2.4
Image Sampling and Quantization
53
A
B
A
B
Sampling
A
B
A
B
Quantization
FIGURE2.16
Generating a
digital image.
(a) Continuous
image.(b) A scan
line from Ato B
in the continuous
image,used to
illustrate the
concepts of
sampling and
quantization.
(c) Sampling and
quantization.
(d) Digital 
scan line.
function in both coordinates and in amplitude.Digitizing the coordinate values
is called sampling.Digitizing the amplitude values is called quantization.
The one-dimensional function in Fig.2.16(b)is a plot of amplitude (intensity
level) values of the continuous image along the line segment ABin Fig.2.16(a).
The random variations are due to image noise.To sample this function,we take
equally spaced samples along line AB,as shown in Fig.2.16(c).The spatial loca-
tion of each sample is indicated by a vertical tick mark in the bottom part of the
figure.The samples are shown as small white squares superimposed on the func-
tion.The set of these discrete locations gives the sampled function.However,the
values of the samples still span (vertically) a continuous range of intensity val-
ues.In order to form a digital function,the intensity values also must be con-
verted (quantized) into discrete quantities.The right side of Fig.2.16(c)shows
the intensity scale divided into eight discrete intervals,ranging from black to
white.The vertical tick marks indicate the specific value assigned to each of the
eight intensity intervals.The continuous intensity levels are quantized by assign-
ing one of the eight values to each sample.The assignment is made depending on
the vertical proximity of a sample to a vertical tick mark.The digital samples
resulting from both sampling and quantization are shown in Fig.2.16(d).Start-
ing at the top of the image and carrying out this procedure line by line produces
a two-dimensional digital image.It is implied in Fig.2.16that,in addition to the
number of discrete levels used,the accuracy achieved in quantization is highly
dependent on the noise content of the sampled signal.
Sampling in the manner just described assumes that we have a continuous
image in both coordinate directions as well as in amplitude.In practice,the
a
b
c
d
GONZ_CH02v6.QXD  7/23/07  10:19 AM  Page 53
Convert fillable pdf to html form - Convert PDF to html files in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
How to Convert PDF to HTML Webpage with C# PDF Conversion SDK
pdf to html converter; to html
Convert fillable pdf to html form - VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF application
PDF to HTML Webpage Converter SDK for VB.NET PDF to HTML Conversion
converting pdf to html email; online convert pdf to html
54
Chapter 2
Digital Image Fundamentals
method of sampling is determined by the sensor arrangement used to generate
the image.When an image is generated by a single sensing element combined
with mechanical motion,as in Fig.2.13,the output of the sensor is quantized in
the manner described above.However,spatial sampling is accomplished by se-
lecting the number of individual mechanical increments at which we activate
the sensor to collect data.Mechanical motion can be made very exact so,in
principle,there is almost no limit as to how fine we can sample an image using
this approach. In practice, , limits on sampling accuracy are determined by
other factors,such as the quality of the optical components of the system.
When a sensing strip is used for image acquisition,the number of sensors in
the strip establishes the sampling limitations in one image direction.Mechani-
cal motion in the other direction can be controlled more accurately,but it
makes little sense to try to achieve sampling density in one direction that ex-
ceeds the sampling limits established by the number of sensors in the other.
Quantization of the sensor outputs completes the process of generating a dig-
ital image.
When a sensing array is used for image acquisition,there is no motion and
the number of sensors in the array establishes the limits of sampling in both di-
rections.Quantization of the sensor outputs is as before.Figure 2.17illustrates
this concept. Figure 2.17(a) shows a continuous image projected onto the
plane of an array sensor.Figure 2.17(b)shows the image after sampling and
quantization.Clearly,the quality of a digital image is determined to a large de-
gree by the number of samples and discrete intensity levels used in sampling
and quantization.However,as we show in Section 2.4.3,image content is also
an important consideration in choosing these parameters.
FIGURE2.17
(a) Continuous image projected onto a sensor array.(b) Result of image
sampling and quantization.
a
b
GONZ_CH02v6.QXD  7/23/07  10:19 AM  Page 54
C# Create PDF from OpenOffice to convert odt, odp files to PDF in
Convert OpenOffice Text Document to PDF with embedded fonts. An advanced .NET control to change ODT, ODS, ODP forms to fillable PDF formats in Visual C# .NET.
convert pdf to html code c#; convert url pdf to word
C# PDF Field Edit Library: insert, delete, update pdf form field
A professional PDF form creator supports to create fillable PDF form in C#.NET. An advanced PDF form maker allows users to create editable PDF form in C#.NET.
changing pdf to html; batch convert pdf to html
2.4
Image Sampling and Quantization
55
2.4.2 Representing Digital Images
Let 
represent a continuous image function of two continuous variables,
sand t.We convert this function into a digital imageby sampling and quanti-
zation,as explained in the previous section. . Suppose that we sample the
continuous image into a 2-D array,
, containing rows and N
columns, where 
are discrete coordinates. . For notational clarity and 
convenience, we use integer values for these discrete coordinates:
and 
Thus, for example, , the
value of the digital image at the origin is 
,and the next coordinate
value along the first row is 
.Here,the notation (0,1) is used to signify
the second sample along the first row.It does notmean that these are the val-
ues of the physical coordinates when the image was sampled.In general,the
value of the image at any coordinates 
is denoted 
,where xand y
are integers.The section of the real plane spanned by the coordinates of an
image is called the spatial domain,with xand ybeing referred to as spatial
variablesor spatial coordinates.
As Fig. 2.18 8 shows, there are three basic ways to represent 
.
Figure 2.18(a)is a plot of the function,with two axes determining spatial location
f(x, y)
f(x, y)
(x, y)
(0, 1)
f
(0, 0)
f
y = 0, 1, 2,Á, N N -1.
x =0, 1, 2,Á, M M - 1
(x, y)
f(x, y)
f(s, t)
Origin




0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
.5.5
.5
.5
1
1
1 1
1
1
.5
.5
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Origin
y
x
x
y
f(x, y)
FIGURE2.18
(a) Image plotted
as a surface.
(b) Image
displayed as a
visual intensity
array.
(c) Image shown
as a 2-D
numerical array
(0,.5,and 1
represent black,
gray,and white,
respectively).
a
b
c
GONZ_CH02v6.QXD  7/23/07  10:19 AM  Page 55
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
HTML webpage to interactive PDF file creator freeware. Create and save editable PDF with a blank page, bookmarks, links Create fillable PDF document with fields.
embed pdf into web page; change pdf to html format
VB.NET Create PDF from OpenOffice to convert odt, odp files to PDF
PDF in VB.NET, VB.NET convert PDF to HTML, VB.NET convert PDF to Convert OpenOffice Spreadsheet data to PDF. Turn ODT, ODS, ODP forms into fillable PDF formats.
pdf to html conversion; convert from pdf to html
56
Chapter 2
Digital Image Fundamentals
and the third axis being the values of f(intensities) as a function of the two spa-
tial variables xand y.Although we can infer the structure of the image in this
example by looking at the plot,complex images generally are too detailed and
difficult to interpret from such plots.This representation is useful when work-
ing with gray-scale sets whose elements are expressed as triplets of the form
,where xand yare spatial coordinates and zis the value of fat coordi-
nates 
.We work with this representation in Section 2.6.4.
The representation in Fig.2.18(b)is much more common.It shows 
as it would appear on a monitor or photograph.Here,the intensity of each
point is proportional to the value of fat that point.In this figure,there are only
three equally spaced intensity values.If the intensity is normalized to the in-
terval [0,1],then each point in the image has the value 0,0.5,or 1.A monitor
or printer simply converts these three values to black,gray,or white,respec-
tively,as Fig.2.18(b)shows.The third representation is simply to display the
numerical values of 
as an array (matrix).In this example,fis of size
elements,or 360,000 numbers.Clearly,printing the complete array
would be cumbersome and convey little information.When developing algo-
rithms,however,this representation is quite useful when only parts of the
image are printed and analyzed as numerical values.Figure 2.18(c)conveys
this concept graphically.
We conclude from the previous paragraph that the representations in
Figs.2.18(b)and (c) are the most useful.Image displays allow us to view re-
sults at a glance.Numerical arrays are used for processing and algorithm devel-
opment.In equation form,we write the representation of an 
numerical
array as
(2.4-1)
Both sides of this equation are equivalent ways of expressing a digital image
quantitatively.The right side is a matrix of real numbers.Each element of this
matrix is called an image element,picture element,pixel,or pel.The terms
imageand pixelare used throughout the book to denote a digital image and
its elements.
In some discussions it is advantageous to use a more traditional matrix no-
tation to denote a digital image and its elements:
(2.4-2)
= D
a
0,
0
a
0,
1
Á
a
0,
N-1
a
1,
0
a
1,1
Á
a
1,
N-1
o
o
o
a
M-1,
0
a
M-1,
1
Á
a
M-1,
N-1
T
f(x, y) ) = = D
f(0, 0)
f(0, 1)
Á
f(0, N N - 1)
f(1, 0)
f(1, 1)
Á
f(1, N N - 1)
o
o
o
f(M- 1, 0) ) f(M- - 1, 1)
Á
f(M - 1, N N - 1)
T
M* N
600 * 600
f(x, y)
f(x, y)
(x, y)
(x, y, z)
GONZ_CH02v6.QXD  7/23/07  10:19 AM  Page 56
VB.NET Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file
Best VB.NET component to convert Microsoft Office Word Create and save editable PDF with a blank page Create fillable PDF document with fields in Visual Basic
converting pdf to html format; convert pdf to html file
VB.NET Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF
Create fillable and editable PDF documents from Excel in Create searchable and scanned PDF files from Excel in VB Convert to PDF with embedded fonts or without
convert fillable pdf to html form; how to convert pdf file to html
2.4
Image Sampling and Quantization
57
Clearly,
so Eqs.(2.4-1) and (2.4-2) are identical
matrices.We can even represent an image as a vector,v.For example,a column
vector of size
is formed by letting the first Melements of vbe the first
column of A,the next Melements be the second column,and so on.Alterna-
tively,we can use the rows instead of the columns of Ato form such a vector.
Either representation is valid,as long as we are consistent.
Returning briefly to Fig.2.18,note that the origin of a digital image is at the
top left,with the positive x-axis extending downward and the positive y-axis
extending to the right.This is a conventional representation based on the fact
that many image displays (e.g.,TV monitors) sweep an image starting at the
top left and moving to the right one row at a time.More important is the fact
that the first element of a matrix is by convention at the top left of the array,so
choosing the origin of 
at that point makes sense mathematically.Keep
in mind that this representation is the standard right-handed Cartesian coordi-
nate system with which you are familiar.
We simply show the axes pointing
downward and to the right,instead of to the right and up.
Expressing sampling and quantization in more formal mathematical terms
can be useful at times.Let Zand Rdenote the set of integers and the set of
real numbers,respectively.The sampling process may be viewed as partition-
ing the xy-plane into a grid,with the coordinates of the center of each cell in
the grid being a pair of elements from the Cartesian product 
which is the
set of all ordered pairs of elements 
with and being integers from
Z.Hence,
is a digital image if 
are integers from 
and fis a
function that assigns an intensity value (that is,a real number from the set
of real numbers,R) to each distinct pair of coordinates 
.This functional
assignment is the quantization process described earlier.If the intensity lev-
els also are integers (as usually is the case in this and subsequent chapters),
Zreplaces R,and a digital image then becomes a 2-D function whose coor-
dinates and amplitude values are integers.
This digitization process requires that decisions be made regarding the val-
ues for M,N,and for the number,L,of discrete intensity levels.There are no
restrictions placed on Mand N,other than they have to be positive integers.
However,due to storage and quantizing hardware considerations,the number
of intensity levels typically is an integer power of 2:
(2.4-3)
We assume that the discrete levels are equally spaced and that they are inte-
gers in the interval 
Sometimes,the range of values spanned by the
gray scale is referred to informally as the dynamic range.This is a term used in
different ways in different fields.Here,we define the dynamic rangeof an imag-
ing system to be the ratio of the maximum measurable intensity to the minimum
[0, L- - 1].
L = 2
k
(x, y)
Z
2
(x, y)
f(x, y)
z
j
z
i
(z
i
, z
j
),
Z
2
,
f(x, y)
MN* 1
a
ij
= f(x= i, y y = j) ) = = f(i, j),
Recall that a right-handed coordinate system is such that,when the index of the right hand points in the di-
rection of the positive x-axis and the middle finger points in the (perpendicular) direction of the positive
y-axis,the thumb points up.As Fig.2.18(a)shows,this indeed is the case in our image coordinate system.
Often,it is useful for
computation or for
algorithm development
purposes to scale the L
intensity values to the
range [0,1],in which case
they cease to be integers.
However,in most cases
these values are scaled
back to the integer range
for image
storage and display.
[0, L L - 1]
GONZ_CH02v6.QXD  7/23/07  10:19 AM  Page 57
VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to
Convert to PDF with embedded fonts or without original fonts fast. Convert multiple pages PowerPoint to fillable and editable PDF documents.
converter pdf to html; online pdf to html converter
VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
Create PDF files from both DOC and DOCX formats. Convert multiple pages Word to fillable and editable PDF documents.
best pdf to html converter; convert pdf into html email
58
Chapter 2
Digital Image Fundamentals
detectable intensity level in the system.As a rule,the upper limit is determined
by saturationand the lower limit by noise(see Fig.2.19).Basically,dynamic
range establishes the lowest and highest intensity levels that a system can repre-
sent and,consequently,that an image can have.Closely associated with this con-
cept is image contrast,which we define as the difference in intensity between
the highest and lowest intensity levels in an image.When an appreciable num-
ber of pixels in an image have a high dynamic range,we can expect the image
to have high contrast.Conversely,an image with low dynamic range typically
has a dull,washed-out gray look.We discuss these concepts in more detail in
Chapter 3.
The number,b,of bits required to store a digitized image is
(2.4-4)
When 
this equation becomes
(2.4-5)
Table 2.1shows the number of bits required to store square images with vari-
ous values of Nand k.The number of intensity levels corresponding to each
value of kis shown in parentheses.When an image can have intensity levels,
it is common practice to refer to the image as a “k-bit image.”For example,an
image with 256 possible discrete intensity values is called an 8-bit image.Note
that storage requirements for 8-bit images of size 
and higher are
not insignificant.
1024 * 1024
2
k
b = N
2
k
M =N,
b = M* N * k
Saturation
Noise
FIGURE2.19
An
image exhibiting
saturation and
noise.Saturation is
the highest value
beyond which all
intensity levels are
clipped (note how
the entire
saturated area has
a high,constant
intensity level).
Noise in this case
appears as a grainy
texture pattern.
Noise,especially in
the darker regions
of an image (e.g.,
the stem of the
rose) masks the
lowest detectable
true intensity level.
GONZ_CH02v6.QXD  7/23/07  10:19 AM  Page 58
C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
Convert multiple pages Word to fillable and editable PDF documents in both .NET WinForms and ASP.NET. Convert both DOC and DOCX formats to PDF files.
how to add pdf to website; convert pdf to html code
C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF
Convert multiple pages PowerPoint to fillable and editable PDF documents. Easy to create searchable and scanned PDF files from PowerPoint.
embed pdf into html; export pdf to html
2.4
Image Sampling and Quantization
59
TABLE 2.1
Number of storage bits for various values of Nand k.Lis the number of intensity levels.
N/k
1 (L 2)
2 (L 4)
3 (L8)
4 (L 16)
5 (L 32)
6 (L 64)
7 (L 128)
8 (L 256)
32
1,024
2,048
3,072
4,096
5,120
6,144
7,168
8,192
64
4,096
8,192
12,288
16,384
20,480
24,576
28,672
32,768
128
16,384
32,768
49,152
65,536
81,920
98,304
114,688
131,072
256
65,536
131,072
196,608
262,144
327,680
393,216
458,752
524,288
512
262,144
524,288
786,432
1,048,576
1,310,720
1,572,864
1,835,008
2,097,152
1024
1,048,576
2,097,152
3,145,728
4,194,304
5,242,880
6,291,456
7,340,032
8,388,608
2048
4,194,304
8,388,608
12,582,912
16,777,216
20,971,520
25,165,824
29,369,128
33,554,432
4096
16,777,216
33,554,432
50,331,648
67,108,864
83,886,080
100,663,296
117,440,512
134,217,728
8192
67,108,864
134,217,728
201,326,592
268,435,456
335,544,320
402,653,184
469,762,048
536,870,912
2.4.3 Spatial and Intensity Resolution
Intuitively,spatial resolution is a measure of the smallest discernible detail in
an image.Quantitatively,spatial resolutioncan be stated in a number of ways,
with line pairs per unit distance, and dots (pixelsper unit distance being
among the most common measures.Suppose that we construct a chart with
alternating black and white vertical lines,each of width Wunits (Wcan be
less than 1).The width of a line pairis thus 2W,and there are Wline pairs
per unit distance.For example,if the width of a line is 0.1 mm,there are 5 line
pairs per unit distance (mm).A widely used definition of image resolution is
the largest number of discernibleline pairs per unit distance (e.g.,100 line
pairs per mm).Dots per unit distance is a measure of image resolution used
commonly in the printing and publishing industry.In the U.S.,this measure
usually is expressed as dots per inch(dpi).To give you an idea of quality,
newspapers are printed with a resolution of 75 dpi,magazines at 133 dpi,
glossy brochures at 175 dpi,and the book page at which you are presently
looking is printed at 2400 dpi.
The key point in the preceding paragraph is that,to be meaningful,mea-
sures of spatial resolution must be stated with respect to spatial units.Image
size by itself does not tell the complete story.To say that an image has,say,a
resolution 
pixels is not a meaningful statement without stating
the spatial dimensions encompassed by the image.Size by itself is helpful only
in making comparisons between imaging capabilities.For example,a digital
camera with a 20-megapixel CCD imaging chip can be expected to have a
higher capability to resolve detail than an 8-megapixel camera,assuming that
both cameras are equipped with comparable lenses and the comparison im-
ages are taken at the same distance.
Intensity resolutionsimilarly refers to the smallest discernible change in in-
tensity level.We have considerable discretion regarding the number of sam-
ples used to generate a digital image,but this is not true regarding the number
1024 * 1024
1>2
GONZ_CH02v6.QXD  7/23/07  10:19 AM  Page 59
60
Chapter 2
Digital Image Fundamentals
of intensity levels.Based on hardware considerations,the number of intensity
levels usually is an integer power of two,as mentioned in the previous section.
The most common number is 8 bits,with 16 bits being used in some applica-
tions in which enhancement of specific intensity ranges is necessary.Intensity
quantization using 32 bits is rare.Sometimes one finds systems that can digi-
tize the intensity levels of an image using 10 or 12 bits,but these are the excep-
tion,rather than the rule.Unlike spatial resolution,which must be based on a
per unit of distance basis to be meaningful,it is common practice to refer to
the number of bits used to quantize intensity as the intensity resolution.For ex-
ample,it is common to say that an image whose intensity is quantized into 256
levels has 8 bits of intensity resolution.Because true discernible changes in in-
tensity are influenced not only by noise and saturation values but also by the
capabilities of human perception (see Section 2.1),saying than an image has 8
bits of intensity resolution is nothing more than a statement regarding the
ability of an 8-bit system to quantize intensity in fixed increments of 
units of intensity amplitude.
The following two examples illustrate individually the comparative effects
of image size and intensity resolution on discernable detail.Later in this sec-
tion,we discuss how these two parameters interact in determining perceived
image quality.
1>256
EXAMPLE 2.2:
Illustration of the
effects of reducing
image spatial
resolution.
Figure 2.20shows the effects of reducing spatial resolution in an image.
The images in Figs.2.20(a) through (d) are shown in 1250,300,150,and 72
dpi,respectively.Naturally,the lower resolution images are smaller than the
original.For example,the original image is of size 
pixels,but the
72 dpi image is an array of size 
In order to facilitate comparisons,
all the smaller images were zoomed back to the original size (the method
used for zooming is discussed in Section 2.4.4).This is somewhat equivalent to
“getting closer”to the smaller images so that we can make comparable state-
ments about visible details.
There are some small visual differences between Figs.2.20(a)and (b),the
most notable being a slight distortion in the large black needle.For the most
part,however,Fig.2.20(b)is quite acceptable.In fact,300 dpi is the typical
minimum image spatial resolution used for book publishing,so one would
not expect to see much difference here.Figure 2.20(c)begins to show visible
degradation (see,for example,the round edges of the chronometer and the
small needle pointing to 60 on the right side).Figure 2.20(d)shows degrada-
tion that is visible in most features of the image.As we discuss in Section
4.5.4,when printing at such low resolutions,the printing and publishing in-
dustry uses a number of “tricks”(such as locally varying the pixel size) to
produce much better results than those in Fig.2.20(d).Also,as we show in
Section 2.4.4,it is possible to improve on the results of Fig.2.20by the choice
of interpolation method used.
213* 162.
3692 *2812
GONZ_CH02v6.QXD  7/23/07  10:19 AM  Page 60
2.4
Image Sampling and Quantization
61
FIGURE2.20
Typical effects of reducing spatial resolution.Images shown at:(a) 1250
dpi,(b) 300 dpi,(c) 150 dpi,and (d) 72 dpi.The thin black borders were added for
clarity.They are not part of the data.
a
b
c
d
GONZ_CH02v6.QXD  7/23/07  10:20 AM  Page 61
62
Chapter 2
Digital Image Fundamentals
EXAMPLE 2.3:
Typical effects of
varying the
number of
intensity levels in
a digital image.
In this example,we keep the number of samples constant and reduce the
number of intensity levels from 256 to 2,in integer powers of 2.Figure 2.21(a)
is a 
CT projection image,displayed with 
(256 intensity levels).
Images such as this are obtained by fixing the X-ray source in one position,
thus producing a 2-D image in any desired direction.Projection images are
used as guides to set up the parameters for a CT scanner,including tilt,number
of slices,and range.
Figures 2.21(b)through (h) were obtained by reducing the number of bits
from 
to 
while keeping the image size constant at 
pixels.
The 256-,128-,and 64-level images are visually identical for all practical pur-
poses.The 32-level image in Fig.2.21(d),however,has an imperceptible set of
452* 374
k =1
k = 7
k = 8
452* 374
FIGURE2.21
(a) 
256-level image.
(b)–(d) Image
displayed in 128,
64,and 32
intensity levels,
while keeping the
image size
constant.
452 *374,
a
b
c
d
GONZ_CH02v6.QXD  7/23/07  10:20 AM  Page 62
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested