
v
xi
5 210Dt 2 5(Dt)2
To find the acceleration at any time t, divide this 
expression by Dt and take the limit of the result as Dt 
approaches zero:
a
x
5lim
Dt
S
0
Dv
x
Dt
5lim
Dt
S
0
1
210t25 Dt
2
5210t
Substitute t 5 2.0 s:
a
x
5 (210)(2.0) m/s2 5   220 m/s2
Because the velocity of the particle is positive and the acceleration is negative at this instant, the particle is slowing 
down.
Notice that the answers to parts (A) and (B) are different. The average acceleration in part (A) is the slope of the 
blue line in Figure 2.9 connecting points A and B. The instantaneous acceleration in part (B) is the slope of the green 
line tangent to the curve at point B. Notice also that the acceleration is not constant in this example. Situations involv-
ing constant acceleration are treated in Section 2.6.
Figure 2.9 
(Example 2.6) 
The velocity–time graph for a 
particle moving along the x axis 
according to the expression  
v
x
5 40 2 5t2.
10
-10
0
0
1
2
3
4
t (s)
v
x
(m/s)
20
30
40
-20
-30
A
B
The acceleration at 
B
is equal to 
the slope of the green tangent 
line at t = 2 s, which is -20 m/s2.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested